dunnettreader + propaganda   26

The Crypto-Keepers | Yasha Levine
It’s 7:30 p.m. on a Monday in June at an undisclosed location somewhere in northern Europe. I’m sitting in a private dining room in an upscale hotel, talking to…
Evernote  military-intel-industrial_complex  democracy_promotion  State_Dept  intelligence_agencies  social_media  cybersecurity  privacy  investment-government  R&D  propaganda  cryptography  free_speech  leaks  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Div Levin - When Great Powers Get a Vote - International Studies Quarterly - 2016
What are the electoral consequences of attempts by great powers to intervene in a partisan manner in another country’s elections? Great powers frequently deploy partisan electoral interventions as a major foreign policy tool. For example, the U.S. and the USSR/Russia have intervened in one of every nine competitive national level executive elections between 1946 and 2000. However, scant scholarly research has been conducted about their effects on the election results in the target. I argue that such interventions usually significantly increase the electoral chances of the aided candidate and that overt interventions are more effective than covert interventions. I then test these hypotheses utilizing a new, original dataset of all U.S. and USSR/Russian partisan electoral interventions between 1946 and 2000. I find strong support for both arguments.
US_foreign_policy  downloaded  propaganda  soft_power  power  article  post-Cold_War  Cold_War  elections  influence-IR  Grear_Powers  intervention  IR-domestic_politics 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Marion Brétéché - Les compagnons de Mercure: Journalisme et politique dans l'Europe de Louis XIV, 1680-1720 (2015) | Champ-Vallon
360 pages, - ISBN 979.10.267.0022.7, 27 euros -- Dans l’Europe intolérante du 18thC, la Hollande fait figure d’exception. C’est là, précisément, qu’est né, à la fin des 1680s, le journalisme politique d’analyse et d’opinion. Afin de rendre compte de l’« art de gouverner et de policer les États » (Furetière), afin de révéler au grand jour ce que les autorités politiques cachent ou taisent, comment des hommes sont-ils parvenus à faire de l’actualité leur profession ? M. Brétéché reconstitue toutes les dimensions de l’activité d’une douzaine de professionnels de l’information, pour la plupart des exilés huguenots, et explore les conditions d’apparition dans les Provinces-Unies de la première presse politique, libre et critique, en langue française. Devenus auteurs en Hollande, ils furent aussi des informateurs au service des puissants : ils nous permettent de saisir dans leur diversité l’inventivité des pratiques manuscrites et imprimées de publication des nouvelles au tournant du Grand Siècle et du Siècle des Lumières. (..) cet ouvrage retrace la rencontre entre un marché de l’information en plein essor, toujours plus avide de nouvelles fraîches, et les politiques de communication des gouvernements, partagés entre la publicité de leur action et les arcana imperii nécessaires à l’exercice du pouvoir. À la croisée de l’histoire sociale du journalisme et de l’histoire politique des médias, est retracé ici un épisode aussi essentiel que méconnu de l’histoire de l’information, qui manifeste déjà la tension entre contrainte et autonomie, entre censure et liberté d’expression. -- Marion Brétéché, agrégée et docteur en histoire, est chercheur associé au Centre Roland Mousnier (Paris Sorbonne – CNRS) et au GRIHL (Groupe de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur l’Histoire du Littéraire – EHESS).
find  media  Nine_Years_War  books  arcana_imperii  17thC  newspapers  censorship  Revocation_of_Edict_of_Nantes  France  information-markets  information-intermediaries  -opinion  government-public_communication  spying  circulation-ideas  secrecy  newsletter  news  journalists  amazon.fr  patronage  propaganda  public_policy  Dutch  political_discourse  Huguenots  literary_history  political_press  cultural_history  circulation-news  social_history  War_of_Spanish_Succession  journalism  libraries 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Schaich, ed. - Monarchy and Religion: The Transformation of Royal Culture in 18thC Europe (2007) - Oxford University Press
OUP/German Historical Institute London Studies of the German Historical Institute London -- 509 pages | 978-0-19-921472-3 | Hardback | This collection of essays is a pioneering survey of the spiritual dimensions of kingship in 18thC Europe. It investigates the role of clergymen in the mechanics of the court, the religious observances of monarchs and their entourages, and the importance of religious images and ceremonial in underpinning royal power. The volume compares the British, French, Russian, and some of the German monarchies in order to allow comparisons to be drawn between different national and especially confessional settings. Based on original research and new source material, the 15 essays by established scholars chart mostly unknown territory. Previous research on the subject has focused on the 16thC and 17thC at the expense of the age of Enlightenment which has widely been regarded as a period of desacralization of monarchy. The essays open up new perspectives on the function of court clerics, conspicuous and internalized forms of aulic devotion, the gendered framing of religion, the purpose of court ritual, and the divide between the public and private spheres of monarchy. Overall the essays maintain that despite the gradual decline of monarchy by divine right, religion still permeated almost all aspects of court life and monarchical representation. The volume thus challenges received wisdom about the disenchantment of kingship and the rise of more rationalized forms of absolutist government during the period between c.1688 and 1789. -- surprise, surprise, leads off with an "ancien régime" essay by JCD Clark
books  cultural_history  religious_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Ancien_régime  secularization  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Absolutism  divine_right  court_culture  authority  cultural_authority  cultural_change  gender  religion-established  gender-and-religion  British_history  Glorious_Revolution  Jacobites  courtiers  Jacobite_court  propaganda  art_history  patronage-artistic  William_III  Queen_Anne  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  royal_families  société_des_princes  kingship  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  Louis_XVI  France  Russia  Holy_Roman_Empire  Catherine_the_Great  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Austria  Spain  ritual 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott McConnell - How the GOP Became the Israel Party | The American Conservative - April 2015
He sees it as a long march of the neocons through the GOP-oriented institutions, with The Weekly Standard playing a key role as ideological enforcer from the 1990s (post GHW Bush administration). He recounts how National Review and figures like Buchanan and Novak had an audience for nationalist-based scepticism of lockstep support for Israeli policies, and that Murdoch and the Kristol folks succeeded in making those positions unspeakable within Beltway-accepted polite discourse on the right -- clearly one reason why he helped found AmCon, since NR caved to the neocons and became ideological enforcers themselves. He doesn't see the Christian Zionist support as suddenly becoming more vocal, rabid or effective at enforcing single-issue discipline -- if anything, the Evangelicals are seeing fissures as the Israeli bombing campaigns, settler intransigence, and the reality of occupation has become visible to more Americans. The SCOTUS-authorized tsunami of money into US politics from ultra Likudnik billionaires is a factor, but its effect has been more the final cementing of uniform ultra-rightwing Israeli support from all corners of the GOP -- no one who wants to run for office on the national level as a Republican can even contemplate the least bit of daylight from the Israeli far right. And there aren't any important policy players on the right who have staked out "moderate" pro Israel positions who could create credible space for a GOP politician to take a position to the left of Bibi. The decades of investment in think tanks and Middle East policy shops promoted by the neocons and their affiliated deep-pocket funders made the career opportunities for GOP-leaning foreign policy types nearly exclusively on the far right, and 9/11 and the Iraq war created an enormous further expansion of energy, ideological discipline and funding. Leaving few alternatives for up and coming careerists and politicians.
US_politics  US_foreign_policy  GOP  neoconservatism  political_press  propaganda  politics-and-money  Israel  right-wing  Evangelical  Zionist  millennarian  Islamophobia  Likud  Iran  diplomacy  arms_control 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
David A. Bell, review essay on Antoine Lilti's new study of The Invention of Celebrity, 1750-1850 - Books & ideas
David A. Bell, « The Fault is Not in Our "Stars", but in Ourselves », Books and Ideas, 8 January 2015. ISSN : 2105-3030. URL : http://www.booksandideas.net/The-Fault-is-Not-in-Our-Stars-but-in-Ourselves.html -- Reviewed: Antoine Lilti, Figures publiques. L’invention de la célébrité, 1750-1850, [Public Figures. The Invention of Celebrity, 1750-1850]. Paris, Fayard, 2014. -- Before we start to lament the triumph of celebrity culture over the most basic civic literacy, we might ask if things were truly better in the past. Antoine Lilti’s brilliant book shows that modern celebrity culture had its origins in the age of revolutions, when selfhood and personal authenticity emerged as new notions.
books  reviews  social_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  France  public_sphere  celebrity  self  authenticity  Rousseau  Napoleon  propaganda  biography-writing 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hopper (lecture transcript) - Turncoats and Renegadoes in the English Civil Wars (2011) | National Army Museum (UK) - Lunchtime Lectures
Recorded on 22 September 2011 (transcript updated 2013) -- Dr Andrew Hopper, Lecturer in English Local History at the University of Leicester, discusses the practice of side changing and the role of treachery and traitors during the English Civil Wars -- gave the lecture a couple of weeks before he finished his Oxford University Press book of the same name -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  lecture  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Dr Elliot Vernon, review essay - Andrew Hopper, Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars | Reviews in History (Nov 2013)
Turncoats and Renegadoes: Changing Sides during the English Civil Wars - Oxford University Press, 2012, hardback ISBN: 9780199575855; 272pp.; - paperback 2014 - as of Jan 2015 no ebook -- 1st rate review essay, and looks like fascinating book that will be useful for notions of "treason" and, during and after "regime change", factional abuse of legal process against their opponents by tarring them with turncoat accusations - not just revolutions (English_Civil_War, French_Revolution, Russian Revolution) but also Glorious Revolution, Hanoverian Succession -- see also Pinboard bookmark for the lecture Hopper gave on the topic in 2011 at the National Army Museum -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  find  buy  libraries  political_history  political_culture  legal_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Parliamentarians  Royalists  Charles_I  treason  faction  propaganda  aristocracy  gentry  Warwick_Earl_of  Holland_Earl_of  Bolingbroke-family  turncoat  New_Model_Army  Rump_Parliament  property-confiscations  revolutions  honor  reputation  Interregnum  elite_culture  state-of-exception  cultural_history  Europe-Early_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Re-Reading My Weblog: March 2005
DeLong links to 2005 posts and papers showing that by 2005 it was already becoming clear there were no potential GOP partners for any sensible compromise fiscal and monrtary policies - the "thought leaders" on the Right, including folks like Mankiew, had all descended into pure hackery. The Social Security "privatization" scheme was a simple attempted bamboozle on behalf if Eall Street wjich ess drooling at the thought of fres for managing all those forced savings accounts. DeLong along with Krugman did a paper in asset prices and growth rates that illustrated what a ripoff the GOP plan from the Bush Admin would be. And that was just one smong a number of 2005 episodes that DeLong's posts exposed. Key is that the posts are contemporaneous, nt benefiting from hindsight after the 2008 crash.
US_politics  US_economy  bad_economics  links  GOP  21stC  propaganda 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Laura Lunger Knoppers, review - Derek Hirst, Richard Strier eds, Writing and Political Engagement in 17thC England; Brendan Dooley, Sabrina Baron, eds, The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR: Renaissance Quarterly, Vol. 56, No. 1 (Spri
Review gives a thumbnail of each contribution to the 2 collections. In the Hirst book his chapter on Marvell's satire of Mr. Bays looks particularly interesting, also a chapter on Algernon Sidney and his attack on Filmer. The information book looks more "ground breaking" studying the pattern across the 17thC of how people in England got news and where print comes in, the continuing life of manuscript newsletters, etc. The latter part of the book has chapters on a number of Continental polities (including Venice, Dutch Republic, Spain), highlighting major periods of development and comparing with the English pattern. -- worth hunting down in a library though since it's from 1999 a lot more news and information studies have been published, so it may be a bit dated -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  find  libraries  cultural_history  social_history  literary_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  newspapers  news  political_press  propaganda  censorship  readership  public_opinion  Venice  Dutch  Spain  espionage  diplomacy  diplomats  intelligence_agencies  poetry  Marvell  Sidney_Algernon  Filmer  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Joad Raymond - Framing Libery: Marvell's "First Anniversary" and the Instrument of Government | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 313-350
1st Anniversary has been treated as the middle poem in a triptych of Marvell's poems on Cromwell. What Marvell's doing in this poem has been the subject of an extreme variety of interpretations, and the structure criticized as fragmented or reflecting the awkwardness of Marvell's political commitments in an environment in flux, the demands of propaganda, or panageric tainted by patronage. Raymond sees the poem as focused not on Cromwell but on the 1st anniversary of the Instrument of Government. The positions of Cromwell in the poem represent tensions between the logic of the Instrument to shape governmental action and political behavior and conflict vs the outsized person of Cromwell, whose manner of governing and leadership both made the success of the Instrument more likely yet threatened the core logic of the Instrument. He extensively tracks the specific debates in 1654, including ephemeral publications of propaganda and controversy, arguing that one reason later readers don't follow Marvell's structure and argument is that, beyond failing to understand the subject is the constitution, Marvell is engaging in specific contemporary arguments and the language in which they were then framed, which are unfamiliar to later readers. He looks at positions that would later become identified with The Good Old Cause and Commonwealthmen, and Harringtinian republicanism. Interesting bibliography Raymond in recent books has been specializing in the development and changes in 17thC print culture(s) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Interregnum  Restoration  publishing  propaganda  pamphlets  politics-and-literature  political_press  Marvell  Cromwell  government-forms  English_constitution  Harrington  Nedham  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
March 2011: The Rise and Fall of Neoconservatism - C. Bradley Thompson, Lead Essay | Cato Unbound
Lead Essay -- Neoconservatism Unmasked by C. Bradley Thompson -- Neoconservative intellectuals often describe themselves as having a particular mode of thinking — maybe even just a “mood.” C. Bradley Thompson argues that neoconservatism is much more than that. Its key philosophical inspiration of comes from Irving Kristol, and particularly from Kristol’s engagement with the philosopher Leo Strauss. Thompson argues that, under Straussian influence, neoconservatives champion the rule of a philosophically cunning elite over a population that will never be able to understand their intellectual masters. Instead, the populace is steered toward self-sacrifice, war, and nationalism — as well as a set of religious and moral beliefs that the elites in no way share. Such a doctrine, Thompson charges, points disturbingly toward fascism.
intellectual_history  political_philosophy  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  Germany  Nazis  fascism  liberalism  Strauss  Straussians  neoconservatism  US_politics  Plato-Republic  elites  esotericism  Heidegger  US_history  democracy  relativism  politics-and-religion  nihilism  mass_culture  political_participation  propaganda 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Oxford Companion to Military History, ed. Richard Holmes: | Answers.com
The Oxford Companion to Military History, edited by Richard Holmes, Oxford University Press -- A complete overview of military history from classical times to the present, The Oxford Companion to Military History is an essential guide to how the world has been shaped by conflict. Entries on key topics such as intelligence, propaganda, peacekeeping and women in the military, are included, with over 70 maps showing the course of famous battles and campaigns.
books  etexts  military_history  military  war  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  propaganda  maritime_history  IR 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
LLOYD BOWEN -- ROYALISM, PRINT, AND THE CLERGY IN BRITAIN, 1639–1640 AND 1642. (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 297-319. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
LLOYD BOWEN - University of Cardiff -- Charles I and his clerical supporters are often said to have been wary of print and public discussion, only entering the public sphere reluctantly and to comparatively little effect during the political crisis of 1642. This article challenges such views by focusing on the neglected role of official forms of print such as proclamations, declarations, and state prayers and their promulgation in the nation's churches. It traces the ways in which the king utilized the network of parish clergy to broadcast his message and mobilize support during the Scottish crisis of 1639–40 and again in the ‘paper war’ of 1642. The article argues that traditional forms of printed address retained their potency and influence despite the proliferation of polemical pamphlets and newsbooks. The significance of these mobilizations is demonstrated by the profound disquiet they caused among the king's Covenanter and parliamentarian opponents as well as the ‘good effects’ they had in generating support for the royalist cause. -* I am most grateful to Mark Stoyle, Mark Kishlansky, John Walter, Jacqueline Eales, and the anonymous reviewers for comments on earlier drafts of this article. -- available for download
article  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Charles_I  propaganda  monarchy  Church_of_England  clergy  parish  politics-and-religion  political_culture  public_opinion  religious_culture  authority  political_order  publishing  pamphlets  political_press  prayers-state  religion-established  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Izabella Kaminska - The Bitcoin personality cult lives on | FT Alphaville Feb 2014
Izzy being brilliant as usual -- In our minds, no product is more important than ourselves. And that’s because the ultimate reward of propaganda, if used wisely, is the sort of hierarchal positioning that was previously only ever associated with dictator-level personality cults.-- As Caesar and Augustus knew only too well, a personality cult will never successfully penetrate public minds if it is too focused on itself. Conversely it needs to be masterfully disassociated from self promotion, and re-associated with altruistic value, humour, or benevolence. In Caesar and Augustus’ case it was only through publicly rejecting kingly power, that they were able to create a much more powerful empirical office to replace it. A masterful slight of hand and example of misdirection. -- The distribution of highly doctored selfies eventually begins to nauseate. No-one likes a narcissist or a megalomaniac. Meanwhile, too much association with high-end products or exclusivity meanwhile backfires with the “Rich Kids of Instagram” effect. Today’s most effective propaganda consequently is the sort that inspires people to care about things other than themselves. It’s not aspirational as much as experience or ideology based.
consumerism  consumers  Internet  social_media  propaganda  rhetoric  ideology  libertarianism  self-regulation  Augustan_Rome  status  self-love  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Your Evening Jemmy - National Gazette, February 20, 1792 | Esquire
A government operating by corrupt influence, substituting the motive of private interest in place of public duty; converting its pecuniary dispensations into bounties to favorites, or bribes to opponents; accommodating its measures to the avidity of a part of the nation instead of the benefit of the whole; in a word, enlisting an army of interested partizans, whose tongues, whose pens, whose intrigues, and whose active combinations, by supplying the terror of the sword, may support a real domination of the few, under an apparent liberty of the many. Such a government, wherever to be found, is an imposter.
-- James Madison, National Gazette, February 20, 1792
quote  Madison  corruption  partisanship  parties  common_good  propaganda 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
David Randall, review essay - Recent Studies in Print Culture: News, Propaganda, and Ephemera | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 67, No. 3 (September 2004), pp. 457-472
In “Recent Studies in Print Culture: News, Propaganda, and Ephemera,” David Randall reviews several monographs and essays concerning aspects of print culture in early modern Britain. These include (1) Paul J. Voss, Elizabethan News Pamphlets: Shakespeare, Spenser, Marlowe, and the Birth of Journalism (Pittsburgh, 2001); (2) three essays by Sabrina Baron, Michael Mendle, and Daniel Woolf in Brendan Dooley and Sabrina Baron, eds., The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe (London and New York, 2001); (3) Jason Peacey, Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum (Aldershot, U.K., 2004); and (4) Joad Raymond, Pamphlets and Pamphleteering in Early Modern Britain (Cambridge, 2003). As the review shows, scholars of ephemeral print culture disagree as to just why this material should be studied, and they have come up with different reasons, asked different questions, and therefore developed very different ways of organizing and interpreting printed ephemera. -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  16thC  17thC  British_history  English_lit  publishing  pamphlets  political_press  political_culture  propaganda  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Shakespeare  Elizabethan  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kate Loveman, review essay - Political Information in the Seventeenth Century | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 555-565
(1) Reading, Society and Politics in Early Modern England by Kevin Sharpe; Steven N. Zwicker; (2) The Politics of Information in Early Modern Europe by Brendan Dooley; Sabrina A. Baron; (3) Literature, Satire and the Early Stuart State by Andrew McRae; (4) The Writing of Royalism, 1628-1660 by Robert Wilcher; (5) Politicians and Pamphleteers: Propaganda during the English Civil Wars and Interregnum by Jason Peacey; (6)The Ingenious Mr. Henry Care, Restoration Publicist by Lois G. Schwoerer -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  censorship  reader_response  readership  reading  propaganda  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Interregnum  English_lit  satire  pamphlets  Grub_Street  history_of_book  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Darrick N. Taylor -thesis - L'Estrange His Life: Public and Persona in the Life and Career of Sir Roger L'Estrange, 1616-1704 (2011)
KU ScholarWorks: Authors: Taylor, Darrick N. Advisors: Clark, Jonathan C.D. .....Downloaded pdf to Note..... The subject of this dissertation is the life and career of Roger L'Estrange, who was a licenser of Books and Surveyor of the Press for Charles II, as well as a royalist pamphleteer. It seeks to answer the question of how conceptions of public and private changed in late seventeenth century England be examining the career of L'Estrange, which involved him in many of the major pamphlet campaigns of the Restoration period. It argues that there was no stable "public sphere" in seventeenth century England, one that clearly marked it off from a private sphere of domesticity. It argues that the classical notion of office, in which reciprocal obligation and duty were paramount, was the basic presupposition of public but also private life, and that the very ubiquity of ideals of office holding made it semantically impossible to distinguish a stable public realm from a private one. Furthermore, the dissertation also argues that the presupposition of officium not only provided the basis for understanding relationships between persons but also of individual identity in seventeenth century England. It argues that L'Estrange saw his own identity in terms of the offices he performed, and that his individual identity was shaped by the antique notion of persona--of a mask that one wears, when performing a role--than to modern notions of individual identity. Lastly, it will argue that people in seventeenth century England still understood their world in terms of offices, but that changes in the way they understood office, visible in L'Estrange's writings, helped prepare the way for the reception of more modern ideas about public and private spheres that would eventually come to fruition in the nineteenth century.
thesis  cultural_history  political_history  political_culture  17thC  Britain  British_politics  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Glorious_Revolution  1680s  1690s  1700s  L'Estrange  Charles_II  James_II  Whigs  Tories  political_press  pamphlets  censorship  propaganda  politics-and-religion  public_sphere  office  persona  identity  self  obligation  moral_philosophy  domesticity  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Yannick Deschamps- Daniel Defoe’s Contribution to the Dispute over Occasional Conformity: An Insight into Dissent and “Moderation” in the Early Eighteenth Century (2013) - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Project MUSE - Yannick Deschamps. "Daniel Defoe’s Contribution to the Dispute over Occasional Conformity: An Insight into Dissent and “Moderation” in the Early Eighteenth Century."Eighteenth-Century Studies 46.3 (2013): 349-361
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  18thC  1700s  Harley  Defoe  political_press  propaganda  politics-and-religion  dissenters  Parliament  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Catherine Tinsley Tuell: "By His Majestie's Special Command": William III and Uncommon Prayer - thesis 2011 - Udini
William III ascended to the throne of England in 1689 following his military intervention in support of the erstwhile claim to the throne by his wife (Mary II) as a replacement for the sitting Roman Catholic king, who was also her father James II. During the ideological and theological conflict that followed William's invited invasion, public worship and public prayer in the Church of England was used by Williamite propagandists to promote and legitimize a monarchy that re-fashioned the concept of a sovereign who ruled by divine right in spite of Parliament into one where the sovereign's divine right was determined by Parliament. Using what I term "uncommon prayer" as supplements to the liturgy of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer , church divines promoted the political agenda and ideology of the Williamite regime. Most often crafted for use on royally designated days of national fasting or thanksgiving, these occasional Forms of Prayer required the active participation of all of their Majesties' subjects during public worship. Satirical balladry during the Irish conflict with James II lampooning the royal proclamation for public fasting and uncommon prayer confirms their Majesties' adversaries recognized the effectiveness of the royal polemical campaign conducted by and through the church. The examination of uncommon prayers reveals that the revolutionary government used language familiar to the people in radically new ways to justify the invasion by a foreign prince, the forced "abdication" of a sitting monarch, and a re-shaping of not only the monarchy, but the Church of England and Parliament. It defined the role of William as the instrument of God's divine providence and emphasized the responsibility of the people for the nation's misfortunes because of their individual and collective sin. The sustained use of uncommon or occasional prayer throughout the years of the Williamite monarchy (1689-1702) to bring before the people the royal agenda attests to the vitality of public worship, the perceived efficacy of public prayer, and the importance of the Church of England on the social and political landscape of late-seventeenth century England.
thesis  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Ireland  Glorious_Revolution  propaganda  William_III  Providence  Church_of_England  religious_history  religious_culture  political_culture  Jacobites  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Simon Wren-Lewis - mainly macro: Must we live with a post-truth media? June 2013
So the idea that the last Labour government seriously mismanaged the nation’s finances is a myth. What is more, unlike older myths like the earth is flat, as these charts show it is not something that is generated by perception and which requires expertise to unravel.

Of course you could say that the Great Recession was the government’s fault. It should have foreseen the financial crisis coming. It should have known that levels of GDP in 2007 were going to be interpreted, five years later, as a massive economic boom rather than as they appeared at the time as something close to trend. It should have known this, despite the advice it was getting to the contrary from the Bank of England, the IMF, OECD, most economists …. and Her Majesty’s opposition! You can take that idealist view - but not if you were agreeing with all this advice at the time.

Now we all know who manufactured the myth. Yet I think most people believe that if a political party started telling a story that was clearly at variance with the facts, it would be found out. In short, people expect journalists and economic commentators to confront politicians who attempt to create and perpetuate myths. In this case they did not. Its also pretty obvious why they did not. The incentive for organisations like the BBC is to stay out of trouble.

So it really is the duty of academics to speak to truth, as loudly as they can, when it is being ignored by the media. On this topic, the media in general and the BBC in particular have been hopelessly biased in allowing the government to get away with this myth. They have some serious explaining to do
UK_politics  political_culture  political_press  UK_economy  economic_history  bad_journalism  propaganda 
june 2013 by dunnettreader

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