dunnettreader + political_nation   15

Symposium on "Democracy Disfigured" - An Answer to My Criticis | Nadia Urbinati - Academia.edu
An answer to my critics in a symposium, organized by John McCormick, held on her book, Democracy Disfigured, by the journal European Political Science, 2015. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_philosophy  democracy  representative_institutions  democracy-direct  political_culture  republicanism  Machiavelli  political_participation  political_discourse  public_opinion  populism  common_good  community  political_nation  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Critical Dialogue: Nadia Urbinati (Democracy Disfigured) and Elizabeth Beaumont (The Civic Constitution) | - Academia.edu - Perspectives on Politics, June 2015
Critiques and responses(1) The Civic Constitution: Civic Visions and Struggles in the Path toward Constitutional Democracy. By Elizabeth Beaumont. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. 386p. (2) Democracy Disfigured: Opinion, Truth, and the People. By Nadia Urbinati. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014. 320 -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  democracy  civil_society  civic_virtue  constitutionalism  constitutions  constitutional_regime  public_opinion  political_participation  political_culture  community  political_discourse  political_nation  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Anne-Marie Thiesse, review - Sylvain Venayre on historians and The Myth of the French Nation - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French original 2013 - Instapaper)
Reviewed : Sylvain Venayre, Les Origines de la France. Quand les historien racontaient la nation, Paris, Le Seuil, collection L’Univers Historique, 2013, 430 p. -- review translated by Pascale Torracinta , -- Tags : nation | history | people | national identity -- Sylvain Venayre responds to politicians who, only yesterday, were asking historians to define national identity. With an exploration of the French nation’s roots, he deliberately shifts the question by proposing a history of how historians are themselves involved in the production of a collective identity. -- downloaded English translation pdf to Note -- French version saved to Instapaper
books  reviews  France  18thC  19thC  20thC  historiography-19thC  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  national_origins  political_culture  political_nation  intellectual_history  professionalization  university  downloaded  EF-add  Instapaper 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Andrew Berman - The Architects of Eighteenth Century English Freemasonry, 1720 - 1740 (2010 thesis) | University of Exeter
Advisors: Black, Jeremy & Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas -- Date Issued: 2010-09-22 --
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10036/2999 -- Following the appointment of its first aristocratic Grand Masters in the 1720s and in the wake of its connections to the scientific Enlightenment, ‘Free and Accepted’ Masonry rapidly became part of Britain’s national profile and the largest and arguably the most influential of Britain’s extensive clubs and societies. (..) Freemasonry became a vehicle for the expression and transmission of the political and religious views of those at its centre, and for the scientific Enlightenment concepts that they championed. The ‘Craft’ also offered a channel through which many sought to realise personal aspirations: social, intellectual and financial. Through an examination of relevant primary and secondary documentary evidence, this thesis seeks to contribute to a broader understanding of contemporary English political and social culture, and to explore the manner in which Freemasonry became a mechanism that promoted the interests of the Hanoverian establishment and connected and bound a number of élite metropolitan and provincial figures. A range of networks centred on the aristocracy, parliament, the magistracy and the learned and professional societies are studied, and key individuals instrumental in spreading and consolidating the Masonic message identified. The thesis also explores the role of Freemasonry in the development of the scientific Enlightenment. The evidence suggests that Freemasonry should be recognised not only as the most prominent of the many 18thC fraternal organisations, but also as a significant cultural vector and a compelling component of the social, economic, scientific and political transformation then in progress. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  Walpole  Whigs-oligarchy  British_history  British_politics  Enlightenment  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-politics  Freemasonry  cultural_history  intellectual_history  networks-social  networks-political  networks-business  sociology_of_science_&_technology  elites  aristocracy  Parliament  MPs  political_nation  economic_sociology  economic_culture  commerce-doux  finance_capital  banking  capital_markets  capital_as_power  history_of_science  historical_sociology  historical_change  center-periphery  provinces  clubs  social_capital  judiciary  professions  professionalization  religious_culture  science-and-religion  latitudinarian  natural_religion  Newtonian  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Making Contact: Petitions and the English Republic | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 45, No. 1 (January 2006), pp. 26-50
A broader study of petitioning is particularly warranted when the prevailing narratives—as of the years of the republic of 1649–609—concentrate on revolution, coercion, and exclusion and thus put a singular slant on the relations of rulers and ruled. (...) The sword certainly put the republic in place, but it neither wrote all its history nor dictated all its practices. In fact, familiar patterns and mechanisms of reciprocity counterpointed the disturbances of revolutionary change, held groups and individuals together, and constituted assets on which the republic could draw. (...) This article will take petitions and the responses they elicited as a measure of the openness, of the responsiveness, of the regime.... In its examination of petitioning—the process, problems of access, tactics, and language used—the article will work within certain narrow limits. Wartime exigencies had proliferated committees and commissions (accounts, army, excise, indemnity, navy, and plundered ministers...) to which countless parties petitioned, before which they pleaded, and from which they often appealed to higher authorities. This article confines itself for several reasons to solicitations of those higher authorities, (...) The descent of Leveller petitioners on parliament, whether in 1649–50, 1653–54, or 1659, certainly produced some revealing exchanges—on each side coercive intentions and language tended to run high—but what was revealed tends to reinforce the traditional picture of an embattled and exclusionary order. This article will accordingly look elsewhere, to more mundane business of governance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  governance  government_officials  petitions  political_participation  political_culture  Cromwell  accountability  popular_politics  political_press  pamphlets  republicanism  political_nation  political_spectacle  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst - Bodies and Interests: Toleration and the Political Imagination in the Later 17thC | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 70, No. 3 (September 2007), pp. 401-426
Religious fragmentation threatened the notion of a unitary body politic, and conservative Anglicans in the Restoration exploited the organic figure to excoriate dissenters. While scriptural patterns drew the godly too to that trope, its ecclesiastical implications often left them parsing uncomfortably as they urged concessions. In this article Derek Hirst argues that they were largely rescued from such parsing by the new discourse of “interest.” When the promise of trade was taking the court by storm, Independents and Presbyterians had much to gain in re-imagining the polity more pluralistically in terms of interest; Locke too was part of this process. But though the general drift is clear, partisan circumstance could occasion surprising cross-currents, in England and Ireland alike. -- Keywords body politic, religious toleration, John Owen, discourse of “interest”, John Locke -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-religion  economic_history  political_economy  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  dissenters  High_Church  merchants  trade  Restoration  tolerance  political_philosophy  political_order  political_nation  interest-discourse  body_politic  Locke  Locke-religion  court_culture  colonialism  tariffs  Presbyterians  Independents  Ireland  Church_of_England  Anglican  Church_of_Ireland  Ulster  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - THE RESILIENCY OF THE NATION-STATE IN SCHOLARSHIP AND IN FACT | JSTOR: Review (Fernand Braudel Center), Vol. 34, No. 3, 2011
Introduction: "Globalization" and the Nation-State in the Modern World-System (pp. 253-258) - Denis O'Hearn and Thomas M. Wilson. *--* Nationalism in a Post-Hegemonic Era (pp. 259-283) - Richard Lachmann. *--* The State of States in International Organizations: From the WHO to the Global Fund (pp. 285-310) - Nitsan Chorev, Tatiana Andia Rey and David Ciplet. *--* On the Study of Social Optics: Foucault, Counter-Surveillance, and the Political Underground in Northern Peru (pp. 311-331) - David Nugent -- lots of interesting bibliography
article  journal  jstor  20thC  21stC  economic_history  political_history  political_economy  international_political_economy  cultural_history  globalization  global_governance  global_economy  global_system  global_history  social_theory  political_sociology  political_culture  political_nation  nation-state  national_ID  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  international_finance  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  hegemony  Foucault  IFIs  world_systems  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
OLIVER J. W. COX -- FREDERICK, PRINCE OF WALES, AND THE FIRST PERFORMANCE OF ‘RULE, BRITANNIA!’ (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 931-954. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
OLIVER J. W. COX - University College, Oxford -- The words and music of ‘Rule, Britannia!’ are synonymous with the expansionist, triumphalist, and imperialist Britain symbolized by fluttering Union Jacks on the Last Night of the Proms. This article explores the cultural and political contexts of the first performance of this important national cultural artefact as the finale of Alfred: a masque to suggest that this opening night served a very different purpose. The first audience was a court in exile from the metropolitan heart of London, popular amongst the general public, but without any prospects of government. Two of the most important members of this group of peers, politicians, poets and a prince had recently died, and with them any cohesive identity. Alfred is both a desperate plea for unity, a rallying cry which forcefully restated the key tenets of this group's identity, and a delayed expression of patriotic celebration occasioned by Admiral Vernon's capture of Portobello. Through addressing this performance, this article makes an important contribution to our understanding of Hanoverian political culture and highlights the continuing impact of Anglo-Saxon England on mid-eighteenth-century Britain. -* For comments and advice on earlier versions of my argument, I am grateful to Dr Hannah Smith and Dr Geoffrey Tyack. - Thanks are also due to John and Virginia Murray who ensured archival work at 50 Albemarle Street was always a pleasure.
article  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  1740s  Whigs-opposition  Whigs-oligarchy  George_II  Walpole  Frederick_Prince_of_Wales  Britannia  Bolingbroke  Mallet  political_culture  political_nation  political_spectacle  theater  theatre-politics  elite_culture  patriotism  Anglo-Saxons  cultural_authority  cultural_pessimism  War_of_Austrian_Succession  British_Navy  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Citizenship and Dignity (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-74 -- Theories of dignity have to navigate between two conceptions: the egalitarian idea of human dignity and the old idea of dignitas, connected with hierarchy, rank, and office. One possible way of bridging the gap between the two is to talk of the dignity of the citizen. In modern republics and democracies, the dignity of the citizen extends to a large sector of the population and connotes something about the general quality of the relation between the government and the governed. This chapter first explores Immanuel Kant’s account of the dignity of the citizen, and then it pursues the implications of the dignity of the citizen for modern society and modern theories of human dignity. Though the dignity of the citizen and human dignity are not the same concept, they are congruent in many respects and the former casts considerable light on the latter — in particular on the connection between dignity and responsibility and dignity and transparency in social and political relations. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: citizenship, contractarianism, dignity, human dignity, Kant, responsibilities, transparency -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  Enlightenment  modernity  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  democracy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  citizenship  citizens  dignity  Kant  Kant-politics  Kant-ethics  egalitarian  rank  social_order  social_contract  responsibility  office  commonwealth  common_good  fiduciaries  accountability  governing_class  transparency  inequality  political_participation  political_nation  political_economy  political_culture  governmentality  power-asymmetric  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Principle of Loyal Opposition (last revised 2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-22 -- The Principle of Loyal Opposition is key to the way in which modern democracies organize themselves. It is bound up with the existence of political parties, of which we need to take much more notice in political theory (as Nancy Rosenblum has argued) and with the significance of reasonable disagreement in politics. The principle is exhibited most clearly in systems that actually assign a role to an official Opposition party and an Opposition Leadership. But versions of it are also apparent in American-style constitutions, albeit they are harder to discern in a context in which different functions of government may assigned, branch by branch, to members of different political parties. Finally, the paper interrogates the idea of "loyalty" in "loyal opposition." Loyalty to what? The paper argues that the phrase should not connote any sort of litmus test of support for constitutional essentials, but should rather convey a sense that as far as possible opposition parties are always to be regarded as loyal, no matter what policies or constitutional changes they favor. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 44 -- Keywords: constitution, constitutional essentials, democracy, loyal opposition, political parties -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  government-forms  mixed_government  partisanship  parties  faction  opposition  political_culture  political_order  competition-political  loyalty  political_nation  constitutionalism  democracy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC and Introduction, Nicholas Rogers - Making the English Middle Class, ca. 1700-1850 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 32, No. 4, Oct., 1993
Introduction (pp. 299-304) Nicholas Rogers [downloaded] *--* (1) "A Just and Profitable Commerce": Moral Economy and the Middle Classes in 18thC London (pp. 305-332) Susan E. Brown [questions "aristocratic century" - independent merchants and bourgeoisie in leading charities, urban politics, polite culture etc. Didn't fit a consistent deference pattern; members of middle class could be on all sides of Poor Laws, so Thompson's bipolar moral economy overstates lack of variation in middle and intermediary functions, especially when drawing on civic traditions that didn't depend on aristocracy leadership] *--* (2) Racism, Imperialism, and the Traveler's Gaze in 18thC England (pp. 333-357) Margaret Hunt [unenlightened middle class elements eg freemasonry could be as xenophobic as cosmopolitan; attention to racial, ethnic difference could also be used to stigmatise the poor and set middle class apart] *--* (3) The Masonic Moment; Or, Ritual, Replica, and Credit: John Wilkes, the Macaroni Parson, and the Making of the Middle-Class Mind (pp. 358-395) John Money. *--* (4) "Middle-Class" Domesticity Goes Public: Gender, Class, and Politics from Queen Caroline to Queen Victoria (pp. 396-432) Dror Wahrman [middle class as defenders of family, domesticity, separate spheres only after won political status in 1832 - nobody adopted Hannah More's vision until decades later - use of the term by others or as self identifier is all over the map, even in the same report or work, stabilizing only c 1830s] -- downloaded Rogers pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  political_history  political_economy  political_culture  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  urbanization  urban_politics  urban_elites  middle_class  aristocracy  politeness  consumerism  travel  xenophobia  racism  poverty  Poor_Laws  merchants  mercantilism  commercial_interest  interest_groups  corporatism  free_trade  Freemasonry  gender  family  domesticity  moral_economy  creditors  debtors  dissenters  local_government  political_nation  oligarchy  Parliament  anti-Jacobin  Loyalists  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  imperialism  London  status  rank  nouveaux_riches  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan G. W. Conlin - High Art and Low Politics: A New Perspective on John Wilkes | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 356-381
Fascinating for mid to late 18thC issues for both Continental Enlightenment and British thinkers and artists re scope of public sphere and state responsibility for promotion of the arts, its benefits for polite culture including middle classes with polite aspirations -- Wilkes connections with philosophes including Holbach and Diderot -- and how Wilkes wove his political reforms and promotion of arts and industry together. Useful discussion of range of historian takes on Wilkes, who he mobilized, relation with older republican opposition and later dissenters and radical opposition. Hume opposition to Wilkes' anti monarchy and anti aristocracy republicanism leads to different assessment of progress in civilizing arts and role of doux commerce. Each historian seems to put Wilkes in their own narrative resulting in dramatically different assessments of both Wilkes himself and his impact. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  art_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  George_III  Wilkes  Hume  Diderot  d'Holbach  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  opposition  public_sphere  public_opinion  governing_class  political_nation  political_culture  accountability  Parliament  franchise  Septennial_Act  nationalism  national_ID  xenophobia  anti-monarchy  anti-aristocracy  middle_class  merchants  state-roles  Grand_Tour  patriotism  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Catherine_the_Great  Walpole  Walpole_Horace  museums  academies  bibliography  enlightened_absolutism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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