dunnettreader + public_policy   74

Peter A.G. van Bergeijk - The heterogeneity of world trade collapses
Abstract
This paper analyses drivers of imports during the major world trade collapses of the Great Depression (1930s; 34 countries) and the Great Recession (1930s; 173 countries). The analysis deals with the first year of these episodes and develops a small empirical model that shows a significant impact of the development of GDP, the share of manufacturing goods in total imports and the political system. The analysis reveals substantial heterogeneity with respect to regional importance of these drivers. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
public_policy  political_participation  economic_growth  global_economy  economic_history  political_economy  trade-policy  paper  institutions  government-forms  business-and-politics  international_political_economy  global_system  downloaded  trade  Great_Recession 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Farr, Hacker & Kazee - Harold Lasswell, The Policy Scientist of Democracy (2006) | The American Political Science Review
The Policy Scientist of Democracy: The Discipline of Harold D. Lasswell -- James Farr, Jacob S. Hacker and Nicole Kazee -- Vol. 100, No. 4, Thematic Issue on the Evolution of Political Science, in Recognition of the Centennial of the Review (Nov., 2006), pp. 579-587 -- The "policy scientist of democracy" was a model for engaged scholarship invented and embodied by Harold D. Lasswell. This disciplinary persona emerged in Lasswell's writings and wartime consultancies during the 1940s, well before he announced in his APSA presidential address, printed in the Review precisely 50 years ago, that political science was "the policy science par excellence." The policy scientist of democracy knew all about the process of elite decision making, and he put his knowledge into practice by advising those in power, sharing in important decisions, and furthering the cause of dignity. Although Lasswell formulated this ambitious vision near the zenith of his influence, the discipline accorded the ideal—and Lasswell—a mixed reception. Some heralded the policy scientist of democracy; others observed a contradictory figure, at once positivist and value-laden, elitist and democratic, heroic and implausible. The conflicted response exemplifies Lasswell's legacy. The policy scientist of democracy was—and is—too demanding and too contradictory a hero. But the vital questions Lasswell grappled with still must be asked a century into the discipline's development: what is the role of the political scientist in a democratic society? - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
social_sciences-post-WWII  technocracy  entre_deux_guerres  social_psychology  article  public_intellectuals  jstor  WWII  behavioralism  public_policy  20thC  public_interest  downloaded  political_science  US_history  elites  intellectual_history  bibliography  democracy  civic_virtue 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell - Dislocated Rhetoric: The Anomaly of Political Theory | JSTOR The Journal of Politics (2006)
Dislocated Rhetoric: The Anomaly of Political Theory
John G. Gunnell
The Journal of Politics
Vol. 68, No. 4 (Nov., 2006), pp. 771-782
Although the estranged relationship between mainstream political science and much of the subfield of political theory has been properly attributed to developments during the last half of the twentieth century, the roots of this alienation are historically deeper. Many of the conversations of political theory are the progeny of a discursive form that attended the birth of modern social science. This genre was a legitimating rhetoric situated in the interstices of social science, philosophy, and politics. The study of the history of political thought originated as such a rhetoric, and it constitutes a paradigm case for examining the extent to which such a discourse can be transformed into a practice of knowledge. This field has succeeded to a greater extent than certain other elements of political theory which, transfixed by the tension between their practical aspirations and academic context, have become anomalous appendages to the social scientific study of politics. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
downloaded  sociology_of_knowledge  political_philosophy  political_science  political_discourse  behavioralism  article  public_policy  intellectual_history  US_history  disciplines  entre_deux_guerres  public_intellectuals  jstor  social_theory  social_sciences-post-WWII  20thC  philosophy_of_social_science 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn - Religious freedom between truth and tactic « The Immanent Frame - March 2012
In the last issue of First Things, a self-described coalition of “Catholics and Evangelicals together” defends religious freedom. The coalition includes a number of notable Americans, like Charles Colson and George Weigel, with endorsements from the archbishops of Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia, along with many others. According to the statement, the situation is unexpectedly urgent. After the fall of the Soviet Union, “throughout the world, a new era of religious freedom seemed at hand.” But, now it is blatantly clear that the scourge of intolerance—especially secularist intolerance—persists. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_politics  2010s  religious_culture  freedom_of_conscience  Catholics-and-politics  Evangelical  culture_wars  persecution  Vatican_II  Papacy  Protestants  Religious_Right  public_sphere  public_opinion  public_policy  Tocqueville  politics-and-religion  Christian_Right  Christianity  Christianity-Islam_conflict  secularism  liberalism-public_reason  liberalism  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Bourke and Raymond Geuss, eds. - Political Judgement: Essays for John Dunn (2009) | Cambridge University Press
From Plato to Max Weber, the attempt to understand political judgement took the form of a struggle to define the relationship between politics and morals. (...) explores a series of related problems in philosophy and political thought, raising fundamental questions about democracy, trust, the nature of statesmanship, and the relations between historical and political judgement. (...) reconsiders some classic debates in political theory – about equality, authority, responsibility and ideology – Introduction **--** Part I. The Character of Political Judgement: *-* 1. What is political judgement? Raymond Geuss *-* 2. Sticky judgement and the role of rhetoric Victoria McGeer and Philip Pettit *-* 3. Theory and practice: the revolution in political judgement Richard Bourke **--** Part II. Trust, Judgement and Consent: *-* 4. On trusting the judgement of our rulers Quentin Skinner *-* 5. Adam Smith's history of law and government as political theory Istvan Hont *-* 6. Marxism in translation: critical reflections on Indian radical thought Sudipta Kaviraj **--** Part III. Rationality and Judgement: *-* 7. Pericles' unreason Geoffrey Hawthorn
8. Accounting for human actions: individual agency and political judgement in Montaigne's Essais Biancamaria Fontana *-* 9. Nehru's judgement Sunil Khilnani **--** Part IV. Democracy and Modern Political Judgement: *-* 10. Democracy, equality and redistribution Adam Przeworski *-* 11. Democracy and terrorism Richard Tuck -- excerpt from Intro downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  political_culture  ancient_Greece  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  18thC  Montaigne  Smith  agency  decision_theory  democracy  equality  redistribution  political_participation  public_opinion  rhetoric-political  Marxism  India  colonialism  post-colonial  terrorism  legitimacy  authority  moral_philosophy  responsibility  accountability  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
John Dunn, ed. - The Economic Limits to Modern Politics (1992) | Cambridge University Press
The central problem of modern government and political action is how to choose and implement effective economic policies. For this reason, the economic considerations of public policy have assumed a more prominent place in contemporary political thought. Despite efforts among political scientists, economists, and sociologists to fathom the complexities of this added dimension, none of these solid sciences offers a satisfying approach to the problem. This volume attempts to display the historical novelty and intellectual importance of this dilemma, to uncover its origins, and to procure a remedy through a clearer and steadier focus. The book's contributors range from historians of ideas to economic theorists, who bring the approach of their own intellectual discipline to bear upon the issue. **--** Introduction, John Dunn *-* 1. The economic limits to modern politics, John Dunn *-* 2. The wealth of one nation and the dynamics of international competition, Istvan Hont *-* 3. The political limits to pre-modern politics, J. G. A. Pocock *-* 4. The economic constraints on political programs, Frank H. Hahn *-* 5. International liberalism reconsidered, Robert O. Keohane *-* 6. Capitalism, socialism, and democracy: compatibilities and contradictions John Dunn. -- ebook Adobe Reader - not clear whether in kindle format -- excerpt (10 ogs Intro) downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  economic_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  capitalism  competition-interstate  economic_growth  development  raison-d'-état  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  trade  trade-policy  Great_Divergence  economic_theory  political_culture  economic_culture  macroeconomic_policy  Innovation  innovation-government_policy  collective_action  property_rights  Labor_markets  redistribution  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  Davenant  Smith  social_order  social_democracy  liberalism  elites-political_influence  IR_theory  globalization  international_political_economy  public_finance  public_goods  class_conflict  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Elizabeth Popp Berman - Creating the Market University: How Academic Science Became an Economic Engine | Princeton University Press - 2012, ebook 2015
US universities today serve as economic engines, performing the scientific research that will create new industries, drive economic growth, and keep the US globally competitive. But only a few decades ago, these same universities self-consciously held themselves apart from the world of commerce. Drawing on extensive historical research, EPB shows how the government--influenced by the argument that innovation drives the economy--brought about this transformation. Americans have a long tradition of making heroes out of their inventors. But before the 1960s and '70s neither policymakers nor economists paid much attention to the critical economic role played by innovation. However, during the late 1970s, a confluence of events--industry concern with the perceived deterioration of innovation in the US, a growing body of economic research on innovation's importance, and the stagnation of the larger economy--led to a broad political interest in fostering invention. The policy decisions shaped by this change were diverse, influencing arenas from patents and taxes to pensions and science policy, and encouraged practices that would focus specifically on the economic value of academic science. By the early 1980s, universities were nurturing the rapid growth of areas such as biotech entrepreneurship, patenting, and university-industry research centers. -- She is assistant professor of sociology at the SUNY-Albany. -- downloaded excerpt to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  economic_history  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  US_politics  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  university  research  research-funding  Innovation  innovation-government_policy  R&D  science-and-politics  urban_development  economic_growth  IP  incentives  incentives-distortions  public-private_partnerships  public_goods  market_fundamentalism  public_policy  -priorities  risk_capital  local_government  state_government  state-and-science  education-finance  academia-governance  managerialism  technology  technology-history  commercialization  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Eurozine - Where is the power? - Wojciech Przybylski, Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz A conversation with Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz - July 2015
Original in Polish -- Translation by Aleksandra Malecka
First published in Res Publica, Nowa 30 (2015) -- In Europe all political thought is imperialist, says Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz. This means that politics as we know it today incorporates the experience of imperial politics from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century, when the foundations of what we call "the political" were forged. -- downloaded pdf to Note
geopolitics  Europe  Europe-Early_Modern  empires  state-building  nation-state  national_interest  EU  EU_governance  imperial-soft  Germany  Germany-Eurozone  Russia  Russian_foreign_policy  Poland  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  empire-and_business  globalization  sovereignty  hierarchy  authority  public_policy  policymaking  public_opinion  political_culture  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Kwass, review essay - Reassessing Enlightenment Economics - Reinert's "Translating Empire" | Books & ideas - 25 March 2013
Reviewed: Sophus A. Reinert, Translating Empire: Emulation and the Origins of Political Economy. Harvard University Press, 438 pp - Resurrecting the life of John Cary’s Essay on the State of England, a book which travelled all over Europe throughout the 18th century, S.A. Reinert challenges our understanding of Enlightenment economics, while calling for a more nuanced and historically-informed understanding of political economy in general. (..) By resurrecting the life of a text that scholars have dismissed as “mercantilist” and repositioning that work at the center of 18th-century political economy, Reinert challenges our basic understanding of Enlightenment economics, so often reduced to the free-trade doctrines of the physiocrats and Adam Smith. He argues that the diffusion of Cary’s work demonstrates that state-centered approaches to the creation of wealth enjoyed wide resonance at the very moment when discussions of economic policy were expanding beyond state chambers to engage a broader public. Far from being eclipsed by theories of laissez-faire economics, as conventional histories of economic thought would have us believe, such approaches became “the absolute mainstream in Europe” by the late 18th century -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle  18thC  economic_history  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  political_economy  Enlightenment  economic_theory  mercantilism  laisser-faire  Physiocrats  Smith  British_history  British_foreign_policy  nation-state  economic_growth  development  public_policy  public_goods  government-roles  Italy  Austria  Germany  readership  history_of_book  print_culture  information-intermediaries  networks-information  networks-business  networks-policy  Republic_of_Letters  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Updating the Policy Framework for Investment (PFI) - OECD
Investment policy reviews are conducted using OECD investment instruments and - since its adoption in 2006 - the Policy Framework for Investment. Using a process of peer examination, the OECD Investment Committee has published investment policy reviews since 1993. Priority countries for review are those showing potential for adherence to the OECD investment instruments. ‌Since the PFI was agreed in 2006, new forces have reshaped the global investment landscape, including the global economic and financial crisis, which started in 2008 and from which many economies have still not recovered, the emergence of new major outward investors within the G20, the spread of global value chains, and signs that pressures for investment protectionism are on the rise. Numerous lessons have also been learnt through the use of the PFI, particularly in developing and emerging economies. The PFI has been updated to reflect these new global economic fundamentals and was released in Paris on 3 June 2015 at the OECD Ministerial Council Meeting. 4/6/2015 - More than 25 countries have used the PFI when engaging in investment policy reviews. The experiences of these countries were used as an integral part of the multi-stakeholder update of the PFI which is now complete. -- pdf links for revised PFI and a "background to the uodate" -- downloaded pdf to Note on Action Taken using PFI guidance
report  OECD  OECD_economies  LDCs  emerging_markets  policymaking  public_policy  investment  investors  FDI  value-chains  supply-side  supply_chains  globalization  regulation-harmonization  trade-policy  financial_sector_development  capital_flows  international_political_economy  international_finance  international_organizations  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron -Judicial Review and Judicial Supremacy (Nov 2014) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-57 -- This paper attempts to identify a particular constitutional evil -- namely, judicial supremacy -- and to distinguish the objection to judicial supremacy from the broader case that can be made against judicial review. Even if one supports judicial review, one ought to have misgivings about the prospect of judicial supremacy. The paper associates judicial supremacy with three distinct tendencies in constitutional politics: (1) the temptation of courts to develop and pursue a general program (of policy and principle of their own) rather than just to intervene on a piecemeal basis; (2) the tendency of the highest court to become not only supreme but sovereign, by taking on a position of something like broad sovereignty within the constitutional scheme (thus confirming Thomas Hobbes in his conviction that the rule of law cannot be applied at the highest level of political authority in a state because any attempt to apply it just replicates sovereignty at a higher level)); (3) the tendency of courts to portray themselves as entitled to "speak before all others" for those who made the constitution, to take on the mantle of pouvoir constituant and to amend or change the understanding of the constitution when that is deemed necessary. -- Pages in PDF File: 44 -- Keywords: constitutions, Hobbes, judicial review, judicial supremacy, judges, judiciary, popular constitutionalism, rule of law, Sieyes, sovereignty -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  political_philosophy  government-forms  Hobbes  Sieyes  sovereignty  authority  democracy  accountability  constitutions  constitutionalism  judicial_review  judiciary  conflict  public_policy  public_opinion  change-social  political_change  policymaking  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Marion Brétéché - Les compagnons de Mercure: Journalisme et politique dans l'Europe de Louis XIV, 1680-1720 (2015) | Champ-Vallon
360 pages, - ISBN 979.10.267.0022.7, 27 euros -- Dans l’Europe intolérante du 18thC, la Hollande fait figure d’exception. C’est là, précisément, qu’est né, à la fin des 1680s, le journalisme politique d’analyse et d’opinion. Afin de rendre compte de l’« art de gouverner et de policer les États » (Furetière), afin de révéler au grand jour ce que les autorités politiques cachent ou taisent, comment des hommes sont-ils parvenus à faire de l’actualité leur profession ? M. Brétéché reconstitue toutes les dimensions de l’activité d’une douzaine de professionnels de l’information, pour la plupart des exilés huguenots, et explore les conditions d’apparition dans les Provinces-Unies de la première presse politique, libre et critique, en langue française. Devenus auteurs en Hollande, ils furent aussi des informateurs au service des puissants : ils nous permettent de saisir dans leur diversité l’inventivité des pratiques manuscrites et imprimées de publication des nouvelles au tournant du Grand Siècle et du Siècle des Lumières. (..) cet ouvrage retrace la rencontre entre un marché de l’information en plein essor, toujours plus avide de nouvelles fraîches, et les politiques de communication des gouvernements, partagés entre la publicité de leur action et les arcana imperii nécessaires à l’exercice du pouvoir. À la croisée de l’histoire sociale du journalisme et de l’histoire politique des médias, est retracé ici un épisode aussi essentiel que méconnu de l’histoire de l’information, qui manifeste déjà la tension entre contrainte et autonomie, entre censure et liberté d’expression. -- Marion Brétéché, agrégée et docteur en histoire, est chercheur associé au Centre Roland Mousnier (Paris Sorbonne – CNRS) et au GRIHL (Groupe de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur l’Histoire du Littéraire – EHESS).
find  media  Nine_Years_War  books  arcana_imperii  17thC  newspapers  censorship  Revocation_of_Edict_of_Nantes  France  information-markets  information-intermediaries  -opinion  government-public_communication  spying  circulation-ideas  secrecy  newsletter  news  journalists  amazon.fr  patronage  propaganda  public_policy  Dutch  political_discourse  Huguenots  literary_history  political_press  cultural_history  circulation-news  social_history  War_of_Spanish_Succession  journalism  libraries 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Mark Schmitt - The Old Progressives Messages Aren’t Working: a New, Comprehensive Approach to “Government Reform” | Washington Monthly
Next installment of reactions to Stan Greenberg's article on connecting with disenchanted working class white voters -- they'd be enthusiastic supporters of government action to address their increasingly precarious economic situation, but their distrust of government is profound. Greenberg claims Democrats can "get" a lot of these voters, but only if they convincingly tackle reforming government 1st. -- Schmitt thinks the standard Progressive responses to "government reform" won't speak to concerns of new generations of voters. The "technocratic efficiency" orientation of Clinton/Gore "reinventing government" has run out of steam for these voters, who are or potentially would be major consumers of government services. It's not the old DNV horror stories, but a lack of connectiveness that, with IT and customer services technology, has increasingly become part of expectations of the overall relation of citizens to "their" government that's supposed to be there for them. He gives a couple of examples to address the barriers to a sense of connection (which would also address efficiency issues but in a manner different from the bureaucratic orientation of cutting, reorganizing and outsourcing specific agency programs in "reinventing government"). Given the allergy in US politics to simple money transfers for redistributive programs, the tax code has become the preferred mechanism, with all sorts of different types of credits, exemptions and deductions that have made filing taxes and receiving benefits as complicated for those at or near the poverty line as for those in the upper brackets. Dems should make simplification for lower bracket taxpayers a top, visible priority, linked with the IRS focusing on evasion by ultra wealthy. Schmitt also gives examples of states that have a single entry point for all programs, with navigation tools that help users integrate their needs and questions across government services.
Instapaper  US_politics  Democrats  Democrats-strategy  political_messaging  working_class  voters-white  voters-demographics  public_opinion  public_policy  government_agencies  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Policy Statement - The implementation of ring-fencing: legal structure, governance and the continuity of services and facilities | Bank of England – PS10/15 - May 2015
The Prudential Regulation Authority is required under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (as amended by the Financial Services (Banking Reform) Act 2013) to make policy to implement the ring-fencing of core UK financial services and activities. This policy statement will be of interest to banks which will be required to ring-fence their core activities. This will include banking groups with core deposits greater than £25 billion. It will also be of interest to financial and other institutions and customers who have dealings with ring-fenced bodies. The policy statement provides feedback on the responses received to Consultation Paper 19/14 published in October 2014, and the amendments to the draft rules and supervisory statements included in CP19/14. The policy statement covers three areas: (1) legal structure arrangements of banking groups subject to ring-fencing; (2) governance arrangements of ring-fenced bodies; and (3) arrangements to ensure continuity of services and facilities to ring-fenced bodies. -- plan for effective date in 2019 -- didn't download
public_policy  financial_regulation  Bank_of_England  banking  deposit_insurance  bank_runs  bank_holding_cos  corporate_governance  too-big-to-fail 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
David Glaser - Paul Krugman on Tricky Urban Economics | Uneasy Money - May 2015
Paul Krugman has a post about a New Yorker piece by Tim Wu discussing the surprising and disturbing increase in vacant storefronts in the very prosperous and… Thinks Krugman should have stressed more the active damage governments can do (and did) when he highlighted the interstate highway system and middle class white flight. Some great quotes from studies of the impact on racially and ethnically marginalized communities -- destroying the "social capital" infrastructure that African-Americans had relied on, thereby reinforcing the impact of discriminatory private and public policies of both Jim Crow and residentia and workforce segregation in the Northern cities. And excellent examples of how the upper end of the wealth spectrum was repeatedly able to protect their urban communities in the freeway wars -- e.g. Cambridge and Georgetown.
US_history  20thC  post-WWII  political_economy  US_politics  urban_development  urban_politics  urban_elites  NIMBY  suburbs  white_flight  governmentality  transport  infrastructure  racism  African-Americans  lower_orders  community  segregation  housing  highways  public_policy  elites-political_influence  policymaking  links  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Martens, Rusconi and Leuze, eds. - New Arenas of Education Governance: The Impact of International Organizations and Markets on Educational Policy Making | Palgrave Macmillan - November 2007
Edited by Kerstin Martens, Alessandra Rusconi, Kathrin Leuze -- How and to what extent is education becoming a field of international and market governance? Traditionally, education policy making has been viewed as the responsibility of the nation state, falling within the realm of domestic politics. But recent years have witnessed the transformation of the state. Globalization has introduced new actors and led to the internationalization and marketization of education. This volume provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date account of these new arenas of education governance, examining the impact of international organizations and the role of the market in policymaking. It demonstrates how education policy is formulated at international levels and what the consequences for national policy making will be. -- excerpt = TOC, Introduction and index -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  public_policy  education  education-higher  education-training  education-privatization  education-finance  international_organizations  globalization  markets_in_everything  market_fundamentalism  privatization  public_goods  governance  global_governance  business-and-politics  business_influence  education-civic  values  accountability  Labor_markets  human_capital  competition  competition-interstate  development  distance_learning  IT  communication  nation-state  national_ID  knowledge_economy  OECD  World_Bank  WTO  trade-policy  trade-agreements  student_debt  democracy_deficit  political_participation  EU  EU_governance  standards-setting  testing  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Karmack - Jonathan Rauch: Political realism - In praise of old fashioned politics | Brookings Institution - May 2015
Jonathan Rauch's paper “Political realism: How hacks, machines, big money and back-room deals can strengthen American democracy” marks the beginning of a serious effort on behalf of Brookings scholars to open up a conversation challenging the reform assumptions of the past few decades. In the coming months we will be convening social scientists and public intellectuals along with politicians and activists in order to explore a new way of looking at solutions to the polarization of contemporary American politics. Not everyone will agree—with Rauch—or with each other. But we feel the time has come to take on the conventional reform wisdom and begin an intellectual dialogue on why our democracy seems to be failing. Taking a page from international relations where realism assumes conflict among nations; political realism also assumes that conflict is a constant part of the system. According to Rauch realism, “…sees governing as difficult and political peace and stability as treasures never to be taken for granted.” He goes on to argue the virtues of transactional politics and to point out how, in the name of reform, weakening the bulwarks of transactional politics has weakened democracy as a whole. “Where the realist tends to believe that governing is inherently difficult, that politics is inherently transactional and that success is best judged in terms of reaching social accommodation rather than achieving some abstract purpose, the progressive tends to see government as perfectible and politics as a path toward a higher public good.” In practice this means that the political realist advocates things that have been anathema to reformers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  democracy  US_politics  US_government  US_legal_system  good_government  sunshine_laws  transparency  realism-political  IR-realism  reform-political  parties  partisanship  faction  extremism  polarization  conflict  common_good  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_sociology  political_participation  political_science  politics-and-money  campaign_finance  elections  public_sphere  public_policy  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Caroline W. Lee - Do-It-Yourself Democracy: The Rise of the Public Engagement Industry (Jan 2015) - Oxford University Press
Citizen participation has undergone a radical shift since anxieties about "bowling alone" seized the nation in the 1990s. Many pundits and observers have cheered America's twenty-first century civic renaissance-an explosion of participatory innovations in public life. Invitations to "have your say!" and "join the discussion!" have proliferated. But has the widespread enthusiasm for maximizing citizen democracy led to real change? Sociologist Caroline W. Lee examines how participatory innovations have reshaped American civic life over the past two decades. Lee looks at the public engagement industry that emerged to serve government, corporate, and nonprofit clients seeking to gain a handle on the increasingly noisy demands of their constituents and stakeholders. The beneficiaries of new forms of democratic empowerment are not only humble citizens, but also the engagement experts who host the forums. Does it matter if the folks deepening democracy are making money at it? How do they make sense of the contradictions inherent in their roles? In investigating public engagement practitioners' everyday anxieties and larger worldviews, we see reflected the strange meaning of power in contemporary institutions. New technologies and deliberative practices have democratized the ways in which organizations operate, but Lee argues that they have also been marketed and sold as tools to facilitate cost-cutting, profitability, and other management goals - and that public deliberation has burdened everyday people with new responsibilities without delivering on its promises of empowerment.
books  kindle-available  US_society  US_politics  US_government  local_government  local_politics  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  firms-organization  hierarchy  decision_theory  NGOs  deliberation-public  public_policy  public_goods  public-private_partnerships  political_culture 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
FACA Database - US Government Federal Advisory Committee Act | Home
The Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) database is used by Federal agencies to continuously manage an average of 1,000 advisory committees government-wide This database is also used by the Congress to perform oversight of related Executive Branch programs and by the public, the media, and others, to stay abreast of important developments resulting from advisory committee activities. Although centrally supported by the General Services Administration's Committee Management Secretariat, the database represents a true "shared system" wherein each participating agency and individual committee manager has responsibility for providing accurate and timely information that may be used to assure that the system's wide array of users has access to data required by FACA.
US_government  open_access  open_government  governments-information_sharing  government_agencies  technocracy  governance  public_policy  public_goods  public-private_partnerships  website  databases 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
The Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) Brochure | GSA - US government
Advisory committees have played an important role in shaping programs and policies of the federal government from the earliest days of the Republic. Since President George Washington sought the advice of such a committee during the Whiskey Rebellion of 1794, the contributions made by these groups have been impressive and diverse. Today, an average of 1,000 advisory committees with more than 60,000 members advise the President and the Executive Branch on such issues as the disposal of high-level nuclear waste, the depletion of atmospheric ozone, the national fight against Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), efforts to rid the Nation of illegal drugs, to improve schools, highways, and housing, and on other major programs. Through enactment of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) of 1972 (Public Law 92-463), the U.S. Congress formally recognized the merits of seeking the advice and assistance of our nation's citizens. At the same time, the Congress also sought to assure that advisory committees: ** Provide advice that is relevant, objective, and open to the public; ** Act promptly to complete their work; and ** Comply with reasonable cost controls and record keeping requirements. -- With the expertise from advisory committee members, federal officials and the nation have access to information and advice on a broad range of issues affecting federal policies and programs. The public, in return, is afforded an opportunity to provide input into a process that may form the basis for government decisions.
US_government  administrative_agencies  open_government  public_policy  public_opinion  public-private_partnerships  governments-information_sharing  government_agencies  technocracy  governance  public_interest 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
John Irons and Isaac Shapiro - Report: Regulation, employment, and the economy: Fears of job loss are overblown | Economic Policy Institute - April 2011
After the first midterms debacle -- . In the first months since the new Congress convened, the House has held dozens of hearings designed to elicit criticisms of regulations, introduced legislation that would dramatically alter the regulatory process by requiring congressional approval of all major regulations, and passed a spending bill that would slash the funding levels of regulatory agencies and restrict their ability to enact rules covering areas such as greenhouse gas emissions. (..) opponents of regulation argue that agency rules are damaging to the economy in general and job generation in particular. Some say specific regulations will destroy millions of jobs and cite a study (critiqued later in this paper) purporting to show that regulations cost $1.75 trillion per year. Regulations are frequently discussed only in the context of their threat to job creation, while their role in protecting lives, public health, and the environment is ignored. This report reviews whether the evidence backs the perspective of regulatory opponents. The first section looks broadly at the effects of regulations, whether they play a useful role in the economy, and whether their overall benefits outweigh their overall costs. The second section assesses the theory and evidence for the assertion that regulations undermine jobs and the economy. The last section examines the kinds of studies that are discussed when regulations are being formulated; these studies, often cited in debates and therefore of great importance, tend to be prospective
estimates of the effects of proposed regulations. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_economy  US_politics  Obama_administration  Congress  GOP  deregulation  cost-benefit  unemployment  business_influence  public_policy  public_goods  public_health  environment  climate  financial_regulation  US_government  regulation  regulation-environment  regulation-costs  common_good  commons  economic_sociology  economic_theory  economic_culture  statistics  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Chuck Marr and Chye-Ching Huang - Obama’s Capital Gains Tax Proposals Would Make Tax Code More Efficient and Fair | Center on Budget and Policy Priorities -Jan 2015
The tax code strongly favors income from capital gains — increases in the value of assets, such as stocks — over income from wages and salaries. These preferences are economically inefficient: they promote tax schemes that convert ordinary income into capital gains and encourage people to hold assets just to escape tax, even if they have better investment opportunities. They are also highly regressive, since capital gains are heavily concentrated at the top of the income scale. The President has proposed to make the tax code more efficient and equitable by reducing one of the biggest subsidies for capital gains (a preferential rate compared to wage and salary income) and largely eliminating another (the ability to avoid capital gains tax completely by holding on to an asset until death). These changes would allow investments to flow to where they are most productive and reduce investment in creating tax avoidance schemes instead of in real economic activity, among other economic benefits. And, because the benefits of the current preferences for capital gains flow overwhelmingly to the top, fully 99 percent of the revenue from the President’s capital gains proposals would come from the top 1 percent of filers, the Treasury Department estimates. -- 7 page report downloaded as pdf to Note
US_economy  US_politics  Obama_administration  taxes  tax_policy  tax_reform  capital  investment  1-percent  inheritance  tax_collection  public_finance  public_policy  trickle-down  incentives  incentives-distortions  distribution-wealth  distribution-income  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Full transcript: President Obama, Dec 4 2013 - Inequality and rolling back Reagan Revolution | The Washington Post
But starting in the late ‘70s, this social compact began to unravel.Technology made it easier for companies to do more with less, eliminating certain job occupations. A more competitive world led companies ship jobs anyway. And as good manufacturing jobs automated or headed offshore, workers lost their leverage; jobs paid less and offered fewer benefits. As values of community broke down and competitive pressure increased, businesses lobbied Washington to weaken unions and the value of the minimum wage. As the trickle-down ideology became more prominent, taxes were slashes for the wealthiest while investments in things that make us all richer, like schools and infrastructure, were allowed to wither. And for a certain period of time we could ignore this weakening economic foundation, in part because more families were relying on two earners, as women entered the workforce. We took on more debt financed by juiced-up housing market. But when the music stopped and the crisis hit, millions of families were stripped of whatever cushion they had left. And the result is an economy that’s become profoundly unequal and families that are more insecure. (..) it is harder today for a child born here in America to improve her station in life than it is for children in most of our wealthy allies, countries like Canada or Germany or France. They have greater mobility than we do, not less.(..) The combined trends of increased inequality and decreasing mobility pose a fundamental threat to the American dream, our way of life and what we stand for around the globe. And it is not simply a moral claim that I’m making here. There are practical consequences to rising inequality and reduced mobility. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
speech  Obama  inequality  supply-side  labor_share  business-ethics  norms  norms-business  morality-conventional  morality-Christian  utilitarianism  globalization  technology  US_foreign_policy  US_economy  US_politics  US_society  US_government  US_history  common_good  civic_virtue  economic_growth  economic_culture  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  unemployment  health_care  public_goods  public_opinion  public_policy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Sprung - Reagan Revolution rollback | xpostfactoid - Jan 2015
Thanks largely to Piketty it's become increasingly clear that in the Reagan Revolution, middle class America sold its birthright for a mess of supply-side pottage. Dems willingness to credit GOP dogma -- raising taxes on high incomes and investment gains inhibits growth, deregulation spurs it -- are melting away. Post midterm losses, Dems are beginning to heighten rather than soft-pedal the policy contrasts between the parties. Wounded politically by perceptions that the ACA helps the poor at the expense of working people, they are looking for proposals attractive to the middle class. Emboldened by accelerating growth and employment gains, they are perhaps shedding inhibitions about leveling the playing field between workers and management. (..)To mess up my timeline a bit, Obama delivered a Pikettian narrative in Dec 2013 ..should have been a landmark speech on inequality (..) if he (and Dems) hadn't (tried to) protect their Senate majority. [In the Dec 2013 soeech] Obama zeroed in on policy choices. "As values of community broke down and competitive pressure increased, businesses lobbied Washington to weaken unions and the value of the minimum wage. As the trickle-down ideology became more prominent, taxes were slashes for the wealthiest while investments in things that make us all richer, like schools and infrastructure, were allowed to wither. And for a certain period of time we could ignore this weakening economic foundation (..) But when the music stopped and the crisis hit, millions of families were stripped of whatever cushion they had left. And the result is an economy that’s become profoundly unequal and families that are more insecure. -- terrific links roundup
US_economy  US_politics  Obama  Obama_administration  Reagan  supply-side  trickle-down  neoliberalism  inequality  middle_class  wages  wages-minimum  labor  labor_law  labor_share  labor_standards  Labor_markets  investment  executive_compensation  1-percent  infrastructure  education  education-higher  civic_virtue  common_good  Piketty  economic_growth  economic_culture  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  unemployment  health_care  public_goods  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  political_culture  political_economy  political_discourse  political_participation  Pocket 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephanie Snow, review - Michael Brown, Performing Medicine: Medical Culture and Identity in Provincial England, c.1760-1850 (Manchester University Press, 2011) | Reviews in History
Dr Stephanie Snow, Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Manchester -- Brown takes a cultural historical approach (..) the ways in which medical identity and culture were transformed over the period from the late 18thC importance of liberal learning and the values of gentility and politeness to the early 19thC focus on vocationally specific forms of knowledge and association. (..) Through a case study of the social and intellectual activities of medical practitioners in the city of York, (..) crucial shifts in the culture of medicine between the 1760s and the 1850s. York (..) a geographical midway point between two key medical metropolises – London and Edinburgh; it did not experience the transformations associated with the processes of industrialization; yet it was shaped by many of the specific characteristics of the period such as political factionalism, the urban renaissance movement and ideologies of socio-scientific progressivism. (..) the ways through which medical practitioners fashioned their identities through public displays of knowledges such as botany, natural history, poetry and literature. Improvements in the health of the population (..) were principally due to the civic improvements in York such as paving and new drains as well as inoculation and other medical advances. [In the later 1830s] successive enactments of medical identity and authority set the stage for a new compact between medicine and society in which medical practitioners were nationally cast as experts in medical science with a collective desire and duty to alleviate disease and suffering. The transformations (..) are underlined by the public’s acceptance of the Medical School’s authority, under the provisions of the Anatomy Act, to dissect the body of a local man who had drowned in the river Ouse in 1835. Only 3 years earlier, (..) popular resistance to such activities during the cholera epidemic was high indeed. (..)case for the relevance of this history to the present dilemmas and controversies over professionalism and medicine and rightly stresses the social and political contingency of medical ideas and values. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  history_of_science  medicine  professionalization  scientific_culture  public_health  politeness  gentility  networks-social  networks-information  authority  improvement  urbanization  education-training  education-professional  public_policy  public_opinion  status  self-fashioning  identity  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob Weisberg, review essay - Bridge Too Far - Rick Perlstein, The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan | Democracy Journal - Issue #34, Fall 2014
Rick Perlstein’s account of Ronald Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity, but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough. --
The Invisible Bridge: The Fall of Nixon and the Rise of Reagan By Rick Perlstein • Simon & Schuster • 2014 • 810 pages -- see Perlstein’s response -- both downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Rick Perlstein - The Reason for Reagan, A response to Jacob Weisberg. | Democracy Journal: Issue #35, Winter 2015
In 1984, the year Reagan won 49 states and 59 percent of the popular vote, only 35 percent of Americans said they favored substantial cuts in social programs in order to reduce the deficit. Given these plain facts, historiography on the rise of conservatism and the triumph of Ronald Reagan must obviously go beyond the deadening cliché that since Ronald Reagan said government was the problem, and Americans elected Ronald Reagan twice, the electorate simply agreed with him that government was the problem. But in his recent review of my book The Invisible Bridge [“A Bridge Too Far,” Issue #34], Jacob Weisberg just repeats that cliché—and others. “Rick Perlstein’s account of Reagan’s rise acknowledges his popularity,” the article states, “but doesn’t take the reasons behind it seriously enough.” Weisberg is confident those reasons are obvious. Is he right? -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  US_politics  US_history  US_society  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Cold_War  20thC  post-WWII  right-wing  Reagan  GOP  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  parties  partisanship  faction  historiography-20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Solutions Journalism - Toolkit for Reporting Internationally
Downloaded guide to iPhone -- This meaty guidebook has two objectives: (1) to highlight and dissect the solutions-oriented work of four Pulitzer Center grantees; and (2) to offer general guidance about howto report on solutions stories internationally – and how to get your story idea funded. This guidebook has been produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which supports international journalism across media platforms.
report  downloaded  journalism  narrative  public_sphere  public_policy  development  urbanism  family  migration  public_health  education  women-education  public_disorder  racism  civil_wars  environment  climate  poverty  access_to_services  labor  labor_standards  political_participation  gender  violence  norms 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Austin Frakt - Notes on Cutler’s *The Quality Cure* | The Incidental Economist - October 2014
Below are my notes from reading David Cutler’s The Quality Cure. Quote of Cutler’s summary: " ...easiest changes are in the site of care. This involves people who are being hospitalized in expensive institutions when they could be treated just as well in less expensive ones or even on an outpatient basis. [...] The groundwork to affect [this] could be laid within one to two years [by 2016]. [...] Somewhat more difficult are changes that need to occur within institutions, to streamline the pathway of care for patients with various conditions [...] rationalizing who receives stents and who does not, implementing care pathways for routine labor and delivery, [etc.]. [...] My guess is that three to five years of work are required before major savings from these pathways can be realized [by 2021 if these follow after site-of-care changes]. The third tier of savings comes form populationwide prevention and patient engagement. [...] Such experimentation will need at least five years to start bearing fruit and likely a decade before major savings can be realized [by 2031 if this follows prior changes]. [...] All told, therefore, improving health care quality is a fifteen- to twenty-year venture. If we are able to pull out 30 percent of costs in fifteen years, this implies a cost reduction [productivity increase] of 2 percent annually. If the transition takes 20 years, the implication is an average cost savings [productivity increase] of 1.5 percent annually." -- If this productivity growth were entirely achieved by (or translated to) reductions in spending at the same rate, this would probably bring overall health care spending in line with GDP growth. However, as Cutler points out, we see higher productivity associated with more overall spending in other industries.
books  reviews  health_care  US_society  US_government  public_policy  management  productivity  organizations  OECD_economies 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
ECONOMICS AS SOCIAL THEORY - Routledge Series edited by Tony Lawson - Titles List
Social theory is experiencing something of a revival within economics. Critical analyses of the particular nature of the subject matter of social studies and of the types of method, categories and modes of explanation that can legitimately be endorsed for the scientific study of social objects, are re-emerging. Economists are again addressing such issues as the relationship between agency and structure, between the economy and the rest of society, and between inquirer and the object of inquiry. There is renewed interest in elaborating basic categories such as causation, competition, culture, discrimination,evolution, money, need, order, organisation, power, probability, process, rationality, technology, time, truth, uncertainty and value, etc. The objective for this series is to facilitate this revival further. In contemporary economics the label `theory' has been appropriated by a group that confines itself to largely a-social, a-historical, mathematical `modelling'. Economics as Social Theory thus reclaims the `theory' label, offering a platform for alternative, rigorous, but broader and more critical conceptions of theorising.
books  social_theory  economic_theory  social_sciences  intellectual_history  political_economy  causation-social  economic_sociology  economic_culture  rationality-economics  rational_choice  rationality-bounded  rational_expectations  critical_realism  evolution-social  history_of_science  historical_sociology  agency-structure  power  power-asymmetric  business-and-politics  capitalism  capital_as_power  Marxist  Post-Keynesian  epistemology  epistemology-social  conventions  social_order  civil_society  public_policy  public_goods  anarchism  competition  financialization  development  economic_growth 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Nitzan, Jonathan - LSE Public Event: Can Capitalists Afford Recovery? -- Video and Paper (May 2014) | bnarchives
Presentation at the LSE Department of International Relations. 27 May 2014. -- Theorists and policymakers from all directions and of all persuasions remain obsessed with the prospect of recovery. For mainstream economists, the key question is how to bring about such a recovery. For heterodox political economists, the main issue is whether sustained growth is possible to start with. But there is a prior question that nobody seems to ask: can capitalists afford recovery in the first place? If we think of capital not as means of production but as a mode of power, we find that accumulation thrives not on growth and investment, but on unemployment and stagnation. And if accumulation depends on crisis, why should capitalists want to see a recovery? -- Video duration: 2:24 hours -- Keywords: crisis, differential accumulation, economic policy, economic theory, expectations, growth, income distribution, Keynesianism, Marxism, monetarism, neoclassical economics, profit, underconsumption -- Subjects: BN State & Government, BN Power, BN Region - North America, BN Business Enterprise, BN Value & Price, BN Crisis, BN Production, BN Macro, BN Conflict & Violence, BN Money & Finance, BN Ideology, BN Distribution, BN Methodology, BN Capital & Accumulation, BN Policy, BN Class, BN Labour, BN Growth -- links to LSE on YouTube -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  video  Great_Recession  financial_crisis  economic_growth  capital_as_power  capitalism-systemic_crisis  economic_theory  economic_models  macroeconomics  neoclassical_economics  Keynesian  Marxist  monetarism  monetary_policy  fiscal_policy  austerity  sovereign_debt  public_finance  public_policy  productivity  production  consumer_demand  underconsumption  investment  profit  productivity-labor_share  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  finance_capital  financialization  capitalization  accumulation  accumulation-differential  elites-self-destructive  elite_culture  ruling_class  class_conflict  Labor_markets  inequality  unemployment 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Hyeng-Joon Park - Korea’s Post-1997 Restructuring: An Analysis of Capital as Power | forthcoming in Review of Radical Political Economics (2015) pp. 1-44 | bnarchives
This paper aims to transcend current debates on Korea’s post-1997 restructuring, which rely on a dichotomy between domestic industrial capital and foreign financial capital, by adopting Nitzan and Bichler’s capital-as-power perspective. Based on this approach, the paper analyzes Korea’s recent political economic restructuring as the latest phase in the evolution of capitalist power and its transformative regimes of capital accumulation. -- Keywords: differential accumulation dominant capital chaebols transnationalization strategic sabotage -- Subjects: BN State & Government, BN Institutions, BN Power, BN International & Global, BN Region - Asia, BN Business Enterprise, BN Value & Price, BN Crisis, BN Production, BN Conflict & Violence, BN Money & Finance, BN Distribution, BN Comparative, BN Capital & Accumulation, BN Policy, BN Class, BN Labour, BN Growth -- downloaded from author's blog to Note
article  international_political_economy  capital_as_power  globalization  Korea  East_Asia  20thC  21stC  economic_history  1990s  2000s  2010s  Asian_crisis  Asia_Pacific  international_finance  FDI  finance_capital  financialization  emerging_markets  oligopoly  chaebols  crony_capitalism  industry  production  capitalism  capitalism-systemic_crisis  capitalization  accumulation  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  cross-border  trade  productivity-labor_share  class_conflict  labor_share  Labor_markets  unions  violence  economic_growth  sabotage-by_business  business-and-politics  business-norms  power-asymmetric  public_policy  public_goods  corporate_finance  corporate_ownership  investment  banking  political_culture  economic_culture  economic_reform  economic_policy  democracy  opposition  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Vincent Dubois - Les champs de l'action publique (2010) in Hilgers (M.), dir., Utiliser la théorie des champs pour comprendre le monde social
L'analyse des politiques publiques a forgé ses propres notions pour décrire les espaces relationnels dans lesquels les politiques sont conduites. La sociologie des champs demeure en revanche très peu mobilisée dans ce domaine. Elle peut pourtant s'avérer utile pour objectiver l'espace de production des politiques, reconstituer les relations entre cet espace spécifique et ceux auxquels les politiques sont destinées ou, plus largement, ceux qui prennent part aux échanges qui les constituent. Elle offre ce faisant un point d'appui décisif pour la sociologie de l'action publique. -- Politique, Religion, Institutions et Sociétés : Mutations Européennes - Groupe de Sociologie Politique Européenne (PRISME-GSPE) CNRS : UMR7012 – Université de Strasbourg -- Mots-Clés : Politique publique – sociologie des champs – champs – action publique – rapports – domination – légitimation -- site archives HAL-SHS :: [halshs-00498020, version 1] -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  social_sciences  public_policy  sociology_of_fields  public_sphere  legitimacy  domination  political_science  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rhodium Group » Remaking American Power - Economic Impacts of EPA Guidelines proposal - Preliminary Findings - July 24, 2014
John Larsen, Shashank Mohan, Whitney Ketchum, and Trevor Houser -- On June 2, 2014, the EPA proposed guidelines for states to develop and implement carbon dioxide emissions standards for existing US power plants. These rules will likely bring about the most significant change in the US electricity sector in decades. But regulating GHG emissions from existing power plants will also have important supply-side implications, whether fuel switching from coal to natural gas or expanded production of renewable energy and energy efficiency equipment technology. CSIS and RHG have partnered to do an initial assessment of the economic impact of future emissions standards that accounts for these broader energy market dynamics and maps impacts by region of the country to help inform key regional and industry stakeholders. The study focuses on the changes to the electric power and energy production that are likely to under the EPA’s proposal, as well as price, demand expenditures and other impacts. The analysis provides a balanced and measured set of estimates of national and regional results to inform ongoing policy deliberations both in Washington and in the states. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_economy  US_government  state_government  energy  energy-markets  public_policy  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
theAIRnet.org - Home
The Academic-Industry Research Network – theAIRnet – is a private, 501(c)(3) not-for-profit research organization devoted to the proposition that a sound understanding of the dynamics of industrial development requires collaboration between academic scholars and industry experts. We engage in up-to-date, in-depth, and incisive research and commentary on issues related to industrial innovation and economic development. Our goal is to understand the ways in which, through innovation, businesses and governments can contribute to equitable and stable economic growth – or what we call “sustainable prosperity”.
website  economic_growth  industry  technology  Innovation  green_economy  development  business  business-and-politics  capitalism  global_economy  public-private_partnerships  public_policy  public_health  public_goods  urban_development  health_care  IP  Labor_markets  wages  unemployment  education-training  sustainability  financial_system  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  CSR  firms-theory  management  plutocracy  MNCs  international_political_economy  human_capital  OECD_economies  emerging_markets  supply_chains  R&D  common_good  1-percent  inequality  working_class  work-life_balance  workforce  regulation  regulation-harmonization  incentives  stagnation 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Rostam J. Neuwirth - The Creative Industries as a New Paradigm for Business and Law: Of 'Smart Phones' and 'Smarter Regulation' :: SSRN June 13, 2014
University of Macau - Faculty of Law, E32 -- Fourth Biennial Global conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/05. **--** From a macroeconomic perspective, the historical evolution of trade and commerce has been closely entangled in a two-way or paradoxical relationship with the evolution of laws, where one is inextricably linked to the other and both mutually influence each other. At the microeconomic level, the same can be said about the relationship between businesses or industries and their underlying technologies. Recent changes, and notably the accelerated pace by which we recognize change, has led to a widespread trend of “convergence”. Convergence has been recognised in different contexts, namely in languages, technologies, and industries as well as regulatory matters. The objective of this article is thus to first trace and describe convergence from a linguistic, technological and industrial perspective. Subsequently, in order to ponder the future regulatory challenges in the regulation of global trade under the aegis of the World Trade Organization (WTO), it will focus on the question of whether technological and industrial convergence should be met by a similar trend towards regulatory convergence through regulatory harmonisation. Put differently, it will critically evaluate the present situation of regulatory divergence in the form of regulatory diversity and regulatory competition with a view of contributing to the debate of improving global trade regulation in the 21st century. - Number of Pages: 21 -- didn't download
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  WTO  regulation  administrative_agencies  administrative_law  technocracy  accountability  public_policy  legal_culture  regulation-harmonization  technology  technology_transfer  economic_culture  creative_economy  political_participation  globalization  global_system  manufacturing  production  change-social  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Gregory Shaffer - How the WTO Shapes the Regulatory State :: SSRN August 14, 2014
University of California, Irvine - School of Law -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/29. *--* The World Trade Organization (WTO) arguably shapes regulatory governance in more countries to a greater extent than any other international organization. This chapter provides a new framework for assessing the broader regulatory implications of the WTO within nation states, as opposed to viewing the WTO as a form of global governance above the nation state. It first examines seven types of changes required for national law and legal practice, which affect how the state raises revenue, how the state spends it, and the principles the state applies to regulation. The chapter then assesses four broader dimensions of regulatory change catalyzed by WTO rules: (i) changes in the boundary between the market and the state (involving concomitantly market liberalization and growth of the administrative state); (ii) changes in the relative authority of institutions within the state (promoting bureaucratized and judicialized governance); (iii) changes in professional expertise engaging with state regulation (such as the role of lawyers); and (iv) changes in normative frames and accountability mechanisms for national regulation (which are trade liberal and transnational in scope). In practice, these four dimensions of change interact and build on each other. The chapter presents what we know to date and a framework for conducting further empirical study. - Number of Pages: 43 -- Keywords: WTO, World Trade Organization, Regulation, Regulatory governance, Market liberalization - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  WTO  regulation  administrative_agencies  administrative_law  technocracy  accountability  public_policy  legal_culture  legal_theory  lawyers  political_participation  business-and-politics  norms-business  markets_in_everything  markets  neoliberalism  free_trade  democracy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Leo E. Strine , Nicholas Walter - Conservative Collision Course?: The Tension between Conservative Corporate Law Theory and Citizens United (Cornell Law Review, Forthcoming) - August 1, 2014 :: SSRN
Leo E. Strine Jr. - Supreme Court of Delaware; Harvard Law School; University of Pennsylvania Law School -- Nicholas Walter, Yale University -- Harvard Law School John M. Olin Center Discussion Paper No. 788 -- One important aspect of Citizens United has been overlooked: the tension between the conservative majority’s view of for-profit corporations, and the theory of for-profit corporations embraced by conservative thinkers. This article explores the tension between these conservative schools of thought and shows that Citizens United may unwittingly strengthen the arguments of conservative corporate theory’s principal rival. Citizens United posits that stockholders of for-profit corporations can constrain corporate political spending and that corporations can legitimately engage in political spending. Conservative corporate theory is premised on the contrary assumptions that stockholders are poorly-positioned to monitor corporate managers for even their fidelity to a profit maximization principle, and that corporate managers have no legitimate ability to reconcile stockholders’ diverse political views. Because stockholders invest in for-profit corporations for financial gain, and not to express political or moral values, conservative corporate theory argues that corporate managers should focus solely on stockholder wealth maximization and non-stockholder constituencies and society should rely upon government regulation to protect against corporate overreaching. Conservative corporate theory’s recognition that corporations lack legitimacy in this area has been strengthened by market developments that Citizens United slighted: that most humans invest in the equity markets through mutual funds under section 401(k) plans, cannot exit these investments as a practical matter, and lack any rational ability to influence how corporations spend in the political process. -- Keywords: Corporate governance, political spending, Citizens United, conservative corporate theory, regulatory externalities, lobbying, profit maximization, constitutional law, election law, labor law
article  SSRN  SCOTUS  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  corporate_law  corporate_governance  principal-agent  management  shareholders  shareholder_value  campaign_finance  lobbying  elections  labor_law  US_constitution  constitutional_law  public_policy  interest_groups  oligarchy  rent-seeking  investors  savings  capitalism  capital_markets  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
PHILIP LOFT -- POLITICAL ARITHMETIC AND THE ENGLISH LAND TAX IN THE REIGN OF WILLIAM III. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 321-343. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
PHILIP LOFT - University College London -- This article explores the role of the method of political arithmetic and political arithmeticians in the changing methods of raising finance during the Nine Years War. It discusses the actions of parliament-men in committees and their interaction with reports containing data, and the influence of projectors on the decision to introduce, and later abandon, the pound rate. Throughout this period, political arithmeticians were active participants, providing data, advice, and schemes to the treasury and parliament, and when they were not, ‘country’ MPs, in particular, were active in calling for data and leading its cross-examination. This article suggests that debates on public finance did not occur along party lines, with ‘county communities’ given fresh presence by the quantification of the inequality of the land tax burden. Political arithmetic is shown to have played an important role in the processes and negotiations that occurred over the setting of taxation policy in the ‘long eighteenth century’. -* I thank Julian Hoppit for his generous encouragement and comments on this article. Thanks also to Clare Jackson, Andrew Preston and the anonymous reviewers. - available for download - to Note
article  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  economic_history  political_economy  Glorious_Revolution  William_III  Nine_Years_War  taxes  landed_interest  land_tax  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  political_arithmetick  Parliament  House_of_Commons  Parliamentary_supremacy  Country_Party  oversight-legislature  public_finance  public_policy  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  Whigs-opposition  sovereign_debt  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The 10 best New Yorker articles on health care - Vox - July 2014
The New Yorker has recently made its post-2007 archives open to the non-subscribing public for the next several months. (Some pieces published before 2007 are available, as well.) My colleagues Libby Nelson and Brandon Ambrosino have put together collections of the magazine's best education and religion writing, and I am shamelessly cribbing their idea for the health care beat. -- selected articles to Evernote
US_society  health_care  medicine  poverty  neuroscience  public_health  public_policy  welfare  Evernote 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Equity, Excellence and Inclusiveness in Education: Policy Lessons from Around the World (July 2014) - OECD iLibrary
Excellence in education without equity risks leading to large economic and social disparities; equity in education at the expense of quality is a meaningless aspiration. The most advanced education systems now set ambitious goals for all students, focusing on both excellence and equity. They also equip their teachers with the pedagogic skills that have been proven effective and with enough autonomy so that teachers can use their own creativity in determining the content and instruction they provide to their individual students. The fourth International Summit on the Teaching Profession brought together education ministers, union leaders and other teacher leaders from high-performing and rapidly improving education systems, as measured by PISA (the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment ). Their aim was to discuss equity, excellence and inclusiveness in education by exploring three questions: • How are high-quality teachers developed, and how do schools with the greatest need attract and retain them? • How can equity be ensured in increasingly devolved education systems? and • What kinds of learning environments address the needs of all students? - To underpin the discussions, this publication identifies some of the steps policy makers can take to build school systems that are both equitable and excellent. The analysis is complemented with examples that illustrate proven or promising practices in specific countries. -- Online access but pdf download requires $
education  inequality  poverty  culture  unions  governmentality  central_government  local_government  OECD_economies  US_government  US_society  university-contemporary  public_policy  public_goods 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Why it’s hard for the US to learn from other countries on education - Vox - July 2014
Summary of OECD report re US comparative position on different metrics and what lessons might be drawn from the report -- see other bookmark for OECD link (to read online - pdf requires $) -- New data on poverty, inequality and education are likely to reignite the conversation. But it's easier to point to what other countries are doing right than it is to figure out what lessons they can teach the US. That's evident in the latest education report from the OECD, a group of 34 mostly rich countries and economies. The OECD is a big player in the international-comparison game because it tests students around the world in math, reading and other subjects. Those tests are often used as benchmarks to show that the US is falling behind. The OECD, though, also reports on how different nations handle inequity in education. That data, like the test scores, shows the US has a long way to go.
education  inequality  poverty  culture  unions  governmentality  central_government  local_government  OECD_economies  US_government  US_society  university-contemporary  public_policy  public_goods 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Paolo Ramazzotti - Policymaking and Learning Actors, or Is a 'Double Movement' in Cognition Possible? | JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 41, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 765-781
Focus is on Polanyi's theory of implications of widening split between economic and societal goals - posits market efficiency and prices etc functions as coordination mechanisms require broadly shared images of the political economy. Uses Simon's bounded rationality to examine how learning happens, why business is likely to have oversized influence on shared images, and that policy changes may require a commitment to influencing the learning process so alternatives to business images can be shared basis of action -- interesting bibliography of classic political economy and social theory. -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_economy  social_theory  rationality-economics  economic_culture  moral_economy  capitalism  political_culture  common_good  reform-economic  efficiency  public_policy  public_sphere  public_opinion  Polanyi_Karl 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong - Harold Pollack Interviews Ezekiel Emmanuel - March 2014
If you could only read one book about the American health system and ACA’s valuable (albeit imperfect) contribution to improving that system, his new book Reinventing American Health Care: How the Affordable Care Act will Improve our Terribly Complex, Blatantly Unjust, Outrageously Expensive, Grossly Inefficient, Error Prone System might be the best one.

The book first provides a primer regarding the various moving parts of our $2.9 trillion medical economy. It then presents a short history of health care reform. It outlines ACA’s main provisions and how the bill actually became law. Emanuel then offers a scathing account of the initial implementation failures. He then offers some rather audacious blue-sky predictions about the future of American health care.
books  US_economy  US_politics  political_economy  Obama_administration  health_care  public_policy  Congress  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Treating Inequality with Redistribution: Is the Cure Worse than the Disease? | iMFdirect - The IMF Blog
Downloaded pdf to Note -- post summarises paper results -- First, we continue to find that inequality is a robust and powerful determinant both of the pace of medium-term growth and of the duration of growth spells, even controlling for the size of redistributive transfers. Thus, it would still be a mistake to focus on growth and let inequality take care of itself, if only because the resulting growth may be low and unsustainable. Inequality and unsustainable growth may be two sides of the same coin. And second, there is remarkably little evidence in the historical data used in our paper of adverse effects of fiscal redistribution on growth. The average redistribution, and the associated reduction in inequality, seem to be robustly associated with higher and more durable growth. We find some mixed signs that very large redistributions may have direct negative effects on growth duration, such that the overall effect—including the positive effect on growth through lower inequality—is roughly growth-neutral.
paper  IMF  macroeconomics  public_policy  inequality  redistribution  welfare  capitalism  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_reform  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Diane Coyle, review - Beyond GDP: Measuring Welfare and Assessing Sustainability by Marc Fleurbaey and Didier Blanchet | The Enlightened Economist
Beyond GDP: Measuring Welfare and Assessing Sustainability by Marc Fleurbaey and Didier Blanchet is a technical book on the profoundly important question of how we measure “the economy”. The authors are two distinguished economists/statisticians who were respectively a member and rapporteur for the Sen-Stiglitz commission appointed by the then French President to consider whether there is a better kind of metric than GDP. -- The book’s concludes that we should be talking about “GDP and Beyond”, because GDP is adequate for measuring production and income. However, when it comes to the ‘beyond’, the authors convincingly show that a number of commonly-proposed alternatives have significant flaws in theoretical terms.The alternatives take one of two forms: a composite index that adjusts GDP in some way, either by subtracting some elements or weighting it with other kinds of indicator; or measuring well-being directly via surveys.
books  reviews  economic_growth  political_economy  capitalism  welfare  public_policy  public_goods  investment  sustainability  macroeconomics  microeconomics  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall -Perspectives book series review - why fight poverty etc » 3:AM Magazine Feb 2014
Series editor Diane Coyle summarises the series nicely when she writes: ‘Perspectives are essays on big ideas by leading writers, each given free rein and a modest word limit to reframe an issue of great contemporary interest.’ Reading them invites peppy fustigation or pash. *--* (1) Julia Unwin’s ‘Why Fight Poverty’ argues that the UK must solve its poverty crisis and focuses on the emotional and sentimental thinking that ultimately provides obstacles for tackling the problem. This is hard-headed pugnacious stuff. *--* (2) Jim O’Neil’s ‘The BRIC Road to Growth’ warns that emerging markets are not an old story. The shift from the dominance of USA and Europe has happened. *--* (3) Anne Powers ‘Phoenix Cities’ is a study of regeneration ideas from Europe and the USA. Bridget Rosewell writes about ‘Reinventing London.’ *--* (4) Rediscovering Growth: After the Crisis’ by Andrew Sentance begins by asking what has happened to economic growth since the North Atlantic crisis in the stricken economies affected by the crisis. It’s an interesting question, and one that has in the background worries that without growth governments won’t be able to contain public borrowing, reduce their debts nor establish a direction for economic recovery.
books  reviews  public_policy  global_economy  global_governance  Great_Recession  emerging_markets  economic_growth  sovereign_debt  austerity  urban_development  urban_politics  London  education  poverty  Poor_Laws  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Esther Snell - Discourses of criminality in the eighteenth-century press: the presentation of crime in The Kentish Post, 1717–1768 | Continuity and Change (2007) - Cambridge Journals Online
In the eighteenth century the newspaper became the most important source for the printed dissemination of criminological stories and information. In bringing together thousands of narratives about crime and justice it far outstripped any other printed source of the period. As the primary literary means of accessing stories and information about crime, it is likely that newspapers influenced their readers' perceptions of and attitudes towards crime and the justice system. This article offers a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the crime content of one provincial newspaper, The Kentish Post, or Canterbury Newsletter. The study reveals the newspaper to have been constructed to a template, which privileged crime as one of its most important subjects. However, the editorial imperatives of compiling a regular text with an unprecedented number of stories resulted in a discourse of the nature, causes and consequences of crime very different to that expounded in the pamphlet literature, which had been the mainstay of printed discourses about crime before the arrival of newspapers and with which historians are more familiar.
article  paywall  social_history  cultural_history  18thC  public_opinion  crime  judiciary  public_disorder  public_policy  lower_orders  sociology_of_knowledge  newspapers  pamphlets  political_press  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jessica Warner and Frank Ivis - "Damn You, You Informing Bitch." Vox Populi and the Unmaking of the Gin Act of 1736 | JSTOR: Journal of Social History, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Winter, 1999), pp. 299-330
This study examines the interaction between legislation and popular culture, with a particular emphasis on the extent to which popular resistance undermined enforcement of the Gin Act of 1736. It is argued that popular resistance, while significant, had no effect on policy until members of the middle classes intervened in an attempt to restore the social relations that had existed before the Act took effect. It was only at this point that the Act became a dead letter. In this role members of the middle classes functioned as mediators between two cultures, one plebeian, the other patrician. As such, our findings suggest that the dialectic of plebeian culture and patrician culture, as variously articulated by E.P. Thompson, may be excessively stark, especially when applied to a setting as dense and heterogenous as early Hanoverian London. Our findings also suggest that working men and women in the capital worked and socialized side by side, sometimes as drinking companions, and sometimes as professional informers. -- over 100 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  18thC  British_politics  classes  class_conflict  lower_orders  middle_class  elites  public_policy  Parliament  law_enforcement  London  public_disorder  popular_culture  popular_politics  gin_craze  1730s  riots  moral_economy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Julian Hoppit - Political Arithmetic in Eighteenth-Century England | JSTOR: The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 49, No. 3 (Aug., 1996), pp. 516-540
With regard to public policy, in late seventeenth-century Britain there was a remarkable development of social statistics, what Petty called 'political arithmetic'. The general view, however, is that this new approach ended early in the eighteenth century only to be rediscovered by the early Victorian statistical movement. In fact, through the eighteenth century public policy continued to be considered partly in quantitative terms. This article explores some of the dimensions and peculiarities of this varied and extensive political arithmetic. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  political_history  18thC  British_politics  political_arithmetick  UK_economy  UK_Government  Parliament  public_policy  public_opinion  political_press  economic_growth  wages  prices  trade  fiscal_policy  sovereign_debt  fiscal-military_state  taxes  Excise_Crisis  luxury  UK_government-colonies  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Natasha Glaisyer - "A due Circulation in the Veins of the Publick": Imagining Credit in Late 17thC and Early 18thC England | JSTOR: The Eighteenth Century, Vol. 46, No. 3 (FALL 2005), pp. 277-297
Thinks too much has been made of fickle Lady Credit and Pocock's Machiavelli reading of anti commerce. Shows other metaphors, eg circulation of blood, and rich pamphlet literature of proposals for dealing with credit necessary for commercial prosperity as well as state financing - shows people weren't such ninnies as Pocock's version would have it. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  economic_culture  political_economy  17thC  18thC  British_history  sovereign_debt  credit  money_supply  capital_markets  money_market  political_press  public_opinion  public_finance  public_policy  fiscal-military_state  commerce  Pocock  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Ashcraft: Economic Metaphors, Behavioralism, and Political Theory: Some Observations on the Ideological Uses of Language | JSTOR: The Western Political Quarterly, Vol. 30, No. 3 (Sep., 1977), pp. 313-328
Downloaded pdf to Note -- In accordance with certain general principles relating to the study of ideology advanced by Marx and Mannheim, it is argued that a significant group of behavioral political scientists employee the terminology and concepts of neo-classical economics metaphorically as a means of establishing the nature and limits of political theory within the discipline of political science. The postwar development of behavioral political theory, the political reality to which it refers, and the purposes of theorizing are all described, metaphorically, in the language of economics. It is especially in their reliance upon "technical reason," which serves both as a characterization of the dynamics of capitalism as a socioeconomic system and as the framework for political theorizing, that behavioral political scientists have demonstrated the ideological limits of their metaphorical language. To paraphrase Marx, behavioral political science has sought, through its usage of economic metaphors, to transform the problematic features of the social order into "natural, self-understood forms of social life."
article  jstor  20thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_science  rationality-economics  rational_choice  public_choice  public_policy  metaphor  social_sciences-post-WWII  behavioralism  ideology  neoclassical_economics  capitalism  political_economy  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
David Sloan Wilson & John M. Gowdy - Evolution as a general theoretical framework for economics and public policy | Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization 2013
1st lead article to special issue of same title -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Economic and evolutionary thinking have been entwined throughout their histories, but evolutionary theory does not function as a general theoretical framework for economics and public policy, as it does for the biological sciences. In this lead article for a special issue of the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, we first describe how evolution functions as a general theoretical framework in the biological sciences. Then we consider four reasons why evolution might not need to be consulted for human-related subjects such as economics and public policy. We conclude that these reasons can be valid in particular cases, but they fail for any sizeable human-related subject area. Hence evolution can and should become a general theoretical framework for economics and public policy. The other articles in the special issue help to substantiate this claim.
paper  journal  economic_theory  economic_models  public_policy  social_theory  social_sciences  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  evo_psych  institutions  institutional_economics  organizations  evolutionary_biology  biocultural_evolution  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
“Evolution as a General Theoretical Framework for Economics and Public Policy” - Special Issue | Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization | The Evolution Institute 2013
Special issue editors: David Sloan Wilson, John M. Gowdy, J. Barkley Rosser -- This supplementary issue of the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization is based on a collaborative project between the Evolution Institute and the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center that started in 2009 with a NESCent catalysis meeting titled “The Nature of Regulation: How Evolution Can Inform the Regulation of Large-scale Human Social Interactions”. The meeting led to a 2-year project on integrating economic and evolutionary theory. This project used NESCent’s working group rubric to organize three workshops, whose participants were drawn from a larger advisory group. Other outputs of the project include a white paper submitted to the National Science Foundation and a final workshop titled “The Science-to-Narrative Chain”, which examines how to create a new public narrative based on the evolutionary paradigm. Supplemental material can also be found at our online magazine: This View of Life http://www.thisviewoflife.com/
social_sciences  public_policy  economic_theory  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  evo_psych  institutions  institutional_economics  organizations 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Matt Breunig - Toward a New Liberalism, Part II | Demos Dec 2013
Interestingly, the status quo discourse appears to be that trying to work the employer channel is the more hardcore and left-wing strategy. In reality of course, putting everything from health insurance to retirement security to vacations to child leave in the hands of employers just empowers them against workers. If you want to take on the boss, the best way to do that is to have your well-being secured socially, not privately.

Beyond the mainly aesthetic point about what is the most radical thing to do, there is a practical point here as well. In a world of increasing precarity where the one-employer-for-life model is dying or dead, it makes very little sense to run what amounts to social insurance schemes through the employer channel. Basic insurance against hardship is not insurance at all if it comes and goes with employment.
public_policy  liberalism  social_democracy  welfare  social_insurance  Labor_markets  inequality 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
The ideal welfare system is a basic income | Adam Smith Institute Nov 2013
Now showing up in the quasi-libertarian Right -- Like the current benefits system, this would provide a safety net. But ‘benefits traps’, where people lose as much in benefits as they earn from work, would be eliminated. A basic income system like this would be at least as clear as the PAYE income tax system is, and substantially clearer than the current benefits system. The dog’s breakfast of welfare schemes that currently exist – all to address the symptoms of poverty, rather than the root – would be abolished, and with it the jumble of unanticipated and often undiscernable interactions between schemes that lead to perverse outcomes.

Best of all, a basic income is the least paternalistic welfare scheme possible. Instead of pushing would-be computer programmers into work as Poundland assistants, a scheme like this would leave decisions entirely up to the individuals involved. The discovery process that each of us is engaged in would continue, and now without mass decision-making by a central state authority.
21stC  public_policy  welfare  poverty  taxes  safety_net  unemployment  health_care 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Steve Coulter, review - The Third Globalization: Can Wealthy Nations Stay Rich in the Twenty-First Century? Dan Breznitz and John Zysman | Pieria Nov 2013
In The Third Globalization, Dan Breznitz and John Zysman gather leading political economists to assess the prospects for growth and prosperity among advanced industrial nations. The contributors aim to examine the core transformations in the economies of advanced countries, the character of the challenge from emerging economies, and the varied policy responses of the advanced countries. This is a consistently well written and tightly organised book with policy-maker appeal, writes Steve Coulter.
The Third Globalization: Can Wealthy Nations Stay Rich in the Twenty-First Century? Dan Breznitz and John Zysman. Oxford University Press. March 2013.
books  reviews  international_political_economy  OECD_economies  competition  emerging_markets  public_policy  economic_growth  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Markets in a State? The Social Market Foundation at 21 - 2011 Report
The Social Market Foundation was founded in late 1989, as state socialism collapsed in Europe. Today, a global economic crisis has brought us to another fork in the road. We face economic stagnation and a heavy burden of government debt. The consequences of the crash will reverberate for years to come and the relationship between the state and the market will inevitably be redefined. But how?

Social market thinking can guide us on the uncertain road ahead. To mark its 21st year, the Social Market Foundation commissioned essays by leading politicians, academics and journalists on social market policy in a period of sustained economic crisis. In this wide-ranging collection, Mary Ann Sieghart, Ian Mulheirn, Philip Collins, David Lipsey, David Owen, Peter Lilley, Robert Skidelsky, Dieter Helm and John Kay suggest how the boundaries between the state and the market should be redrawn.

Downloaded pdf to Note
political_economy  21stC  capitalism  public_policy  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little - Understanding Society: Contingent historical development - Dec 2008
The ways in which the railroads and their technologies were regulated and encouraged were very different in the three countries, and the eventual rail networks had very different properties in the three countries. The question for explanation is this: can we explain the differences in these three national experiences on the basis of some small set of structural or cultural differences that existed among the three countries and that causally explain the resulting differences in build-out, structure, and technical frameworks? Or, possibly, are the three historical experiences different simply because of the occurrence of a large but cumulative number of unimportant and non-systemic events?

These are the questions that historical sociologist Frank Dobbin poses in his book, Forging Industrial Policy: The United States, Britain, and France in the Railway Age. He argues that there were significantly different cultures of political and industrial policy in the three countries that led to substantial differences in the ways in which government and business interacted in the development of the railroads.
books  kindle-available  reviews  economic_history  economic_sociology  political_economy  economic_culture  19thC  British_history  US_history  France  infrastructure  development  public_policy 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff - C. Wright Mills, Floyd Hunter, and 50 Years of Power Structure Research | Who Rules America
C. Wright Mills, Floyd Hunter, and 50 Years of Power Structure Research
by G. William Domhoff
Keynote address to the Michigan Sociological Association, 2006

NOTE: This document is an extended version of "C. Wright Mills, Power Structure Research, And The Failures of Mainstream Political Science," but without the critique of mainstream political science. Instead, it includes more historical background on power structure research, a more detailed critique of pluralism, and a critique of structural Marxists. It is actually a lightly edited and extended reprint of a journal article with the following citation:

Domhoff, G. William. 2007. "C. Wright Mills, Floyd Hunter, and 50 Years of Power Structure Research." Michigan Sociological Review 21:1-54.
social_theory  US_history  US_economy  US_politics  power  elites  parties  US_politics-race  post-WWII  labor  Labor_markets  public_policy  right-wing  New_Left  New_Deal  neoliberalism  social_sciences-post-WWII  sociology  politics-and-money  elections  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff - Interlocking Directorates in the Corporate Community (updated October 2013) | Who Rules America
Describes concepts and research methods for identifying interlocking governance and ownership relations in the corporate community -- used in the new study (separate bookmark) - Interlocks and Interactions Among the Power Elite: The Corporate Community, Think Tanks, Policy-Discussion Groups, and Government by G. William Domhoff, Clifford Staples, & Adam Schneider - August 2013
US_economy  global_economy  business  corporate_governance  power  elites  public_policy  networks  1-percent  NGOs  nonprofit  databases  methodology  social_capital  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff, Clifford Staples, & Adam Schneider: Interlocks and Interactions Among the Power Elite | Who Rules America August 2013
Interlocks and Interactions Among the Power Elite: The Corporate Community, Think Tanks, Policy-Discussion Groups, and Government
by G. William Domhoff, Clifford Staples, & Adam Schneider

This document presents new findings about the American power structure based on the connections among 2,563 corporations, 6 business leadership and policy-discussion groups, 33 prominent think tanks, 82 major foundations, 47 private universities with large endowments, and 19 White House advisory committees for the years 2011-2012. In all, the database used for our study contains 2,750 separate organizations and 9,121 individuals.

It may be the largest and most extensive data set ever assembled for the United States that includes for-profit, nonprofit, and governmental organizations. 35.2% of the individuals in our database have connections to at least two of the organizations in the database.
US_politics  US_economy  US_government  power  elites  political_culture  public_policy  NGOs  university  nonprofit  business  lobbying  corporate_governance  capitalism  classes  networks  inequality  1-percent  databases  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff - Basics of Studying Power (2005)| Who Rules America
Intro to the "power research" section of Domhoff website Who Rules America - Nice overview of the methods used to infer the presence of various dimensions of "power" - he adopts Mann's 4 networks theory as orientation for his class dominance approach to modern societies - bibliography
social_theory  methodology  power  elites  networks  public_policy  classes  capitalism  politics-and-money  historical_sociology  bibliography  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
What Gets Measured in Education - Alan Kantrow - Harvard Business Review
The Obama Administration in the U.S., for instance, plans to create a new performance-based rating system with teeth. In future, it says, resources will flow only where tangible student-focused outcomes justify their deployment. Those outcomes will be, most likely, improved retention and graduation rates; fewer wasted credits; lower student debt-burdens; easier access to financial support; greater efficiency estimated by linking progress to degrees and demonstrations of competency, not to credit hours or seat times; more students hired within a reasonable period after graduation; higher salary levels for them; and so on. But these are not measures of educational performance; these measure only the efficiency of the educational process. Meanwhile, two great ironies are unfolding. One, while the accuracy of traditional grading stagnates, the ability to carry out true learning-related assessments has advanced with lightning speed. Two, this is also a time when corporations and executives can help create the outcomes they desire as long as they don’t focus only on helping colleges to boost process efficiency or re-shape curriculums. The corporate world knows a lot about how to evaluate the kinds of learning that matter to it.
US_society  education  public_policy  university 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Patrick Meagher: Enabling Environments For Microfinance: A Concept Note (2010) | FSA (Financial Services Assessments in the Developing World)
FSA is at U of Michigan funded by Gates -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The microfinance innovations are within the control of the grantee organizations. They are the primary subject of the empirical studies being carried out by the IRIS Center and Microfinance Opportunities under the rubric, "Assessing the Impact of Innovation Grants in Financial Services." Those innovations are not, however, the main focus of this note. Rather, we focus on the second group of elements listed, those usually described as the enabling environment (EE). Just as critical, we must carefully delimit what we study when we consider the EE. It is neither the environment as a whole nor the innovation itself, but the instruments such as policies and organizations that the public or the financial sector establishes to create a stable basis for action. (In terms of our farming metaphor, the EE constituted by a society corresponds to the techniques used by the farmer.)
microfinance  development  public_policy  financial_system  financial_regulation  banking  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little - Understanding Society: Ian Hacking on chance as worldview | Sept 1, 2013
Very nice look at Hacking's contributions to philosophy of science, including where he fits with Kuhn and Foucault. -- Ian Hacking was one of the more innovative and adventurous philosophers to take up the philosophy of science as their field of inquiry. The Taming of Chance (1990) is a genuinely fascinating treatment of the subject of the emergence of the idea of populations of events rather than discrete individuals. Together with The Emergence of Probability: A Philosophical Study of Early Ideas about Probability, Induction and Statistical Inference (1975; 2nd ed. 2006), the two books represent a very original contribution to an important aspect of modern ways of thinking: the ways in which the human sciences and the public came to think differently about the nature of social and biological reality.
philosophy_of_science  history_of_science  probability  17thC  18thC  19thC  population  public_policy  biology  medicine  public_health  statistics  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
James L. Webb: Dewey: Back to the Future (2002)
JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Dec., 2002), pp. 981-1003 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see also later issue with discussion in 2 comments between Webb and commentor on whether this is substantive or terminology debate
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  institutional_economics  pragmatism  instrumentalist  technology  science  public_sphere  public_opinion  democracy  public_policy  Dewey  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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