dunnettreader + pragmatism   108

Susan Haack’s Scientism and its Discontents | Rounded Globe
Susan Haack’s Scientism and its Discontents is based on her September 2016 Agnes Cuming Lectures at University College, Dublin. - Download epub version to Dropbox
sociology_of_science_&_technology  ebooks  epistemology  postmodern  pragmatism  philosophy_of_science  scepticism  downloaded  scientism 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Dmitri N. Shalin - Critical Theory and theh Pragmatist Challenge (1992) | American Journal of Sociology
AJS Volume 98 Number 2 (September 1992): 237-79 -- Habermas's theory breaks with the Continental tradition that has denigrated pragmatism as an Anglo-Saxon philosophy subservient to technocratic capitalism. While Habermas deftly uses pragmatist insights into communicative rationality and democratic ethos, he shows little sensitivity to other facets of pragmatism. This article argues that incorporating the pragmatist perspective on experience and indeterminacy brings a corrective to the emancipatory agenda championed by critical theorists. The pragmatist alternative to the theory of communicative action is presented, with the discussion centering around the following themes: disembodied reason versus embodied reasonableness, determinate being versus indeterminate reality, discursive truth versus pragmatic certainty, rational consensus versus reasonable dissent, transcendental democracy versus democratic transcendence, and rational society versus sane community. -- downloaded via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
article  downloaded  social_theory  political_philosophy  critical_theory  pragmatism  Habermas  Peirce  James_William  Dewey  democracy  community  public_sphere  public_reason  rationality  experience  indeterminacy  dissent  consensus  public_opinion  cultural_critique  change-social 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R Westphal - Empiricism, Pragmatic Realism & the A Priori in "Mind and the World Orde" (draft - forthcoming 2017 | Academia.edu
Forthcoming in: Carl SACHS & Peter OLEN eds., Contemporary Perspectives on C. I. Lewis: Pragmatism in Transition (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) --This paper re-examines how C.I. Lewis’s pragmatic realism in Mind and the World Order (1929, ‘MWO’) contrasts to logical empiricism, and to Lewis’s later An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation (1946, ‘AKV’), to highlight several important philosophical points Lewis clearly understood and argued for in MWO, which we need to recover today. MWO is expressly an ‘Outline of a Theory of Knowledge’; nevertheless, it provides several important lessons about human knowledge, action and our worldly context. These are highlighted by contrast to some key points in Carnap’s empiricist semantics (§2) and by considering a point important to scientific realism, not properly accommodated by Carnap’s semantics: Reichenbach’s (1920, 1922) ‘coördination’ (Zuordnung) principles – a very important point about scientific measurement procedures, central both to Peirce and to MWO (§3). These coördinating principles for exact scientific measurements highlight the contrast between the meta-linguistic ‘relative a priori’ admissible by empiricist semantics (Friedman 1999, 2001), and Lewis’ robustly realist ‘pragmatic a priori’ in MWO. I re-examine key features of MWO (§4), including Lewis’s rejection of mythical givenness and of a series of false dichotomies which still plague current discussions of epistemology, pragmatism and history and philosophy of science. -- Research Interests: Epistemology, Semantic Externalism, Pragmatism (Philosophy), Explication (Philosophy), Clarence Irving Lewis,
paper  downloaded  intellectual_history  20thC  pragmatism  Logical_Positivism  empiricism  Lewis_CI  Carnap  metaphysics  epistemology  apriori  philosophy_of_science  logic  semantics  Peirce  realism-scientific  scientific_method  myth_of_the_given 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Ruairidh James Macleod - The Concept of Temporality in John Dewey's Early Works (2015 thesis) - Academic Commons
Ruairidh James Macleod, 2015, The Concept of Temporality in John Dewey's Early Works, Columbia University Academic Commons, http://dx.doi.org/10.7916/D8M044XW : -- It is well understood that a concept of temporality is central to Dewey’s later work, finding its culmination in his essay “Time and Individuality” (1938). What has not been either acknowledged or established is the fact that a detailed and sophisticated concept of temporality, one which is fully in accord with his later work, was already present in Dewey’s early work, particularly in his essay “The Reflex Arc Concept in Psychology” (1896). This thesis therefore seeks to demonstrate not only that such a concept of temporality exists in Dewey’s early work, but also the nuanced nature of that concept of temporality, particularly in its function as a central, grounding component of the preconditions required for Dewey’s concept of experience. (..) this thesis argues that it in fact constitutes a key contribution to a tradition of philosophy of temporality which starts with the work of Henri Bergson, continues with the philosophy of Martin Heidegger (most saliently with Being and Time), and finds its full contemporary statement in Gilles Deleuze’s work on time, based on his concept of ‘the virtual.’ The fact that Dewey’s concept of temporality, as with that of Deleuze, is based on a sophisticated understanding of contemporary scientific findings is also explored, with the argument made that possessing such a foundation in scientific thought allows Dewey’s concept of temporality to become fully compatible to current research in psychology, particularly as it concerns educational psychology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  downloaded  intellectual_history  18thC  20thC  philosophical_anthropology  mind  consciousness  time  time-perception  subjectivity  Dewey  pragmatism  psychology  physiology  neuroscience  Bergson  Heidegger  Deleuze  education  learning 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Thomas L. Prendergast - The Structure of the Argument in Peirce's "Questions concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man" (1977 | JSTOR - Charles S. peirce Society
The Structure of the Argument in Peirce's "Questions concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man"
Thomas L. Prendergast
Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society
Vol. 13, No. 4 (Fall, 1977), pp. 288-305
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
pragmatism  Peirce  intuitionism  logic  jstor  article  downloaded  certainty  Cartesians  demonstration  Descartes  inference 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
j Chevalier - Reception of Peirce in France (2010) | JSTOR - Revue philosophique française et Etranger
Despite his efforts, the American philosopher Charles S. Peirce found hardly any interlocutors in France. He was considered mostly as a mathematician and logician, a physicist and a reliable psychologist, but his philosophical work was systematically distorted in consequence of "Franco-French" disputes. We emphasize here the read­ings of André Lalande and Louis Couturat who made significant contributions towards the recognition in France of the originality of the founding father of Pragmaticism. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Fin-de-Siècle  19thC  France  Peirce  intellectual_history  pre-WWI  French_intellectuals  article  downloaded  pragmatism 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Richard Rorty - Davidson between Wittgenstein and Tarsk | JSTOR - Critica (1998)
Davidson between Wittgenstein and Tarski
Richard Rorty
Crítica: Revista Hispanoamericana de Filosofía
Vol. 30, No. 88 (Apr., 1998), pp. 49-71
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
article  analytical_philosophy  downloaded  logic  Logical_Positivism  pragmatism  epistemology  jstor  truth  Wittgenstein  Davidson  Rorty  epistemology-social 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Barry Allen - Another New Nietzsche - review of Bernard Williams, Truth and Truthfulness | JSTOR - History and Theory (2003)
Another New Nietzsche
Reviewed Work: Truth and Truthfulness: An Essay in Genealogy by Bernard Williams
Review by: Barry Allen
History and Theory
Vol. 42, No. 3 (Oct., 2003), pp. 363-377
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
incentives  perspectivism  Williams_Bernard  pragmatism  reviews  norms  downloaded  books  Nietzsche  punishment  sub_species_aeternis  genealogy-method  epistemology-social  kindle  Rorty  morality-conventional  biocultural_evolution  certainty  epistemology  moral_philosophy  relativism  truth 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Martin Jay, review essay - PHILOSOPHY AS PERPETUAL MOTION: PRAGMATISM MOVES ON | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Oct 2011)
Reviewed Works: The Pragmatic Turn by Richard J. Bernstein; Pragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty by Colin Koopman -- History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 425-432 -- respectively a summing up of the past half-century of the tradition's history and a possible program for its future development. Bernstein ecumenically considers the achievements of a wide range of thinkers from Peirce, Dewey, and James to Brandom, Putnam, and Rorty, drawing valuable lessons from each, while not sparing criticism of their flaws. Koopman also tries to bridge the gap between what he calls "classicopragmatism" and "neopragmatism," although he finds more to admire in Rorty than in his predecessors. Whereas Bernstein attempts to supplement the pragmatist tradition by turning to Habermas, Koopman finds his inspiration in Foucault. Both authors emphasize the historicist, evolutionary, and transitionalist implications of pragmatism, paying as a result insufficient attention to the historical possibilities of repetition, rupture, discontinuity, and the unexpected event. In terms of the political implications they draw, Koopman advocates a meliorist incrementalism that lacks any real bite, while Bernstein expresses dissatisfaction with the democratic pieties of Rorty's final work, but doesn't really provide a sustained alternative. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  pragmatism  pragmatism-analytic  postmodern  critical_theory  political_philosophy  Peirce  James_William  Dewey  Rorty  Putnam  Quine  Habermas  Foucault  Brandom  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther - James and Dewey on Abstraction, The Pluralist, 07/2014 | via Researchgate
elucidates the abstraction-reification account diagnosed by James and Dewey and locates it in contemporary scientific work. Section 2 -- the complex process of abstraction in James and Dewey, and with a nod to CS Peirce. Identifying 3 stages in the abstraction process— singling out, symbolizing, and systematizing—clarifies the parallels between James’s and Dewey’s analyses. Section 3 -- pragmatists’ warnings against committing abstractionist fallacies. Identifies pernicious reification as neglecting 3 kinds of context: functional, historical, and analytical-level. Both philosophers implored everyday reasoners, scientists, and philosophers to attend to context. Reification, qua pathology of abstraction, results in disease symptoms such as universalized, narrowed, and/ or ontologized abstractions. Acknowledging the importance of biographical and social conditions, the genealogy and mutual influence of James’s and Dewey’s perspectives are traced, especially in endnotes. Section 4 -- how James and Dewey avoid reifying the very distinction with which they are weaving their analysis: the abstract vs. the concrete. Conclusion -- following the pragmatic forward-looking attitude, a gesture is made toward developing medicines (pluralism and assumption archaeology) out of the abstraction-reification account. After all, pernicious reification is to abstraction as disease is to health. Such treatments permit de-reifying ill models in contemporary science. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  pragmatism  James_William  Dewey  Peirce  epistemology  logic-Dewey  abstraction  essence  essentialism  reification  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science  sociology_of_science_&_technology  scientific_method  scientific_culture  induction  modelling  reason  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Stéphane Madelrieux, review - David Lapoujade, Fictions du pragmatisme. William et Henry James - La Vie des idées -27 juin 2008
Recensé : David Lapoujade, Fictions du pragmatisme. William et Henry James, Paris, Les Éditions de Minuit, 2008, 287 pages, 29 €. -- Qu’est-ce que Henry et William James ont en commun, à part d’être frères ? Peut-être d’avoir partagé une même vision du pragmatisme. Le livre de David Lapoujade renouvelle la comparaison entre l’œuvre de l’écrivain et celle du philosophe à travers une analyse deleuzienne qui ne le cède en rien aux approches biographiques. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  James_William  James_Henry  pragmatism  Deleuze  Bergson  perspectivism  mind-theory_of  alienation  Spinoza  Nietzsche  norms  epistemology  downloaded 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
John Patrick Diggins - Arthur O. Lovejoy and the Challenge of Intellectual History (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 181-208 -- another attack on Pragmatism as deconstruction, postmodern assault on Enlightenment etc etc -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  18thC  19thC  20thC  Lovejoy  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  reason  modernity  Modernism  pragmatism  postmodern  deconstruction  epistemology  power-knowledge  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Brian Z. Tamanaha - The Third Pillar of Jurisprudence: Social Legal Theory :: SSRN - William & Mary Law Review, Vol. 56, 2015
Jurisprudence is generally thought to consist of two main classical rival branches — natural law and legal positivism — followed by a bunch of modern schools — legal realism, law and economics, critical theory, legal pragmatism, etc. In this essay I argue that three main branches of jurisprudence have existed, and battled, for centuries, not two, but the third goes unrecognized as such because it has traveled under different labels and the underlying connections have been clouded by various confusions. The core insights and focus of this third branch, what I call “Social Legal Theory,” trace in a continuous thread from Montesquieu, through historical jurisprudence, sociological jurisprudence, and legal realism, up to the present. This third branch, I argue, provides a contrasting/complementary perspective, in conjunction with natural law and legal positivism, which rounds out the full range of theoretical angles on law: natural law is normative; legal positivism is analytical/conceptual; and social legal theory is empirical. (Among a number of clarifications, I answer the common objection that empirically-grounded theories are not sufficiently theoretical.) The conventional jurisprudential narrative is redrawn in this essay in a way that exposes unseen connections among theoretical schools and brings into focus critical issues about the nature of law that currently are marginalized by natural law and legal positivism. -- Pages in PDF File: 44 -- Keywords: Jurisprudence, legal philosophy, law and society, legal realism, legal development, legal history
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  positivism-legal  natural_law  legal_realism  legal_history  sociology_of_law  social_order  social_theory  change-social  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  19thC  20thC  Montesquieu  pragmatism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
The Diverse Diversity of William James | s-usih.org - July 2015
Martin Halliwell and Joel Rasmussen, eds., William James and the Transatlantic Conversation: Pragmatism, Pluralism, and Philosophy of Religion (New York: Oxford…
books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  James_William  pragmatism  epistemology  epistemology-naturalism  empiricism  experience  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_experience  from instapaper
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Newall interview with John Dupré: The Disunity of Science (2006) - The Galilean Library
John Dupré is a professor of philosophy of science in the Department of Sociology and Philosophy at Exeter University in the UK, and also the director of Egenis, the ESRC Centre for Genomics in Society. I was able to ask him about several keys areas of his work and relate it to contemporary issues in both science and the philosophy of science. -- Hits all my hot buttons. Anti mathematization of economics and its divorce from empiricism, disdainful of evo-devo psych, the Centre is part of a larger program looking at impacts of genetics and biology, from philosophy through sociology, economics, politics, art and humanities. Pal of Nancy Cartwright, Philip Kitcher and part of the "Stanford School". Author of Darwin's Legacy on Kindle -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
interview  philosophy_of_science  scientific_method  scientific_culture  scientism  methodology  laws_of_nature  empiricism  pragmatism  genetics  evolutionary_biology  molecular_biology  epigenetics  evo_psych  economic_models  mathematization  kindle  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
David Luban - Time-Mindedness and Jurisprudence: A Commentary on Postema's "Jurisprudence, the Sociable Science" | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 903 (2015)
Postema offers two general programmatic suggestions for jurisprudence besides greater historical consciousness: sociability and synechism. Sociability, has two dimensions. First, it means interdisciplinarity—a continual dialogue with the study of legal phenomena by the sciences, humanities, and even theology. Second, it means embedding jurisprudence in general philosophy, ... [Sellars]: “not only ‘cabbages and kings’, but numbers and duties, possibilities and finger snaps, aesthetic experience and death.” Synechism is a less familiar idea, drawn from the philosophy of C.S. Peirce. It is the commitment to seek continuity among phenomena. Peirce was metaphysically committed to the existence of actual continua everywhere in nature, history, and human psychology. So synechism will impose a certain demand on all systematic studies, namely discerning those continua.(..) a certain kind of historiography: The historian’s job is to unearth continuities between past and present rather than studying ruptures. This, it seems to me, is a contestable commitment that rules out a great deal of important historical work. Peirce understood synechism to imply that ideas are intrinsically temporal and historical phenomena. Although Postema does not endorse this general thesis, he does argue for a special case of it, namely that law is “intrinsically temporal.” This conclusion is central to his argument against the possibility of time-slice legal systems. It, too, is contestable; but, I shall suggest, Postema can reach his conclusion on grounds other than synechism, and I agree with him about law’s intrinsic temporality. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  pragmatism  historiography  historical_change  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  analytical_philosophy  legal_history  continuity  change-social  change-intellectual  intellectual_history  Peirce  social_sciences  legal_culture  legal_realism  philosophy_of_history  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Gerald J. Postema - Jurisprudence, the Sociable Science (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 869 (2015)
Renaissance jurisprudence strove to be a sociable science. Following Ulpian’s lead, it refused to relegate jurisprudence either to pure speculation or to mere practice. Jurisprudence was a science, a matter of knowledge and of theoretical understanding, not merely an applied art or practice of prudence innocent of theory. It was regarded as the very heart of theoretical studies, drawing to itself all that the traditional sciences of theology, metaphysics, and moral philosophy, as well as the newly emerging humanist sciences of philology and hermeneutics, had to offer. No less resolutely, however, it refused to abandon its foothold in the life of practice. (..) Rather than reject philosophical reflection, (..) Renaissance jurists sought to locate it in concrete human life and experience. (..) Philosophy.., was most true to its vocation, and was most engaged in human life, when its reflections were anchored in the social life acknowledged, comprehended, and informed by and informing law. Jurisprudence, vera philosophia, was ...the point at which the theoretical and the practical intersected (..) at its “sociable” best sought to integrate them. Analytic jurisprudence began as self-consciously, even militantly, “unsociable,” and its matured and much-sophisticated descendant, fin de siècle analytic legal philosophy, remained largely if not exclusively so. (..) It may be time, in this period of self-conscious attention to jurisprudential method, to press beyond the current limits of this debate over method to a reassessment of the ambitions of jurisprudence and of philosophy’s role in it. (..) my aim is not critical but constructive. (..) to recover something of the ideal of jurisprudence as a sociable science, to retrieve as much as our disenchanted age can be challenged to embrace, or at least to entertain, of the ambition of jurisprudence as vera philosophia. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  social_sciences  intellectual_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  common_law  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  norms  analytical_philosophy  concepts  concepts-change  change-social  change-intellectual  social_order  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  pragmatism  Peirce  continuity  historical_change  methodology-qualitative  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Markus Gabriel interview with Richard Marshall - Why The World Does Not Exist But Unicorns Do | 3AM - May 2015
Markus Gabriel broods on why the world doesn’t exist and never stops wondering about Kant, existence, pluralism, fields of sense, Huw Price, about why he isn’t po-mo, nor a Meinongian, about why unicorns exist, about why he’s a realist, about dissolving the hard problem, about why naturalism and physicalism are wrong, about Schelling and post-Kantian idealism, about Badiou and Meillassouz, Heidegger, about resisting skepticism, about negative philosophy, mythology, madness, laughter and the need for illusions in metaphysics, and about the insult that is the continental/analytic divide . Gird up for an amazing story… -- humongous interview divided into 2 pages - each about twice as long as one of Marshall's regular interviews -- only page 1 picked up by Instapaper, and no single page option -- saved as 2 pdfs to Note
Instapaper  downloaded  intellectual_history  philosophy  metaphysics  ontology  ontology-social  realism  realism-speculative  postmodern  Rorty  Kant  Schelling  German_Idealism  pragmatism  pragmatism-analytic  Husserl  Heidegger  scepticism  myth  Brandom  French_intellectuals  continental_philosophy  philosophy_of_science  analytical_philosophy  Russell_Bertrand  Frege  physicalism  materialism  naturalism  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Theory newsletter - H Joas, 'The Sacredness of the Person,' and P Strydom, 'Immanent Transcendence: Pragmatism, Critical Theory and Cognitive Social Theory’ (Jan 2010) | academia.edu
Theory: The Newsletter of the Research Committee on Sociological Theory, International Sociological Association, Autumn/Winter 2009, January 2010, Joas item pp 2-3, Strydom pp. 3-5. -- Joas discusses origins of Human Rights -- rejects the French Revolution theory as based on anticlericalism as codified by Kant and equally rejects Human Rights depending on Christianity (what took you 1700 years, eh?) Elaborates Durkheim's theory of process of universalizing sacred (not Weber's sacrilization of Reason) -- but main point is to halt the pissing match between those who insist human rights have no foundation apart from religion and those who view religions as the main violators of human rights. The Strydom piece places his hopes of theoretical renewal in the intersection between the 2 traditions of Left Hegelianism, from Marx and Peirce. It's pretty cryptic beyond a general indication of why immanent transcendence makes sense for social and cultural objects of study.
social_theory  pragmatism  critical_theory  Frankfurt_School  Hegelian  -Left  Marx  Peirce  epistemology-social  ontology-social  human_rights  French_Enlightenment  anticlerical  Durkheim  sacred 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Turner - Max Weber and the Dispute Over Reason and Value (Routledge, 1984) | bookmark for book abstract - Academia.edu
The problem of the nature of values and the relation between values and rationality is one of the defining issues of twentieth-century thought and Max Weber was one of the defining figures in the debate. In this book, Turner and Factor consider the development of the dispute over Max Weber's contribution to this discourse, by showing how Weber's views have been used, revised and adapted in new contexts. The story of the dispute is itself fascinating, for it cuts across the major political and intellectual currents of the twentieth century, from positivism, pragmatism and value-free social science, through the philosophy of Jaspers and Heidegger, to Critical Theory and the revival of Natural Right and Natural Law. As Weber's ideas were imported to Britain and America, they found new formulations and new adherents and critics and became absorbed into different traditions and new issues. This book was first published in 1984 by Routledge. -- Research Interests: Ethics, Political Theory, Continental Philosophy, Max Weber (Philosophy), Social and Political Philosophy, and Max Weber
books  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Weber  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  epistemology  epistemology-social  positivism  rationality  values  fact-value  constructivism  pragmatism  German_scholarship  German_historical_school  hermeneutics  Heidegger  Frankfurt_School  critical_theory  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Works by Kenneth Burke | KB Journal - Bibliographies
Lengthy -- divided into categories, e.g. books (non-fiction), essays, poetry, fiction -- notes the main changes and additions to each edition of his major works, including tracking hardback and paperback versions, which is almost impossible to sort out on Amazon -- they note the bibliographies are updated (probably mostly the secondary works page) -- downloaded as pdf to Note
Burke_Kenneth  bibliography  US_history  20thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  cultural_critique  social_theory  economic_theory  lit_crit  literary_theory  literary_language  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-moral_basis  political_culture  political_sociology  action-theory  philosophy_of_language  epistemology  epistemology-social  dialectic  dialogue  historiography  English_lit  Shakespeare  poetry  poetics  theater  psychology  meaning  perspectivism  pragmatism  progressivism  socialism  communism  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Piet Strydom - Inferential Dialectics: On Dialectical Reasoning in Critical Social Science and the Sociocultural World, (2015) | Academia.edu
Unpublished preliminary study for "Towards a New Cognitive Social Science" (book in progress) -- In this paper, I take as my starting point Norman Fairclough’s treatment of critical social analysis as a form of dialectical reasoning. While generally concurring with this equivalency despite a host of smaller disagreements on which I do not dwell, I venture to fill in a largely blank space in his argument by focusing on the internal workings of dialectical reasoning. The reference point for the core of my argument is the fact that Fairclough regards critical social analysis as based on epistemological dialectics which forms part of a larger set of relations, yet passes over the explication of the place and role of this basic form of dialectics in this constellation in favour of focusing on its practical dialectical nature. The point is, however, that an adequate grasp of practical dialectics requires the simultaneous consideration of the principal operative features of epistemological dialectics, not just in critical social analysis but more basically still also in social life itself. My proposal is that this could be done by introducing the inferential stance in order to consider what I call the dialectics of inference or inferential dialectics. This perspective forms part of a broader cognitive sociological approach that focuses on the cognitive processes – of which discourse is but one – on which the construction and structuring of society depend and which pervade the latter’s every fibre. -- Key words: Abduction, Badiou, Brandom, cognitive sociology, critical realism, critical social analysis, Critical Theory, deduction, dialectics, Fairclough, Hegel, induction, inference, Peirce, reasoning, social theory -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  cognition-social  constructivism  logic  logic-Peirce  deduction  abduction  inference  logic-Hegelian  dialectic  Brandom  critical_theory  critical_realism  pragmatism  induction  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hartman, review essay - How Americans Have Received Nietzsche and Heidegger and Why It Matters | Reviews in American History > Volume 41, Number 1, March 2013 - Project MUSE
Reviewed -- (1) Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen. American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas. - Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2012. and (2) Martin Woessner. Heidegger in America. - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Heidegger  pragmatism  phenomenology  existentialism  postmodern  Rorty  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Talisse, R. B. (2011), A Farewell to Deweyan Democracy. Political Studies, 59: 509–526 | Wiley Online Library
Talisse, R. B. (2011), A Farewell to Deweyan Democracy. Political Studies, 59: 509–526. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-9248.2010.00860.x The revival of pragmatism has brought renewed enthusiasm for John Dewey's conception of democracy. Drawing upon Rawlsian concerns regarding the fact of reasonable pluralism, I argue that Deweyan democracy is unworthy of resurrection. A modified version of Deweyan democracy recently proposed by Elizabeth Anderson is then taken up and also found to be lacking. Then I propose a model of democracy that draws upon Peirce's social epistemology. The result is a non-Deweyan but nonetheless pragmatist option in democratic theory.
article  Wiley  paywall  political_philosophy  pragmatism  democracy  epistemology-social  Rawls  Dewey  Peirce  pluralism 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen Nash and Liza Rybak - On Logical Difficulties, Philosophy, and the T.C.E. Explanation of the Firm | JSTOR: Review of Social Economy, Vol. 68, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2010), pp. 339-363
By exploring the implications of the linkage between Knight and Pragmatism, some non-trivial implications can be argued to exist. Specifically, section 2 outlines the T. C. E. literature, and how it exists in an atmosphere mixed with Marshallian competition and Knightian uncertainty. Section 3 then considers the disparate philosophical positions behind the work of Knight and Marshall. Knight's critique of Marshall is seminal, not because of any trivial technical innovations that Knight may have inspired within economic theory, but because Knight grounds his work on a philosophical viewpoint that effectively devastated Hegelian philosophy: American Pragmatism. Section 4 then links together the previous two sections by considering how the T. C. E. literature exhibits a dependency on both Pragmatism and Hegelian philosophy. The non-trivial implications of understanding the T. C. E. literature as a branch of Marshallian economics, which recognises Knightian uncertainty, are developed in section 5. Possible conclusions and a summary of the argument are provided in section 6. -- over 100 references from Kant through the pragmatists, Knight and 20thC economics, variants of neoclassical, and empirical evidence including probability and uncertainty in econometrics with heavy emphasis on theories of the firm, transaction cost analysis, Coase and Williamson, markets and hierarchies-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  economic_theory  economic_models  macroeconomics  neoclassical_economics  econometrics  probability  risk  certainty  uncertainty  Kant  Hegel  Hegelian  Marshall  transaction_costs  markets  markets-structure  firms-theory  organizations  hierarchy  management  Knight  Coase  Williamson_O  pragmatism  Peirce  Dewey  economic_sociology  economic_culture  evolution-social  competition  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Philosophy at 3:AM: Questions and Answers with 25 Top Philosophers : Richard Marshall : 9780199969531
Contents -- i. Introduction. ; Chapter 1. Brian Leiter: 'Leiter Reports' ; Chapter 2. Jason Stanley : 'Philosophy As The Great Naivete' ; Chapter 3. Eric Schwitzgebel: 'The Splintered Skeptic' ; Chapter 4. Mark Rowlands: 'Hour Of The Wolf' ; Chapter 5. Eric T Olson: 'The Philosopher With No Hands' ; Chapter 6. Craig Callender: ' Time Lord' ; Chapter 7. Kieran Setiya: ' What Anscombe Intended and Other Puzzles' ; Chapter 8. Kit Fine: 'Metaphysical Kit' ; Chapter 9. Patricia Churchland: 'Causal Machines' ; Chapter 10. Valerie Tiberius: 'Mostly Elephant, ErgoEL' ; Chapter 11. Peter Carruthers: 'Mind Reader' ; Chapter 12. Josh Knobe: 'Indie Rock Virtues' ; Chapter 13. Al Mele: 'The Four Million Dollar Philosopher ; Chapter 14.Graham Priest: 'Logically Speaking' ; Chapter 15. Ursula Renz: 'After Spinoza: Wiser, Freer, Happier' ; Chapter 16. Cecile Fabre: ' On The Intrinsic Value Of Each Of Us' ; Chapter 17. Hilde Linderman: ' No Ethics Without Feminism' ; Chapter 18. Elizabeth S. Anderson: 'The New Leveller' ; Chapter 19. Christine Korsgaard: 'Treating People As End In Themselves' ; Chapter 20. Michael Lynch: 'Truth, Reason and Democracy' ; Chapter 21. Timothy Williamson : 'Classical Investigations' ; Chapter 22. Ernie Lapore: 'Meaning, Truth, Language, Reality' ; Chapter 23. Jerry Fodor: 'Meaningful Words Without Sense, And Other Revolutions.' ; Chapter 24. Huw Price: 'Without Mirrors' ; Chapter 25. Gary Gutting: 'What Philosophers Know'
books  buy  philosophy  intellectual_history  metaphysics  metaethics  ontology  scepticism  analytical_philosophy  political_philosophy  epistemology  feminism  philosophy_of_language  mind  mind-body  consciousness  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_law  pragmatism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
"PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- Two contemporary quandaries in legal theory provide an occasion for a revival of interest in natural law theories of law. First, the debate about legal indeterminacy has made it clear that law cannot function autonomously—as a self-contained set of rules—but requires a normative justification of judges’ decisions in hard cases. In addition, Steven D. Smith has persuasively argued that there is an "ontological gap" between the practice of law, which presupposes a classical or religious ontology, and legal theory, which presupposes a scientific ontology (i.e., scientific materialism) that rejects religious ontology. This article demonstrates how the process philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead and the radical empiricism of William James support a new process theory of natural law. Under this theory, judges resolve legal indeterminacy by determining what maximizes the telos beauty—in accordance with the circumstances of the case and the social perfection possible within that society—rather than by relying on fixed, antiquated natural laws. Process natural law also closes the ontological gap by providing an ontology that unifies the moral insights of religion with the insights of modern science. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "PROLEGOMENA TO A PROCESS THEORY OF NATURAL LAW" HANDBOOK OF WHITEHEADIAN PROCESS THOUGHT (1st ed). Ed. Michel Weber and Will Desmond. Frankfurt: Ontos Verlag, 2008. 507-536. -- downloaded pdf to Note
philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  legal_history  legal_theory  natural_law  foundationalism  anti-foundationalism  social_theory  process_theology  laws_of_nature  divine_command  divine_right  legitimacy  authority  Whitehead  James_William  moral_philosophy  materialism  reductionism  science-and-religion  theology  ancient_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  pragmatism  legal_indeterminancy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Rorty and the Philosophical Tradition: A Comment on Professor Szubka :: SSRN
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 298 -- I agree with Tadusz Szubka's thesis that there is a "partial" continuity between Rorty's work in the 1960s (esp. The Linguistic Turn) and his later pragmatic philosophy in which he repudiated "analytic" philosophy. I suggest additional support for the thesis of continuity comes from an examination of Rorty's undergraduate and graduate education. I then argue that the real puzzle about Rorty's intellectual development is not why he gave up on "analytic" philosophy - he had never been much committed to that research agenda, even before it became moribund--but why, beginning with Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature (PMN), he gave up on the central concerns of philosophy going back to antiquity. Many contemporary philosophers influenced by Quine's attack on the analytic-synthetic distinction and Sellars' attack on "the Myth of the Given" (the two argumentative linchpins of PMN) didn't abandon philosophical questions about truth, knowledge, and mind, they just concluded those questions needed to be naturalized, to be answered in conjunction with the empirical sciences. Why didn't Rorty go this route? The paper concludes with some interesting anecdotes about Rorty that invite speculative explanations. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 6 -- Keywords: Rorty, analytic philosophy, Sellars, Quine, Nietzsche, metaphilosophy -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  20thC  Rorty  pragmatism  analytical_philosophy  epistemology  Quine  Sellars  naturalism  anti-foundationalism  scepticism  analytic-synthetic  Nietzsche  linguistic_turn  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Science and Morality: Pragmatic Reflections on Rorty's Pragmatism (2007) :: SSRN - University of Chicago Law Review, 2007
U of Texas Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 128 -- This is an invited commentary on Richard Rorty's Dewey Lecture, given last year at the University of Chicago Law School. "Pragmatism," says Rorty, "puts natural science on all fours with politics and art. It is one more source of suggestions about what to do with our lives." I argue that the truth in pragmatism - that the epistemic norms that help us cope are the ones on which we rely - is obscured by Rorty's promiscuous version of the doctrine, which confuses the criteria for relying on particular epistemic norms (namely, that they work for human purposes) with the content of the norms themselves (most of which make no reference to human purposes, but rather criteria like causal or explanatory power). We need presuppose no Archmiedean standpoint to conclude, as Richard Posner does, that moral inquiry is feeble in a way physics is not; we need only take seriously our best current understanding of the world, how it works, and the epistemic norms that have proven most effective in making sense of it. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 13 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  20thC  Rorty  pragmatism  analytical_philosophy  epistemology  Quine  Sellars  naturalism  anti-foundationalism  causation  epistemology-moral  relativism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Prus - Reconceptualizing the Study of Community Life: Emile Durkheim's "Pragmatism and Sociology" | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 40, No. 1/2 (March-June 2009), pp. 106-146
Emile Durkheim may be best known as a structuralist and an empiricist of a distinctively quantitative sort, but a comparatively neglected set of lectures on pragmatism presented by Durkheim just prior to his death suggests that this characterization is only partially justified. Interestingly, whereas Durkheim is critical of pragmatism in some very consequential respects, he not only uses pragmatism to indicate the major shortcomings of rationalist and empiricist approaches to the study of human group life but he also builds on pragmatism as an instructive resource in developing his own thoughts on human knowing and acting. These lectures may help scholars appreciate some of the more enduring tensions in Durkheim's scholarship, but they also reveal some of the inadequacies of contemporary "sociological theory" with respect to both depictions of the scholarship of Emile Durkheim and the more fundamental study of human knowing and acting. -- interesting bibliography for intellectual_history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  19thC  20thC  France  Durkheim  epistemology  pragmatism  rationalist  empiricism  social_sciences  action-social  community  quantitative_methods  structuralist  Dewey  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Antony Puddephatt - The Search for Meaning: Revisiting Herbert Blumer's Interpretation of G.H. Mead | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 40, No. 1/2 (March-June 2009), pp. 89-105
Herbert Blumer's interpretation of George Herbert Mead's work has set the intellectual foundation for the symbolic interactionist tradition. However, the adequacy of this interpretation has been challenged, leading to a series of highly charged debates in the 1970s—80s. This article reflects back on these debates, and reconsiders the contrast between the Blumerian and Meadian epistemologies from a contemporary perspective. It is demonstrated that while Mead's work is able to adapt to and contribute to emerging challenges to dualism in contemporary interpretive theory, Blumer's root epistemological position fails in this regard, and creates an inconsistent framework for social reality. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  intellectual_history  20thC  pragmatism  Mead  symbolic_interaction  epistemology  epistemology-social  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Sébastien Gandon & Mathieu Marion - Issue intro - L’idéalisme britannique : histoire et actualité - Philosophiques v36 n1 2009, p. 3-34 | Érudit 
Sébastien Gandon - Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand & Mathieu Marion -Université du Québec à Montréal -- British Idealism is a philosophical movement that dominated British universities (and those of its empire), for fifty years around the turn from the XIXth to the XXth century, but it went largely unnoticed in the French-speaking world. Condemned by analytic philosophers, these authors were also ignored in their own country, but some of them, notably Bradley and Collingwood, are now enjoying a newly found popularity within the larger trend towards a study of the origins of analytic philosophy. This text is an introduction to British Idealism that plots, in an historical first part, the outlines of its rise, development and decline. In the second part, we provide reasons for further studies of this movement. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  cultural_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  British_history  idealism  British_Idealism  Bradley  Collingwood  Royce  analytical_philosophy  Russell_Bertrand  Logical_Positivism  pragmatism  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Antonio - After Postmodernism: Reactionary Tribalism | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 106, No. 1 (July 2000), pp. 40-87
Revived Weimar‐era “radical conservatism” and fresh “New Right” and “paleoconservative” theories offer a radical cultural critique of global capitalism and liberal democracy. Expressing a broader retribalization and perceived failure of modernization, their defense of communal particularity attacks the multicultural nation‐state, liberal rights, and universal citizenship. This essay links reactionary tribalism to a recurrent 20th‐century theoretical tendency, the “total critique of modernity”—a fusion of oversimplified Nietzschean and Weberian ideas. Historically, total critique has promoted convergence between right and left, such as the current overlapping facets of “radical conservatism” and “strong‐program postmodernism.” Total critique counters the “historicist” method of “internal critique” and the “communication model” characteristic of reflexive social theory. The discussion uncovers the mediating role of social theory in the problematic relationship of science and partially disenchanted public spheres in plural, democratic cultures. -- 200+ references! -- in postmodernism includes range of "end of" thinkers from left and right, and the overlaps between far right and some of the postmodern cultural left -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  cultural_history  modernity  irrational  Germany  Weimar  Nazis  Heidegger  Nietzsche  Schmitt  Strauss  neo-Hegelian  right-wing  cultural_pessimism  Leftist  Marxist  historicism  cultural_critique  Habermas  Dewey  pragmatism  liberalism  democracy  patriarchy  nationalism  ethnic_ID  universalism  citizenship  nation-state  multiculturalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Norman K. Denzin, review essay - Postpragmatism: Beyond Dewey and Mead | JSTOR: Symbolic Interaction, Vol. 17, No. 4 (Winter 1994), pp. 453-463
Reviewed work: Continual Permutations of Action, by Anselm L. Strauss. Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter, 1993. 280 pp., $44.95 (cloth), $21.95 (paper). -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  20thC  pragmatism  Dewey  Mead  symbolic_interaction  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
The Question of Certainty by John Dewey (1929)
Source: The Quest for Certainty (1933), publ. Capricorn Books, 1960. -- Chapter II - Philosophy's Search for the Immutable -- The failure and frustration of actual life is then attributed to the fact that this world is finite and phenomenal, sensible rather than real, or to the weakness of our finite apprehension, which cannot see that the discrepancy between existence and value is merely seeming, and that a fuller vision would behold partial evil an element in complete good. Thus the office of philosophy is to project by dialectic, resting supposedly upon self-evident premises, a realm in which the object of completest cognitive certitude is also one with the object of the heart's best aspiration. The fusion of the good and the true with unity and plenitude of Being thus becomes the goal of classic philosophy. -- Practical activity is dismissed to a world of low grade reality. Desire is found only where something is lacking and hence its existence is a sign of imperfection of Being. Hence one must go to passionless reason to find perfect reality and complete certitude. But nevertheless the chief philosophic interest is to prove that the essential properties of the reality that is the object of pure knowledge are precisely those characteristics which have meaning in connection with affection, desire and choice. After degrading practical affairs in order to exalt knowledge, the chief task of knowledge turns out to be to demonstrate the absolutely assured and permanent reality of the values with which practical activity is concerned! Can we fall to see the irony in a situation wherein desire and emotion are relegated to a position inferior in every way to that of knowledge, while at the same time the chief problem of that which is termed the highest and most perfect knowledge is taken to be the existence of evil-that is, of desires errant and frustrated?
etexts  Dewey  pragmatism  epistemology  ontology  Great_Chain_of_Being  Platonism  idealism-transcendental  Hegelian  evil  theodicy  certainty  desire  moral_philosophy  values  morality-objective  morality-conventional  moral_psychology  epistemology-social  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Rorty's Platonists, Positivists, and Pragmatists (1982)
Source: Consequences of Pragmatism, University of Minnesota Press, 1982. Introduction only reproduced, “Fair Use” provisions; Transcribed Andy Blunden 1998. -- One can use language to criticise and enlarge itself, as one can exercise one’s body to develop and strengthen and enlarge it, but one cannot see language-as-a-whole in relation to something else to which it applies, or for which it is a means to an end... But Philosophy, the attempt to say “how language relates to the world” by saying what makes certain sentences true, or certain actions or attitudes good or rational, is, on this view, ... the impossible attempt to step outside our skins – the traditions, linguistic and other, within which we do our thinking and self-criticism – and compare ourselves with something absolute. This Platonic urge to escape from the finitude of one’s time and place, the “merely conventional” and contingent aspects of one’s life, is responsible for the original Platonic distinction between two kinds of true sentence. By attacking this latter distinction, the holistic “pragmaticising” strain in analytic philosophy has helped us see how the metaphysical urge – common to fuzzy Whiteheadians and razor-sharp “scientific realists” – works. It has helped us be sceptical about the idea that some particular science (say physics) or some particular literary genre (say Romantic poetry, or transcendental philosophy) gives us that species of true sentence which is not just a true sentence, but rather a piece of Truth itself.
etexts  intellectual_history  20thC  pragmatism  Platonism  Logical_Positivism  empiricism  neo-Kantian  analytical_philosophy  analytic-synthetic  philosophy_of_language  epistemology  Rorty  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Gross - Charles Tilly and American Pragmatism | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 337-357
Charles Tilly's work on repertoires of contention and social mechanisms was pathbreaking. In this article, I argue that his understanding of both concepts overlaps with social-theoretical work informed by the philosophical tradition of classical American pragmatism. There is no evidence that Tilly was influenced by pragmatism, but I argue that the overlap is substantial enough that large portions of his oeuvre can serve as illustrations of the explanatory power of pragmatist social science—and that Tilly's theorization of mechanisms in particular would have been even stronger had he engaged pragmatism directly. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  20thC  pragmatism  conflict  habit  mechanisms-social_theory  causation-social  Tilly  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Elias L. Khalil - Rational, Normative and Procedural Theories of Beliefs: Can They Explain Internal Motivations? I JSTOR: Journal of Economic Issues, Vol. 45, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 641-664
This paper offers three-way taxonomy of theories of beliefs. For rational theories, beliefs are determined by given information and updated via Bayes's rule. For normative theory, best represented by Hayek and sociological theory, beliefs are categories that precede information and, in fact, formulate the otherwise impenetrable information. For procedural theory, best represented by Herbert Simon and pragmatic philosophy, while beliefs formulate the information, they can be replaced in response to shocks. While each theory manages to capture one kind of belief, all three largely fail to explain internal motivations that characterize entrepreneurship, innovation, and creativity. The failure arises from the fact that the three theories are about cognitive beliefs (i.e., beliefs about the world), while internal motivations are beliefs concerning self-ability. -- paywall -- large references list quite interesting
article  jstor  paywall  economic_sociology  belief  motivation  action-theory  Bayesian  Hayek  pragmatism  Innovation  creativity  cognition  bibliography 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Brandom - Pragmatism, Inferentialism, and Modality in Sellars's Arguments against Empiricism
"Pragmatism, Inferentialism, and Modality in Sellars's Arguments against Empiricism", in Empiricism, Perceptual Knowledge, Normativity, and Realism, Willem deVries (ed.), Oxford University Press, 2009...
paper  analytical_philosophy  pragmatism  epistemology  logic  inference  empiricism  Sellars  downloaded  EF-add  from notes
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview - Peter Godfrey-Smith - philosophy of biology » 3:AM Magazine April 2014
Peter Godfrey-Smith is the go-to guy in the philosophy of biology. He is forever evolving his thoughts on externalism, complexity and why we shouldn’t expect a settled outcome, the contribution of pragmatists to philosophy of biology, why Fodor gets it wrong, on how best to understand what science is, on Darwinian theory, Darwinian populations, on why Richard Dawkins and David Hull are wrong and on the contribution of philosophy to biology. Like Cool Hand Luke, this one bites like a ‘gator!
philosophy_of_science  biology  evolution  evolutionary_biology  pragmatism  mind  mind-body  language  Darwinism  behavioralism  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Sarin Marchetti, review - William J. Gavin, William James in Focus: Willing to Believe // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Dec 2013
Given the breadth and richness of his intellectual biography, any recounting of the philosophy of William James would be impressionistic at best. However, as James tellingly remarked in Pragmatism, philosophies themselves are necessarily "abstract outlines" whose significance and impact should be "measured by the definiteness of our summarizing reactions, by the immediate perceptive epithet with which the expert hits such complex objects off." Thus, as there are better and worse philosophical "outlines", there would be better and worse accounts of them, so measured. William Gavin's book, for both insight and ambition, undoubtedly belongs among the better. He in fact offers, in one hundred pages, a concise and mostly effective sketch of James' arc of thought, in which the theme of the impressive and engaging nature of James' philosophical "outline" is expressly tackled. This theme represents a recurrent motif underlying James' distinctive philosophical approach, which Gavin rightly takes as essential. Overlooking its importance would in fact radically betray the spirit of James' writings, altogether missing the point of his philosophical reflection. Gavin helps the reader to avoid these too-frequent shortcomings, offering an original account of James' philosophy in which the responsive, practical character of his writings is featured. As the subtitle suggests, the key to this critical survey is an examination of the role and pervasiveness of James' conception of "the will to believe" as it informs several aspects of his philosophical outlook. By focusing on the uses and applications of this notion, which the author considers the cornerstone of James' philosophy, the volume works as an erudite exposition of an entire intellectual trajectory.
books  reviews  kindle-available  pragmatism  James_William  Rorty  Dewey  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Nathan Houser, review - Paul Forster, Peirce and the Threat of Nominalism // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // March 2013
Key ideas and insights from Peirce are frequently featured in contemporary research ranging across much of philosophy, and across other disciplines, yet when these ideas are considered together, it is difficult to see how they can belong to one system of thought. A notable accomplishment of Paul Forster... is that he has achieved a comprehensive account of most of Peirce's leading ideas in a way that gives the reader a grasp of how everything fits together in the context of Peirce's battle against nominalism. This is no mere device for unifying Peirce's wide-ranging ideas; his opposition to nominalism motivated him as nothing else did and, as Forster shows, is central to his philosophical program. While Peirce's argument against nominalism was strictly philosophical, his objection to it extended beyond logic to what he regarded as the undesirable consequences of nominalism for civilization. Peirce understood nominalism in the broad anti-realist sense usually attributed to William of Ockham, as the view that reality consists exclusively of concrete particulars and that universality and generality have to do only with names and their significations. This view relegates properties, abstract entities, kinds, relations, laws of nature, and so on, to a conceptual existence at most. Peirce believed nominalism (including what he referred to as "the daughters of nominalism": sensationalism, phenomenalism, individualism, and materialism) to be seriously flawed and a great threat to the advancement of science and civilization. His alternative was a nuanced realism that distinguished reality from existence and that could admit general and abstract entities as reals without attributing to them direct (efficient) causal powers. Peirce held that these non-existent reals could influence the course of events by means of final causation (conceived somewhat after Aristotle's conception), and that to banish them from ontology, as nominalists require, is virtually to eliminate the ground for scientific prediction as well as to underwrite a skeptical ethos unsupportive of moral agency.
books  reviews  19thC  intellectual_history  Peirce  logic  nominalism  universals  laws_of_nature  kinds  philosophy_of_science  pragmatism  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Timothy J. Nulty, review - David Egan, Stephen Reynolds, and Aaron James Wendland (eds.), Wittgenstein and Heidegger // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
Readers familiar with both Heidegger and Wittgenstein will find in this book detailed and thorough expressions of perhaps some of their own intuitions about the similarities and differences between these two influential twentieth-century philosophers. The 16 essays provide insights and arguments published for the first time. Even those who consider themselves well-versed in the works of Heidegger and Wittgenstein are sure to find this book worth their time... -- Braver examines Heidegger's and Wittgenstein's views of fundamental logical principles [and] succeeds in showing how Wittgenstein and Heidegger gave very similar answers to questions about the basic principles that are supposed to guide our thinking. For Wittgenstein, the target of critique was the Law of Non-contradiction, while for Heidegger it was the Principle of Sufficient Reason. Both philosophers return logic and reason to the human domain. One is reminded of the American pragmatist William James and his attempt to provide an account of truth that was cognizant of the finite, contextual nature of human understanding. Logic and reason are not transcendent to our practices; they are not answerable to "Meaning or Reason or anything metaphysical or capitalized" ... In giving up a transcendent source of justification, we only lose what we never had in the first place.
books  reviews  20thC  intellectual_history  metaphysics  logic  philosophy_of_language  ontology  Wittgenstein  Heidegger  phenomenology  empiricism  pragmatism  James_William  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Dermot Moran, review - Steven Crowell, Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Feb 2014
C Normativity and Phenomenology in Husserl and Heidegger, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 321pp., $29.99 (pbk), ISBN 9781107682559.

Reviewed by University College Dublin

Steven Crowell's latest monograph is a careful and nuanced thematic and historically grounded defense of the philosophical importance of what is now frequently called "classical" phenomenology (specifically Husserl and Heidegger) in addressing the issues of meaning, normativity, agency and first-person knowledge, topics central to contemporary analytic philosophy of mind and action. This well argued book situates Husserl and Heidegger not just at the center of contemporary debates in the philosophy of mind and action, but also as interlocutors in current disputes over normativity and practical knowledge (as found in the neo-pragmatism of John McDowell and Robert Brandom, among others), as well as the current discussions concerning first-person authority and mental content.

Crowell is not just conversant with the intricacy of the texts of Husserl and Heidegger (whom he reads with detailed documentation as in substantial agreement with one another), but also with a wide range of figures in contemporary philosophy of mind, moral psychology, and neo-pragmatism, including John Searle, Hubert Dreyfus, Alva Noë, Richard Moran (no relation), and Christine Korsgaard). In the course of his interpretations of Husserl and Heidegger, moreover, Crowell has a lot of instructive (and corrective) things to say about such issues as mental content, internalism and externalism, causation, the relation between perception and conception, the connection between self-consciousness and normativity, the transparency and immediacy of self-knowledge (in an interesting engagement with Moran) and the meaning of agency (including moral agency) in relation to Heidegger's notion of authenticity. This is a very rich, often dense but never less than lucid book that offers a systematic defense of phenomenology in the language of contemporary philosophy and thereby achieves a double objective, namely to set a new agenda for phenomenological discussion in the twenty-first century and to show why analytic philosophers would be wrong to neglect the phenomenological heritage.
books  reviews  kindle-available  philosophy  phenomenology  Husserl  Heidegger  idealism-transcendental  mind  action-theory  normativity  consciousness  responsibility  conscience  perception  causation  mind-body  agency  moral_psychology  Kant  analytical_philosophy  meaning  concepts  pragmatism  authenticity  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
LEEMON B. McHENRY - Quine's Pragmatic Ontology | JSTOR: The Journal of Speculative Philosophy, New Series, Vol. 9, No. 2 (1995), pp. 147-158
Claims Quine shouldn't be put in with the pragmatists -- lots of references to key Quine articles with links -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  analytical_philosophy  pragmatism  Quine  ontology  epistemology  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Keith Topper - In Defense of Disunity: Pragmatism, Hermeneutics, and the Social Sciences | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 28, No. 4 (Aug., 2000), pp. 509-539
Opposes Rorty claim of unity of method of inquiry for both natural and social sciences, though Rorty also advocated diversity of objectives. Topper sees pragmatism and hermeneutics as congenial approaches for social sciences -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  social_sciences  methodology  pragmatism  hermeneutics  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Symposium: Dewey's Pragmitism, Social Inquiry, and Democracy | JSTOR: American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 43, No. 2, Apr., 1999
(1) Dewey's Pragmatism, Social Inquiry, and Democracy: Introduction to the Symposium(pp. 518-519) James Johnson. *--* (2) John Dewey and American Political Science(pp. 520-541) James Farr. *--* (3) Experience as Experiment: Some Consequences of Pragmatism for Democratic Theory(pp. 542-565) Eric A. MacGilvray. *-'* (4) Inquiry into Democracy: What Might a Pragmatist Make of Rational Choice Theories?(pp. 566-589) Jack Knight and James Johnson. *--* (5) Democracy as Inquiry, Inquiry as Democratic: Pragmatism, Social Science, and the Cognitive Division of Labor(pp. 590-607) James Bohman. *--* (6) "How Shall We Read What We Call Reality?": John Dewey's New Science of Democracy(pp. 608-628) Debra Morris. *--* (7) Pragmatic Inquiry and Democratic Politics(pp. 629-647)
Marion Smiley
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_science  social_theory  democracy  accountability  pragmatism  Dewey  political_participation  rational_choice  conflict  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Shane J. Ralston - Can Pragmatists be Institutionalists? John Dewey Joins the Non-ideal/Ideal Theory Debate | JSTOR: Human Studies, Vol. 33, No. 1 (May 2010), pp. 65-84
During the 1960s and 1970s, institutionalists and behavioralists in the discipline of political science argued over the legitimacy of the institutional approach to political inquiry. In the discipline of philosophy, a similar debate concerning institutions has never taken place. Yet, a growing number of philosophers are now working out the institutional implications of political ideas in what has become known as "non-ideal theory." My thesis is two-fold: (1) pragmatism and institutionalism are compatible and (2) non-ideal theorists, following the example of pragmatists, can avoid a similar debate as took place between institutionalists and behavioralists by divulging their assumptions about institutions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  social_theory  critical_theory  pragmatism  liberalism  Dewey  institutions  ideal_theory  Rawls  pluralism  conflict  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Heikki J. Koskinen and Sami Pihlström - Quine and Pragmatism | JSTOR: Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Summer, 2006), pp. 309-346
This paper discusses critically W. V Quine's relation to the tradition of pragmatism. Even though Quine is often regarded as a pragmatist, it is far from clear what his commitment to pragmatism actually amounts to. It is argued that while there are pragmatist elements in Quine's position, this is not sufficient to classify him as a pragmatist in any strong historical sense; indeed, he was not even clear himself what it means to be a pragmatist. It is also shown that neither Quine s philosophy nor pragmatism are as anti-metaphysical as has sometimes been thought. In order to enrich the picture of Quine s place in the pragmatist tradition, some neopragmatist criticisms of his ideas (e.g., by Hilary Putnam and Richard Rorty) are also discussed. -- extensive bibliography looks good for 20thC US intellectual_history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  pragmatism  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  epistemology  Quine  Rorty  Putnam  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Sinclair - Quine and Conceptual Pragmatism | JSTOR: Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Spring 2012), pp. 335-355
Quine famously concluded that his rejection of the analytic-synthetic distinction resulted in a more ‘thorough' pragmatism. While suggesting a possible link to American pragmatism, Quine would later explain that he was only extending the use of ‘pragmatic’ found in Carnap's thought. However, Quine has also acknowledged the influence of his teacher C.I. Lewis, who defended his ‘Conceptual Pragmatism’ in the 1920s and 1930s. This essay focuses on Quine's alleged connection to pragmatism by examining the influence of Lewis's pragmatism on Quine's developing epistemological perspective. It makes reference to Quine's unpublished graduate papers in order to argue that the structural affinities between Quine's and Lewis's conceptions of epistemology suggest an important historical source of the pragmatic elements in Quine's view. This further highlights a forgotten element of the epistemological backdrop to Quine's mid-century interpretation and criticism of Carnap's use of the analytic-synthetic distinction. -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  20thC  pragmatism  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  epistemology  Quine  Carnap  Logical_Positivism  apriori  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric Steinhart - Royce's Model of the Absolute | JSTOR: Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Spring 2012), pp. 356-384
At the end of the 19th century, Royce uses the mathematical ideas of his day to describe the Absolute as a self-representative system. Working closely with Royce's texts, I will develop a model of the Absolute that is both more thoroughly formalized and that is stated in contemporary mathematical language. As I develop this more formal model, I will show how structures found within it are similar to structures widely discussed in current analytic metaphysics. The model contains structures found in the recent analytic metaphysics of modality; it contains Democritean worlds as defined by Quine; it contains Turing-computable sequences; and it contains networks of interacting software objects as defined by Dennett. Much of the content of recent analytic metaphysics is already implicit in Royce's study of the Absolute. Far from being an obsolete system of historical interest only, Royce's metaphysics is remarkably relevant today. -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  19thC  US  pragmatism  idealism  mathematics  Absolute  analytical_philosophy  Quine  metaphysics  systems-self-representative  Dennett  networks-information  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton, review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation | Philosophy and Literature 16 (1992): 432-37
Delightful Denis Dutton review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation (Cambridge University Press, $39.95 hardbound, $11.95 paper) -- presents three lectures by Umberto Eco, with responses by Richard Rorty, Jonathan Culler, and Christine Brooke-Rose, a final rejoinder by Eco, and a general introduction by Stefan Collini. The occasion was the Clare Hall Tanner Lectures, and they apparently packed out one of the biggest auditoriums at Cambridge University in 1990. There was more debate, including Frank Kermode, Malcolm Bradbury, and David Lodge, than is included here, and one imagines it was an exciting occasion. -- quite splendid description of debate between Eco and Rorty. Culler who is more open ended than Eco on limits to interpretation turns his guns on the self described American pragmatists, Rorty and Stanley Fish. Needless to say Dutton is reluctant to put Rorty in the same tradition as Dewey - Eco's voracious curiosity and wonder about the world is more in Dewey’s line - and is appalled at labeling Fish a pragmatist. Definitely to buy.
books  reviews  find  amazon.com  lit_crit  literary_theory  hermeneutics  hermeticism  gnostic  interpretivism  deconstruction  reader_response  intentionality  Eco  Rorty  pragmatism 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Garnar - Power, Action, Signs: Between Peirce and Foucault | JSTOR: Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Summer, 2006), pp. 347-366
This paper argues that pragmatists must be more cognizant of the concept of "power" and its consequences. To demonstrate this, I show how Foucault's analytics of power can be brought into Peirce s theory of signs. Central to both philosophers is the role of action. Using the concept of action, I explain that Foucault s conception of power, action on actions, can be understood as structuring Peircian habits, which are rules for action. From here I build out to Peirce s semiotics, illustrating how power channels the meanings of signs in certain directions. The rest of the paper is dedicated to reconstructing in light of Foucault Peirces claim that the subject is nothing more than the signs it uses. I argue that any understanding of the subject must account for the subject being distributed through a field of power. The paper concludes by proposing a new "philosophy of the subject" which seeks to reconcile Foucaults concerns with those of pragmatism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  pragmatism  action-theory  subject  subjectivity  semiotics  power  power-symbolic  Peirce  Dewey  Foucault  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Cécile Alduy, Roland Greene - Forum Introduction - Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads | Republics of Letters - Volume 1, Issue 2 ( February 2010)
Nice overview of the entangling and untangling of our notions of experience and experiment from Petrarch to Montaigne -- downloaded pdf to Note -- TOC of Forum -- Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads by Cécile Alduy, by Roland Greene. (1) Artificial Men: Alchemy, Transubstantiation, and the Homunculus by Mary Baine Campbell. (2) Machines in the Garden by Jessica Riskin. (3) Atheism as a Devotional Category by George Hoffmann. (4) Montaigne: The Eclectic Pragmatist by Anthony Long. (5) Putting Experience First by Timothy Hampton
article  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  epistemology  empiricism  self  metaphor  cultural_history  literary_history  Seneca  Montaigne  scepticism  atheism_panic  pragmatism  alchemy  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew J. Brown - John Dewey’s Logic of Science | JSTOR: HOPOS: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science, Vol. 2, No. 2 (Fall 2012), pp. 258-306
In recent years, pragmatism in general and John Dewey in particular have been of increasing interest to philosophers of science. Dewey’s work provides an interesting alternative package of views to those which derive from the logical empiricists and their critics, on problems of both traditional and more recent vintage. Dewey’s work ought to be of special interest to recent philosophers of science committed to the program of analyzing “science in practice.” The core of Dewey’s philosophy of science is his theory of inquiry—what he called “logic.” There is a major lacuna in the literature on this point, however: no contemporary philosophers of science have engaged with Dewey’s logical theory, and scholars of Dewey’s logic have rarely made connections with philosophy of science. This article aims to fill this gap, to correct some significant errors in the interpretation of key ideas in Dewey’s logical theory, and to show how Dewey’s logic provides resources for a philosophy of science. -- paywall $14.00
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  Dewey  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  pragmatism  logic-Dewey  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC -- De la vérité: Pragmatisme, historicisme et relativisme | JSTOR: Rue Descartes, No. 5/6, Novembre 1992
Avant-propos (pp. 9-10) *-* PART 1 *-* A-t-on besoin du vrai ? Le défi pragmatique *-* *-- (1) Qu'est-ce que le pragmaticisme ? (pp. 13-21) Charles Sanders Peirce and Jacques Poulain. *-- (2) Le partage de l'héritage anticartésien de C.S. Peirce : D. Davidson, H. Putnam et R. Rorty (pp. 23-52) Jacques Poulain. *-- (3) Dewey entre Hegel et Darwin (pp. 53-71) Richard Rorty and Patrick Sauret. *-- (4) Wittgenstein, la vérité et le passé de la philosophie (pp. 73-93) Hilary Putnam and Patrick Sauret. *-* PART 2 *-* Historicisme ou essentialisme ? L'alternative épistémologique. *-- (5) L'état de la théorie du langage chez Richard Rorty (pp. 97-109) Henri Meschonnic. *-- (6) Des tournants historiques (pp. 111-120) Jonathan Rée. *-- (7) La réalisation linguistique de la vérité (pp. 121-141) Aldo G. Gargani and Patrick Sauret. *-* PART 3 Les fins de l'histoire pragmatique : la justice libérale et le Bien communautaire *-* *-- (8) Les limites du libéralisme. De l'éthique politique aux États-Unis aujourd'hui (pp. 145-157) Axel Honneth and Patrick Sauret. *-- (9) Les Lumières et l'esprit juif ou la raison des vaincus (pp. 159-175) Reyès Maté and Catherine Ballestero. *-- (9) Vérité, contingence et modernité (pp. 177-194) Albrecht Wellmer and Marie-Noëlle Ryan. *-* PART 4 *-* Le « bonheur » de l'homme pragmatique *-* *-- (10) L'esthétique pragmatique de Rorty (pp. 197-208) Rainer Rochlitz. *-- (11) L'esthetique postmoderne du rap (pp. 209-228) Richard Shusterman
journal  article  jstor  20thC  historiography  epistemology  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  aesthetics  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  cultural_critique  modernity  contingency  continental_philosophy  pragmatism  historicism  relativism  postmodern  liberalism  critical_theory  Peirce  Dewey  Rorty  Putnam  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
The Politics of Systems and Environments, Part I -- TOC | JSTOR: Cultural Critique, No. 30, Spring, 1995
(1) Introduction: The Politics of Systems and Environments (pp. 5-13) William Rasch and Cary Wolfe [downloaded pdf to Note] *-- (2) Realism/Anti-Realism: A Debate (pp. 15-32) Adam Muller and Paisley Livingston. *-- (3) In Search of Post-Humanist Theory: The Second-Order Cybernetics of Maturana and Varela (pp. 33-70) Cary Wolfe. *-- (4) Making the Cut: The Interplay of Narrative and System, or What Systems Theory Can't See (pp. 71-100) N. Katherine Hayles. *-- (5) Blinded Me with Science: Motifs of Observation and Temporality in Lacan and Luhmann (pp. 101-136) Jonathan Elmer. *-- (6) Systems Theory According to Niklas Luhmann: Its Environment and Conceptual Strategies (pp. 137-170) Dietrich Schwanitz. *-- (7) Why Does Society Describe Itself as Postmodern? (pp. 171-186) Niklas Luhmann. *-- (8) Response to Luhmann (pp. 187-192) Peter Uwe Hohendahl. *-- (9) Immanent Systems, Transcendental Temptations, and the Limits of Ethics (pp. 193-221) William Rasch. *-- (10) Rethinking the beyond within the Real (Response to Rasch) (pp. 223-234)
Drucilla Cornell
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_philosophy  metaphysics  metaethics  epistemology  ontology-social  philosophy_of_science  moral_psychology  systems_theory  posthumanism  postmodern  cybernetics  information  narrative  Luhmann  pragmatism  time  subject  objectivity  paradox  critical_realism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
William Rasch and Cary Wolfe - Introduction: The Politics of Systems and Environments | JSTOR: Cultural Critique, No. 30 (Spring, 1995), pp. 5-13
Introduction to 2 special issues devoted to using Systems Theory as the foil for sorting out "what is to be done" on the Left in the aftermath of constructivist and postmodern "theory" that has deconstructed the rationalist and idealist traditions - humanist, materialist,etc with limited resources to address the depoliticization and managerial trends, as well as the fragmentation of identity, multiculturalism, post colonialism. They use demise of representationalism - in both epistemological and political senses, as organizing theme for the problems as well as what areas new philosophy and social theory must solve. They adopt the postmodern assumptions of dialectic replaced by difference with possibilities of aporias, the death of the subject relative to objects, replaced by subject position, post (or anti?) Humanism with environment and cybernetics becoming key new elements, non-foundationalism, and demise of logocentrism. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see bookmarks for issue TOCs
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january 2014 by dunnettreader
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