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Bibliographical Aspects of the Acts and Monuments - Julian Roberts & Elizabeth Evenden | The Acts and Monuments Online
Bibliographical Aspects of the Acts and Monuments
by Julian Roberts and Elizabeth Evenden
This section is concerned less with the editorial problems posed by the Acts and Monuments than with what happened to the masses of manuscript and print which John Foxe brought, at approximately seven year intervals into the printing house of John Day in Aldersgate. (...) The kind of material which Foxe produced, how much of it was in the hands of his various transcribers, how much in the form of letters by or about the principal actors, and how much in his own hand, is a matter for editors and other analysts to determine. Here we can only offer some clues as to how that material was mediated by the printer, in the light of the known practices of an Elizabethan printing house. This knowledge has hitherto been only partial, and partly reconstructed from the descriptions of Joseph Moxon a century later, but it has been considerably augmented in the course of the present study.
Evernote  16thC  British_history  Protestants  Reformation  printing  print_culture  history_of_book 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
John Foxe - The Acts and Monuments Online | johnfoxe.org
Welcome to The Acts and Monuments Online [TAMO], John Foxe’s protestant martyrology. You can browse and compare the unabridged texts of the four editions of this massive work published in John Foxe’s lifetime (1563, 1570, 1576, 1583). Each edition changed significantly as Foxe sought to incorporate new material, answer his critics, and adjust its polemical force to the needs of the moment. You can search and view modern transcriptions that keep as close as possible to the original texts. You can identify the individuals and places that are mentioned in the text. You can explore the latest scholarship to understand the sources upon which it was based, and the purposes for which they were deployed. Facsimiles of all the woodcut illustrations in the text can be viewed along with commentaries. Significant passages in Latin and Greek are translated. TAMO is both an instrument of scholarship and a tool for anyone who wants to explore this remarkable work, a milestone in the history of the English printed book and a signal achievement of its printer, John Day.
website  16thC  British_history  Reformation  printing  Protestants  Protestant_International  Foxe-Book_of_Martyrs  etexts 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Folgerpedia - Folger Shakespeare Library
Founded on 9 July 2014, Folgerpedia is the Folger Shakespeare Library's collaboratively-edited, search-based encyclopedia of all things "Folger." Content of the articles has been contributed by various departments within the institution, as well as Folger readers and other scholars. The articles address each topic as it relates to the Folger and the Folger collection. There is a variety of article types that can be found on Folgerpedia, including: lists; how tos; and encyclopedic entries concerning items in the collection, Shakespeare's works and characters, and his works in performance.

To read more about Folgerpedia, check out the Folger research blog, The Collation.
Reformation  Tudor  stagecraft  printing  political_culture  Italian_lit  English-language  English_lit  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_culture  Shakespeare  James_I  theater  Renaissance  digital_humanities  history_of_book  intellectual_history  British_history  publishing  plays  website  literary_language  cultural_history  actors  London  event  playwrights  Latin_lit  politics-and-literature  Elizabeth 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Jürgen Habermas interviewed by Markus Schwering - Essays: Internet and Public Sphere What the Web Can't Do | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 24 July 2014
"After the inventions of writing and printing, digital communication represents the third great innovation on the media plane. With their introduction, these three media forms have enabled an ever growing number of people to access an ever growing mass of information. These are made to be increasingly lasting, more easily. With the last step represented by Internet we are confronted with a sort of “activation” in which readers themselves become authors. Yet, this in itself does not automatically result in progress on the level of the public sphere. [...] The classical public sphere stemmed from the fact that the attention of an anonymous public was “concentrated” on a few politically important questions that had to be regulated. This is what the web does not know how to produce. On the contrary, the web actually distracts and dispels." This is how, among many more subjects, Jürgen Habermas comments the evolution of democratic participation in the internet era. Reset-DoC is pleased to republish the translated version of a long interview published last June on the "Frankfurter Rundschau" for the philosopher's eighty-fifth birthday. -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  public_sphere  information-intermediaries  printing  print_culture  Internet  communication  community-virtual  media  political_culture  political_participation  political_press  Habermas  post-secular  cultural_history  cultural_change  networks-information  networks-political  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Bernard, ed. - The Literary Correspondences of the Tonsons - Oxford University Press
The Tonsons were the pre-eminent literary publishers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. It is difficult to estimate their contribution to the formation of English literature accurately. Nevertheless, it is clear that they carried Shakespeare into the eighteenth century and started the practice of modern editing of him. Without Rowe's life and without the Pope-Theobald controversy, the history of Shakespeare studies would have been different, perhaps much less illustrious. The same is true of Milton, a figure who through his political sympathies was in disrepute, but on whom Jacob Tonson the elder (and his nephew after him) decided to lavish the care, eventually including illustration and annotation, usually reserved for the classics. Later they issued an edition of Spenser by John Hughes, thus creating the triumvirate who for many years were to dominate the study of English renaissance literature. It is not unreasonable to claim that the house of Tonson invented English literature as matter for repeated reading and study. In addition, of course, the Tonsons were Dryden's main publisher, the first to publish Pope, and the consistent supporters of Addison and Steele and their early periodicals, while Jacob Tonson the elder had earlier shaped the miscellany, the translation of classical poetry into English, the pocket Elzevier series, and the luxury edition - practices carried on by the Tonson firm throughout the eighteenth century. They were at the forefront of the creation of a Whig literary culture and Jacob Tonson the elder was the founder of the famous Whig Kit-Cat Club which, it has been said, saved the nation. This edition brings together the correspondences of the Tonsons for the first time and represents a major intervention in the field of the history of the book and literary production. It includes 158 letters, with translations where necessary, from major authors, politicians, and men and women of letters of the period, discussing their work and the role that the Tonsons played in getting literature to the press and the reading nation. The letters are accompanied by generous and insightful annotation, as well as brief biographies of each of the Tonsons, and special sections on publishing, patronage, and retirement.
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  elite_culture  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Whigs-grandees  Whigs-oligarchy  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  publishing  print_culture  printing  Dryden  Pope_Alexander  Addison  Steele  English_lit  poetry  theater  theatre-Restoration  theatre-politics  correspondence  EF-add 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Petitions and the "Invention" of Public Opinion in the English Revolution | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 101, No. 6 (May, 1996), pp. 1497-1555
Current accounts of the capitalist and Protestant origins of the democratic public sphere are inconsistent and speculative. This empirical account explains the transition in political communication from norms of secrecy to appeals to public opinion. Popular communicative change in the English Revolution anticipated, in practice, the democratic theory of the public sphere when printing transformed a traditional instrument of communication-the petition. Petitions had medieval origins and traditions that upheld norms of secrecy and privilege in political communication. Economic and technical properties of printing-namely, heightened commercialism and the capacity to reproduce texts-demolished these norms by changing the scope and content of communication by petition. This practical innovation appears in all factions in the revolution. But among radical groups, the political use of printed petitions led to novel theories and to democratic speculation on constitutional provisions that would ensure the authority of public opinion in politics. This analysis contradicts key assumptions on communicative change that fuel pessimistic assessments of the modern public sphere in post-modernism and critical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  public_sphere  social_process  change-social  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  mixed_government  public_opinion  democracy  arcana_imperii  political_culture  social_order  printing  print_culture  communication  political_press  political_participation  petitions  radicals  commonwealth  Levellers  postmodern  critical_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Canterbury Tales Project
The Canterbury Tales Project aims to investigate the textual tradition of Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales to achieve a better understanding of the history of its composition and publication before 1500. Here is how we work: (1) We have established a system of transcription for all the manuscripts and early printed books of the Canterbury Tales into computer-readable form. (2) We transcribe the manuscripts using this system. (3) We compare all the manuscripts, creating a record of their agreements and disagreements with a computer collation program (Collate). (4 )We use computer-based methods, some drawn from evolutionary biology, to help reconstruct the history of the text from this record of agreements and disagreements. (5) We publish all the materials, the results of our analysis, and the tools which we use in electronic form.-- We have published seven CD-ROMs to date, with more coming soon. We have begun internet publication with the Caxtons online, and you can see web samples of our Hengwrt, Miller's Tale and Nun's Priest's Tale CD-ROMs online. Altogether, we have published transcripts and images of over 5000 pages from manuscripts and early editions of the Tales, amounting to around 20% of all surviving fifteenth-century witnesses. -- we are active in promoting mass manuscript digitization: see the website we have established, in partnership with others. We are now at the Institute for Textual Scholarship and Electronic Editing at the University of Birmingham.
website  digital_humanities  English_lit  Chaucer  14thC  15thC  printing  manuscripts 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Treasures at Christ's College, Cambridge: Treasures in Focus #7 - Donations Book [Christ's College, MS 23]
The manuscript is dated on its opening folio as 1623 and therefore post-dates Lady Margaret herself by some considerable time, but it is significant in being the earliest extant document held by the College that provides us with a list of the books she presented. We must assume that the anonymous scribe was working from contemporary documents which now no longer survive. Concerned that her new foundation should be provided with books from the very outset, Lady Margaret gave a collection of 40 titles, 27 of which remain in the Old Library today. All of the books were in Latin, and focussed on the subjects most relevant to the needs of the first scholars; theology forms the bulk of the collection as one might expect, but there are also books on arts, law and one medical text. The manuscript is interesting to us not just for the most obvious reason of recording the donation from our benefactor, but also for what this demonstrates about the character of Lady Margaret. For example, all of the items listed are printed; there was no manuscript material given which adds weight to the argument that she offered significant support to printers and the newly flourishing book trade in general. As mentioned, all of these books were in Latin, yet we know that Lady Margaret could only read in English and French, so these books were obviously not donations from her own collection; they were being specifically purchased to be given to the College for use by its students. -- blog post has image of title page with coats of arms of Lady Margaret and her 3 husbands and her device which became the arms of the college
16thC  17thC  books  libraries  university  Cambridge_University  manuscripts  printing  education-higher  Bolingbroke-family  patrons  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader

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