dunnettreader + power   61

Aligica
Revisiting the theory of institutional hybridity and diversity developed by Vincent and Elinor Ostrom to cope with the challenge of the "neither states nor markets" institutional domain, this article reconstructs the Ostromian system along the "value heterogeneity-co-productionpolycentricity" axis. It articulates the elements of a theory of value heterogeneity and of the fuzzy boundaries between private and public. It rebuilds the model of co-production, clarifying the ambiguity surrounding a key technical public choice theoretical assumption, and it demonstrates (a) why it should not be confused with the Alchian-Demsetz team production model and (b) how co-production engenders a type of market failure that has been neglected so far. In light of this analysis, the article reconsiders polycentricity, the capstone of the Ostromian system, explaining why polycentricity may be seen as a solution both to this co-production market failure problem and to the problems of social choice in conditions of deep heterogeneity. It also discusses further normative corollaries. - Downloaded via iphone
power  market_failure  political_economy  centralization  power-asymmetric  governance  downloaded  public-private_gaps  bargaining  institutional_economics  commons  article  normativity  accountability  common_good  jstor  political_science  decentralization  public_goods  public_choice  norms 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Div Levin - When Great Powers Get a Vote - International Studies Quarterly - 2016
What are the electoral consequences of attempts by great powers to intervene in a partisan manner in another country’s elections? Great powers frequently deploy partisan electoral interventions as a major foreign policy tool. For example, the U.S. and the USSR/Russia have intervened in one of every nine competitive national level executive elections between 1946 and 2000. However, scant scholarly research has been conducted about their effects on the election results in the target. I argue that such interventions usually significantly increase the electoral chances of the aided candidate and that overt interventions are more effective than covert interventions. I then test these hypotheses utilizing a new, original dataset of all U.S. and USSR/Russian partisan electoral interventions between 1946 and 2000. I find strong support for both arguments.
US_foreign_policy  downloaded  propaganda  soft_power  power  article  post-Cold_War  Cold_War  elections  influence-IR  Grear_Powers  intervention  IR-domestic_politics 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Diane Coyle - Adam Ozanne's "Power and economics" - April 2016
My esteemed colleague Adam Ozanne has written a very interesting, short book on the strange absence of the concept of power from mainstream modern economics.… [unfortunately Palgrave has been idiots again and have priced both the paper and ebook editions for libraries not for people who'd actually be interested and would boost sales by word of mouth - not clear that this is likely to find many library buyers either]
Instapaper  books  economic_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  social_sciences  political_economy  power  from instapaper
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Paul Frijters - An Economic Theory of Greed, Love, Groups, and Networks | Cambridge University Press - March 2013
PaperbackISBN: 9781107678941 $63.95 inc GST --;Why are people loyal? How do groups form and how do they create incentives for their members to abide by group norms? Until now, economics has only been able to partially answer these questions. In this groundbreaking work, Paul Frijters presents a new unified theory of human behaviour. To do so, he incorporates comprehensive yet tractable definitions of love and power, and the dynamics of groups and networks, into the traditional mainstream economic view. The result is an enhanced view of human societies that nevertheless retains the pursuit of self-interest at its core. This book provides a digestible but comprehensive theory of our socioeconomic system, which condenses its immense complexity into simplified representations. The result both illuminates humanity's history and suggests ways forward for policies today, in areas as diverse as poverty reduction and tax compliance.
books  economic_theory  economic_models  economic_sociology  utility  rationality-economics  behavioral_economics  networks  action-theory  self-interest  altruism  power  loyalty 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Daniel McCarthy - Why Liberalism Means Empire | Lead essay / TAC Summer 2014
Outstanding case made for "consrrvative" realist IR position of off-shore balancing - not really "conservative" but he needs to give it that spin for his aufience buy-in -- takes on not just the militarists, neicons and librral intrrventionists but thr "non-liberal" sbtu-interventionists like Kennan and Buchanan - he leaves out the corrosive, anti-liberal democracy effects of globalized, financial capitalism that undermines the narrative of gradualist liberal democratization and achievements in OECD rconomies - as Zingales putscit "save capitalism from the capitalists" beeds to be included with the hegemon's responsibilities along with off-shore balancing - dimensions of power beyond military, which Dan does stress in his sketch of ehy Britain could meet the military challenges until WWI
Pocket  18thc  19thc  20thc  anti-imperialism  balance-of-power  british_empire  british_history  british_politics  civil_rights  cold_war  competition-interstate  cultural_transmission  democracy  empires  entre_deux_guerres  europe  foreign_policy  french_revolution  geopolitics  germany  global  governance  globalization  great_powers  hegemony  hong_kong  human_rights  ideology  imperialism  international_system  ir  ir-history  iraq  japan  liberalism  military-industrial  military_history  napoleon  napoleonic  wars  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  naval_history  neocons  neoliberalism  peace  pinboard  political_culture  politics-and-history  post-wwii  power  rule_of_law  social_science  trade  us  history  us_foreign_policy  us_military  us_politics  uses_of_history  warfare  world  wwi  wwii 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicola Lacey - Jurisprudence, History, and the Institutional Quality of Law (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 919 (2015)
A cri de coeur for putting legal theory and history back together with social theory and empirical social sciences,. -- In the early part of my career, legal history and the history of legal ideas were closed books to me, as I made my way in a field of criminal law scholarship dominated by doctrinal scholarship and by concept-focused philosophical analysis of the foundations of criminal law. These 2 very different paradigms have 1 big thing in common: They tend to proceed as if the main intellectual task is to unearth the deep logic of existing legal doctrines, not infrequently going so far as to read them back onto history, as if things could never have been other than they are. (..)I have increasingly found myself turning to historical resources (1) [to examine] the contingency of particular legal arrangements, and (2) ...to develop causal and other theses about the dynamics which shape them and hence about the role and quality of criminal law as a form of power in modern societies. So, in a sense, I have been using history in support of an analysis driven primarily by the social sciences. (..) it is no accident that all of the great social theorists, from Marx to Foucault via Weber, Durkheim, and Elias, ..have incorporated significant historical elements into their interpretations .... Indeed, without the diachronic perspective provided by history (or the perspective offered by comparative study) we could have no critical purchase on social theory’s characterizations of or causal hypotheses about the dynamics of social systems. Hence, (...) my boundless gratitude to the historians whose meticulous research makes this sort of interpretive social theory possible). -- Lacey is not over-dramatizing -- see the "commentary" from a "legal philosopher" who believes the normative basis of criminal responsibility can be investigated as timeless "moral truths". -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  social_theory  historical_sociology  historical_change  institutions  institutional_change  philosophy_of_law  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_social_science  jurisprudence  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  concepts  morality-conventional  morality-objective  criminal_justice  responsibility  mind  human_nature  norms  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  power  Neoplatonism  neo-Kantian  a_priori  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  evidence  mental_health  social_order  epistemology  epistemology-moral  change-social  change-intellectual  comparative_law  comparative_anthropology  civil_liberties  women-rights  women-property  rights-legal  rights-political  access_to_services  discrimination  legal_culture  legal_system  legal_reasoning  Foucault  Marx  Weber  Durkheim  metaethics  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
George Serafeim - The Role of the Corporation in Society: An Alternative View and Opportunities for Future Research b(revised June 2014) :: SSRN
Harvard University - Harvard Business School *--* A long-standing ideology in business education has been that a corporation is run for the sole interest of its shareholders. I present an alternative view where increasing concentration of economic activity and power in the world’s largest corporations, the Global 1000, has opened the way for managers to consider the interests of a broader set of stakeholders rather than only shareholders. Having documented that this alternative view better fits actual corporate conduct, I discuss opportunities for future research. Specifically, I call for research on the materiality of environmental and social issues for the future financial performance of corporations, the design of incentive and control systems to guide strategy execution, corporate reporting, and the role of investors in this new paradigm. -- Pages in PDF File: 27 -- Keywords: corporate performance, corporate size, sustainability, corporate social responsibility, accounting -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  corporate_governance  corporate_citizenship  global_economy  global_governance  international_political_economy  shareholder_value  shareholders  CSR  disclosure  accountability  accounting  institutional_economics  institutional_investors  incentives  institutional_change  long-term_orientation  business-and-politics  business-norms  business_practices  business_influence  sustainability  MNCs  firms-theory  firms-structure  firms-organization  power  power-concentration  concentration-industry  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Grillot & Jean-Claude Monod - Interview with Bruce Ackerman - Reconstructing Citizenship for the 21stC | March 2012 - Books & ideas
Also translated into French -- Tags : liberalism | youth | elections | journalism | Constitution | citizenship | deliberation -- A world-famous legal scholar, Bruce Ackerman wants to reinvigorate citizenship in today’s democracies. Here, he reexamines the intellectual foundations of his work, and some of the pragmatic applications he designed with others. His principle is to always consider how the state intervenes in the autobiography of every man. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  liberalism  liberal_democracy  legal_theory  constitutional_law  constitutionalism  government-forms  elections  political_participation  political_culture  governmentality  deliberation-public  state-roles  power  power-asymmetric  downloaded  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Grillot & Pauline Peretz - Interview with William Novak and James Sparrow - The American State: Power Obscured | Nov 2011 - Books & ideas
Tags : welfare state | state | war | law | France | United States of America -- Finding the American state where historians never looked before: this could be the motto of the new history of the state, of which William Novak and James Sparrow are two of the strongest advocates. To capture the specificity of state formation in the U.S., they encourage historians to look at the mutual constitution of state and society, instead of taking their separation for granted. Their approach is key to understanding the current legitimation crisis undergone by the American state. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_government  US_history  US_politics  state-building  state-roles  19thC  20thC  anti-statist  right-wing  rights-legal  rights-political  centralization  central_government  ideology  libertarianism  market_fundamentalism  historiography  political_science  political_culture  sociology-process  legitimacy  power  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
R.I. Moore - The Formation of a Persecuting Society: Authority and Deviance in Western Europe 950-1250, 2nd ed (2007) | Wiley Online Library
The 10th to 13thCs in Europe saw the appearance of popular heresy and the establishment of the Inquisition, the expropriation and mass murder of Jews, and the propagation of elaborate measures to segregate lepers from the healthy and curtail their civil rights. These were traditionally seen as distinct and separate developments, and explained in terms of the problems which their victims presented to medieval society. In this stimulating book, first published in 1987 and now widely regarded as a a classic in medieval history, Moore argues that the coincidences in the treatment of these and other minority groups cannot be explained independently, and that all are part of a pattern of persecution which now appeared for the first time to make Europe become, as it has remained, a persecuting society. Moore updates and extends his original argument with a new, final chapter, "A Persecuting Society". Here and in a new preface and critical bibliography, he considers the impact of a generation's research and refines his conception of the "persecuting society" accordingly, addressing criticisms of the 1st ed. -- free access to pdfs of new preface, a final bibliographical essay & the bibliography & index -- downloaded all pdfs but index to Air
books  bibliography  medieval_history  religious_history  political_history  social_history  10thC  11thC  12thC  13thC  persecution  heterodoxy  heresy  Judaism  Inquisition  Papacy  religious_culture  civil_liberties  authority  deviance  norms  hierarchy  Crusades  power  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Garicano, Luis and Rossi-Hansberg, Esteban (2014) - Knowledge-based hierarchies: using organizations to understand the economy - LSE Research Online
Via Economic Principals -- We argue that incorporating the decision of how to organize the acquisition, use, and communication of knowledge into economic models is essential to understand a wide variety of economic phenomena. We survey the literature that has used knowledge-based hierarchies to study issues like the evolution of wage inequality, the growth and productivity of firms, economic development, the gains from international trade, as well as offshoring and the formation of international production teams, among many others. We also review the nascent empirical literature that has, so far, confirmed the importance of organizational decisions and many of its more salient implications. - downloaded to iPhone
paper  lit_survey  economic_theory  economic_growth  productivity  inequality  labor  wages  supply_chains  teams  off-shoring  trade  emerging_markets  corporate_finance  development  MNCs  power  power-asymetric  firm-theory  organization  hierarchy  know-how  technology  innovation  superstars  middle_class  working_class  social_stratification  social_theory  institutional_economics  globalization  economy_of_scale  increasing_returns  IP  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Collin Finn - Two Kinds of Social Epistemology « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (8): 79-104. (2013)
Steve Fuller’s programme of Social Epistemology was initiated some 25 years ago with the launching of a journal and the publication of a monograph with those very words as their title. Since then, the programme has evolved in a constant critical dialogue with other players in the fields of epistemology and science studies. Fuller’s main confrontation has been with analytic epistemology which, in its classical form, adopts a contrary position on most key issues. However, analytic epistemologists have gradually moved in the direction of Fuller’s views and even adopted the term “social epistemology” for their emerging position. Still, substantial disagreement remains between the two identically named programmes with regard to the proper philosophical approach to knowledge as a social phenomenon; in this article, I try to pinpoint the locus of this disagreement. However, Fuller has also been engaged in minor skirmishes with his Science Studies fellows; I also examine these clashes. Finally, I express my wishes concerning the future direction of social epistemology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
epistemology  epistemology-social  analytical_philosophy  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  history_of_science  scientific_method  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  social_theory  downloaded  EF-add  cognition  cognition-social  institutions  power  power-knowledge  knowledge  knowledge_economy  power-asymmetric  Rawls  democracy  expertise  epistemology-naturalism  human_nature  posthumanism  post-truth  Latour  humanities  humanism  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  political_culture  cultural_capital  social_capital  neoliberalism  instrumentalist 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
George Steinmetz - William Sewell's "Logics of History" as a Framework for an Integrated Social Science | JSTOR: Social Science History, Vol. 32, No. 4 (Winter, 2008), pp. 535-553
This essay surveys the contributions of William H. Sewell Jr.'s "Logics of History" and concludes that the book sketches a compelling agenda for an integrated historical social science. The author first summarizes Sewell's ontological and epistemological claims concerning social structure and event, history and temporality, and sociohistorical causality. The author then discusses five main areas in which ambiguities in Sewell's approach might be clarified or his arguments pushed farther. These concern (1) the relationship between historical event and traumatic event; (2) the idea of the unprecedented event or "antistructure"; (3) the theory of semiosis underlying Sewell's notion of a multiplicity of structures; and (4) the compatibilities and differences between the concepts of structure and mechanism (here the author argues that social structures are the distinctive "mechanisms" of the human or social sciences). Finally, (5) Sewell's call for "a more robust sense of the social" in historical writing locates the "social" mainly at the level of the metafield of power, or what regulation theory calls the mode of regulation; the author suggests a possible integration of this society-level concept with Pierre Bourdieu 's theory of semiautonomous fields. -- This is a Duke journal that only uses jstor for posting abstracts for the entire history of the journal
article  find  libraries  social_theory  historiography  historical_sociology  philosophy_of_social_science  methodology  mechanisms-social_theory  structure  event  causation-social  power  levels_of_analyis  Bourdieu  fields  ontology-social  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone - More Social Movements or Fewer? Beyond Political Opportunity Structures to Relational Fields | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 3/4, (Jun. - Aug., 2004), pp. 333-365
Theory and Society - Special Issue: Current Routes to the Study of Contentious Politics and Social Change -- If social movements are an attempt by "outsiders" to gain leverage within politics, then one might expect the global spread of democracy to reduce social movement activity. This article argues the reverse. Granted, many past social movements, such as women's rights and civil rights, were efforts to empower the disenfranchised. However, this is not typical. Rather, social movements and protest tactics are more often part of a portfolio of efforts by politically active leaders and groups to influence politics. Indeed, as representative governance spreads, with the conviction by all parties that governments should respond to popular choice, then social movements and protest will also spread, as a normal element of democratic politics. Social movements should therefore not be seen as simply a matter of repressed forces fighting states; instead they need to be situated in a dynamic relational field in which the ongoing actions and interests of state actors, allied and counter-movement groups, and the public at large all influence social movement emergence, activity, and outcomes. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  power  power-asymmetric  democracy  political_participation  government-forms  governing_class  elites  grassroots  representative_institutions  reform-political  reform-social  reform-economic  franchise  accountability  interest_groups  voice  civil_liberties  women-rights  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone and Bert Useem - Putting Values and Institutions Back into the Theory of Strategic Action Fields | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 30, No. 1 (MARCH 2012), pp. 37-47
Neil Fligstein and Doug McAdam have presented a new theory of how collective action creates the structure and dynamics of societies. At issue is the behavior of social movements, organizations, states, political parties, and interest groups. They argue that all of these phenomena are produced by social actors (which may be individuals or groups) involved in strategic action. This allows Fligstein and McAdam to advance a unified theory of "strategic action fields." This article takes issue with aspects of Fligstein and McAdam's important contribution. We argue that that all organizations are not essentially the same; in addition to the location and interactions of their strategic actors, their dynamics are shaped and distinguished by differing values and norms, by the autonomy of institutions embedded in strategic action fields, and by the fractal relationships that nested fields have to broader principles of justice and social organization that span societies. We also criticize the view that social change can be conceptualized solely in terms of shifting configurations of actors in strategic action fields. Rather, any theory of social action must distinguish between periods of routine contention under the current institutions and norms and exceptional challenges to the social order that aim to transform those institutions and norms. -- Sage paywall on a 3 year delay for jstor
article  jstor  paywall  social_theory  collective_action  social_movements  organizations  nation-state  parties  partisanship  institutions  strategic_action_fields  political_culture  civil_society  social_order  institutional_change  old_institutionalism  new_institutionalism  rational_choice  norms  contention  conflict  social_process  change-social  change-intellectual  levels_of_analyis  networks-political  networks-social  networks  networks-policy  networks-religious  power  action-social  action-theory  revolutions  reform-social  reform-political  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
ECONOMICS AS SOCIAL THEORY - Routledge Series edited by Tony Lawson - Titles List
Social theory is experiencing something of a revival within economics. Critical analyses of the particular nature of the subject matter of social studies and of the types of method, categories and modes of explanation that can legitimately be endorsed for the scientific study of social objects, are re-emerging. Economists are again addressing such issues as the relationship between agency and structure, between the economy and the rest of society, and between inquirer and the object of inquiry. There is renewed interest in elaborating basic categories such as causation, competition, culture, discrimination,evolution, money, need, order, organisation, power, probability, process, rationality, technology, time, truth, uncertainty and value, etc. The objective for this series is to facilitate this revival further. In contemporary economics the label `theory' has been appropriated by a group that confines itself to largely a-social, a-historical, mathematical `modelling'. Economics as Social Theory thus reclaims the `theory' label, offering a platform for alternative, rigorous, but broader and more critical conceptions of theorising.
books  social_theory  economic_theory  social_sciences  intellectual_history  political_economy  causation-social  economic_sociology  economic_culture  rationality-economics  rational_choice  rationality-bounded  rational_expectations  critical_realism  evolution-social  history_of_science  historical_sociology  agency-structure  power  power-asymmetric  business-and-politics  capitalism  capital_as_power  Marxist  Post-Keynesian  epistemology  epistemology-social  conventions  social_order  civil_society  public_policy  public_goods  anarchism  competition  financialization  development  economic_growth 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Nitzan, Jonathan - From Olson to Veblen: The Stagflationary Rise of Distributional Coalitions (1992) | bnarchives
Paper read at the annual meeting of the History of Economics Society. Fairfax, Virginia. 1-2 June (1992). pp. 1-75. -- This essay deals with the relationship between stagflation and the process of restructuring. The literature dealing with the interaction of stagnation and inflation is invariably based on some explicit or implicit assumptions about economic structure, but there are very few writings which concentrate specifically on the link between the macroeconomic phenomenon of stagflation and the process of structural change. Of the few who dealt with this issue, we have chosen to focus mainly on two important contributors – Mancur Olson and Thorstein Veblen. The first based his theory on neoclassical principles, attempting to demonstrate their universality across time and place. The second was influenced by the historical school and concentrated specifically on the institutional features of modern capitalism. Despite the fundamental differences in their respective frameworks, both writers arrive at a similar conclusion, namely, that the phenomenon of stagflation is inherent in the dynamic evolution of collective economic action, particularly in the rise and consolidation of 'distributional coalitions.' -- Keywords: absentee ownership, intangible assets, big business, bonds, capital, accumulation, capitalism, collective action, collusion, corporation, credit, degree of monopoly, distributional coalitions, excess capacity, finance, immaterial wealth, income distribution, industry, inflation, institutions, interest, labour, liabilities, machine process, material wealth, neoclassical economics, normal rate of return, power, price, profit, productivity, property, sabotage, scarcity, stagnation, stagflation, stocks, tangible assets, technology, United States, value
paper  US_economy  economic_history  economic_theory  institutional_economics  Veblen  political_economy  Olson_Mancur  public_choice  collective_action  capital  capitalism  power  power-asymmetric  business-and-politics  interest_groups  interest_rates  interest_rate-natural  profit  corporate_ownership  managerialism  industry  production  productivity  productivity-labor_share  sabotage-by_business  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  wealth  asset_prices  financial_system  credit  competition  monopolies  oligopoly  prices  inflation  stagnation  property  technology  capital_markets  antitrust  neoclassical_economics  change-economic  change-social  levels_of_analyis  mesolevel  microfoundations  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Bichler, Shimshon and Nitzan, Jonathan - Differential Accumulation (Reprint) | bnarchives
Dissident Voice. 28 December 2011. pp. 1-13. (Magazine Article; English). -- This is the latest version of this eprint. -- Early in 2011, we received a surprising invitation from the Financial Times Lexicon. A reader had suggested that an entry on differential accumulation be added to the Lexicon, and the online content developer asked us if we would be willing to write it. Our first thought was that this must have been a mistake. . . . Keywords: capital, capitalization, differential accumulation, finance, investment, modes of power, sabotage -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  capital_as_power  capital  capitalism  capitalization  accumulation  accumulation-differential  financial_system  finance_capital  financialization  investment  power  power-asymmetric  sabotage-by_business  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark S. Mizruchi - Berle and Means Revisited: The Governance and Power of Large U.S. Corporations | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 5 (Oct., 2004), pp. 579-617
In The Modern Corporation and Private Property (1932), Berle and Means warned of the concentration of economic power brought on by the rise of the large corporation and the emergence of a powerful class of professional managers, insulated from the pressure not only of stockholders, but of the larger public as well. In the tradition of Thomas Jefferson, Berle and Means warned that the ascendance of management control and unchecked corporate power had potentially serious consequences for the democratic character of the United States. Social scientists who drew on Berle and Means in subsequent decades presented a far more benign interpretation of the rise of managerialism, however. For them, the separation of ownership from control actually led to an increased level of democratization in the society as a whole. Beginning in the late 1960s, sociologists and other social scientists rekindled the debate over ownership and control, culminating in a series of rigorous empirical studies on the nature of corporate power in American society. In recent years, however, sociologists have largely abandoned the topic, ceding it to finance economists, legal scholars, and corporate strategy researchers. In this article, I provide a brief history of the sociological and finance/legal/strategy debates over corporate ownership and control. I discuss some of the similarities between the two streams of thought, and I discuss the reasons that the issue was of such significance sociologically. I then argue that by neglecting this topic in recent years, sociologists have failed to contribute to an understanding of some of the key issues in contemporary business behavior. I provide brief reviews of four loosely developed current perspectives and then present an argument of my own about the changing nature of the U.S. corporate elite over the past three decades. I conclude with a call for sociologists to refocus their attention on an issue that, however fruitfully handled by scholars in other fields, cries out for sociological analysis. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  US_economy  US_politics  political_economy  political_sociology  economic_sociology  law-and-finance  law-and-economics  capitalism  corporations  MNCs  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  capital_markets  shareholder_value  shareholders  principal-agent  management  managerialism  corporate_citizenship  corporate_control_markets  corporate_law  M&A  business-and-politics  business-norms  power  power-asymmetric  status  interest_groups  lobbying  regulation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
KATRINA FORRESTER -- CITIZENSHIP, WAR, AND THE ORIGINS OF INTERNATIONAL ETHICS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, 1960–1975 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 773-801. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
KATRINA FORRESTER - St John's College, Cambridge -- This article examines a series of debates about civil disobedience, conscription, and the justice of war that took place among American liberal philosophers, lawyers, and activists during the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. It argues that these debates fundamentally reshaped American political philosophy, by shifting the focus from the welfare state to the realm of international politics. In order to chart this transition from the domestic to the international, this article focuses on the writings of two influential political theorists, John Rawls and Michael Walzer. The turn to international politics in American political philosophy has its origins, in part, in their arguments about domestic citizenship. In tracing these origins, this article situates academic philosophical arguments alongside debates among the American public at large. It offers a first account of the history of analytical political philosophy during the 1960s and 1970s, and argues that the role played by the Vietnam War in this history, though underappreciated, is significant. -* I would like to thank Duncan Bell, Kenzie Bok, Christopher Brooke, Adam Lebowitz, Peter Mandler, Jamie Martin, Samuel Moyn, Andrew Preston, David Runciman, Tim Shenk, Brandon Terry, Mira Siegelberg, Joshua Specht, and two anonymous reviewers for their comments
article  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  20thC  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  post-WWII  Vietnam_War  citizenship  civil_liberties  IR-liberalism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  liberalism  Rawls  Walzer  power  power-asymmetric  justice  welfare_state  just_war  moral_philosophy  US_government  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Chris Dillow - Stumbling and Mumbling: Am I a Tory? - July 2014
Am I a Tory, or is Jesse Norman a socialist? I'm prompted to ask because the other day he reminded me of his superb lecture (pdf) on Burke and Oakeshott. What I mean is that, as Jesse says, both men, in their different ways, supported tradition against rationalism. This anti-rationalism, says Jesse, is "one of the central intellectual roots of conservatism through the ages." -- Jesse continues: Rationalism can be seen in totalitarian societies, which seek to capture and organize the staggeringly diverse potential of human beings, and frame it on some Procrustean bed". It certainly can. But for me, managerialist rationalism is also totalitarian, in the sense both that it wants to extend to places such as universities where it is unwarranted, and that it seeks to suppress diversity in favour of conformist careerism. So, it seems that me, Jesse, Burke and Oakehott have much in common. And, indeed, Jesse is well aware (pdf) that crony capitalism and excessive CEO pay are inconsistent with conservative tradition he praises. -- downloaded pdfs
political_economy  political_philosophy  political_culture  conservatism  Tories  Burke  Oakeshott  MacIntyre  managerialism  totalitarian  ideology  capitalism  power  crony_capitalism  corporate_governance  rationalist 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Epistemic Status of the Human Sciences: Critical Reflections on Foucault (2008) :: SSRN
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 279 -- Any reader of Foucault's corpus recognizes fairly quickly that it is animated by an ethical impulse, namely, to liberate individuals from a kind of oppression from which they suffer. This oppression, however, does not involve the familiar tyranny of the Leviathan or the totalitarian state; it exploits instead values that the victim of oppression herself accepts, and which then leads the oppressed agent to be complicit in her subjugation. It also depends, crucially, on a skeptical thesis about the epistemology of the social sciences. It is this conjunction of claims - that individuals oppress themselves in virtue of certain moral and epistemic norms they accept - that marks Foucault's uniquely disturbing contribution to the literature whose diagnostic aim is, with Max Weber, to understand the oppressive character of modernity, and whose moral aim is, with the Frankfurt School, human liberation and human flourishing. I offer here both a reconstruction of Foucault's project - focusing on the role that ethical and epistemic norms play in how agents subjugate themselves - and some modestly critical reflections on his project, especially the weaknesses in his critique of the epistemic standing of the human sciences. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 18 -- Keywords: Foucault, Nietzsche, human sciences, epistemology -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  social_theory  20thC  Germany  France  Foucault  Weber  Frankfurt_School  ethics  power  institutions  social_order  modernity  flourishing  social_sciences-post-WWII  epistemology-social  norms  socialization  self  morality-conventional  morality-critics  scepticism  agency  agency-structure  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Morality Critics [chapter] :: SSRN - in THE OXFORD HANDBOOK OF CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY, B. Leiter & M. Rosen, eds., Oxford University Press, 2007
U of Texas Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 114 -- One striking feature of post-Kantian philosophy in Europe has been the emergence of morality critics, philosophers who, contra the popular consensus, dispute the value of morality and the moral life. Their views find a faint echo in the work of some Anglophone moral philosophers (Philippa Foot and Bernard Williams are the main exemplars), but, as we will see, the "Continental" criticisms of morality generally cut far deeper and more radically. -- These Continental morality critics object that morality in practice is an obstacle to human flourishing itself. So understood, this attack on morality raises two immediate questions. First, the Continental morality critics are plainly not without ethical views of their own - ..broadly, about the good life for (some or all) human beings - since it is on the basis of these views that they criticize "morality." -- we can usefully divide Continental critics of morality into two camps: .... In the first camp ... see the individual's acceptance of morality as such as an obstacle to the individual's flourishing; in different ways, Nietzsche and Freud .... In the second camp ... see morality as among the "ideological" instruments that sustain socio-economic relations that are obstacles to individual flourishing. On this second account - ..Marx and perhaps some of ..the Frankfurt School - it is not allegiance to morality per se that thwarts individual flourishing, but rather the role such allegiance plays in sustaining certain socio-economic relations.. We will call the former "Direct Morality Critics" and the latter "Indirect Morality Critics." (Foucault straddles both approaches, and so we will discuss him in a transitional section.) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  social_theory  metaethics  continental_philosophy  cultural_critique  Germany  France  Marx  Nietzsche  Freud  Frankfurt_School  Foucault  morality-Nietzche  morality-conventional  normativity  human_nature  social_order  ideology  bourgeoisie  power  morality-critics  Williams_Bernard  values  ethics  human_condition  flourishing  Aristotelian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jan Pakulski - The Weberian Foundations of Modern Elite Theory and Democratic Elitism | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 37, No. 1 (139) (2012), pp. 38-56
Max Weber's portrayal of modern elites shows clear proximity to "classical elite theory," modern "elite perspective," and "democratic elitism." This portrayal -stressing power concentration in the state apparata, legitimacy of rule, centrality of leadership groups, and the capacity of these groups to form cohesive power actors -anticipates many central themes in the work of contemporary elite theorists, such as John Higley, whose theoretical attention focuses on patterns of elite integration and ruling consensus as the key "elite variables." Higley's seminal studies, especially those linking such elite integration and ruling consensus with political outcomes and regime types, combine the classical elite-theoretical heritage with the Weberian "supplements," the latter stressing the variable internal structure of "ruling minorities" that form in modern nation states. The Weberian elite perspective and theoretical model have been substantiated, elaborated and extended in research undertaken by John Higley and his collaborators. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  Weber  social_theory  political_culture  elites  power  legitimacy  groups-cohesion  ruling_class  democracy  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kurtuluş Gemici - Uncertainty, the problem of order, and markets: a critique of Beckert, "Theory and Society", May 2009 | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 41, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 107-118
Jens Beckert's 2009 article on the constitution and dynamics of markets is a bold attempt to define a novel research agenda. Deeming uncertainty and coordination essential for the constitution of social action in markets, Beckert proposes a framework centered on the resolution of three coordination problems: valuation, cooperation, and competition. The empirical study of these three coordination problems has the potential to contribute considerably to the sociological analysis of markets. However, the assertion that such a theoretical vantage point can explain the constitution and dynamics of markets is not compelling because it (1) conflates social interaction with social structures, (2) fails to address power relations, institutions, and macro-level structures, and (3) neglects the historically contingent and socially contested nature of markets themselves. The present article shows that these three pitfalls are the result of starting from the problem of order and building upon uncertainty as the basis of action in markets, lending the suggested framework a methodologically individualist bent. Therefore, Beckert's suggested framework is in danger of mystifying the very power relations, institutions, and macro-level structures that are at the heart of the constitution and dynamics of markets. -- paywall -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  economic_sociology  markets  institutions  networks-exchange  networks-information  networks-business  action-social  power  microfoundations  agency-structure  bibliography 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Noah McCormack - Friends without Benefits | Blog | The Baffler
Zappos has apparently decided it is no longer good enough to be a qualified hire who is interested in the job. An interested applicant must also spend unremunerated time pretending to engage in virtual social relationships with existing employees. The American economy has become so warped that it now appears reasonable to a subsidiary of a leading public company to require people who may never be hired to spent large amounts of time pretending to be friends with people with whom they may never work. This represents the convergence of at least three disturbing trends in the current American economy: the long-term unemployment of large numbers of people and the consequent power given to any company which is hiring; the technology industry’s revival of old prejudices under catchy new names; and the way that technology increasingly erodes any sense that our work selves are merely a component of our lives, rather than the entirety of our existence.
US_society  unemployment  Labor_markets  social_media  employers  power  labor  inequality  markets_in_everything  discrimination  work  work-life_balance 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Chris Dillow - Stumbling and Mumbling: Housing vs financial wealth - May 2014
Chris Giles deserves great credit for his careful scrutiny of Thomas Piketty's data, and Piketty also deserves credit for the openness of that data and for his generous response to Chris. Like Justin Wolfers and Paul Krugman, though, I wonder just how damaging Chris's critique is of Piketty's central thesis. Chris says that, in the UK, "there seems to be little consistent evidence of any upward trend in wealth inequality of the top 1 percent." He points to ONS data showing that the top 1% owned 12.5% of all wealth in 2010-12. However, this proportion is depressed because house prices are high. These mean that the owner of quite a modest home has substantial wealth which naturally depresses the proportion of wealth held by the really well-off. If we look only at financial wealth, we see a different picture. The top 1% owns 36.4% of all financial wealth, and the top 10% owns 75.9% (table 2.6b of this Excel file). As the ONS points out, the Lorenz curve for financial wealth is much steeper than that for property wealth. If you believe the ONS is under-counting offshore wealth, inequality is even greater. This poses the question: should we conflate housing and financial wealth as Chris and Thomas both do? Perhaps not, because housing wealth might not have as much "wealthiness" as financial wealth, in four senses: [interesting discussion and links]
economic_history  economic_theory  political_economy  Piketty  inequality  UK_economy  wealth  housing  1-percent  capitalism  power  plutocracy  links  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Corey Robin - The Republican War on Workers' Rights - NYTimes.com - May 2014
In 2010, the Republicans won control of the executive and legislative branches in 11 states (there are now more than 20 such states). Inspired by business groups like the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Association of Manufacturers, they proceeded to rewrite the rules of work, passing legislation designed to enhance the position of employers at the expense of employees. The University of Oregon political scientist Gordon Lafer, who wrote an eye-opening report on this topic last October for the Economic Policy Institute, a liberal think tank in Washington, looked at dozens of bills affecting workers. The legislation involved unemployment insurance, the minimum wage, child labor, collective bargaining, sick days, even meal breaks. Despite frequent Republican claims to be defending local customs and individual liberty, Mr. Lafer found a “cookie-cutter” pattern to their legislation. Not only did it consistently favor employers over workers, it also tilted toward big government over local government. And it often abridged the economic rights of individuals.
US_politics  political_economy  GOP  state_government  business  business-and-politics  labor  wages  civil_liberties  inequality  power 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - ON DESCRIBING THE OTHER | Pandaemonium - Sept 2012
This first extract is from Chapter 8 of my book The Meaning of Race; the chapter opens with a discussion of Edward Said’s argument in Orientalism and moves on to discuss poststructuralist/postmodernist ideas of difference, equality, universalism and the human. (And before anyone misunderstands what I am saying, I am not suggesting that Said was a poststructuralist or postmodernist, simply that he drew upon certain poststructuralist themes.) This edited extract takes in the latter part of the discussion of Said’s work and the beginning of the discussion of Foucault’s notion of discourse and of poststructuralist ideas of the ‘Other’. -- also discusses Levinas and swipes at Rorty -- comments have a useful framing of Foucault and "power"
poststructuralist  postmodern  post-colonial  orientalism  power  discourse  epistemology-social  relativism  Foucault  Rorty 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone - From Structure to Agency to Process: The Evolution of Charles Tilly's Theories of Social Action | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 358-367
"From Structure to Agency to Process: The Evolution of Charles Tilly's Theories of Social Action as Reflected in His Analyses of Contentious Politics" in special issue - Remembering Charles Tilly -- Charles Tilly's social theories shifted over the course of his career from an early focus on quantitative and macro-sociological approaches to a later focus on relations and agency. His studies of state-making also shifted, from a focus on conflict and capitalism to explorations of democracy. This paper details these shifts and places them in the context of broader trends in comparative-historical and political sociology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  change-social  conflict  structure  agency  agency-structure  social_process  relations-social  causation-social  democracy  nation-state  nationalism  economic_sociology  power  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Mustafa Emirbayer - Tilly and Bourdieu | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 400-422
The first part of this essay discusses the most important similarities between the sociological visions of Pierre Bourdieu and Charles Tilly; the second part surveys the key differences. The conclusion then offers a critical assessment of these two thinkers' respective contributions to social science. -- huge references list -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  cultural_capital  Tilly  Bourdieu  change-social  power  power-symbolic  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Ann R. Tickamyer - Between Modernism and Postmodernism: Lenski's "Power and Privilege" in the Study of Inequalities | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Jun., 2004), pp. 247-257
Special issue - Religion, Stratification, and Evolution in Human Societies: Essays in Honor of Gerhard E. Lenski -- Gerhard Lenski's classical work on stratification, "Power and Privilege", was an effort to reconcile and to synthesize different approaches to inequality incorporated into the grand theories of the day. It anticipated a variety of developments in the theoretical and empirical understanding of inequalities. These include recognition of the multiplicity of inequalities; emphasis on race, class, gender, and other sources and systems of domination and subordination; and the intersection of these factors in complex patterns to create different standpoints and life consequences. The result was ground-breaking work that underscored the multidimensionality of stratification systems, the variability of their influences, and the notion that their intersection in itself has implications beyond the sum of component parts. In these ways his work foreshadowed the possibilities of finding common ground between modern and postmodern perspectives, to make Lenski the last grand theorist of modernity and a forerunner of postmodern theories of inequality.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  structure  status  inequality  feminism  post-colonial  postmodern  power  power-symbolic  classes  race  gender  stratification  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Joseph M. Whitmeyer - Interest-Network Structures in Exchange Networks | JSTOR: Sociological Perspectives, Vol. 42, No. 1 (Spring, 1999), pp. 23-47
Studies of power in exchange networks have concentrated overwhelmingly on how the power distribution in the network is affected by the network structure. In this article I look at how one type of interest-network structure--the distribution of interest coincidence among network members--affects the power distribution in exchange networks. All exclusionary networks--networks in which power differences stem from differential ability to exclude exchange partners from exchange--have assumed an interest-network structure of homogeneous interests among network members. All connected actors have opposing interests within exchange; when one partner does better the other does worse. Here I allow connected pairs of actors to vary in the degree to which their interests are opposing or coincident. This creates the possibility of a wide variety of structures of interest coincidence in exchange networks. Using two different methods--an analytic method derived from power-dependence principles and a modification of a widely used computer program simulating exchange in networks--I show that, given the assumptions embodied in those methods, the interest-network structure of interest coincidence can have substantial effects on the power rankings of network members. -- limits of narrowly conceived rationality in game theory -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  networks  networks-exchange  game_theory  rationality-economics  power  structure  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
William A. Jackson - Capabilities, Culture and Social Structure | JSTOR: Review of Social Economy, Vol. 63, No. 1 (MARCH 2005), pp. 101-124
Sen's capability approach has a culturally specific side, with capabilities influenced by social structures and institutions. Although Sen acknowledges this, he expresses his theory in individualistic terms and makes little allowance for culture or social structure. The present paper draws from recent social theory to discuss how the capability approach could be developed to give an explicit treatment of cultural and structural matters. Capabilities depend not only on entitlements but on institutional roles and personal relations: these can be represented openly if capabilities are disaggregated into individual, social and structural capacities. The three layers interact, and a full analysis of capabilities should consider them all. A stratified method implies that raising entitlements will not on its own be enough to enhance capabilities and that cultural and structural changes will be needed. -- good references -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  economic_theory  economic_sociology  Sen  capabilities  economic_culture  institutional_economics  institution-building  networks  networks-social  structure  structuralist  power  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan H. Turner - Toward a General Sociological Theory of the Economy | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Jun., 2004), pp. 229-246
Vol. 22, No. 2, Religion, Stratification, and Evolution in Human Societies: Essays in Honor of Gerhard E. Lenski -- In the spirit of Gerhard Lenski's macro-level analysis of stratification and societal evolution, a theory of the economy is presented. Like Lenski's work, this theory emphasizes population and power as they interact with production and distribution dynamics. Macro-level social organization in general, and economic processes in particular, are viewed as driven by the forces of population, power, production, and distribution. For each force, a theoretical proposition is presented. Forces are all implicated in each other; the resulting set of principles provides a view of how production and distribution, as the core of an economy, are embedded in population and power processes, and vice versa. The end result is a more general macro-level theory that captures the spirit and substance of Lenski's models of societal organization.
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  economic_sociology  population  power  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Deborah Boucoyannis - The Equalizing Hand: Why Adam Smith Thought the Market Should Produce Wealth Without Steep Inequality | Cambridge Journals Online - Perspectives on Politics - Dec 2013
For long overview of the article, see her post from the LSE blog -- Perspectives on Politics, 11, pp 1051-1070. doi:10.1017/S153759271300282X. - That the market economy inevitably leads to inequality is widely accepted today, with disagreement confined to the desirability of redistributive action, its extent, and the role of government in the process. The canonical text of liberal political economy, Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations, is assumed even in the most progressive interpretations to accept inequality, rationalized as the inevitable trade-off for increasing prosperity compared to less developed but more equal economies. I argue instead that Smith's system, if fully implemented, would not allow steep inequalities to arise. In Smith, profits should be low and labor wages high, legislation in favor of the worker is “always just and equitable,” land should be distributed widely and evenly, inheritance laws liberalized, taxation can be high if it is equitable, and the science of the legislator is necessary to put the system in motion and keep it aligned. Market economies are made in Smith's system. Political theorists and economists have highlighted some of these points, but the counterfactual “what would the distribution of wealth be if all the building blocks were ever in place?” has not been posed. Doing so encourages us to question why steep inequality is accepted as a fact, instead of a pathology that the market economy was not supposed to generate in the first place. --Deborah Boucoyannis is Assistant Professor at the University of Virginia (dab5fw@virginia.edu). Her interests lie in the historical preconditions for the emergence of the liberal order and of constitutionalism.
paper  paywall  political_economy  intellectual_history  economic_theory  Smith  18thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  inequality  wages  taxes  landowners  monopolies  rent-seeking  luxury  consumer_demand  competition  profit  regulation  power  investment  capital  neoliberalism  Labor_markets  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Deborah Boucoyannis - For Adam Smith, inequality was contrary to the Wealth of Nations | British Politics and Policy at LSE – Feb 2014
Overview of her article in Perspectives on Politics - see Cambridge Journals bookmark - The assumption that Adam Smith accepted inequality as the necessary trade-off for a more prosperous economy is wrong, writes Deborah Boucoyannis. In reality, Smith’s system precluded steep inequalities not out of a normative concern with equality but by virtue of the design that aimed to maximise the wealth of nations. Much like many progressive critics of current inequality, Smith targets rentier practices by the rich and powerful as distorting economic outcomes.
paper  political_economy  intellectual_history  economic_theory  Smith  18thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  inequality  wages  taxes  landowners  monopolies  rent-seeking  luxury  consumer_demand  competition  profit  regulation  power  investment  capital  neoliberalism  Labor_markets  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrik Aspers - Nietzsche's Sociology | JSTOR: Sociological Forum, Vol. 22, No. 4 (Dec., 2007), pp. 474-499
Downloaded pdf to Note -- large bibliography looks especially interesting re placing Nietzsche's social constructivism in context of 19thC social sciences and emerging discipline of sociology especially in Germany. -- The aim of this article is to present that part of Friedrich Nietzsche's work that is of special interest to sociologists. To do this, I discuss the relationship between Nietzsche's work and the sociology both of today and of his own time. The most important idea is that he saw reality as a social construction. The idea of social construction is related to the beliefs and values, power and interests of the actors. Nietzsche's discussions of power and of the individual vs. the collective are also analyzed.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  social_sciences  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  sociology  Weber  constructivism  belief  values  power  individualism  subject  civil_society  community  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Garnar - Power, Action, Signs: Between Peirce and Foucault | JSTOR: Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, Vol. 42, No. 3 (Summer, 2006), pp. 347-366
This paper argues that pragmatists must be more cognizant of the concept of "power" and its consequences. To demonstrate this, I show how Foucault's analytics of power can be brought into Peirce s theory of signs. Central to both philosophers is the role of action. Using the concept of action, I explain that Foucault s conception of power, action on actions, can be understood as structuring Peircian habits, which are rules for action. From here I build out to Peirce s semiotics, illustrating how power channels the meanings of signs in certain directions. The rest of the paper is dedicated to reconstructing in light of Foucault Peirces claim that the subject is nothing more than the signs it uses. I argue that any understanding of the subject must account for the subject being distributed through a field of power. The paper concludes by proposing a new "philosophy of the subject" which seeks to reconcile Foucaults concerns with those of pragmatism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  pragmatism  action-theory  subject  subjectivity  semiotics  power  power-symbolic  Peirce  Dewey  Foucault  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Marianne Constable - Foucault & Walzer: Sovereignty, Strategy & the State | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Winter, 1991), pp. 269-293
Uses Walzer attack on Foucault as anarchist, nihilist etc to flesh out what about liberal political theory Foucault rejects or places in a different social position than liberals do. -- Michael Walzer faults the political theory of Michel Foucault for failing to provide an account of the liberal state and the rule of law or to provide the kind of knowledge that regulates disciplinary arrangements in society. This article assesses Walzer's criticism in light of Foucault's analysis of liberal political theory. It concludes that Walzer's theory, couched in the discourse of sovereignty, employs disciplinary strategies of power, akin to those Foucault describes, to combat the tyrannical state. -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  power  social_theory  mass_culture  liberalism  rule_of_law  nation-state  sovereignty  tyranny  resistance_theory  judiciary  legitimacy  democracy  Foucault  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Johnson - Communication, Criticism, and the Postmodern Consensus: An Unfashionable Interpretation of Michel Foucault | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Aug., 1997), pp. 559-583
Downloaded pdf to Note -- useful bibliography of lots of interpretations of Foucault with which he takes issue -- the epigraph by Foucault re critique examining buried assumptions and denaturalizing commonly received social arrangements and what passes for knowledge -- why Burke so bent out of shape by Bolingbroke in the 1750s and returns to him and the freethinkers in 1790s
article  jstor  political_philosophy  power  communication  discourse  critique  Foucault  Derrida  postmodern  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Power: A Response to Critics [eScholarship] | Rethinking History (2000)
This is Bevir's response to the roundtable of articles on his book, The Logic of the History of Ideas -- Additional Info: This is an electronic version of an article published in Rethinking History© 2000 Copyright Taylor & Francis; Rethinking History is available online at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13642529.asp -- Keywords:
hermeneutics, intentionality, philosophy, power, rationality, rhetoric
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  concepts  historical_change  historiography  narrative  White_Hayden  power  Foucault  intentionality  meaning  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rationality  agency  individualism-methodology  philosophy_of_language  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Foucault and Critique: Deploying Agency Against Autonomy [eScholarship]
Published in Political Theory, February 1 1999, Volume 27, No. 1. © 1999 Sage Publications. -- also in jstor -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  jstor  social_theory  self  self-development  autonomy  agency  power  Foucault  norms  poststructuralist  Enlightenment-ongoing  cultural_critique  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Terry M. Moe - Power and Political Institutions | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 3, No. 2 (Jun., 2005), pp. 215-233
Rational choice theory tends to view political institutions as structures of voluntary cooperation that resolve collective action problems and benefit all concerned. Yet the political process often gives rise to institutions that are good for some people and bad for others, depending on who has the power to impose their will. Political institutions may be structures of cooperation, but they may also be structures of power-and the theory does not tell us much about this. As a result, it gives us a one-sided and overly benign view of what political institutions are and do. This problem is not well understood, and indeed is not typically seen as a problem at all. For there is a widespread sense in the rational choice literature that, because power is frequently discussed, it is an integral part of the theory and just as fundamental as cooperation. Confusion on this score has undermined efforts to right the imbalance. My purpose here is to clarify the analytic roles that power and cooperation actually play in this literature, and to argue that a more balanced theory-one that brings power from its periphery to its very core-is both necessary and entirely possible.
article  jstor  social_theory  political_science  political_philosophy  rational_choice  institutions  power  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Joseph Henrich - A cultural species: How culture drove human evolution | Science Brief - Am Psychological Assoc Nov 2011
Recognizing the centrality of culture in human life leads to a novel evolutionary theory of status and status psychology. Evolutionary researchers have tended to assume that human status is merely an extension of primate dominance hierarchies. However, because humans are so heavily dependent on an information economy for survival, our species has evolved a second avenue to social status that operates alongside dominance and has its own suite of cognitive and affective processes. -- This work connects with the emotion literature where prior empirical studies had indicated the existence of two facets for the emotion pride—labeled authentic and hubristic pride. Our ongoing efforts suggest that hubristic pride is associated with dominance-status and authentic pride with prestige-status. -- Much empirical work treats status as a uni-dimensional construct, and then unknowingly operationalizes it as either prestige or dominance, or some mix of the two. -- The cultural evolution of norms over tens or hundreds of thousands of years, and their shaping by cultural group selection, may have driven genetic evolution to create a suite of cognitive adaptations we call norm psychology. -- This suite facilitates, among other things, our identification and learning of social norms, our expectation of sanctions for norm violations, and our ability to internalize normative behavior as motivations. This approach also predicts that humans ought to be inclined to “over-imitate” for two different evolutionary reasons, one informational and the other normative. The informational view hypothesizes that people over-imitate because of an evolved reliance on cultural learning to adaptively acquire complex and cognitively-opaque skills, techniques and practices that have been honed, often in nuanced and subtle ways, over generations. However, because individuals should also “over-imitate” because human societies have long been full of arbitrary norms (behaviors) for which the “correct” performance is crucial to one’s reputation (e.g., rituals, etiquette), we expect future investigations to reveal two different kinds of over-imitation. -- The selection pressures created by reputational damage and punishment for norm-violation may also favour norm-internalization. Neuroeconomic studies suggest that social norms are in fact internalized as intrinsic motivations in people’s brains.
biocultural_evolution  social_psychology  norms  status  power  leaders  learning  children  innate_ideas  incentives  behavioral_economics  moral_psychology  emotions  morality-conventional  sociology_of_religion  trust  cooperation  Innovation  tools  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little - Understanding Society: Power elites after fifty years - July 2009
[Re cimplaints that Mills didn't provide empirical evidence] Regrettably, we don't have a direct ability to carry out this experiment. But we might consider a test case invoking an important decision and a large number of "stakeholders", large and small: the current effort to reform the health care system in the United States. Will this issue be resolved in a fully democratic way, with the interests of all elements of society being represented fairly in the outcome? Or will a relatively small group of corporations, political interests, and professions be in a position to invisibly block reforms that would be democratically selected? And if this is in fact the case, then doesn't that speak loudly in support of the power elite hypothesis?

With the advantage of fifty years of perspective, I think two observations can be made about Mills's book. First, he seems to have diagnosed a very important thread in the sociological reality of power in America -- albeit in a way that is more intuitive and less empirical than contemporary sociologists would prefer. And second, he illustrates a profoundly important ability to exercise his sociological imagination: to arrive at a way of looking at contemporary society that allows us to make sense of many of the observations that press upon us.
social_theory  methodology  US_politics  20thC  21stC  power  elites  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff - C. Wright Mills, Floyd Hunter, and 50 Years of Power Structure Research | Who Rules America
C. Wright Mills, Floyd Hunter, and 50 Years of Power Structure Research
by G. William Domhoff
Keynote address to the Michigan Sociological Association, 2006

NOTE: This document is an extended version of "C. Wright Mills, Power Structure Research, And The Failures of Mainstream Political Science," but without the critique of mainstream political science. Instead, it includes more historical background on power structure research, a more detailed critique of pluralism, and a critique of structural Marxists. It is actually a lightly edited and extended reprint of a journal article with the following citation:

Domhoff, G. William. 2007. "C. Wright Mills, Floyd Hunter, and 50 Years of Power Structure Research." Michigan Sociological Review 21:1-54.
social_theory  US_history  US_economy  US_politics  power  elites  parties  US_politics-race  post-WWII  labor  Labor_markets  public_policy  right-wing  New_Left  New_Deal  neoliberalism  social_sciences-post-WWII  sociology  politics-and-money  elections  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff - Rival Theories of Urban Power | Who Rules America
Attacks especially the pluralist theory - as often further modified by rational choice - which has relied on questionable results of Dahl study of New Haven urban renewal (1961)

Conclusion

Pluralism and Marxism are both based on abstract models of the good society, but they have very different attitudes toward markets. A complete market system is the ideal for pluralists, with a minimal role for government, whereas a planned non-market economy is the ideal for Marxists because they believe that private capitalists will inevitably dominate a market system and exploit workers. Given these strong ideological roots, the two theories are very hard to dislodge despite the many empirical studies of urban power structures that contradict their assumptions and conclusions.

Regime theory comes closer to the mark because it draws on insights from both of these traditions. However, it does not take the systemic power held by landowners and developers seriously enough. It remains at the institutional level as a theory even while recognizing that local growth coalitions are usually the dominant partners in city regimes, except under the unusual circumstances when neighborhoods and activists can forge a progressive coalition that lasts beyond one or two issues and a few elections. The commodified nature of land in the United States, and the conflict between use values and exchange values, is therefore the best starting point for understanding urban power structures.
social_theory  political_culture  power  elites  urban_politics  urban_development  US_politics  US_history  parties  20thC  rational_choice  neoliberalism  Marxist  property  economic_growth  landowners  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff - Interlocking Directorates in the Corporate Community (updated October 2013) | Who Rules America
Describes concepts and research methods for identifying interlocking governance and ownership relations in the corporate community -- used in the new study (separate bookmark) - Interlocks and Interactions Among the Power Elite: The Corporate Community, Think Tanks, Policy-Discussion Groups, and Government by G. William Domhoff, Clifford Staples, & Adam Schneider - August 2013
US_economy  global_economy  business  corporate_governance  power  elites  public_policy  networks  1-percent  NGOs  nonprofit  databases  methodology  social_capital  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff, Clifford Staples, & Adam Schneider: Interlocks and Interactions Among the Power Elite | Who Rules America August 2013
Interlocks and Interactions Among the Power Elite: The Corporate Community, Think Tanks, Policy-Discussion Groups, and Government
by G. William Domhoff, Clifford Staples, & Adam Schneider

This document presents new findings about the American power structure based on the connections among 2,563 corporations, 6 business leadership and policy-discussion groups, 33 prominent think tanks, 82 major foundations, 47 private universities with large endowments, and 19 White House advisory committees for the years 2011-2012. In all, the database used for our study contains 2,750 separate organizations and 9,121 individuals.

It may be the largest and most extensive data set ever assembled for the United States that includes for-profit, nonprofit, and governmental organizations. 35.2% of the individuals in our database have connections to at least two of the organizations in the database.
US_politics  US_economy  US_government  power  elites  political_culture  public_policy  NGOs  university  nonprofit  business  lobbying  corporate_governance  capitalism  classes  networks  inequality  1-percent  databases  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
G. William Domhoff - Basics of Studying Power (2005)| Who Rules America
Intro to the "power research" section of Domhoff website Who Rules America - Nice overview of the methods used to infer the presence of various dimensions of "power" - he adopts Mann's 4 networks theory as orientation for his class dominance approach to modern societies - bibliography
social_theory  methodology  power  elites  networks  public_policy  classes  capitalism  politics-and-money  historical_sociology  bibliography  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Jürgen Kädtler: Financialisation of Capitalist Economies — Bargaining on Conventional Economic Rationalities (2011)
JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 36, No. 4 (138) (2011), pp. 169-191 -- Special Issue: Conventions and Institutions from a Historical Perspective -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The paper deals with financialisation of capitalist economies since the 1990s drawing on a conventional concept of economic rationalities. It is argued that financial rationality is not the mere outcome of relations of power rooted elsewhere but a power resource on its own. It is analysed as one type of bounded rationality among others, the recent predominance of which traces back mainly to a paradigmatic shift in economics. However predominance does not mean unambiguousness. It is demonstrated that financial rationality on the level of companies or companies' strategies always has to be interpreted and specified in the perspective of other rationalities. And effective financialised strategies are always the outcome of bargaining between social actors bringing into play various interests, power resources, and rationalities. The financial and economic crisis since 2007 is perceived as symptomatic for a new kind of systemic instabilities caused by the predominance of financial rationality.
article  jstor  social_theory  economic_sociology  historical_sociology  institutional_economics  markets  financial_system  financialization  rationality-economics  power  financial_crisis  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Richard H. Steinberg and Jonathan M. Zasloff: Power and International Law (2006)
JSTOR: The American Journal of International Law, Vol. 100, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 64-87 -- downloaded pdf to Note-- review of thinking re relationship between international law and power over past century -- 4 periods identified
article  jstor  intellectual_history  international_law  IR  social_sciences-post-WWII  20thC  power  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
J. S. Maloy: The Aristotelianism of Locke's Politics (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 235-257 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Locke takes up Aristotle attack in Plato mixing political with family power, which Filmer adopts
article  jstor  17thC  Britain  political_philosophy  Locke  Filmer  patriarchy  family  power  Aristotle  Plato  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hartman: Culture and Other Theories of Power | USIH Blog Aug 2011
The Gramsci-Genovese theory of culture-as-power—hegemony—was hardly inspirational, and thus seemed to carry less affinity with E.P. Thompson than with his great interlocutor, Louis Althusser. For Althusser, whose imprint on Foucault is apparent even though the student largely left the teacher’s Marxism behind, people were always-already hailed, or in his language, interpellated, into powerful social structures that he called social formations. Culture is powerful, as constitutive of the larger social formation, but “economy is determinant in the last instance.” We might think of our current social formation as neoliberalism, or the information age. In it, culture is very powerful, perhaps more powerful than ever before. Sometimes it feels as if culture is capitalism, and vice versa. But this feeling arises because “economy is determinant in the last instance,” or, capitalism is still first and foremost an economic system even if it seems to shape all of life.

Comments
Tim Lacy: On discourse, though I am an adherent of Hollinger-esque “communities of discourse” thinking in intellectual history, I work really hard to avoid the traps of postmodern/poststructuralism in language theory. To me, the discourse-is-everything line of thinking ultimately works to negate or avoid questions of power and meaning (in speech acts, ultimately) due to diffusion (someone has the power to move people through speech and writing). That’s why I like the communities trope; it provides focus for power centers, but still locates power in various nests of society/culture (not putting too much power in the “hands” of an individual).
social_theory  Marxist  cultural_history  power  hegemony  structuralist  postmodern  philosophy_of_language  capitalism  consumerism  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

1-percent  10thC  11thC  12thC  13thC  16thC  17thC  18thc  19thc  20thc  21stC  access_to_services  accountability  accounting  accumulation  accumulation-differential  action-social  action-theory  agency  agency-structure  altruism  analytical_philosophy  anarchism  anthropology  anti-imperialism  anti-statist  antitrust  Aristotelian  Aristotle  article  asset_prices  authority  autonomy  a_priori  balance-of-power  bargaining  behavioral_economics  belief  bibliography  biocultural_evolution  books  Bourdieu  bourgeoisie  Britain  british_empire  british_history  british_politics  Burke  business  business-and-politics  business-norms  business_influence  business_practices  buy  capabilities  capital  capitalism  capitalization  capital_as_power  capital_markets  causation-social  centralization  central_government  change-economic  change-intellectual  change-social  children  citizenship  civil_liberties  civil_rights  civil_society  classes  cognition  cognition-social  cold_war  collective_action  colonialism  commercial_interest  commons  common_good  communication  community  comparative_anthropology  comparative_law  competition  competition-interstate  concentration-industry  concepts  conflict  conservatism  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  constructivism  consumerism  consumer_demand  contention  continental_philosophy  conventions  cooperation  corporate_citizenship  corporate_control_markets  corporate_finance  corporate_governance  corporate_law  corporate_ownership  corporations  credit  criminal_justice  critical_realism  critique  crony_capitalism  Crusades  CSR  cultural_authority  cultural_capital  cultural_critique  cultural_history  cultural_transmission  databases  decentralization  deliberation-public  democracy  Derrida  development  deviance  Dewey  disclosure  discourse  discrimination  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  downloaded  Durkheim  economic_culture  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_models  economic_sociology  economic_theory  economy_of_scale  EF-add  elections  elites  elite_culture  emerging_markets  emotions  empire-and_business  empires  employers  Enlightenment-ongoing  entre_deux_guerres  epistemology  epistemology-moral  epistemology-naturalism  epistemology-social  eScholarship  ethics  europe  Europe-Early_Modern  event  evidence  evolution-social  expertise  family  feminism  feudalism  fields  Filmer  finance_capital  financialization  financial_crisis  financial_system  find  firm-theory  firms-organization  firms-structure  firms-theory  flourishing  foreign_policy  Foucault  France  franchise  Frankfurt_School  french_revolution  Freud  Galbraith_JK  game_theory  gender  geopolitics  germany  global  globalization  global_economy  global_governance  GOP  governance  governing_class  government-forms  governmentality  grassroots  Grear_Powers  great_powers  groups-cohesion  groups-exclusion  haute_bourgeoisie  hegemony  heresy  heterodoxy  hierarchy  historical_change  historical_sociology  historiography  history  history_of_science  hong_kong  housing  humanism  humanities  human_condition  human_nature  human_rights  ideology  imperialism  incentives  increasing_returns  individualism  individualism-methodology  industry  inequality  inflation  influence-IR  innate_ideas  innovation  Inquisition  Instapaper  institution-building  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutional_investors  institutions  instrumentalist  intellectual_history  intentionality  interest_groups  interest_rate-natural  interest_rates  international_law  international_organizations  international_political_economy  international_system  Internet  intervention  investment  IP  ir  IR-domestic_politics  ir-history  IR-liberalism  iraq  IR_theory  japan  jstor  Judaism  judiciary  jurisprudence  justice  just_war  kindle-available  know-how  knowledge  knowledge_economy  labor  Labor_markets  landed_interest  landowners  Latour  law-and-economics  law-and-finance  leaders  learning  legal_culture  legal_reasoning  legal_system  legal_theory  legitimacy  levels_of_analyis  liberalism  liberal_democracy  libertarianism  libraries  links  lit_survey  lobbying  Locke  London  long-term_orientation  loyalty  luxury  M&A  MacIntyre  management  managerialism  markets  markets_in_everything  market_failure  market_fundamentalism  Marx  Marxist  mass_culture  meaning  mechanisms-social_theory  medieval_history  mental_health  mercantilism  merchants  mesolevel  metaethics  methodology  microfoundations  middle_class  military-industrial  military_history  mind  MNCs  modernity  monopolies  morality-conventional  morality-critics  morality-Nietzche  morality-objective  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  napoleon  napoleonic  narrative  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  naval_history  neo-Kantian  neoclassical_economics  neocons  neoliberalism  Neoplatonism  networks  networks-business  networks-exchange  networks-information  networks-policy  networks-political  networks-religious  networks-social  New_Deal  new_institutionalism  New_Left  NGOs  Nietzsche  nonprofit  normativity  norms  Oakeshott  off-shoring  old_institutionalism  oligopoly  Olson_Mancur  ontology-social  organization  organizations  orientalism  Papacy  paper  parties  partisanship  patriarchy  paywall  peace  Peirce  persecution  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  Piketty  pinboard  Plato  plutocracy  Pocket  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_order  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_science  political_sociology  politics-and-history  politics-and-money  population  positivism  post-Cold_War  post-colonial  Post-Keynesian  post-truth  post-wwii  posthumanism  postmodern  poststructuralist  power  power-asymetric  power-asymmetric  power-concentration  power-knowledge  power-symbolic  pragmatism  prices  principal-agent  production  productivity  productivity-labor_share  profit  propaganda  property  public-private_gaps  public_choice  public_goods  public_intellectuals  public_interest  public_policy  race  rationalist  rationality  rationality-bounded  rationality-economics  rational_choice  rational_expectations  Rawls  reform-economic  reform-political  reform-social  refugees  regulation  relations-social  relativism  religious_culture  religious_history  rent-seeking  representative_institutions  resistance_theory  responsibility  revolutions  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  right-wing  rights-legal  rights-political  Rorty  rule_of_law  ruling_class  sabotage-by_business  scepticism  scientific_method  Scottish_Enlightenment  self  self-development  self-interest  semiotics  Sen  shareholders  shareholder_value  Smith  socialization  social_capital  social_history  social_media  social_movements  social_order  social_process  social_psychology  social_science  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_stratification  social_theory  sociology  sociology-process  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_religion  sociology_of_science_&_technology  sociology_of_social_science  soft_power  sovereignty  SSRN  stagnation  state-building  state-roles  state_government  statistics  status  strategic_action_fields  stratification  structuralist  structure  subject  subjectivity  superstars  supply_chains  sustainability  taxes  teams  technocracy  technology  territory  terrorism  Tilly  tools  Tories  totalitarian  trade  trust  tyranny  UK_economy  unemployment  university  urban_development  urban_politics  us  uses_of_history  US_economy  us_foreign_policy  US_government  US_history  us_military  us_politics  US_politics-race  US_society  utility  values  Veblen  Vietnam_War  voice  wages  Walzer  warfare  wars  wealth  Weber  welfare_state  White_Hayden  Williams_Bernard  women-property  women-rights  work  work-life_balance  working_class  world  wwi  wwii 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: