dunnettreader + postmodern   117

Susan Haack’s Scientism and its Discontents | Rounded Globe
Susan Haack’s Scientism and its Discontents is based on her September 2016 Agnes Cuming Lectures at University College, Dublin. - Download epub version to Dropbox
sociology_of_science_&_technology  ebooks  epistemology  postmodern  pragmatism  philosophy_of_science  scepticism  downloaded  scientism 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Orlando: An audio guide | OUPblog
Interview with Michael Whitworth, editor of Works of Virginia Woolf and Oxford Classics edition of Orlando
fiction  identity  cultural_history  biography  20thC  Modernism  audio  homosexuality  sexuality  postmodern  literary_history  historical_fiction  19thC  gender_history  Woolf_Virginia 
april 2017 by dunnettreader
Warren Breckman - Cornelius Castoriadis contra Postmodernism: Beyond the "French Ideology" (1998) | JSTOR
Cornelius Castoriadis contra Postmodernism: Beyond the "French Ideology"
Warren Breckman
French Politics and Society
Vol. 16, No. 2 (Spring 1998), pp. 30-42
Topics: Political freedom, Concept of being, Postmodern philosophy, Political ideologies, Political philosophy, Rationalism, Democracy, Unconscious mind, Psyche, Political extremism
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
unconscious  article  ideology  social_theory  20thC  postmodern  democracy  extremism  political_philosophy  Castoriadis  French_intellectuals  downloaded 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Roger Chartier's emeritus pages - Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - Collège de France
Écrit et cultures dans l'Europe moderne (2006-2016) - links to his courses and seminars while he held the chair, and location for subsequent work especially the Débats d'histoire discussions - once a month starting in December 2015 - during the school year (i.e. through May) with announced intention to restart this school year. Joined for several by Patrick Boucheron who arrived (Dec 2015) as Chartier's regular appointment came to an end.
cultural_authority  Roman_Catholicism  Counter-Reformation  lit_crit  French_Enlightenment  religious_history  Europe-Early_Modern  podcast  intellectual_history  postmodern  cultural_capital  critical_theory  history_of_science  cultural_change  connected_history  historiography  theater  circulation-ideas  history_of_book  translation  microhistory  authority  interview  courses  classicism  Renaissance  website  literary_history  global_history  cultural_history  audio  Foucault  video  lecture 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Stephen Turner - Markus Gabriel, Why the World Does not Exist. A Review | Weber Studies - Academia.edu
Fairly lengthy attempt to get to grips with what Gabriel is proposing especially vis a vis neo-Kantianism post Heidegger's cul de sac.
books  reviews  metaphysics  epistemology  idealism  realism  relativism  constructivism  postmodern  neo-Kantian 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Edward Slingerland - What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture | Cambridge University Press (2008)
What Science Offers the Humanities examines some of the deep problems facing current approaches to the study of culture. It focuses especially on the excesses of postmodernism, but also acknowledges serious problems with postmodernism's harshest critics. In short, Edward Slingerland argues that in order for the humanities to progress, its scholars need to take seriously contributions from the natural sciences—and particular research on human cognition—which demonstrate that any separation of the mind and the body is entirely untenable. The author provides suggestions for how humanists might begin to utilize these scientific discoveries without conceding that science has the last word on morality, religion, art, and literature. Calling into question such deeply entrenched dogmas as the "blank slate" theory of nature, strong social constructivism, and the ideal of disembodied reason, Slingerland replaces the human-sciences divide with a more integrated approach to the study of culture. --
Introduction
Part I. Exorcising the Ghost in the Machine:
1. The disembodied mind
2. They live among us
3. Pulling the plug
Part II. Embodying Culture:
4. Embodying culture
Part III. Defending Vertical Integration:
5. Defending the empirical
6. Who's afraid of reductionism?
Conclusion.
Edward Slingerland, University of British Columbia, Vancouver - taught in the School of Religion and Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at USC.... currently Associate Professor of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia and is Canada Research Chair in Chinese Thought and Embodied Cognition. His previous books include The Annalects of Confucius and Effortless Action: Wu-wei as Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in Early China, which won the American Academy of Religion's 2003 Best First Book in the History of Religions Award. -- downloaded Intro
books  kindle-available  downloaded  humanities  philosophy_of_social_science  cognition  mind  philosophy_of_religion  human_nature  Chinese_thought  embodied_cognition  naturalism  reductionism  postmodern  two_cultures  constructivism  cultural_history  religious_history  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Fouré Lionel, « Le complément de sujet, de Vincent Descombes. », Le Philosophoire 1/2005
Fouré Lionel, « Le complément de sujet, de Vincent Descombes. », Le Philosophoire 1/2005 (n° 24) , p. 132-135
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-1-page-132.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.024.0132.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
downloaded  phenomenology  deconstruction  existentialism  structuralist  self  French_intellectuals  philosophy_of_language  subjectivity  consciousness  philosophy_of_social_science  reviews  mind  Wittgenstein  books  Peirce  postmodern  poststructuralist 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Lionel Fouré - Entretien avec Vincent Descombes (2005) - Cairn.info
Fouré Lionel, « Entretien avec Vincent Descombes. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 7-20
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-7.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0007.
elite_culture  human_nature  comparative_anthropology  modernity  mind  downloaded  epistemology  social_theory  French_intellectuals  philosophy_of_social_science  modernity-emergence  subjectivity  mass_culture  interview  identity  postmodern  neuroscience  nature-nurture 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - « La modernité et son devenir contemporain. Notices bibliographiques sur quelques parutions récentes» (2095) - Cairn.info
Plan de l'article
Sociologie du temps présent. Modernité avancée ou postmodernité ?, de Y. Bonny
Le hors-série de Sciences Humaines sur Foucault-Derrida-Deleuze, et la question du devenir de la pensée postmoderne
L’individu hypermoderne, Sciences Humaines n°l54
Les actes du colloque L’individu hypermoderne, dirigés par N. Aubert
L’invention de soi, de J.-C. Kaufmann
Citot Vincent, « La modernité et son devenir contemporain. Notices bibliographiques sur quelques parutions récentes», Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 153-162
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-153.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0153.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
alienation  French_intellectuals  downloaded  Deluze  Foucault  books  multiculturalism  subjectivity  norms  modernity  consumerism  postmodern  change-social  social_order  bibliography  Derrida  social_theory  self-fashioning  poststructuralist  community  phenomenology  identity  anti-humanism  reviews  human_nature  self 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Weibel P, Sloterdijk P, Finkielkraut A, Houellebecq M - La nouvelle conception de l'homme. La construction de l'être humain (2004) - Cairn.info
Weibel Peter, Sloterdijk Peter, Finkielkraut Alain, Houellebecq Michel, « La nouvelle conception de l'homme. La construction de l'être humain. », Le Philosophoire 2/2004 (n° 23) , p. 32-55
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2004-2-page-32.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.023.0032.
Transcript from 2001 conference
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
21stC  evolution-social  biocultural_evolution  Modernism  humanism  downloaded  posthumanism  human_nature  change-social  conference  genetics  anti-humanism  neuroscience  social_theory  postmodern 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot, review - S. Chaumier, L'inculture pour tous - les effets pervers du démocratisme culturel (2011) - Cairn.info
Premier effet pervers du démocratisme culturel : le maintien dans un état d’inculture (non pas au sens anthropologique, on l’aura compris) de ceux qui n’étaient pas les « héritiers » d’un « capital culturel » familial – pour parler la langue de Bourdieu. Second effet pervers, très bien analysé par Serge Chaumier : la confusion de la culture et des loisirs fait le jeu du consumérisme. Les démocrates voulaient favoriser une contre-culture (celle de la rue, des banlieues, des cités, etc.), mais ils n’ont fait que faciliter la marchandisation de la culture
taste  working_class  France  Boudrieu  popular_culture  Malraux  cultural_history  hierarchy  21stC  egalitarian  national_ID  multiculturalism  postmodern  books  status  judgment-aesthetics  reviews  democratization  elite_culture  republicanism  culture_industries  French_intellectuals  education-civic  20thC  political_history  social_capital 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Marc Jimenez - La fin de la fin de l'art (2011) - Cairn.info
Décrépitude, déclin, fin, mort, progrès, décadence, dégénérescence (de l’art) ne sont plus des notions fondamentales pour penser la création actuelle. L’art contemporain, depuis plus de trois décennies, brouille les cartes esthétique, historique et idéologique qui déterminaient autrefois les critères de pertinence et de qualité des œuvres d’art. L’art ne disparaît pas, il se dissout dans le « culturel », là où la valeur marchande prévaut sur les valeurs artistique et esthétique. Le capitalisme libéral crée l’art pérenne. Il invente ainsi la fin de la fin de l’art, un art à son image, sans valeurs, sans idéaux, sans perspective humaniste, témoin désabusé de notre époque, parfois violent, excessif, mais peu contestataire, sismographe d’un monde agité et déboussolé. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
elite_culture  judgment-aesthetics  postmodern  Modernism  patronage  aesthetics  popular_culture  consumer_society  declinism  art_history  taste  art-economics  conspicuous_consumption  art_market  artists  cultural_authority  downloaded  cultural_critique  capitalism  article  contemporary_art  avant_guard  cultural_studies 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Martin Jay, review essay - PHILOSOPHY AS PERPETUAL MOTION: PRAGMATISM MOVES ON | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Oct 2011)
Reviewed Works: The Pragmatic Turn by Richard J. Bernstein; Pragmatism as Transition: Historicity and Hope in James, Dewey, and Rorty by Colin Koopman -- History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 425-432 -- respectively a summing up of the past half-century of the tradition's history and a possible program for its future development. Bernstein ecumenically considers the achievements of a wide range of thinkers from Peirce, Dewey, and James to Brandom, Putnam, and Rorty, drawing valuable lessons from each, while not sparing criticism of their flaws. Koopman also tries to bridge the gap between what he calls "classicopragmatism" and "neopragmatism," although he finds more to admire in Rorty than in his predecessors. Whereas Bernstein attempts to supplement the pragmatist tradition by turning to Habermas, Koopman finds his inspiration in Foucault. Both authors emphasize the historicist, evolutionary, and transitionalist implications of pragmatism, paying as a result insufficient attention to the historical possibilities of repetition, rupture, discontinuity, and the unexpected event. In terms of the political implications they draw, Koopman advocates a meliorist incrementalism that lacks any real bite, while Bernstein expresses dissatisfaction with the democratic pieties of Rorty's final work, but doesn't really provide a sustained alternative. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  pragmatism  pragmatism-analytic  postmodern  critical_theory  political_philosophy  Peirce  James_William  Dewey  Rorty  Putnam  Quine  Habermas  Foucault  Brandom  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
J DEN HOLLANDER, H PAUL & R PETERS - INTRO: THE METAPHOR OF HISTORICAL DISTANCE | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 1-10 -- What does "historical distance" mean? Starting with Johan Huizinga, the famous Dutch historian who refused to lecture on contemporary history, this introductory article argues that "historical distance" is a metaphor used in a variety of intellectual contexts. Accordingly, the metaphor has ontological, epistemological, moral, aesthetic, as well as methodological connotations. This implies that historical distance cannot be reduced to a single "problem" or "concept." At the same time, this wide variety of meanings associated with distance helps explain why an easily recognizable tradition of scholarly reflection on historical distance does not exist. In a broad survey of nineteenth-and twentieth-century historical theory, this article nonetheless attempts to show that distance has been a major, if seldom explicitly articulated, theme in European and American philosophy of history. In doing so, it pays special attention to those few authors who in recent years have taken up the metaphor for critical study. Finally, the paper summarizes some of the main arguments put forward in the articles comprising this issue on historical distance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  historiography-postWWII  postmodern  epistemic_virtue  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Hans Kellner - BEYOND THE HORIZON: CHRONOSCHISMS AND HISTORICAL DISTANCE | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
Historical distance presents more complex issues than simply evaluating the meaning of the temporal span between a point in the past and some moment present to an observer. The ordinary historical difference, which is horizontal in the sense that it evokes the notion of hermeneutic horizons, fragments uncontrollably when examined closely, resulting in what might be called a "chronoschism." The experience of encountering a historical painting by Botticelli provides an example of this fragmentation. This complication of historical distance reminds us also of quite different sorts of distance, including the depths of endless regression, and the elevation of the historical sublime. These various forms of historical distance present a challenge to the horizontal character of normal historical practice. -- of interest mostly for how he appears to use Akersmith, Hayden White, Foucault etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography-20thC  historiography-postWWII  postmodern  historiography  sublime  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
MARK BEVIR - WHY HISTORICAL DISTANCE IS NOT A PROBLEM | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 24-37 -- concerns about historical distance arose along with modernist historicism, and they disappear with postfoundationahsm. The developmental historicism of the 19thC appealed to narrative principles to establish continuity between past and present and to guide selections among facts. In the 20thC, modernist historicists rejected such principles, thereby raising the specter of historical distance: that is, the distorting effects of the present on accounts of the past, the chasm between facts and narrative. The modernist problem became: how can historians avoid anachronism and develop accurate representations of the past? Instead of using narrative principles to select facts, modernist historicists appealed to atomized facts to validate narratives. However, in the late 20thC, postmodernists (Frank Ankersmit and Hayden White) argued that there was no way to close the distance between facts and narratives. The postmodern problem became: how should historians conceive of their writing given the ineluctable distance between facts and narratives? Today, postfoundationahsm dispels both modernist and postmodernist concerns with historical distance; it implies that all concepts (not just historical ones) fuse fact and theory, and it dissolves issues of conceptual relativism, textual meaning, and re-enactment. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  historiography-postWWII  Modernism  postmodern  post-foundational  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Aiôn and Chronos: Deleuze and the Stoic Theory of Time (2007) | Academia.edu
[published in Collapse 3 (2007), 177-205] -- Gilles Deleuze outlines a supposedly Stoic dual theory of time: on the one hand there is aiôn, comprising an infinite past and future; on the other there is chronos, the extended present. In the scholarly literature on Stoicism, however, either a single theory is reconstructed or the evidence is dismissed as too thin and incoherent. I offer an explanation for this distance between the Deleuzian and scholarly presentations of the Stoic theory of time. I conclude by answering the question to what extent, if any, the Deleuzian theory of aiôn and chronos deserves to be called Stoic.-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  late_antiquity  commentaries  Diogenes_Laertius  Plutarch  Stoicism  time  cosmology  ontology  20thC  Deleuze  poststructuralist  postmodern  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Patrick Diggins - Arthur O. Lovejoy and the Challenge of Intellectual History (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 181-208 -- another attack on Pragmatism as deconstruction, postmodern assault on Enlightenment etc etc -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  18thC  19thC  20thC  Lovejoy  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  reason  modernity  Modernism  pragmatism  postmodern  deconstruction  epistemology  power-knowledge  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Markus Gabriel interview with Richard Marshall - Why The World Does Not Exist But Unicorns Do | 3AM - May 2015
Markus Gabriel broods on why the world doesn’t exist and never stops wondering about Kant, existence, pluralism, fields of sense, Huw Price, about why he isn’t po-mo, nor a Meinongian, about why unicorns exist, about why he’s a realist, about dissolving the hard problem, about why naturalism and physicalism are wrong, about Schelling and post-Kantian idealism, about Badiou and Meillassouz, Heidegger, about resisting skepticism, about negative philosophy, mythology, madness, laughter and the need for illusions in metaphysics, and about the insult that is the continental/analytic divide . Gird up for an amazing story… -- humongous interview divided into 2 pages - each about twice as long as one of Marshall's regular interviews -- only page 1 picked up by Instapaper, and no single page option -- saved as 2 pdfs to Note
Instapaper  downloaded  intellectual_history  philosophy  metaphysics  ontology  ontology-social  realism  realism-speculative  postmodern  Rorty  Kant  Schelling  German_Idealism  pragmatism  pragmatism-analytic  Husserl  Heidegger  scepticism  myth  Brandom  French_intellectuals  continental_philosophy  philosophy_of_science  analytical_philosophy  Russell_Bertrand  Frege  physicalism  materialism  naturalism  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
‘First Philosophy and its Metacritique: The Case of Karl-Otto Apel’ ( 1982) | Piet Strydom - Academia.edu
‘First Philosophy and its Metacritique: The Case of Karl-Otto Apel’, unpublished paper presented to the philosophical society Cogito, University College Cork, 10 December 1982 -- [after noting the recurring battle between metaphysics and anti metaphysics, most recently the strange bedfellows of conservative, liberal and radical from Heidegger to Rorty to Derrida proposes a 4-fold rather than binary model] This quadruple constellation has been in evidence ever since the classical Greek period and can be traced back to the existence side by side of everyday language embodying common sense, the paradigmatically regulated language of science which tends to monopolise rationality as such, philosophical language which claims to embody noetic rationality, and finally the claim of metacritical enlighteners to be able to expose the presuppositions of philosophy and thus to clarify the concept of rationality in its broadest conceivable sense. Accordingly, the following four poles can be seen most basically to determine the dispute between the representative of first philosophy and their metacritics: -- (1) "dogmatic first philosophy", including every form of philosophy of common-sense which elevates conventional forms of language use, cognition and action to the status of criterion of argumentation; (2) "self-critical first philosophy" in the sense of all forms of transcendental philosophy which regard common sense as well as science as explicandum and deduce general conditions for them from an irreducible, final and immutable criterion; -- (3) "dogmatic metacitique" in the sense of the scientistic critique of philosophy which on the basis of a determinate concept of science as final criterion implicitly or explicitly seeks the dissolution of both dogmatic and self-critical forms of first philosophy; -- and, finally, (4) "dialectical metacritique" as that form of critique of philosophy which takes in its stride all the above-mentioned types of philosophy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  metaphysics  scepticism  rationality  foundationalism  anti-foundationalism  Heidegger  Wittgenstein  Rorty  Derrida  Foucault  deconstruction  postmodern  critical_theory  certainty  epistemology  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Hartman, review essay - How Americans Have Received Nietzsche and Heidegger and Why It Matters | Reviews in American History > Volume 41, Number 1, March 2013 - Project MUSE
Reviewed -- (1) Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen. American Nietzsche: A History of an Icon and His Ideas. - Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2012. and (2) Martin Woessner. Heidegger in America. - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Heidegger  pragmatism  phenomenology  existentialism  postmodern  Rorty  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
John D. Wilkins, review - Neil Postman, Building a Bridge to the 18th Century (1999) | Technology and Society Book Reviews
In Building a Bridge to the 18th Century, Neil Postman weaves an interesting tale on the development of a new "conversation" that Americans should commence. His book was an enjoyable read, and it re-ignites debate over policy questions and knowledge claims in the process of decision making. However, in formulating his arguments, he ran afoul, as so many do, in misconstruing the meaning of social construction and the manner in which society constructs knowledge. At the same time, Postman correctly articulates 'a crisis in narrative' (p.113). His story is best understood in the context of a manifesto that sees current narratives as inadequate for the future development of a healthy society. He sees a loss of meaning in our stories and reminds us that the 18th century is a social location that provides a foundation from which to launch a new conversation in order to restore a more meaningful social life. His manifesto does not seem to be interested in contemplation or conversation as he implies. Instead, I will argue that Postman is looking for efficiency and efficacy, and advocating his perspective from an ethnocentric foundation. I will attempt to provide the notion that there are multiple stories to be told, and that retelling one can be another form of advocating the status quo. In this review, I will focus on Postman's arguments for healthy skepticism, some of his contradictions, the notion of individualism and egoism, and the misconstruction of postmodern thought. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  cultural_critique  21stC  18thC  Enlightenment  philosophes  social_theory  constructivism  intellectual_history  Tocqueville  narrative  narrative-contested  conservation  postmodern  scepticism  scepticism-Academic  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  science-and-politics  science-public  individualism  self-interest  self-interest-cultural_basis  community  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott Montgomery - The Shape of the New: Four Big Ideas and How They Made the Modern World:Amazon:Books
Princeton U Press - release May 2015 - A testament to the enduring power of ideas, The Shape of the New offers unforgettable portraits of Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, Charles Darwin, and Karl Marx--heirs of the Enlightenment who embodied its highest ideals about progress--and shows how their thoughts, over time and in the hands of their followers and opponents, transformed the very nature of our beliefs, institutions, economies, and politics. Yet these ideas also hold contradictions. They have been used in the service of brutal systems such as slavery and colonialism, been appropriated and twisted by monsters like Stalin and Hitler, and provoked reactions against the Enlightenment's legacy by Islamic Salafists and the Christian Religious Right. The Shape of the New argues that it is impossible to understand the ideological and political conflicts of our own time without familiarizing ourselves with the history and internal tensions of these world-changing ideas. With passion and conviction, it exhorts us to recognize the central importance of these ideas as historical forces and pillars of the Western humanistic tradition. It makes the case that to read the works of the great thinkers is to gain invaluable insights into the ideas that have shaped how we think and what we believe.
19thc  books  kindle-available  modernity  political_philosophy  ideology  totalitarian  right-wing  fundamentalism  culture_wars  humanism  anti-humanism  postmodern  sociology_of_religion  science-and-religion  politics-and-religion  social_epistemology  20thc  Smith  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  counter-Enlightenment  18thc  21stc  political_economy  intellectual_history  Smoth  Jefferson  Hamilton  Marx  Darwin 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
David Hoover - The End of the Irrelevant Text: Electronic Texts, Linguistics, and Literary Theory | DHQ: Digital Humanities Quarterly, Vol 1.2 (2007)
David Hoover <david_dot_hoover_at_nyu_dot_edu>, New York University -- The close study of literary texts has a long and illustrious history. But the popularity of textual analysis has waned in recent decades, just at the time that widely available electronic texts were making traditional analytic tools easier to apply and encouraging the development of innovative computer-assisted tools. Without claiming any simple causal relationship, I argue that the marginalization of textual analysis and other text-centered approaches owes something to the dominance of Chomskyan linguistics and the popularity of high theory. Certainly both an introspective, sentence-oriented, formalist linguistic approach and literary theories deeply influenced by ideas about the sign's instability and the tendency of texts to disintegrate under critical pressure minimize the importance of the text. Using examples from Noam Chomsky, Jerome McGann, and Stanley Fish, I argue for a return to the text, specifically the electronic, computable text, to see what corpora, text-analysis, statistical stylistics, and authorship attribution can reveal about meanings and style. The recent resurgence of interest in scholarly editions, corpora, text- analysis, stylistics, and authorship suggest that the electronic text may finally reach its full potential. -- see bibliography re Chomsky Language Instinct debates
article  English_lit  lit_crit  linguistics  innate_ideas  digital_humanities  reader_response  postmodern  poststructuralist  translation  bibliography 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Bichler, Shimshon and Nitzan, Jonathan - Palan on Piketty - New Left Project, September 2014 | bnarchives
In late August, 2014, we received an invitation from the New Left Project to comment on Ronen Palan’s article ‘Capitalising the Future’. Palan’s piece examines Thomas Piketty’s book ‘Capital in the Twenty-First Century’ (2014), and the editors felt it had strong affinities with our approach. The affinities are certainly there (albeit unmentioned). But they are largely superficial. Palan demonstrates little understanding of our framework, and we very much doubt he has comprehended Piketty’s. His article contains so many elementary errors and fallacies that it is unclear how it got published in the first place. [The NLP piece has been revised to make the text less confrontational. For those interested, we also provide the original unedited version.] -- Keywords: futurity leverage, Sokal Hoax, postism Piketty -- Keywords includes "Sokal Hoax" so looks like B&N have vented their ire at posties on the hapless Palan -- downloaded pdf of unedited version to Note
article  books  review  Piketty  capitalism  inequality  capital_as_power  postmodern  capitalization  political_economy  capital  leverage  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
William M. Dugger and William Waller - Radical Institutionalism: From Technological to Democratic Instrumentalism | JSTOR: Review of Social Economy, Vol. 54, No. 2 (SUMMER 1996), pp. 169-189
This article explains the nature and significance of radical institutionalism. Radical institutionalism does not represent a break with the institutionalist paradigm, but an attempt to move it beyond its outmoded, Ayresian philosophical foundation. Radical institutionalism involves the introduction of three new elements into the contemporary stream of institutionalist works. These three new elements include an emphasis on Veblenian fundamentals, a shift in research interests, and a reconsideration of the philosophical foundations of inquiry. -- useful bibliography of generations of institutionalist theorists -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  intellectual_history  economic_theory  economic_history  institutional_economics  epistemology-social  sociology_of_knowledge  capitalism  corporations  welfare_state  democracy  Veblen  class_conflict  financialization  ruling_class  postmodern  Post-Keynesian  epistemology  critical_realism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
William M. Dugger and William Waller - Radical Institutionalism: From Technological to Democratic Instrumentalism | JSTOR: Review of Social Economy, Vol. 54, No. 2 (SUMMER 1996), pp. 169-189
This article explains the nature and significance of radical institutionalism. Radical institutionalism does not represent a break with the institutionalist paradigm, but an attempt to move it beyond its outmoded, Ayresian philosophical foundation. Radical institutionalism involves the introduction of three new elements into the contemporary stream of institutionalist works. These three new elements include an emphasis on Veblenian fundamentals, a shift in research interests, and a reconsideration of the philosophical foundations of inquiry. -- interesting institutional bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  social_sciences-post-WWII  postmodern  critical_theory  social_theory  political_economy  institutional_economics  evolution-social  epistemology-social  philosophy_of_social_science  Veblen  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
David D. Roberts - Rethinking Hayden White's treatment of Croce | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue: Hayden White’s "Metahistory" 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Hayden White began as a partisan of the earlier Italian thinker Benedetto Croce. After 1963, however, White gradually turned against Croce, finally, in Metahistory, casting Croce's position as the limiting ironic outcome of nineteenth-century historiographical realism. Croce putatively left the historian as a passive observer, cut off from using historical understanding to help shape events. Whereas most students of White say little about White's encounter with Croce, this article argues that both thinkers were seeking to establish a post-realist cultural framework. Although White had plausible reasons to dissent from Croce, he sidestepped the challenge of the Crocean alternative by forcing Croce into a limiting mold as a time-bound, bourgeois ideological spokesman. This was to restrict unnecessarily and unfortunately the terms of post-realist debate. -- David D. Roberts is Albert Berry Saye Professor of History, Emeritus, at the University of Georgia (U.S.A.). His most recent books are The Totalitarian Experiment in Twentieth-Century Europe: Understanding the Poverty of Great Politics (Routledge, 2006) and Historicism and Fascism in Modern Italy (Toronto, 2007). Among his earlier writings on Benedetto Croce are Benedetto Croce and the Uses of Historicism (California, 1987); Nothing but History: Reconstruction and Extremity after Metaphysics (California, 1995); and Una nuova interpretazione del pensiero di Croce: Lo storicismo crociano e il pensiero contemporaneo (Istituti Editoriali e Poligrafici Internazionali, 1995).
article  paywall  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  historiography  historiography-19thC  realism  narrative  philosophy_of_history  historicism  White_Hayden  Croce  postmodern  epistemology-history  historians-and-politics 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Trevor A. Harley - History lessons: what can we learn about history? | Rethinking History Vol. 18, Iss. 3, 2014 - Taylor & Francis Online
What can we learn from the past? This paper examines the nature of the past and discusses the extent to which historical outcomes are robust over different starting conditions, using primarily the example of the origin of the Great War. It reviews the mathematical and psychological literature on complexity theory, and considers the idea that history can indeed in some circumstances be robust across initial conditions. I introduce the notion of a dynamic historical attractor to account for the way in which the past unfolds over time, and relate dynamic attractors to post-modern approaches to historical interpretation. -- Keywords: complexity, chaos, dynamic historical attractors, alternative histories, causality, narrative, post-modernism -- T&F paywall
article  paywall  historiography  causation-social  causation  complexity  chaos_theory  dynamic_attractors  counterfactuals  narrative  narrative-contested  postmodern  WWI  contingency  social_theory  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Three Ways of Explaining the Rise of “Law and Economics,” and Also, One Way (Guest Post by Sara Mayeux) | s-usih.org
So, how did law and economics go from an oddball preoccupation of a few Chicago professors to one of the dominant intellectual frameworks for thinking and talking about law? Here are three recent accounts, each emphasizing a different causal mechanism: the two chapters on law and economics in Steven Teles’s book The Rise of the Conservative Legal Movement; the discussion of law and economics in Rodgers’s Age of Fracture; and Brad Snyder’s recent article “The Former Clerks Who Nearly Killed Judicial Restraint.”
intellectual_history  20thC  US_legal_system  legal_theory  law-and-economics  judiciary  postmodern  neoliberalism  conservatism  right-wing  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jay M. Smith - Between Discourse and Experience: Agency and Ideas in the French Pre-Revolution | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Dec., 2001), pp. 116-142
C Experience has recently reemerged as an important analytical category for historians of the Old Regime and the French Revolution. Reacting against the perceived excesses of discourse analysis, which made political language independent of any social determinants, certain post-revisionists are now seeking to contextualize political language by relating it to the experience of those who use it. Political agency, in these analyses, is understood to be the effect of particular formative experiences. This article suggests that the search for an experiential antidote to discourse is misconceived because it perpetuates an untenable dichotomy between thought and reality. Access to the phenomenon of historical agency should be pursued not through experience or discourse but through the category of consciousness, since the make-up of the subject's consciousness determines how he/she engages the world and decides to attempt changing it. After a brief discussion of an important study that exemplifies both the allure and the functionality of the notion of experience, Timothy Tackett's Becoming a Revolutionary, the article focuses on the evolving political consciousness of a man who became a revolutionary agitator in 1789, J.-M.-A. Servan. Analysis of his writings between 1770 and 1789 shows that the way in which his perspective was constructed, rather than the lessons of experience per se, determined the shape of his revolutionary intentions in 1789. -- issue devoted to Agency after postmodernism -- big bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  postmodern  linguistic_turn  discourse  agency  agency-structure  historical_change  action-theory  revisionism  18thC  French_Revolution  perspectivism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick H. Hutton - Vico for Historians: An Introduction [dedicated issue to Vico for historians for our time] | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 479-493
Introduction gives a brief biography and discusses each of the papers in the issue, plus a short "further reading" -- Contents *--* Community, Prereflective Virtue, and the Cyclopean Power of the Fathers: Vico's Reflections on Unexpected Consequences (pp. 495-515) Edmund E. Jacobitti. *--* The Significance of Tacitus in Vico's Idea of History (pp. 517-535) Alexander U. Bertland. *--* Vico and the End of History (pp. 537-558) Patrick H. Hutton. *--* Vico, Rhetorical Topics and Historical Thought (pp. 559-585) Catherine L. Hobbs. *--* Situating Vico Between Modern and Postmodern (pp. 587-617) Sandra Rudnick Luft. *--* Interpretations and Misinterpretations of Vico (pp. 619-639) Cecilia Miller -- Introduction and all papers downloaded to Note and in separate folder in Dropbox
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Vico  Enlightenment  historicism  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  ancient_history  poetry  rhetoric  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  stadial_theories  Tacitus  oral_culture  postmodern  reading  reader_response  readership  cycles  human_nature  humanism  hermeticism  hermeneutics  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
"BEYOND THEOCRACY AND SECULARISM (PART I): TOWARD A NEW PARADIGM FOR LA" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
To move beyond theocracy (pre-modern) and secularism (modern), this article closes by identifying the trajectory for a new constructive postmodern paradigm that embraces legal indeterminacy and secularizing the text of the law but argues that a plurality of religious convictions implicitly legitimates and thereby desecularizes the law. Desecularizing the law does not result in the imposition of the religion of the ruler (theocracy) in a pluralistic democratic society. Rather, the constructive postmodern paradigm of law and religion allows for the religious pluralism in society to provide a plurality of religious ontologies that implicitly legitimate the law and close the ontological gap between legal theory and legal practice. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "BEYOND THEOCRACY AND SECULARISM (PART I): TOWARD A NEW PARADIGM FOR LAW AND RELIGION" Mississippi College Law Review 27.1 (2008): 159-233. -- downloaded pdf to Note
philosophy_of_law  ontology  ontology-social  social_theory  foundationalism  moral_philosophy  secularism  secular_humanism  post-secular  postmodern  legal_indeterminancy  values  pluralism  legal_theory  legal_culture  political-theology  politics-and-religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Volker Depkat - The 'Cultural Turn' in German and American Historiography | JSTOR: Amerikastudien / American Studies, Vol. 54, No. 3 (2009), pp. 425-450
This article analyzes the academic debates about the 'cultural turn' in U.S. and German historiography in terms of convergence and divergence. While the 'new cultural history' in the United States and Germany seem to be pretty much alike on the conceptual and theoretical level, the political, social, cultural and institutional contexts of historiography are significantly different in both countries. This explains the rather different dynamics of the cultural turn on both sides of the Atlantic. In Germany, the debate about the cultural turn stood in the long shadow of historicism, and it evolved as a largely academic discussion between post-historicist social historians revolving around the question of how to arrive at a deeper and more complex understanding of why people in the past acted the way they did. In the United States, the cultural turn, while it was moving on the academic plane, was still inseparably tied to the 'identity politics' and 'culture wars' of an American society that became increasingly self-aware of its diversity and multi-ethnicity. Against this backdrop the role of Germany-based experts on U.S. history in the debates about culture on both sides of the Atlantic is assessed critically. -- 200 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  19thC  20thC  Germany  US  cultural_history  historicism  social_history  historical_sociology  culture_wars  postmodern  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Cole, The Birth of Theory (pub date June 21 2014) eBook: : Amazon.com
Modern theory needs a history lesson. Neither Marx nor Nietzsche first gave us theory—Hegel did. Andrew Cole presents a refreshingly clear and lively account of the origins and legacy of Hegel’s dialectic as theory. Cole explains how Hegel boldly broke from modern philosophy when he adopted medieval dialectical habits of thought to fashion his own dialectic. While his contemporaries rejected premodern dialectic as outdated dogma, Hegel embraced both its emphasis on language as thought and its fascination with the categories of identity and difference, creating what we now recognize as theory, distinct from systematic philosophy. Hegel also used this dialectic to expose the persistent archaism of modern life itself, establishing a method of social analysis that has influenced everyone from Marx and the nineteenth-century Hegelians, to Nietzsche and Bakhtin, all the way to Deleuze and Jameson. By uncovering these theoretical filiations across time, Cole will not only change the way we read Hegel, but also the way we think about the histories of theory. ... chapters that powerfully reanimate the overly familiar topics of ideology, commodity fetishism, and political economy, ...a groundbreaking reinterpretation of master/slave dialectic, ...places the disciplines of philosophy, literature, and history in conversation with one another. Daring to reconcile the sworn enemies of Hegelianism and Deleuzianism, this timely book will revitalize dialectics for the 21stC.
books  kindle-available  buy  intellectual_history  revisionism  medieval_philosophy  19thC  Hegel  dialectic  philosophy_of_language  difference  identity  20thC  theory  postmodern  Hegelian  Hegelians-French  social_theory  social_sciences  Nietzsche  Bakhtin  Deleuze  literary_theory  literary_history  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Rekha Mirchandani - Postmodernism and Sociology: From the Epistemological to the Empirical | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Mar., 2005), pp. 86-115
This article investigates the place of postmodernism in sociology today by making a distinction between its epistemological and empirical forms. During the 1980s and early 1990s, sociologists exposited, appropriated, and normalized an epistemological postmodernism that thematizes the tentative, reflective, and possibly shifting nature of knowledge. More recently, however, sociologists have recognized the potential of a postmodern theory that turns its attention to empirical concerns. Empirical postmodernists challenge classical modern concepts to develop research programs based on new concepts like time-space reorganization, risk society, consumer capitalism, and postmodern ethics. But they do so with an appreciation for the uncertainty of the social world, ourselves, our concepts, and our commitment to our concepts that results from the encounter with postmodern epistemology. Ultimately, this article suggests that understanding postmodernism as a combination of these two moments can lead to a sociology whose epistemological modesty and empirical sensitivity encourage a deeper and broader approach to the contemporary social world. -- giant bibliography that covers all the French theorists and reactions to them across disciplines from philosophy, history, sociology_of_knowledge, social_theory, cultural studies etc. -- looks interesting more as intellectual_history than for her recommendations, which appears to be extracting the common sense parts of postmodern critique while dumping the extravagance-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  modernity  Enlightenment_Project  postmodern  sociology_of_knowledge  social_theory  constructivism  epistemology-social  metaethics  capitalism  consumerism  scientism  positivism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Petitions and the "Invention" of Public Opinion in the English Revolution | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 101, No. 6 (May, 1996), pp. 1497-1555
Current accounts of the capitalist and Protestant origins of the democratic public sphere are inconsistent and speculative. This empirical account explains the transition in political communication from norms of secrecy to appeals to public opinion. Popular communicative change in the English Revolution anticipated, in practice, the democratic theory of the public sphere when printing transformed a traditional instrument of communication-the petition. Petitions had medieval origins and traditions that upheld norms of secrecy and privilege in political communication. Economic and technical properties of printing-namely, heightened commercialism and the capacity to reproduce texts-demolished these norms by changing the scope and content of communication by petition. This practical innovation appears in all factions in the revolution. But among radical groups, the political use of printed petitions led to novel theories and to democratic speculation on constitutional provisions that would ensure the authority of public opinion in politics. This analysis contradicts key assumptions on communicative change that fuel pessimistic assessments of the modern public sphere in post-modernism and critical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  public_sphere  social_process  change-social  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  mixed_government  public_opinion  democracy  arcana_imperii  political_culture  social_order  printing  print_culture  communication  political_press  political_participation  petitions  radicals  commonwealth  Levellers  postmodern  critical_theory  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add  English_constitution 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Postmodernism and the 'Death of the Subject' by James Heartfield (2002) | Marxists.org Philosophy excerpts
Source: Abstracted from The ‘Death of the Subject’ Explained, Sheffield Hallam UP, 2002 and reproduced with the permission of the author.
intellectual_history  20thC  poststructuralist  postmodern  humanism  anti-humanism  Derrida  feminism  Marxist  continental_philosophy  self  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
HUMANISM, ANTIHUMANISM AND THE RADICAL TRADITION | Pandaemonium
Edited extract from The Meaning of Race (Macmillan, 1996), pp 236-242 -- Associated with the anti-universalist stance of poststructuralist theories has been an unremitting hostility to a humanist approach. At the heart of humanism are two key ideas. First, humanists hold that human beings, while an inherent part of nature and subject to its laws, nevertheless have an exceptional status in nature because of the unique ability, arising out of human rationality and sociability, to overcome the constraints placed upon them by nature. Second, humanists believe in the unity of humankind, holding that all humans possess something in common, a something that is often described as a common ‘human nature’. -- Indeed, no emancipatory philosophy is possible without a humanist perspective, for any antihumanist outlook is forced to look outside of humanity for the agency of salvation. -- Antihumanist strands developed from the Enlightenment onwards... ranging from the conservatism of Burke, the Catholic reaction of de Maistre to the nihilism of Nietzsche and the Nazism of Heidegger. -- they despaired of the capacity of humankind for such rational progress. Such despair often emerged out of fear of, and contempt for, the masses, who were seen as irrational, atavistic and a threat to civilized society. Antihumanism rejected ideas of equality and human unity, celebrating instead difference and divergence, and exalting the particular and the authentic over the universal. -- a central component of elite theories and hence of racial theories. In the postwar era, however, antihumanism came to represent a very different tradition – the liberal, indeed radical, anticolonial and antiracist outlook.
intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  humanism  anti-humanism  post-colonial  poststructuralist  postmodern  post-foundational  post-WWII  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - ON DESCRIBING THE OTHER | Pandaemonium - Sept 2012
This first extract is from Chapter 8 of my book The Meaning of Race; the chapter opens with a discussion of Edward Said’s argument in Orientalism and moves on to discuss poststructuralist/postmodernist ideas of difference, equality, universalism and the human. (And before anyone misunderstands what I am saying, I am not suggesting that Said was a poststructuralist or postmodernist, simply that he drew upon certain poststructuralist themes.) This edited extract takes in the latter part of the discussion of Said’s work and the beginning of the discussion of Foucault’s notion of discourse and of poststructuralist ideas of the ‘Other’. -- also discusses Levinas and swipes at Rorty -- comments have a useful framing of Foucault and "power"
poststructuralist  postmodern  post-colonial  orientalism  power  discourse  epistemology-social  relativism  Foucault  Rorty 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Ann R. Tickamyer - Between Modernism and Postmodernism: Lenski's "Power and Privilege" in the Study of Inequalities | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Jun., 2004), pp. 247-257
Special issue - Religion, Stratification, and Evolution in Human Societies: Essays in Honor of Gerhard E. Lenski -- Gerhard Lenski's classical work on stratification, "Power and Privilege", was an effort to reconcile and to synthesize different approaches to inequality incorporated into the grand theories of the day. It anticipated a variety of developments in the theoretical and empirical understanding of inequalities. These include recognition of the multiplicity of inequalities; emphasis on race, class, gender, and other sources and systems of domination and subordination; and the intersection of these factors in complex patterns to create different standpoints and life consequences. The result was ground-breaking work that underscored the multidimensionality of stratification systems, the variability of their influences, and the notion that their intersection in itself has implications beyond the sum of component parts. In these ways his work foreshadowed the possibilities of finding common ground between modern and postmodern perspectives, to make Lenski the last grand theorist of modernity and a forerunner of postmodern theories of inequality.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  social_theory  structure  status  inequality  feminism  post-colonial  postmodern  power  power-symbolic  classes  race  gender  stratification  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Tom Eyers, review - Tzuchien Tho and Giuseppe Bianco (eds., trs.), Badiou and the Philosophers: Interrogating 1960s French Philosophy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // March 2014
Fascinating review - [E]ven as Badiou marks a break with earlier, linguistically-oriented forms of French philosophy, he is as doggedly faithful to the modernist radical Left as the new anti-critics [eg Latour and speculative realists] are determined to leave it behind. Badiou is nothing if not a thinker of grand Truths, both philosophical and political, and the volume under review, nimbly edited by young philosophers of note Tzuchien Tho and Giuseppe Bianco, gives readers an insight into the very earliest moments of the militant philosopher's development. At one and the same time, the book offers us glimpses of the pre-1968 generation that Badiou and his peers would take intellectual sustenance from, filtered through questions asked by a precocious 27-year-old Badiou as part of a unique series of television interviews, broadcast by the French state broadcaster between 1965 and 1968. --The transcripts of the interviews with Jean Hyppolite, Michel Foucault, Georges Canguilhem, Raymond Aron, Paul Ricoeur, Michel Henry and Michel Serres have been carefully edited and translated by Tho and Bianco, and the latter have penned a lengthy introduction that situates the text within concurrent developments in French politics and media culture. -- ...the undeniable initial thrill that comes from encountering thinkers, already eminent at the time they were interviewed, struggling to summarize their life's work on the spot and within the confines of a newly dominant cultural medium. At the very least, one gets a sense of just how crucial this mostly older generation of philosophers was to the famous upstarts - Lacan, Derrida, Kristeva, Badiou himself - who were beginning to make their mark as the interviews aired; an understanding, in other words, of how the apparently irrevocable break that structuralism and post-structuralism inflicted in the late 1960s may have been less absolute than previously assumed.
books  reviews  20thC  France  intellectual_history  theory  Hegelians-French  structuralist  poststructuralist  postmodern  continental_philosophy  Foucault  phenomenology  Ricoeur  Aron  Sartre  philosophy_of_science  life_sciences  biology  post-Marxism  Leftist  Modernism  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Leslie Paul Thiele, review essay - Common Sense, Judgment, and the Limits of Political Theory | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 28, No. 4 (Aug., 2000), pp. 565-588
Reviewed work(s): (1) A Third Concept of Liberty: Judgment and Freedom in Kant and Adam Smith by Samuel Fleischacker; *--* (2) Philosophy in a Time of Lost Spirit: Essays on Contemporary Theory by Ronald Beiner; *--* (3) The Orders of Discourse: Philosophy, Social Science, and Politics by John G. Gunnell; *--* (4) Speech and Political Practice: Recovering the Place of Human Responsibility by Murray Jardine; *--* (5) The Claims of Common Sense: Moore, Wittgenstein, Keynes and the Social Sciences by John Coates; *--* (6) Human Judgment and Social Policy: Irreducible Uncertainty, Inevitable Error, Unavoidable Injustice by Kenneth R. Hammond
books  reviews  article  jstor  political_philosophy  social_theory  critical_theory  social_sciences  intellectual_history  18thC  20thC  social_sciences-post-WWII  postmodern  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton on Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism | Philosophy and Literature 23 (1999): 243-55. Denis Dutton
Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism (Cambridge University Press, $39.95) is notable not only for its passion, but for the way it supplies a new take on familiar problems. -- Etlin, however, is an architectural historian, and it’s refreshing to come across a cultural warrior lobbing grenades from a different academic encampment. -- Etlin’s book is excessively ambitious in trying to attack poststructuralism from dozens of angles; this, however, is part of its charm. He is bravely willing to take on anyone — Hayden White, Foucault, Nietzsche, Derrida, Bourdieu, de Man, Norman Bryson, Freud — and has no hesitation in identifying heroes and heroines, from Rembrandt to Jane Austen to Jefferson to Victor Hugo to Frank Lloyd Wright. -- Etlin says that not since Hegel have intellectuals displayed the hubris they show today, “attributing to themselves the power to arbitrate all meaning.” Their celebration of complexity and ambiguity becomes a form of “boundless egotism.” Poststructuralists are as suckered by the notion that texts are hidden repositories of obscure meanings as previous generations of intellectuals were suckered by the forces of astrology or alchemy. But their feelings of power, freedom, and discovery are illusory. "....Claims about variety, endless or even limited, can never be merely asserted; they must be demonstrated with coherent solutions.” -- Etlin’s brief but incisive treatment of Walter Benjamin’s 1935 essay “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” is quite typical of the provocations of his book, making me wonder why this essay is continuously reproduced, forced on students, and cited in articles. Benjamin’s so-called pathbreaking discourse is wrong on virtually all major counts, as Etlin shows.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  lit_crit  humanism  anti-humanism  19thC  20thC  poststructuralist  postmodern  social_theory  literary_theory  historiography-postWWII  epistemology-history  complexity  diversity  hermeneutics  deconstruction  narrative  aesthetics  mass_culture  Benjamin  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Ellrodt - Literary History and the Search for Certainty | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 3 (Summer, 1996), pp. 529-543
Debates re historical knowledge, fact and fiction, epistemological standing of traces of the past, narrative and its relation to truth telling function, etc from 16thC through 20thC and deconstruction. French emphasis -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  epistemology-history  La_Mothe_le_Vayer  Descartes  Gassendi  deconstruction  postmodern  White_Hayden  Ricoeur  Derrida  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Terry Eagleton - The Contradictions of Postmodernism | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 28, No. 1 (Winter, 1997), pp. 1-6
Culture or historicism or the marginalized aren't inherently radical left - as likely to be appropriated or constituted by reactionaries -- culturisn as reductionist as biologism etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  20thC  21stC  social_theory  culture  cultural_history  new_historicism  New_Left  postmodern  post-colonial  conservatism  culture_wars  Marxist 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Graeme Garrard - Nietzsche for and against the Enlightenment | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 70, No. 4 (Fall, 2008), pp. 595-608
This essay explores Nietzsche's attitude to the Enlightenment, which the author argues underwent a major reversal between his so-called middle works and his later writings. The author examines the nature of this change and considers some of the reasons behind it. In the process, some of Nietzsche's "postmodern" admirers are taken to task for appropriating his criticisms of the Enlightenment without acknowledging his ambivalence toward it. Furthermore, the radical change in Nietzsche's view of the Enlightenment is taken as evidence of the periodization of his thought, which some prominent Nietzsche scholars (e.g. Walter Kaufmann) have disputed. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  postmodern  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Allan Megill, review essay - Historicizing Nietzsche? Paradoxes and Lessons of a Hard Case | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 68, No. 1 (Mar., 1996), pp. 114-152
Reviewed works: *--* (1) Nietzsche Contra Rousseau: A Study of Nietzsche's Moral and Politicial Thought by Keith Ansell-Pearson; *--* (2) The Neitzche Legacy in Germany, 1890-1990 by Steven E. Aschheim; *--* (3) Confrontations: Derrida/Heidegger/Nietzsche by Ernst Behler; *--* (4) Neitzsche on Truth and Philosophy by Steven Taubeneck; *--* (5) Nietzsche Contra Nietzsche: Creativity and the Anti-Romantic by Adrian Del Caro; *--* (6) Neitzsche and the Politics of Aristocratic Radicalism by Bruce Detwiler; *--* (7) Nietzsche's New Seas: Explorations in Philosophy, Aesthetics, and Politics by Michael Allen Gillespie; Tracy B. Strong; *--* (8) Nietzsche and the Origin of Virtue by Lester H. Hunt; *--* (9) Zarathustras Geheimnis: Friedrich Nietzsche und seine verschlüsselte Botschaft by Joachim Köhler; *--* (10) Nietzsche as Postmodernist: Essays Pro and Contra; Clayton Koelb; *--* (11) Nietzsche's Case: Philosophy as/and Literature by Bernd Magnus; Stanley Stewart; Jean-Pierre Mileur; *--* (12) Nietzsche's Philosophy of Nature and Cosmology by Alistair Moles; *--* (13) Nietzsche und der Nietzscheanismus by Ernst Nolte; *--* (14) Young Nietzsche: Becoming a Genius by Carl Pletsch; *--* (15) Nietzsche and the Question of Interpretation: Between Hermeneutics and Deconstruction by Alan D. Schrift; *--* (16) Alcyone: Nietzsche on Gifts, Noise, and Women by Gary Shapiro; *-'* (17) Nietzschean Narratives by Gary Shapiro; *--* (18) Thinker on Stage: Nietzsche's Materialism by Peter Sloterdijk; *--* (19) Reading Nietzsche by Robert C. Solomon; Kathleen M. Higgins; *--* (20) Nietzsche's Voice by Henry Staten; *--* (21) Left-Wing Nietzscheanism: The Politics of German Expressionism, 1910-1920 by Seth Taylor; *--* (22) Friedrich Nietzsche and the Politics of the Soul: A Study of Heroic Individualism by Leslie Paul Thiele; *--* (23) Nietzsche and Political Thought by Mark Warren; *--* (24) Within Nietzsche's Labyrinth by Alan White; *--* (25) Nietzsche's Philosophy of Art by Julian Young -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Nietzsche  Rousseau  Heidegger  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  aesthetics  morality-Nietzche  lit_crit  literary_history  individualism  self  self-development  Weimar  hermeneutics  deconstruction  postmodern  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  metaethics  style-philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Johnson - Communication, Criticism, and the Postmodern Consensus: An Unfashionable Interpretation of Michel Foucault | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Aug., 1997), pp. 559-583
Downloaded pdf to Note -- useful bibliography of lots of interpretations of Foucault with which he takes issue -- the epigraph by Foucault re critique examining buried assumptions and denaturalizing commonly received social arrangements and what passes for knowledge -- why Burke so bent out of shape by Bolingbroke in the 1750s and returns to him and the freethinkers in 1790s
article  jstor  political_philosophy  power  communication  discourse  critique  Foucault  Derrida  postmodern  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ronald Paulson - Versions of a Human Sublime - Discussion article for issue: The Sublime and the Beautiful: Reconsiderations | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 16, No. 2 (Winter, 1985), pp. 427-437
(1) From the Sublime to the Political: Some Historical Notes (pp. 213-235) Gary Shapiro. *--* (2) Sociology and the Sublime (pp. 237-249) Judith Huggins Balfe. *--* (3) Plato's Performative Sublime and the Ends of Reading (pp. 251-273) Charles Altieri. *--* (4) Longinus and the Subject of the Sublime (pp. 275-289) Suzanne Guerlac. *--* (5) A Commentary on Suzanne Guerlac's "Longinus and the Subject of the Sublime"(pp. 291-297) Frances Ferguson. *--* (6) Gothic Sublimity (pp. 299-319) David B. Morris. *--* (7) A Grammar of the Sublime, or Intertextuality Triumphant in Church, Turner, and Cole (pp. 321-341) Bryan J. Wolf. *--* (8) Sublime or Ridiculous? Turner and the Problem of the Historical Figure (pp. 343-376) Andrew Wilton. *--* (9) Seascapes of the Sublime: Vernet, Monet, and the Oceanic Feeling (pp. 377-400) Steven Z. Levine. *--* (10) Declensions: D'Annunzio after the Sublime (pp. 401-415) Paolo Valesio and Marilyn Migiel. *--* (11) Fresh Frozen Fenix Random Notes on the Sublime, the Beautiful, and the Ugly in the Postmodern Era (pp. 417-425) Nathaniel Tarn -- downloaded pdf to Note
journal  article  jstor  literary_history  lit_crit  intellectual_history  aesthetics  sublime  antiquity  Longinus  Plato  Plato-poetry  18thC  Gothic-fiction  painting  art_history  art_criticism  20thC  Modernism  avant_guard  postmodern  political_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Wim Weymans - Michel de Certeau and the Limits of Historical Representation | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 43, No. 2 (May, 2004), pp. 161-178
The polymath Michel de Certeau is traditionally seen as one of a group of French post-structuralist thinkers who reject constructs in the social sciences in favor of the diversity of the everyday or the past. However, in this paper I will show that, as a historian, Certeau did not discard these constructs, but rather valued them as a means of doing justice to the "strangeness" of the past. The position that Certeau adopts can be seen most clearly from his theoretical debate with Paul Veyne, which is the starting point of this article. I then show how Certeau's first major historical work, The Possession at Loudun, exemplifies his theoretical position. An analysis of this work demonstrates how the historian's active reconstruction of interactions between exorcists, medical doctors, state officers, and possessed nuns helps us to perceive the complexity of the past in a way that can be seen as a microhistory avant la lettre. I will suggest that during his writing of the history of Loudun, Certeau implicitly raises more theoretical and epistemological problems, and in so doing he "practices" a theory of history. The most elusive aspect of the story at Loudun turns out to be the drama around the priest Grandier. This article demonstrates how Certeau pays tribute to Grandier by using "scientific" methods, thus showing the "limits of representation" through disciplinary means. Finally, the article explores the implications of Certeau's theory and practice of the writing of history for understanding historiography at large. The historian not only appears as a tramp who looks for remains that are forever lost to us, but is also a "scientist" who uses both models and concepts in order to put them to the test. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  20thC  historicism  new_historicism  poststructuralist  postmodern  microhistory  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
David Rollison - Exploding England: The Dialectics of Mobility and Settlement in Early Modern England | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 24, No. 1 (Jan., 1999), pp. 1-16
Movement, change, uncertainty and unpredictability, the most obvious characteristics of English life between the Reformation and the execution of Charles Stuart, have been lost in the recent historiography of early modern England. From a post-colonial perspective, it is obvious that something very dramatic must have happened to turn three million English speakers into six hundred million and convert entire cultures to English ways of organising and thinking. Viewed from the colonies, England exploded during this period, and continued to explode for at least 350 years. Something very revolutionary must have been going on in England to make this happen. This paper explores the dialectics of movement and settlement in early modern England for signs of contradiction. -- impact on doing social history of postmodernism on thinking about geography, territory, "governmentality" reflected in archives that doesn't match lived experience, post-colonial insights -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  historiography  postmodern  postcolonial  social_theory  geography  territory  migration  social_mobility  political_economy  middle_class  peasants  labor  agriculture  gentry  colonialism  British_Empire  demography  emigration  population  urbanization  British_history  16thC  17thC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Catherine H. Zuckert - On the 'Rationality' of Rational Choice | JSTOR: Political Psychology, Vol. 16, No. 1 (Mar., 1995), pp. 179-198
Proponents argue that rational choice theory is a form of positive science, one whose simplified model of the human psyche generates useful predictions of human behavior. But their assumptions are contrary to fact. Their analyses of public policy decisions are cast in terms of the sharp and now largely discredited distinction logical positivists drew between "facts" and "values" or efficient "means" and affective "ends." And their models arouse suspicions concerning and objections to the political and psychological effects of the methods they employ and the policy options they endorse. All of this makes the theory not only less useful for understanding politics but also more subject to criticism by "postmodern" thinkers than it need be. Were its proponents explicitly to acknowledge the "prescriptive" character of "rational choice," however, they would help foster a broader discussion of the different kinds of rationality and their interaction in the formulation of public policy. That discussion of the forms of rationality would, in turn, bring out a more complex view of the psychological basis of both politics and rationality. -- see bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_science  rational_choice  fact-value  postmodern  values  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Farr, John Gunnell, Raymond Seidelman - Can Political Science History Be Neutral? | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 84, No. 2 (Jun., 1990), pp. 587-607
In the December 1988 issue of this Review, John Dryzek and Stephen Leonard argued the need for @'context-sensitive@' histories of the discipline of political science. In their view, disciplinary history must guide practical inquiry if it is to be most useful. The course of their argument draws the criticisms of three political scientists concerned about the history of political science--James Farr, John Gunnell, and Raymond Seidelman. Dryzek and Leonard respond to their critics and underscore their own rationale for enhanced interest in the history of the discipline. -- sociology_of_knowledge issues, early postmodern theory debates, perils of Whiggish history and sceptical Whiggism a la Scottish Enlightenment -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  social_theory  social_sciences  political_science  18thC  19thC  20thC  sociology_of_knowledge  philosophy_of_social_science  ideology  disciplines  discourse  postmodern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
AHR Forum: Geoff Eley's "A Crooked Line: From Cultural History to History of Society" (2005) | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 113, No. 2, Apr., 2008
Eley dismayed by cultural turn from social history. One article by William Sewell who isn't eager to return to the "totalizing" ambitions of social history. A South Asia historian agrees that important things are lost with cultural_history dominating -- particularly comparative, scale (spatial and temporal) and subjects especially important for postcolonial, eg political economy.
journal  article  jstor  historiography  20thC  21stC  social_history  cultural_history  postmodern  post-colonial  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - How to Be an Intentionalist | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 209-217
See Brown article in same issue - The general aim of this paper is to establish the plausibility of a postfoundational intentionalism. Its specific aim is to respond to criticisms of my work made by Vivienne Brown in a paper "On Some Problems with Weak Intentionalism for Intellectual History." Postfoundationalism is often associated with a new textualism according to which there is no outside to the text. In contrast, I suggest that postfoundationalists can legitimate our postulating intentions, actions, and other historical objects outside of the text. They can do so by reference to, first, philosophical commitments to general classes of objects, and, second, inference to the best explanation with respect to particular objects belonging to such classes. This postfoundational intentionalism sets up a suitable context within which to address Brown's more specific questions.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  author_intention  reader_response  intertextual  Derrida  postmodern  hermeneutics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Gabrielle M. Spiegel - Revising the Past/Revisiting the Present: How Change Happens in Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 46, No. 4 (Dec., 2007), pp. 1-19
Lead article in an issue focused on revisionism in historiography -- This article investigates the various forces that may help to explain the ongoing historiographical phenomenon of revision. It takes as its point of departure Michel de Certeau's understanding of the writing of history as a process consisting of an unstable and constantly changing triangulated relationship among a place (a recruitment, a milieu, a profession), analytical procedures (a discipline), and the construction of a text (or discourse). For de Certeau, revision is the formal prerequisite for writing history because the very distance between past and present requires continuous innovation simply to produce the objects of historical knowledge, which have no existence apart from the historian's identification of them. The specific nature of revision at a given moment is determined by the specificities of the process as a whole, that is, by the characteristics of place, procedure, and text and their contemporary relational configuration. Taking the rise of "linguistic-turn" historiography as exemplary of the process of historical revision in its broadest possible meaning, the article seeks to discover the possible "causes" for that turn. It begins with an analysis of the psychological roots of poststructuralism as a response to the Holocaust and its aftermath, and then proceeds to explore the possible economic and social transformations in the postwar world that might account for its reception, both in Europe but also, more counterintuitively, in the United States, where postmodernism proved to have an especially strong appeal. Added to this mix are the new patterns of social recruitment into the historical profession in the "sixties." The essay suggests that, to the extent that revision is understood as the result of the combined effect of psychological, social, and professional determinations, it is unlikely that there will ever be genuine consensus about the sources of revision in history, since all historians bring to their work differing congeries of psychological preoccupations, social positions, and professional commitments.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  historiography  revisionism  linguistic_turn  social_sciences-post-WWII  postmodern  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC -- De la vérité: Pragmatisme, historicisme et relativisme | JSTOR: Rue Descartes, No. 5/6, Novembre 1992
Avant-propos (pp. 9-10) *-* PART 1 *-* A-t-on besoin du vrai ? Le défi pragmatique *-* *-- (1) Qu'est-ce que le pragmaticisme ? (pp. 13-21) Charles Sanders Peirce and Jacques Poulain. *-- (2) Le partage de l'héritage anticartésien de C.S. Peirce : D. Davidson, H. Putnam et R. Rorty (pp. 23-52) Jacques Poulain. *-- (3) Dewey entre Hegel et Darwin (pp. 53-71) Richard Rorty and Patrick Sauret. *-- (4) Wittgenstein, la vérité et le passé de la philosophie (pp. 73-93) Hilary Putnam and Patrick Sauret. *-* PART 2 *-* Historicisme ou essentialisme ? L'alternative épistémologique. *-- (5) L'état de la théorie du langage chez Richard Rorty (pp. 97-109) Henri Meschonnic. *-- (6) Des tournants historiques (pp. 111-120) Jonathan Rée. *-- (7) La réalisation linguistique de la vérité (pp. 121-141) Aldo G. Gargani and Patrick Sauret. *-* PART 3 Les fins de l'histoire pragmatique : la justice libérale et le Bien communautaire *-* *-- (8) Les limites du libéralisme. De l'éthique politique aux États-Unis aujourd'hui (pp. 145-157) Axel Honneth and Patrick Sauret. *-- (9) Les Lumières et l'esprit juif ou la raison des vaincus (pp. 159-175) Reyès Maté and Catherine Ballestero. *-- (9) Vérité, contingence et modernité (pp. 177-194) Albrecht Wellmer and Marie-Noëlle Ryan. *-* PART 4 *-* Le « bonheur » de l'homme pragmatique *-* *-- (10) L'esthétique pragmatique de Rorty (pp. 197-208) Rainer Rochlitz. *-- (11) L'esthetique postmoderne du rap (pp. 209-228) Richard Shusterman
journal  article  jstor  20thC  historiography  epistemology  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  aesthetics  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  cultural_critique  modernity  contingency  continental_philosophy  pragmatism  historicism  relativism  postmodern  liberalism  critical_theory  Peirce  Dewey  Rorty  Putnam  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
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