dunnettreader + primary_sources   7

Scott Sowerby, review - Brian Cowan, The State Trial of Doctor Henry Sacheverell | H-Albion, H-Net Reviews. August, 2014.
Cowan’s erudite edition of primary sources charts contemporary reactions to the Sacheverell trial. Cowan sees the trial as an instance of the personalization of political ideas, as long-standing debates about church and state became “focused on one figure—Sacheverell, who could now be cast as either a hero or a scoundrel, depending upon one’s politics” (p. 15, emphasis in original). Unlike so many studies of print culture that focus on production, this volume is attuned to reception, with reproductions of commonplace books and marginalia that alternately endorsed and disputed the standard printed accounts of the trial. Cowan’s edition assembles sources from eleven libraries on two continents. Most of his selections are from unpublished manuscripts; five are from publications so rare that they are found in only one repository. The footnotes alone are worth the price of admission, providing a blow-by-blow account of the trial for the uninitiated. The volume is splendidly illustrated, with photographs of manuscripts, satirical prints, engravings of Sacheverell’s portrait, and depictions of the courtroom. The extended introduction surveys the history of printed transcripts of the trial, from Jacob Tonson’s official record to competing accounts by Tory and Whig authors. A helpful timeline and a comprehensive biographical guide round out the edition.
books  reviews  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Sacheverell  1710s  1720s  parties  Tories  Whig_Junto  Whigs  Church_of_England  tolerance  comprehension-church  Protestant_International  church-in-danger  Queen_Anne  impeachment  Parliament  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  political_press  public_sphere  public_opinion  Revolution_Principles  Walpole  print_culture  reception  Tonson  rhetoric-political  politics-and-religion  religion-established  Church-and-State  manuscripts  primary_sources 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
PATRICK A. WALSH -- THE FISCAL STATE IN IRELAND, 1691–1769 (2013).| The Historical Journal, 56, pp 629-656 Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
PATRICK A. WALSH - University College, Dublin (& UCL post doc fellowship) -- This article examines the Irish fiscal-military state in the eighteenth century. It locates the Irish state within a broader imperial context showing how Ireland contributed to the wider British imperial project. In particular, this article looks at the development of an efficient tax-gathering apparatus, showing how the revenue board, the most pervasive agency of the eighteenth-century Irish state, extracted increasing levels of taxation from a sometimes hostile population. Drawing extensively on the records of the Irish revenue commissioners, a very rich if under utilized source, it demonstrates for the first time the levels of taxation raised in Ireland, while also exploring how these taxes were collected. It concludes that this period saw the expansion of an increasingly professional bureaucracy, challenging existing interpretations that have focused predominantly on politicization. The final section looks at issues of evasion and compliance, showing the difficulties faced by the Irish state in this period, as it expanded deeper into Irish society. -* I would like to thank Stephen Conway, Niamh Cullen, Julian Hoppit, Eoin Magennis, and Ivar McGrath, as well as the two anonymous readers, for their comments on earlier drafts.
article  paywall  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  taxes  fiscal-military_state  tax_collection  bureaucracy  state-building  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  primary_sources  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
CAROLYN POLIZZOTTO -- WHAT REALLY HAPPENED AT THE WHITEHALL DEBATES? A NEW SOURCE (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 33-51. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
CAROLYN POLIZZOTTO - The University of Western Australia -- A variant transcription of one of the Whitehall Debates has been identified among the Clarke papers. Located in volume 16 of the Worcester MSS, it records the latter part of the longest debate, on 14 December 1648, concerning the Second Agreement of the People. The fair copy of this debate by army secretary William Clarke (in volume 65 of the Worcester MSS) was previously believed to be the only surviving record. The new source provides additional text, clarifies obscure passages, and is generally easier to understand. Historians now have the advantage of another account of the meeting, which reveals its importance more fully. Although the Levellers’ Agreement was never to be implemented, the Whitehall Debates took place between Pride's Purge and the trial and execution of Charles I. The variant therefore sheds new light on the thinking of the army command and its advisers both religious and lay at this time of unprecedented constitutional crisis. It also provides the first documentary evidence that the army debates at Putney (1647) and Whitehall (1648–9) were not recorded by Clarke alone, but by a team of at least three secretaries. -* For their invaluable advice in the preparation of this article, I would like to express my gratitude to Dr Clive Holmes and Prof. Ian Gentles. Dr Joanna Parker, Librarian, Worcester College, Oxford, and the staff of the Scholars’ Centre in the University of Western Australia Library, especially Azra Tulic
article  paywall  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Levellers  New_Model_Army  English_constitution  religious_history  godly_persons  Puritans  Independents  radicals  primary_sources  manuscripts  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Best of the OLL No. 43: “The Habeas Corpus Act” (1679) - Online Library of Liberty
The Best of the OLL No. 43: “The Habeas Corpus Act” (1679) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2013). -- This is part of “The Best of the Online Library of Liberty” which is a collection of some of the most important material in the OLL. A thematic list with links to HTML versions of the texts is available here. Parliament passed the Habeas Corpus Act in 1679 as part of a campaign against King Charles II led by the Earl of Shaftesbury who was attempting to exclude Charles II’s brother James from the succession to the throne of England because of his Catholic religious beliefs and the fear that he would rule in an arbitrary manner. The Act was designed to place limits on the arbitrary power of the monarch to imprison his political opponents by by-passing the courts. -- downloaded pdf to Note
etexts  primary_sources  legislation  17thC  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  judiciary  habeas_corpus  civil_liberties  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Parliament  Absolutism  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Best of the OLL No. 44: “The English Bill of Rights” (1689) - Online Library of Liberty
The Best of the OLL No. 44: “The English Bill of Rights” (1689) (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2013). -- This is part of “The Best of the Online Library of Liberty” which is a collection of some of the most important material in the OLL. A thematic list with links to HTML versions of the texts is available here. The English Bill of Rights (1689) is part of a series of legal statements about the rights of Englishmen which were proclaimed during the 17th century. Others include the Petition of Right (1628), the Agreement of the People (1647, 1648), and the Habeas Corpus Act (1679). It was a clear statement of the primacy of Parliament in the British system of government and defined the legal limits of the power of the government over the citizens. -- downloaded pdf to Note
etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_history  constitutionalism  limited_monarchy  Glorious_Revolution  civil_liberties  government-forms  mixed_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  Parliament  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Popish_Plot  Rye_House_Plot  tolerance  prerogative  Glorious_Revolution  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Mary  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  loyalty_oaths  Royalists  dissenters  parties  faction  Church_of_England  resistance_theory  religion-established  ecclesiology  nonjurors  defacto_rule  Norman_Conquest  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 1 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 1. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/810> -- Volume I consists of pamphlets written from the reign of James I to the Restoration (1620-1660). -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

17thC  18thC  1710s  1720s  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  article  bibliography  books  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  British_history  British_politics  bureaucracy  Charles_II  Church-and-State  church-in-danger  Church_of_England  civic_humanism  civil_liberties  commonwealth  comprehension-church  constitutionalism  defacto_rule  dissenters  divine_right  downloaded  ecclesiology  EF-add  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  etexts  Exclusion_Crisis  faction  find  fiscal-military_state  Glorious_Revolution  godly_persons  government-forms  habeas_corpus  history_of_England  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  impeachment  Independents  intellectual_history  Interregnum  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  James_II  judiciary  legislation  Levellers  limited_monarchy  loyalty_oaths  Magna_Carta  manuscripts  mixed_government  New_Model_Army  nonjurors  Norman_Conquest  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  parties  paywall  political-theology  political_history  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  Popish_Plot  prerogative  primary_sources  print_culture  Protectorate  Protestant_International  public_opinion  public_sphere  Puritans  Queen_Anne  Queen_Mary  radicals  reception  religion-established  religious_history  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  resistance_theory  Restoration  reviews  Revolution_Principles  rhetoric-political  Royalists  Rye_House_Plot  Sacheverell  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  sovereignty  state-building  taxes  tax_collection  tolerance  Tonson  Tories  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  Walpole  Whigs  Whig_Junto  William_III 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: