dunnettreader + print_culture   23

Bibliographical Aspects of the Acts and Monuments - Julian Roberts & Elizabeth Evenden | The Acts and Monuments Online
Bibliographical Aspects of the Acts and Monuments
by Julian Roberts and Elizabeth Evenden
This section is concerned less with the editorial problems posed by the Acts and Monuments than with what happened to the masses of manuscript and print which John Foxe brought, at approximately seven year intervals into the printing house of John Day in Aldersgate. (...) The kind of material which Foxe produced, how much of it was in the hands of his various transcribers, how much in the form of letters by or about the principal actors, and how much in his own hand, is a matter for editors and other analysts to determine. Here we can only offer some clues as to how that material was mediated by the printer, in the light of the known practices of an Elizabethan printing house. This knowledge has hitherto been only partial, and partly reconstructed from the descriptions of Joseph Moxon a century later, but it has been considerably augmented in the course of the present study.
Evernote  16thC  British_history  Protestants  Reformation  printing  print_culture  history_of_book 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
K. Tonry - Agency and Intention in English Print, 1476–1526 | Brepols
K. Tonry Agency and Intention in English Print, 1476–1526 Add to basket -> XV+241 p., 15 b/w ill., 156 x 234 mm, 2016 ISBN: 978-2-503-53576-0 Languages:…
books  history_of_book  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  print_culture  publishing  British_history  cultural_history  cultural_change  from instapaper
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Scott Sowerby, review - Brian Cowan, The State Trial of Doctor Henry Sacheverell | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. August, 2014.
Cowan’s erudite edition of primary sources charts contemporary reactions to the Sacheverell trial. Cowan sees the trial as an instance of the personalization of political ideas, as long-standing debates about church and state became “focused on one figure—Sacheverell, who could now be cast as either a hero or a scoundrel, depending upon one’s politics” (p. 15, emphasis in original). Unlike so many studies of print culture that focus on production, this volume is attuned to reception, with reproductions of commonplace books and marginalia that alternately endorsed and disputed the standard printed accounts of the trial. Cowan’s edition assembles sources from eleven libraries on two continents. Most of his selections are from unpublished manuscripts; five are from publications so rare that they are found in only one repository. The footnotes alone are worth the price of admission, providing a blow-by-blow account of the trial for the uninitiated. The volume is splendidly illustrated, with photographs of manuscripts, satirical prints, engravings of Sacheverell’s portrait, and depictions of the courtroom. The extended introduction surveys the history of printed transcripts of the trial, from Jacob Tonson’s official record to competing accounts by Tory and Whig authors. A helpful timeline and a comprehensive biographical guide round out the edition.
books  reviews  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Sacheverell  1710s  1720s  parties  Tories  Whig_Junto  Whigs  Church_of_England  tolerance  comprehension-church  Protestant_International  church-in-danger  Queen_Anne  impeachment  Parliament  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  Revolution_Principles  Walpole  print_culture  reception  Tonson  rhetoric-political  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church-and-State  manuscripts  primary_sources 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Jenny Davidson - Footnotology | Light Reading
Have sacrificed my morning run in order to get a handle on the huge list of tasks that need to be done in advance of tomorrow's travels. First up: returning a…
Instapaper  English_lit  17thC  18thC  19thC  literary_history  history_of_book  print_culture  Swift  Pope_Alexander  footnote  marginalia  design  reception  from instapaper
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Jürgen Habermas interviewed by Markus Schwering - Essays: Internet and Public Sphere What the Web Can't Do | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 24 July 2014
"After the inventions of writing and printing, digital communication represents the third great innovation on the media plane. With their introduction, these three media forms have enabled an ever growing number of people to access an ever growing mass of information. These are made to be increasingly lasting, more easily. With the last step represented by Internet we are confronted with a sort of “activation” in which readers themselves become authors. Yet, this in itself does not automatically result in progress on the level of the public sphere. [...] The classical public sphere stemmed from the fact that the attention of an anonymous public was “concentrated” on a few politically important questions that had to be regulated. This is what the web does not know how to produce. On the contrary, the web actually distracts and dispels." This is how, among many more subjects, Jürgen Habermas comments the evolution of democratic participation in the internet era. Reset-DoC is pleased to republish the translated version of a long interview published last June on the "Frankfurter Rundschau" for the philosopher's eighty-fifth birthday. -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  public_sphere  information-intermediaries  printing  print_culture  Internet  communication  community-virtual  media  political_culture  political_participation  political_press  Habermas  post-secular  cultural_history  cultural_change  networks-information  networks-political  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Kwass, review essay - Reassessing Enlightenment Economics - Reinert's "Translating Empire" | Books & ideas - 25 March 2013
Reviewed: Sophus A. Reinert, Translating Empire: Emulation and the Origins of Political Economy. Harvard University Press, 438 pp - Resurrecting the life of John Cary’s Essay on the State of England, a book which travelled all over Europe throughout the 18th century, S.A. Reinert challenges our understanding of Enlightenment economics, while calling for a more nuanced and historically-informed understanding of political economy in general. (..) By resurrecting the life of a text that scholars have dismissed as “mercantilist” and repositioning that work at the center of 18th-century political economy, Reinert challenges our basic understanding of Enlightenment economics, so often reduced to the free-trade doctrines of the physiocrats and Adam Smith. He argues that the diffusion of Cary’s work demonstrates that state-centered approaches to the creation of wealth enjoyed wide resonance at the very moment when discussions of economic policy were expanding beyond state chambers to engage a broader public. Far from being eclipsed by theories of laissez-faire economics, as conventional histories of economic thought would have us believe, such approaches became “the absolute mainstream in Europe” by the late 18th century -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle  18thC  economic_history  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  political_economy  Enlightenment  economic_theory  mercantilism  laisser-faire  Physiocrats  Smith  British_history  British_foreign_policy  nation-state  economic_growth  development  public_policy  public_goods  government-roles  Italy  Austria  Germany  readership  history_of_book  print_culture  information-intermediaries  networks-information  networks-business  networks-policy  Republic_of_Letters  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - the three big stories of modernity | TextPatterns July 2015
So far there have been three widely influential stories about the rise of modernity: the Emancipatory, the Protestant, and the Neo-Thomist. (..) all these narrators of modernity see our own age as one in which the consequences of 500-year-old debates conducted by philosophers and theologians are still being played out. I think all of these narratives are wrong. They are wrong because they are the product of scholars in universities who overrate the historical importance and influence of other scholars in universities, and because they neglect ideas that connect more directly with the material world. All of these grands recits should be set aside, and they should not immediately be replaced with others, but with more particular, less sweeping, and more technologically-oriented stories. The technologies that Marshall McLuhan called "the extensions of Man" are infinitely more important for Man's story, for good and for ill, than the debates of the schoolmen and interpreters of the Bible. Instead of grand narratives of the emergence of The Modern we need something far more plural: technological histories of modernity.
Instapaper  cultural_history  cultural_capital  modernity  technology  Tech/Culture  social_theory  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  Thomism-21stC  Reformation  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  modernity-emergence  material_culture  economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  colonialism  Military_Revolution  Scientific_Revolution  consumer_revolution  technology-history  historiography  medicine  public_health  public_sphere  public_goods  media  print_culture  history_of_science  history_of_book  history-and-social_sciences  narrative  narrative-contested  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Bernard, ed. - The Literary Correspondences of the Tonsons - Oxford University Press
The Tonsons were the pre-eminent literary publishers of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. It is difficult to estimate their contribution to the formation of English literature accurately. Nevertheless, it is clear that they carried Shakespeare into the eighteenth century and started the practice of modern editing of him. Without Rowe's life and without the Pope-Theobald controversy, the history of Shakespeare studies would have been different, perhaps much less illustrious. The same is true of Milton, a figure who through his political sympathies was in disrepute, but on whom Jacob Tonson the elder (and his nephew after him) decided to lavish the care, eventually including illustration and annotation, usually reserved for the classics. Later they issued an edition of Spenser by John Hughes, thus creating the triumvirate who for many years were to dominate the study of English renaissance literature. It is not unreasonable to claim that the house of Tonson invented English literature as matter for repeated reading and study. In addition, of course, the Tonsons were Dryden's main publisher, the first to publish Pope, and the consistent supporters of Addison and Steele and their early periodicals, while Jacob Tonson the elder had earlier shaped the miscellany, the translation of classical poetry into English, the pocket Elzevier series, and the luxury edition - practices carried on by the Tonson firm throughout the eighteenth century. They were at the forefront of the creation of a Whig literary culture and Jacob Tonson the elder was the founder of the famous Whig Kit-Cat Club which, it has been said, saved the nation. This edition brings together the correspondences of the Tonsons for the first time and represents a major intervention in the field of the history of the book and literary production. It includes 158 letters, with translations where necessary, from major authors, politicians, and men and women of letters of the period, discussing their work and the role that the Tonsons played in getting literature to the press and the reading nation. The letters are accompanied by generous and insightful annotation, as well as brief biographies of each of the Tonsons, and special sections on publishing, patronage, and retirement.
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  elite_culture  British_politics  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Whigs-grandees  Whigs-oligarchy  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  publishing  print_culture  printing  Dryden  Pope_Alexander  Addison  Steele  English_lit  poetry  theater  theatre-Restoration  theatre-politics  correspondence  EF-add 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Niccolò Tempini -- Book Review: “Raw Data” is an Oxymoron, edited by Lisa Gitelman | LSE Review of Books
“Raw Data” is an Oxymoron. Lisa Gitelman (ed.). MIT Press. March 2013. -- We live in the era of Big Data, with storage and transmission capacity measured not just in terabytes but in petabytes. Data collection is constant and even insidious, with every click and every “like” stored somewhere for something. This edited collection seeks to remind us that data is anything but “raw”, that we shouldn’t think of data as a natural resource but as a cultural one that needs to be generated, protected, and interpreted. Niccolò Tempini finds that all of the matters discussed in this book are as inherently political as they are urgent. -- the book review is excellent -- helpful sketch of each contribution, many very interesting -- starting with etymology of "data", which seems initially used in rhetoric, as the "given" supplied by the orator from which persuasive argument would be built -- review copied to Pocket
books  kindle-available  reviews  epistemology-social  statistics  data  databases  sociology_of_knowledge  intellectual_history  constructivism  digital_humanities  history_of_science  economic_history  evidence  media  cultural_history  print_culture  texts  rhetoric  technology  Pocket 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Walton, « Politics and Economies of Reputation », | Books and Ideas - La Vie des Idèes, 30 October 2014
Reviewed: (1) Jean-Luc Chappey, Ordres et désordres biographiques: Dictionnaires, listes de noms, réputation des Lumières à Wikipédia, Seyssel: Champ Vallon, 2013. (2) Clare Haru Crowston, Credit, Fashion, Sex: Economies of Regard in Old Régime France, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2013. -- Historians of 18thC France have become increasingly interested in the ‘individual’. Inspired by the conceptual framework of such theorists as Foucault and Bourdieu, research on identity, self-fashioning and reputation has in recent years become bound up with the study of historical processes (social mobility, rising consumption, public opinion) that reveal a historically unstable and contingently produced ‘self’. The two monographs under consideration here investigate these themes, especially the problem of ‘regard’, that is, how individuals saw and assessed each other. Although the authors analyze different phenomena – biographical notices for Jean-Luc Chappey, fashion and credit for Clare Haru Crowston – both explore the practices that developed in the 18thC and early 19thC for representing and managing reputations. To be sure, the use of print and fashion to assert one’s standing in society had existed for centuries. Two developments, however, altered their importance in the 18thC. First, the consumer revolution, which made print and fashion increasingly accessible. This revolution offered new means for understanding the world (print) and expressing oneself (fashion). Second, the rise of a critical public sphere in which moral assessments about individuals – what they wrote, for example, and what they wore – became increasingly difficult to control. Struggles over social standing took place in an increasingly competitive world, where textual accounts of one’s life and work (Chappey) and sartorial strategies (Crowston) became vulnerable to the vicissitudes of market forces and public opinion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  France  cultural_history  social_history  social_order  status  identity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  public_sphere  celebrity  consumers  consumerism  public_opinion  reputation  social_capital  Bourdieu  Foucault  biography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Patrick Wallace Hughes - Antidotes to Deism: A reception history of Thomas Paine's "The Age of Reason", 1794--1809 (2013 dissertation) | ProQuest Gradworks
Hughes, Patrick Wallace, Ph.D., UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH, 2013, 362 pages; 3573259 - Adviser: Paula M. Kane -- In the Anglo-American world of the late 1790s, Thomas Paine's The Age of Reason was not well received, and his volumes of Deistic theology were characterized as extremely dangerous. Over 70 replies to The Age of Reason appeared in Britain and the US. It was widely criticized in the periodical literature, and it garnered Paine the reputation as a champion of irreligion. This dissertation is a study of the rhetoric of refutation, and I focus on the replies to The Age of Reason that were published during Paine's lifetime (d. 1809). To effectively refute The Age of Reason, Paine's respondents had to contend not only with his Deistic arguments, but also with his international reputation, his style of writing, and his intended audience. I argue that much of the driving force behind the controversy over The Age of Reason stems from the concern that it was geared towards the “uneducated masses” or the “lower orders.” (..) For Paine's critics, when the masses abandon their Christianity for Deism, bloody anarchy is the inevitable result, as proven by the horrors of the French Revolution. (..) Drawing on Habermas's theories of the bourgeois public sphere, I focus on how respondents to The Age of Reason reveal not only their concerns and anxieties over the book, but also what their assumptions about authorial legitimacy and expectations about qualified reading audiences say about late 18thC print culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  Paine  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  Deism  natural_religion  Christianity  religious_lit  religious_culture  political_culture  publishing  pamphlets  journalism  lower_orders  public_opinion  public_sphere  print_culture  hierarchy  mass_culture  anarchy  readership  social_order  public_disorder  Radical_Enlightenment  masses-fear_of  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
JENNIFER BATT - From the Field to the Coffeehouse: Changing Representations of Stephen Duck | JSTOR: Criticism, Vol. 47, No. 4 (FALL 2005), pp. 451-470
Vol. 47, No. 4, Special Issue: Learning to Read in the Long Revolution: New Work on Laboring-Class Poets, Aesthetics, and Politics (FALL 2005) -- covers 2 presentations of Duck, both awkward in their own way - 1. Joseph Spence who thought Duck was an extraordinary individual, and supported his transformation to poet patronized by Queen Caroline, but presents him in his laboring milieu in agriculture Wiltshire 2. Grub-Street Journal report of an encounter with Duck in a Richmond coffeehouse after Queen Caroline had granted him a small house in Richmond - the paper was opposition and often mocked the patronage choices of the court - presenting Duck as a (undeserving? ) fish out of water -- see bibliography of political and literary journals, especially opposition, in 1730s including the Craftsman -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  1730s  English_lit  poetry  elite_culture  print_culture  patronage  Queen_Caroline  political_press  literary_journals  Craftsman  opposition  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  high_culture  lower_orders  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
JERRY C. BEASLEY - ENGLISH FICTION IN THE 1740s: SOME GLANCES AT THE MAJOR AND MINOR NOVELS | JSTOR: Studies in the Novel, Vol. 5, No. 2 (summer 1973), pp. 155-175
Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, and Tobias Smollett reached their first successes in the 1740s, when they burst upon the scene with novels that seemed surprisingly fresh and "new," as indeed their authors claimed they were. Certain aspects of this "newness" have been frequently explored by scholars, who have tried to show how these three authors built upon, and departed from, the practice of their predecessors. But the major novels of the 1740s appeared simultaneously with a great many other works of fiction, both native pieces and foreign works in translation—romances and "novels," "spy" stories and secret histories, feigned "lives," "memoirs," and "histories." By looking at these, we stand to learn a good deal about the initial appeal, and sometimes the methods, of Richardson, Fielding, and Smollett, who were keenly aware of the contemporary scene in prose fiction. In fact, an important measure of these novelists' achievement is the way they were able to exploit several current modes of storytelling in creating ingeniously textured novels that gained great popularity by satisfying the tastes of a very heterogeneous audience, and that managed also to be excitingly original, utterly serious works of art. -- looks quite interesting -- didn't download
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  1740s  popular_culture  print_culture  readership  novels  prose  fiction  Fielding  Richardson  Smollett  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Petitions and the "Invention" of Public Opinion in the English Revolution | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 101, No. 6 (May, 1996), pp. 1497-1555
Current accounts of the capitalist and Protestant origins of the democratic public sphere are inconsistent and speculative. This empirical account explains the transition in political communication from norms of secrecy to appeals to public opinion. Popular communicative change in the English Revolution anticipated, in practice, the democratic theory of the public sphere when printing transformed a traditional instrument of communication-the petition. Petitions had medieval origins and traditions that upheld norms of secrecy and privilege in political communication. Economic and technical properties of printing-namely, heightened commercialism and the capacity to reproduce texts-demolished these norms by changing the scope and content of communication by petition. This practical innovation appears in all factions in the revolution. But among radical groups, the political use of printed petitions led to novel theories and to democratic speculation on constitutional provisions that would ensure the authority of public opinion in politics. This analysis contradicts key assumptions on communicative change that fuel pessimistic assessments of the modern public sphere in post-modernism and critical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  public_sphere  social_process  change-social  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  mixed_government  public_opinion  democracy  arcana_imperii  political_culture  social_order  printing  print_culture  communication  political_press  political_participation  petitions  radicals  commonwealth  Levellers  postmodern  critical_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  1710s  1720s  1730s  1740s  actors  Addison  aesthetics  anarchy  Ancients-and-Moderns  ancient_Greece  anti-Catholic  anti-Jacobin  apocalyptic  arcana_imperii  article  art_criticism  art_history  Austria  authenticity  authority  authors  authors-women  belles-lettres  Bible-as-literature  bibliography  bibliophiles  biography  books  bookshelf  Bourdieu  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_politics  celebrity  change-social  Charles_I  Charles_II  Christianity  Church-and-State  church-in-danger  Church_of_England  colonialism  comedy  commonwealth  communication  community  community-virtual  comprehension-church  constructivism  consumerism  consumers  consumer_revolution  conversation  copyright  correspondence  courtiers  court_culture  Craftsman  credit  critical_theory  cultural_authority  cultural_capital  cultural_change  cultural_history  data  databases  Deism  democracy  design  development  digital_humanities  downloaded  Dryden  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_theory  EF-add  elite_culture  Elizabeth  emotions  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  English_lit  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-ongoing  Enlightenment_Project  enthusiasm  epistemology-social  Europe-Early_Modern  Evangelical  Evernote  evidence  faction  family  fashion  femininity  fiction  Fielding  find  footnote  Foucault  France  French_Enlightenment  French_lit  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  gender  gender_history  genre  Germany  Glorious_Revolution  government-roles  Great_Divergence  Greek_lit  groups-social_capital  Habermas  hierarchy  high_culture  historical_change  historical_fiction  historicism  historiography  historiography-antiquity  history-and-social_sciences  history_of_book  history_of_science  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  identity  illuminations  imagination  imitation  impeachment  Industrial_Revolution  information-intermediaries  Instapaper  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  Internet  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  Italy  James_I  James_II  journalism  jstor  kindle  kindle-available  laisser-faire  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  Latin_lit  Levellers  libraries  literacy  literary_history  literary_journals  literary_language  literary_theory  literature-and-morality  lit_crit  London  lower_orders  man-of-feeling  manuscripts  maps  marginalia  masculinity  masses-fear_of  mass_culture  material_culture  mechanism  media  medicine  medieval_history  mercantilism  Military_Revolution  mixed_government  Modernism  modernity  modernity-emergence  morality-conventional  narrative  narrative-contested  nation-state  natural_religion  networks-business  networks-information  networks-policy  networks-political  new_historicism  norms  novels  opposition  oral_culture  Paine  pamphlets  Parliament  parties  partisanship  patriarchy  patronage  periodization  petitions  Physiocrats  Pocket  poetics  poetry  politeness  political_culture  political_discourse  political_economy  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  Pope_Alexander  popular_culture  post-secular  postmodern  power-knowledge  primary_sources  printing  print_culture  private_life  prose  Protestants  Protestant_International  public_disorder  public_goods  public_health  public_opinion  public_policy  public_sphere  publishing  publishing-industry  publishing-piracy  Queen_Anne  Queen_Caroline  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  rationality  readership  reception  reform-political  reform-social  Reformation  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_history  religious_lit  Renaissance  Republic_of_Letters  reputation  Restoration  reviews  Revolution_Principles  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-writing  Richardson  romances  Romanticism  Sacheverell  science-and-religion  science-public  scientific_method  Scientific_Revolution  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  secularization  self  self-control  self-examination  self-fashioning  self-interest  sensibility  sentimentalism  sexuality  Smith  Smollett  sociability  social_capital  social_history  social_order  social_process  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  statistics  status  Steele  Sterne  style  subjectivity  sublime  subscriptions  Swift  Tech/Culture  technology  technology-history  texts  theater  theatre-politics  theatre-Restoration  theatre-sentimental  theology  thesis  Thomism-21stC  tolerance  Tonson  Tories  tragedy  translation  transport  transport-overland  vernacular  Walpole  website  Whigs  Whigs-grandees  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Whig_Junto  William_III 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: