dunnettreader + political_discourse   31

Andrew March - Rethinking Religious Reasons in Public Justification (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
Abstract
This article intervenes in the debate on the place of religious arguments in public reason. I advance the debate not by asking whether something called "religious reasons" ought to be invoked in the justification of coercive laws, but by creating a typology of (a) different kinds and forms of religious arguments and, more importantly, (b) different areas of political and social life which coercive laws regulate or about which human political communities deliberate. Religious arguments are of many different kinds, are offered to others in a variety of ways, and the spheres of life about which communities deliberate pose distinct moral questions. Turning back to the public reason debate, I argue then that political liberals ought to be concerned primarily about the invocation of a certain subset of religious reasons in a certain subset of areas of human activity, but also that inclusivist arguments on behalf of religious contributions to public deliberation fail to justify the use of religious arguments in all areas of public deliberation. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
jstor  norms  liberalism-public_reason  politics-and-religion  discourse-political_theory  article  public_reason  political_theory  liberal_democracy  downloaded  democracy  deliberation-public  political_discourse  bibliography 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Dario Battistella - Raymond Aron, réaliste néoclassique | Érudit | Études internationales v43 n3 2012, p. 371-388 |
Institut d’études politiques de Bordeaux -- Successivement apprécié, critiqué, et oublié, Raymond Aron a toujours été difficile à classer au sein de la discipline des Relations internationales. Parmi les recensions récentes dont son oeuvre a fait l’objet, celle de Michael Doyle fait une proposition intéressante, en y voyant un réaliste constitutionnaliste. Notre contribution se propose d’approfondir cette piste en montrant qu’Aron est en fait un réaliste néoclassique avant la lettre. Après avoir rappelé les points communs qu’Aron partage avec le réalisme classique de Morgenthau et le néoréalisme de Waltz, cet article démontre les affinités à la fois ontologiques et épistémologiques entre l’internationaliste français et les réalistes néoclassiques nord-américains qui ignorent qu’ils ignorent Aron. -- dowloaded via Air
article  downloaded  intellectual_history  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  WWII  post-WWII  Cold_War  Aron_Raymond  IR  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  French_intellectuals  French_politics  French_history  Vichy  4th_Republic  5th_Republic  political_press  political_discourse 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Henry Farrell - Privatization as State Transformation — Crooked Timber - Sept 2016
This account helps explain not only why key parts of the state have become privatized or semi-privatized, being put out to private operators, but why states are increasingly relying on private systems of ordering. It shows how the privatization of governance spans the international sphere as well as domestic politics, since international and cross-national forms of regulation have sometimes been partly privatized, and sometimes structured so as to provide private entities with new opportunities to challenge government decisions. Finally, it provides the basis for a specific normative critique of privatization. Here, I do not try to evaluate whether the economy works worse, or better, after privatization than it did in an era when the state exercised control through ownership rather than regulation. Instead, more simply, I show that privatization did not work as its enthusiasts argued and believed that it would, looking to evaluate it in terms of its own promises. Rather than pushing back the state, and replacing political inefficiency with the competitive disciplines of the market, it has replaced one form of political control with another. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
competition-political  political_science  efficiency  political_change  downloaded  international_organizations  international_political_economy  IR-domestic_politics  hierarchy  accountability  reform-political  competition  political_economy  risk_management  paper  government-forms  political_sociology  political_order  politics-and-money  political_discourse  privatization  organizations  decision_theory  bureaucracy  political_culture 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Anoush Fraser Terjanian, Associate Professor - Department of History - East Carolina University
Anoush F. Terjanian, Commerce and Its Discontents in Eighteenth-Century French Political Thought (Cambridge UP, © 2013) -- Co-editor. Book 17 of Raynal et. al., Histoire philosophique et politique du commerce et des établissements des européens dans les deux Indes, (1770, 1774, 1780), Ferney: Centre international d'étude du XVIIIe siècle, forthcoming 2016.
academia  18thC  French_history  French_Enlightenment  political_economy  colonialism  anticolonialism  philosophes  commerce-doux  luxury  virtue  politics-and-literature  political_discourse  economics-and-morality  economic_discourse  Histoire_des_Deux_Indes  intellectual_history  historiography-18thC  Montesquieu  Raynal  books 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Emily Nacol - An Age of Risk: Politics and Economy in Early Modern Britain (2016) | Princeton University Press (eBook and Hardcover)
In An Age of Risk, Emily Nacol shows that risk, now treated as a permanent feature of our lives, did not always govern understandings of the future. Focusing on the epistemological, political, and economic writings of Hobbes, Locke, Hume, and Adam Smith, Nacol explains that in 17th-18thC Britain, political and economic thinkers reimagined the future as a terrain of risk, characterized by probabilistic calculation, prediction, and control. Nacol contends, we see 3 crucial developments in thought on risk and politics. While thinkers differentiated uncertainty about the future from probabilistic calculations of risk, they remained attentive to the ways uncertainty and risk remained in a conceptual tangle, a problem that constrained good decision making. They developed sophisticated theories of trust and credit as crucial background conditions for prudent risk-taking, and offered complex depictions of the relationships and behaviors that would make risk-taking more palatable. They also developed 2 narratives that persist in subsequent accounts of risk—risk as a threat to security, and risk as an opportunity for profit. Nacol locates the origins of our own ambivalence about risk-taking. By the end of the 18thC, a new type of political actor would emerge from this ambivalence, one who approached risk with fear rather than hope. -- Emily C. Nacol is assistant professor of political science at Vanderbilt University.
Chapter 1 Introduction 1
Chapter 2 “Experience Concludeth Nothing Universally” - Hobbes and the Groundwork for a Political Theory of Risk 9
Chapter 3 The Risks of Political Authority - Trust, Knowledge, and Political Agency in Locke’s Politics and Economy 41
Chapter 4 Hume’s Fine Balance - On Probability, Fear, and the Risks of Trade 69
Chapter 5 Adventurous Spirits and Clamoring Sophists - Smith on the Problem of Risk in Political Economy 98
Chapter 6 An Age of Risk, a Liberalism of Anxiety 124
Notes 131 -- References 157 -- Index 167
Downloaded Chapter 1 to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  Hobbes  Locke  Locke-Essay  Locke-2_Treatises  Hume  Hume-causation  Hume-politics  Smith  political_economy  trade  commerce  commercial_interest  epistemology  epistemology-history  probability  risk  risk_assessment  uncertainty  insurance  risk_shifting  political_discourse  economic_culture 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Chris Lehmann - The Political Class Struggles | The Baffler - July 2016
“Elite opinion” is admittedly a baggy construct—whose opinion? which elite?—but thanks to the…
Instapaper  US_politics  political_press  elections-2016  political_discourse  elites  from instapaper
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Philip Connell - British Identities and the Politics of Ancient Poetry in Later 18thC England (2006) | The Historical Journal on JSTOR
The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 161-192 - This article examines the scholarly recovery and popular reception of 'ancient poetry' in later eighteenth-century England, with a view to elucidating the relationship between cultural primitivism and more overtly politicized discourses of national identity. The publication of the poems of Ossian, in the early 1760s, gave a new prominence to the earliest cultural productions of Celtic antiquity, and inspired the attempts of English literary historians, such as Thomas Percy and Thomas Warton, to provide an alternative 'Gothic' genealogy for the English literary imagination. However, both the English reception of Ossian, and the Gothicist scholarship of Percy and Warton, were complicated by the growing strength of English radical patriotism. As popular political discourse assumed an increasingly insular preoccupation with Saxon liberties and ancient constitutional rights, more conservative literary historians found their own attempts to ground English poetic tradition in some form of Gothic inheritance progressively compromised. The persistence of ancient constitutionalism as a divisive element of English political argument thus curtailed the ability of Gothicist literary scholarship to function as an effective vehicle for English cultural patriotism.
article  jstor  18thC  English_lit  literary_history  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-literature  political_culture  political_discourse  Gothic  ancient_constitution  liberty  radicals  conservatism  antiquity  antiquaries  history_of_England  popular_culture  high_culture  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Paul Glastris - Elizabeth Warren just gave the most sneakily important speech of 2016
Re pattern of industry consolidation in US, and need for aggressive competition policies - Glastris thinks EW has figured out how to package it as "common sense", easy to understand, political discourse for Democrats
US_politics  US_economy  Democrats  elections-2016  competition  antitrust  political_economy  political_discourse  Instapaper  from instapaper
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Ezra Klein - The Republican Party is broken | VOX - Feb 2016
Photo by David Calvert/Getty Images Could the Republican Party have stopped Donald Trump? The theory goes like this: The Republican Party had the chance to off…
Instapaper  elections-2016  GOP  US_politics  political_culture  political_discourse  parties-transmission_belts  elites-self-destructive  elites-political_influence  politics-and-religion  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell - Dislocated Rhetoric: The Anomaly of Political Theory | JSTOR The Journal of Politics (2006)
Dislocated Rhetoric: The Anomaly of Political Theory
John G. Gunnell
The Journal of Politics
Vol. 68, No. 4 (Nov., 2006), pp. 771-782
Although the estranged relationship between mainstream political science and much of the subfield of political theory has been properly attributed to developments during the last half of the twentieth century, the roots of this alienation are historically deeper. Many of the conversations of political theory are the progeny of a discursive form that attended the birth of modern social science. This genre was a legitimating rhetoric situated in the interstices of social science, philosophy, and politics. The study of the history of political thought originated as such a rhetoric, and it constitutes a paradigm case for examining the extent to which such a discourse can be transformed into a practice of knowledge. This field has succeeded to a greater extent than certain other elements of political theory which, transfixed by the tension between their practical aspirations and academic context, have become anomalous appendages to the social scientific study of politics. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
downloaded  sociology_of_knowledge  political_philosophy  political_science  political_discourse  behavioralism  article  public_policy  intellectual_history  US_history  disciplines  entre_deux_guerres  public_intellectuals  jstor  social_theory  social_sciences-post-WWII  20thC  philosophy_of_social_science 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell - American Political Science, Liberalism, and the Invention of Political Theory | JSTOR The American Political Science Review (1988)
American Political Science, Liberalism, and the Invention of Political Theory
John G. Gunnell
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 82, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 71-87 -- The contemporary estrangement of political theory from political science is in large measure the product of a quarrel that originated in the challenge to the values of U.S. political science initiated by emigre scholars during the 1940s. The behavioral revolution was in an important respect a conservative rebellion in defense of the values of liberalism and related notions of science, relativism, and historical progress that had traditionally informed the discipline. This controversy in the context of political science fundamentally structured the discourse of academic political theory and the contemporary constitution of the field both as a division of political science and as a wider interdisciplinary enterprise.
political_discourse  political_science  university-contemporary  jstor  liberalism  sociology_of_knowledge  social_sciences-post-WWII  20thC  behaviorism  downloaded  article  political_philosophy  disciplines  intellectual_history 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell - Interpretation and the History of Political Theory: Apology and Epistemology | JSTOR- The American Political Science Review (1982)
Interpretation and the History of Political Theory: Apology and Epistemology
John G. Gunnell
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 76, No. 2 (Jun., 1982), pp. 317-327 -- Recent challenges to traditional approaches and purposes for studying the history of political theory have raised questions about its constitution as both a subject matter and subfield of political science. Methodological arguments advocating what is characterized as a more truly historical mode of inquiry for understanding political ideas and recovering textual meaning have become increasingly popular. The relationship of these hermeneutical claims about historicity, such as that advanced by Quentin Skinner, to the actual practice of interpretation is problematical. Such claims are more a defense of a certain norm of historical investigation than a method of interpretation, and the implications of this norm for the reconstitution of the history of political theory require careful consideration. -- interesting collection of references re hermeneutics debates- Not just Anglo but eg Gadamer -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
hermeneutics  Cambridge_School  political_philosophy  jstor  Skinner  political_discourse  political_science  intellectual_history  article  Gadamer  historiography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Melissa Lane - Doing Our Own Thinking for Ourselves: On Quentin Skinner's Genealogical Turn on JSTOR
Doing Our Own Thinking for Ourselves: On Quentin Skinner's Genealogical Turn - in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 71-82 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  Cambridge_School  Skinner  history-and-social_sciences  political_philosophy  political_discourse  language-politics  language-history  speech-act  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  genealogy-method  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
JEFFREY ANDREW BARASH - ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Oct 2011)
Fulltitle -- MYTH IN HISTORY, PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY AS MYTH: ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF HANS BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF ERNST CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH, History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 328-340 This essay explores the different interpretations proposed by Ernst Cassirer and Hans Blumenberg of the relation between Platonic philosophy and myth as a means of bringing to light a fundamental divergence in their respective conceptions of what precisely myth is. It attempts to show that their conceptions of myth are closely related to their respective assumptions concerning the historical significance of myth and regarding the sense of history more generally. Their divergent conceptions of myth and of history, I argue, are at the same time not simply matters of abstract speculation, but spring from fundamental presuppositions concerning myth's political significance. The present elucidation aims not only to set in relief one or another of the ways in which Cassirer or Blumenberg understood myth, nor even to present Blumenberg's critical reception of Cassirer's theories, but above all to contribute to the interpretation of the political implications of myth and of its historical potency in our contemporary epoch. -- most ftnts to Blumenberg in German, especially Work on Myth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  historiography  cultural_history  political_culture  Blumenberg  Cassirer  myth  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  identity  national_tale  national_ID  symbols-political  symbols-religious  symbol  political_discourse  Platonism  Neoplatonism  German_Idealism  neo-Kantian  hermeneutics  political-theology  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Kevin Killeen - Hanging up Kings: The Political Bible in Early Modern England | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (2011)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 72, No. 4 (October 2011), pp. 549-570 -- thinks the Biblical language in which so much 17thC political discourse, including the regicide, was conducted makes much of it out of our audible range, so he's undertaking some geological retrieval --:downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  politics-and-religion  politico-theology  James_I  Charles_I  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Interregnum  Cromwell  Parliamentarians  political_discourse  republicanism  Milton  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Symposium on "Democracy Disfigured" - An Answer to My Criticis | Nadia Urbinati - Academia.edu
An answer to my critics in a symposium, organized by John McCormick, held on her book, Democracy Disfigured, by the journal European Political Science, 2015. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_philosophy  democracy  representative_institutions  democracy-direct  political_culture  republicanism  Machiavelli  political_participation  political_discourse  public_opinion  populism  common_good  community  political_nation  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Critical Dialogue: Nadia Urbinati (Democracy Disfigured) and Elizabeth Beaumont (The Civic Constitution) | - Academia.edu - Perspectives on Politics, June 2015
Critiques and responses(1) The Civic Constitution: Civic Visions and Struggles in the Path toward Constitutional Democracy. By Elizabeth Beaumont. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. 386p. (2) Democracy Disfigured: Opinion, Truth, and the People. By Nadia Urbinati. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2014. 320 -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  democracy  civil_society  civic_virtue  constitutionalism  constitutions  constitutional_regime  public_opinion  political_participation  political_culture  community  political_discourse  political_nation  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Pfau - Romantic Moods: Paranoia, Trauma, and Melancholy, 1790–1840 (2005 hbk only) | JHU Press
Thomas Pfau reinterprets the evolution of British and German Romanticism as a progress through three successive dominant moods, each manifested in the "voice" of an historical moment. Drawing on a multifaceted philosophical tradition ranging from Kant to Hegel to Heidegger—incorporating as well the psychosocial analyses of Freud, Benjamin, and Adorno—Pfau develops a new understanding of the Romantic writer's voice as the formal encryption of a complex cultural condition. Pfau focuses on 3 specific paradigms of emotive experience: paranoia, trauma, and melancholy. Along the trajectory of Romantic thought paranoia characterizes the disintegration of traditional models of causation and representation during the French Revolution; trauma, the radical political, cultural, and economic restructuring of Central Europe in the Napoleonic era; and melancholy, the dominant post-traumatic condition of stalled, post-Napoleonic history both in England and on the continent. (..) positions emotion as a "climate of history" to be interpretively recovered from the discursive and imaginative writing in which it is objectively embodied. (..) traces the evolution of Romantic interiority by exploring the deep-seated reverberations of historical change as they become legible in new discursive and conceptual strategies and in the evolving formal-aesthetic construction and reception of Romantic literature. In establishing this relationship between mood and voice, Pfau moves away from the conventional understanding of emotion as something "owned" or exclusively attributable to the individual and toward a theory of mood as fundamentally intersubjective and deserving of broader consideration in the study of Romanticism.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  Romanticism  social_psychology  self  subjectivity  self-examination  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  political_culture  political_discourse  aesthetics  cultural_history  Radical_Enlightenment  radicals  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  worldviews  social_history  change-social  change-intellectual  poetics  rhetoric-political  prose  facebook 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Timothy Michael - British Romanticism and the Critique of Political Reason (Dec 2015) | JHU Press
What role should reason play in the creation of a free and just society? Can we claim to know anything in a field as complex as politics? And how can the cause of political rationalism be advanced when it is seen as having blood on its hands? These are the questions that occupied a group of British poets, philosophers, and polemicists in the years following the French Revolution. (..) argues that much literature of the period is a trial, or a critique, of reason in its political capacities and a test of the kinds of knowledge available to it. For Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Burke, Wollstonecraft, and Godwin, the historical sequence of revolution, counter-revolution, and terror in France—and radicalism and repression in Britain—occasioned a dramatic reassessment of how best to advance the project of enlightenment. The political thought of these figures must be understood, Michael contends, in the context of their philosophical thought. Major poems of the period, including The Prelude, The Excursion, and Prometheus Unbound, are in this reading an adjudication of competing political and epistemological claims. This book bridges for the first time two traditional pillars of Romantic studies: the period’s politics and its theories of the mind and knowledge. Combining literary and intellectual history, it provides an account of British Romanticism in which high rhetoric, political prose, poetry, and poetics converge in a discourse of enlightenment and emancipation.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  British_history  English_lit  political_philosophy  political_culture  Enlightenment  epistemology  moral_philosophy  mind  Romanticism  poetry  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Shelley  Burke  Wollstonecraft  Godwin_Wm  reason  rationality  perception  judgment-political  judgment-independence  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  political_discourse  poetics  rhetoric-political  freedom  civil_liberties  civil_society  liberty-positive  scepticism 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Marion Brétéché - Les compagnons de Mercure: Journalisme et politique dans l'Europe de Louis XIV, 1680-1720 (2015) | Champ-Vallon
360 pages, - ISBN 979.10.267.0022.7, 27 euros -- Dans l’Europe intolérante du 18thC, la Hollande fait figure d’exception. C’est là, précisément, qu’est né, à la fin des 1680s, le journalisme politique d’analyse et d’opinion. Afin de rendre compte de l’« art de gouverner et de policer les États » (Furetière), afin de révéler au grand jour ce que les autorités politiques cachent ou taisent, comment des hommes sont-ils parvenus à faire de l’actualité leur profession ? M. Brétéché reconstitue toutes les dimensions de l’activité d’une douzaine de professionnels de l’information, pour la plupart des exilés huguenots, et explore les conditions d’apparition dans les Provinces-Unies de la première presse politique, libre et critique, en langue française. Devenus auteurs en Hollande, ils furent aussi des informateurs au service des puissants : ils nous permettent de saisir dans leur diversité l’inventivité des pratiques manuscrites et imprimées de publication des nouvelles au tournant du Grand Siècle et du Siècle des Lumières. (..) cet ouvrage retrace la rencontre entre un marché de l’information en plein essor, toujours plus avide de nouvelles fraîches, et les politiques de communication des gouvernements, partagés entre la publicité de leur action et les arcana imperii nécessaires à l’exercice du pouvoir. À la croisée de l’histoire sociale du journalisme et de l’histoire politique des médias, est retracé ici un épisode aussi essentiel que méconnu de l’histoire de l’information, qui manifeste déjà la tension entre contrainte et autonomie, entre censure et liberté d’expression. -- Marion Brétéché, agrégée et docteur en histoire, est chercheur associé au Centre Roland Mousnier (Paris Sorbonne – CNRS) et au GRIHL (Groupe de Recherche Interdisciplinaire sur l’Histoire du Littéraire – EHESS).
find  media  Nine_Years_War  books  arcana_imperii  17thC  newspapers  censorship  Revocation_of_Edict_of_Nantes  France  information-markets  information-intermediaries  -opinion  government-public_communication  spying  circulation-ideas  secrecy  newsletter  news  journalists  amazon.fr  patronage  propaganda  public_policy  Dutch  political_discourse  Huguenots  literary_history  political_press  cultural_history  circulation-news  social_history  War_of_Spanish_Succession  journalism  libraries 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Brookhiser, review essay - Finally, James Madison Mania | The Daily Beast April 2015
Four new titles join the list: The Quartet: Orchestrating the Second American Revolution, 1783-1789 by Joseph J. Ellis; Becoming Madison: The Extraordinary Origins of the Least Likely Founding Father by Michael Signer; The Bill of Rights: The Fight to Secure America’s Liberties, by Carol Birken; and Madison’s Gift: Five Partnerships That Built America by David O. Stewart. -- the Ellis book measures up to expectations from his earlier books -- the most interesting looks like the Stewart book that goes through the presidency period and his relationship with Monroe -- as Brookhiser points out, not enough is being done on Madison as key to his and Jefferson’s "invention" of American political parties and what that involved in flipping from their approach to the Constitution, as well as ideologically obliterating Washington's heritage.
books  reviews  kindle-available  US_history  US_constitution  US_politics  18thC  19thC  Early_Republic  Founders  Madison  Hamilton  Jefferson  political_philosophy  republicanism  political_discourse  parties  faction  biography 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Piet Strydom - Discourse and Knowledge: The Making of Enlightenment Sociology, Liverpool University Press, 2000. | -00 Academia.edu
This book offers an original interpretation of the rise of sociology from a contemporary point of view that is both theoretically and historically informed. Rather than assuming the ‘dual revolution’ as watershed, it goes back behind the French Revolution and the industrial revolution in order to start from the more pervasive communication revolution. The central theme of the book is the currently topical one of the role played by discourse in the construction of knowledge. It is substantively developed through an investigation of a neglected period in the history of sociology. By closely analysing the contributions of such theorists as More, Hobbes, Vico, Montesquieu, Ferguson and Millar to the emergence of sociology in its original form, the argument follows the discursive construction of sociology in the context of the society-wide early modern practical discourse about violence and rights – what is here called the rights discourse. Parallels with the nineteenth- and twentieth-century discourse about poverty and justice and the contemporary discourse about risk and responsibility allow the author to reflect not only on the generation of knowledge through discourse, but also on the role that sociology itself plays in this process. The argument draws on the latest epistemological, theoretical and methodological advances. Constructivism is explored, Habermas and Foucault are creatively synthesised to arrive at a new formulation of the theory of discourse, and a finely elaborated frame and discourse analysis is applied – thus making a substantial contribution to the currently emerging cognitive sociology. The contemporary relevance of the analysis lies in its linking of early sociology’s critique of modern society to the need under current conditions of an open history, contingency and uncertainty for cultivating a culture of contradictions and a participatory politics of conflict, contestation and compromise. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  sociology  discourse  discourse-political_theory  discourse_ethics  cognition-social  public_sphere  violence  rights-legal  rights-political  sociology_of_knowledge  cultural_critique  Hobbes  Montesquieu  Scottish_Enlightenment  civil_society  civility-political  politeness  commerce-doux  conflict  political_participation  political_discourse  constructivism  Habermas  Foucault  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Andrew Sprung - Reagan Revolution rollback | xpostfactoid - Jan 2015
Thanks largely to Piketty it's become increasingly clear that in the Reagan Revolution, middle class America sold its birthright for a mess of supply-side pottage. Dems willingness to credit GOP dogma -- raising taxes on high incomes and investment gains inhibits growth, deregulation spurs it -- are melting away. Post midterm losses, Dems are beginning to heighten rather than soft-pedal the policy contrasts between the parties. Wounded politically by perceptions that the ACA helps the poor at the expense of working people, they are looking for proposals attractive to the middle class. Emboldened by accelerating growth and employment gains, they are perhaps shedding inhibitions about leveling the playing field between workers and management. (..)To mess up my timeline a bit, Obama delivered a Pikettian narrative in Dec 2013 ..should have been a landmark speech on inequality (..) if he (and Dems) hadn't (tried to) protect their Senate majority. [In the Dec 2013 soeech] Obama zeroed in on policy choices. "As values of community broke down and competitive pressure increased, businesses lobbied Washington to weaken unions and the value of the minimum wage. As the trickle-down ideology became more prominent, taxes were slashes for the wealthiest while investments in things that make us all richer, like schools and infrastructure, were allowed to wither. And for a certain period of time we could ignore this weakening economic foundation (..) But when the music stopped and the crisis hit, millions of families were stripped of whatever cushion they had left. And the result is an economy that’s become profoundly unequal and families that are more insecure. -- terrific links roundup
US_economy  US_politics  Obama  Obama_administration  Reagan  supply-side  trickle-down  neoliberalism  inequality  middle_class  wages  wages-minimum  labor  labor_law  labor_share  labor_standards  Labor_markets  investment  executive_compensation  1-percent  infrastructure  education  education-higher  civic_virtue  common_good  Piketty  economic_growth  economic_culture  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  unemployment  health_care  public_goods  public_opinion  public_policy  elections  political_culture  political_economy  political_discourse  political_participation  Pocket 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Glenn Burgess, The Politics of the Ancient Constitution: An Introduction to English Political Thought, 1603-1642 | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 100, No. 2 (Apr., 1995), pp. 516-517
Helpful discussion of where Burgess fits within historiography debates, both with respect to the legal and political issues of the ancient constitution, (dominated by Pocock) and the broader "causes of the English Civil War" revisionism, anti revisionism, post revisionism etc. Burgess analyzes 3 different discourses each for a different sphere (e.g. king-in-parliament, prerogative, taxation and judicial review spoke the language of law and ancient constitution whereas religious sphere was a discourse of obedience). Major increase in tensions when a sphere (e.g. religious) deployed language from another sphere (e, g. divines advocating taxation in sermons). and juduc Main criticism by Hirst is Burgess significantly reduces the importance of Coke. On the positive side, Burgess explains the nearly universal consensus re significance of the ancient constitution, the common law and role of the judiciary and most of the monarch's prerogative powers. Hirst says Burgess has provided a framework for the consensus that gives a coherent foundation for distinctive key figures like Bacon and Selden. That serves to highlight where constructive ambiguity maintained consensus, where fault lines were hidden, where and how major conflicts emerged and a logic of the dynamics of how conflicts played out. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  find  amazon.com  17thC  British_history  British_politics  legal_history  ancient_constitution  English_constitution  common_law  judiciary  judicial_review  prerogative  Absolutism  divine_right  mixed_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  counselors  religion-established  Act_of_Supremacy  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_I-personal_rule  political_discourse  Bacon  Selden  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell (Yale ed., 2 vols) and The Poems of Andrew Marvell (Nigel Smith ed.) | JSTOR: Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Winter, 2004), pp. 697-700
Review of (1) The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell, eds, Annabel Patterson; Martin Dzelzainis, Nicholas von Maltzahn, N. H. Keeble and (2) The Poems of Andrew Marvell, ed. Nigel Smith -- the poetry volume is dinged for not fully reflecting new work on Marvell, not surprisingly since Hirst with Zwicker have led the way on repositioning Marvell's biography (ambiguous sexuality, fraught relationships with families and the constantly shifting system of patronage, and childhood abuse) to see both his politics and poetry dufferently, The more substantive critique of the 2 volume prose works is Patterson hauling Marvell and her co-editors into a "liberal avant la lettre" frame where Marvell generally doesn't belong. Par for Patterson who wants to claim all good things in 17thC and 18thC English_lit to liberalism and "Whig culture" -- 3 pgs, didn't download
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  English_lit  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Marvell  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  English_constitution  anti-absolutism  tolerance  popery  poetry  poetics  political_press  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  political_discourse  pamphlets  censorship  British_foreign_policy  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Two-Way Translation: The Ethics of Engaging with Religious Contributions in Public Deliberation (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-84 -- Using as an exemplar, the 2007 "Evangelical Declaration against Torture," this paper examines the role of religious argument in public life. -- It argues for an absolute ban on the use of torture deploying unashamedly Christian rhetoric, some of it quite powerful and challenging. -- The present paper considers whether there is any affront to the duties of political civility in arguing in these terms. There is a line of argument, associated with John Rawls's book, "Political Liberalism," suggesting that citizens should refrain from discussing issues of public policy in religious or deep-philosophical terms that are not accessible to other citizens. The present paper challenges the conception of inaccessibility on which this Rawlsian position is based. It argues, with Jurgen Habermas, that all sides in a modern pluralist society have a right to state their views as firmly and as deeply as they can, and all sides have the duty to engage with others, and to strain as well as they can to grasp others' meanings. It is not enough to simply announce that one can not understand religious reasons, especially if no good faith effort has been made, using the ample resources available in our culture, to try. Of course, many peoeple will not be convinced by the reasons that are offered in religious discourse; but to argue for their rejection - which is always what may happen in respectable political deliberation - is not to say that the presentation of those reasons was offensive or inappropriate. (This paper was originally presented as the 2010 Meador Lecture at the University of Virginia Law School). -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 -- Keywords: Absolute Principles, Pluralism, Public Reason, Rawls, Religious Reasons, Torture
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july 2014 by dunnettreader

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