dunnettreader + political-theology   30

Duncan Kelly - Carl Schmitt's Political Theory of Representation (2004 ) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 113-134 -- As Pitkin suggested, political representation explores the way in which "the people (or a constituency) are present in governmental action, even though they do not literally act for themselves." This paper examines Carl Schmitt's "solution" to this quandary of political representation, which suggests that representation can bring about the political unity of the state, but only if the state itself is properly "represented" by the figure or person of the sovereign. I focus upon his attempted reconciliation of a starkly "personalist" and then Hobbesian account of representation that would justify support for the Reichspraisident under the Weimar Republic, with insights drawn from the constitutional republicanism of the Abbe Sieyes that placed the constituent power of the people at the basis of representative democracy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political-theology  representation  representative_institutions  sovereignty  exec_branch  17thC  Hobbes  corporate_personhood  Sieyes  French_Revolution  republicanism  people_the  collective_action  agency  20thC  Schmitt  Weimar  constitutionalism  constituent_power  social_contract  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
JEFFREY ANDREW BARASH - ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Oct 2011)
Fulltitle -- MYTH IN HISTORY, PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY AS MYTH: ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF HANS BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF ERNST CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH, History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 328-340 This essay explores the different interpretations proposed by Ernst Cassirer and Hans Blumenberg of the relation between Platonic philosophy and myth as a means of bringing to light a fundamental divergence in their respective conceptions of what precisely myth is. It attempts to show that their conceptions of myth are closely related to their respective assumptions concerning the historical significance of myth and regarding the sense of history more generally. Their divergent conceptions of myth and of history, I argue, are at the same time not simply matters of abstract speculation, but spring from fundamental presuppositions concerning myth's political significance. The present elucidation aims not only to set in relief one or another of the ways in which Cassirer or Blumenberg understood myth, nor even to present Blumenberg's critical reception of Cassirer's theories, but above all to contribute to the interpretation of the political implications of myth and of its historical potency in our contemporary epoch. -- most ftnts to Blumenberg in German, especially Work on Myth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  historiography  cultural_history  political_culture  Blumenberg  Cassirer  myth  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  identity  national_tale  national_ID  symbols-political  symbols-religious  symbol  political_discourse  Platonism  Neoplatonism  German_Idealism  neo-Kantian  hermeneutics  political-theology  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Job's Complaint in "Paradise Regained" (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Fall, 2009), pp. 625-660 - reading Milton’s commitment to separation of church and state, against a renewal of an integrated political theology, as also a message for the individual's relation with approaching the reading of scripture -- looks like a link between her work on Milton in Wayward Contracts and her vocal program against reading imperatives of a political theology back into secularization history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  English_lit  17thC  Milton  Restoration  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Bible-as-literature  Job  New_Testament  theodicy  justice  justification  Satan  political-theology  secularism  freedom_of_conscience  temptation  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Nitzan Lebovic - Introduction - to issue "Political Theology" (2008) | JSTOR - New German Critique
No. 105, Political Theology (Fall, 2008), pp. 1-6 -- Articles in issue -- György Geréby, Political Theology versus Theological Politics: Erik Peterson and Carl Schmitt (pp. 7-33) *--* Christiane Frey, χλη̑σις/Beruf: Luther, Weber, Agamben (pp. 35-56) *--* Astrid Deuber-Mankowsky and Catharine Diehl, The Image of Happiness We Harbor: The Messianic Power of Weakness in Cohen, Benjamin, and Paul (pp. 57-69) *-'* Samuel Moyn, Hannah Arendt on the Secular (pp. 71-96) *--* Nitzan Lebovic, The Jerusalem School: The Theopolitical Hour (pp. 97-120) *--* Arnd Wedemeyer, Herrschaftszeiten! Theopolitical Profanities in the Face of Secularization (pp. 121-141) *--* Benjamin Lazier, On the Origins of "Political Theology": Judaism and Heresy between the World Wars (pp. 143-164) -- Introduction downloaded to Note
article  journals-academic  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  political-theology  Schmitt  Arendt  secularization  secularism  Luther  Weber  Judaism  entre_deux_guerres  Holocaust  downloaded  post-WWII  Cold_War  eschatology  Benjamin 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Sheehan - Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe - Issue Introduction (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 4 (Oct., 2006), pp. 561-570 **--** Articles in issue on idolatry *--* Jonathan Sheehan, Introduction: Thinking about Idols in Early Modern Europe (pp. 561-570) *-* Joan-Pau Rubiés, Theology, Ethnography, and the Historicization of Idolatry (pp. 571-596) *--* Carina L. Johnson, Idolatrous Cultures and the Practice of Religion (pp. 597-622) *--* Sabine MacCormack, Gods, Demons, and Idols in the Andes (pp. 623-648) *--* Jonathan Sheehan, The Altars of the Idols: Religion, Sacrifice, and the Early Modern Polity (pp. 649-674) *--* Peter N. Miller, History of Religion Becomes Ethnology: Some Evidence from Peiresc's Africa (pp. 675-696) *--* Martin Mulsow, Idolatry and Science: Against Nature Worship from Boyle to Rüdiger, 1680-1720 (pp. 697-712) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  journal  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  exploration  colonialism  religious_culture  religious_belief  religious_experience  ritual  idolatry  political_philosophy  politics-and-religion  theology  sociology_of_religion  political-theology  science-and-religion  historicism  relativism  demons  devil  Bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  comparative_religion  comparative_history  sacrifice  science_of_man  social_sciences  human_nature  Africa  Latin_America  pagans  nature  natural_religion  nature_worship  religious_imagery  religious_practices  Boyle  Antiquarianism  natural_history  Peiresc  virtuosos  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicolas Delalande & Thomas Grillot - Interview with Jocelyne Dakhlia - Pouvoir et passions en terre d’Islam | Feb 2014 - La Vie des idées
Also translated into English -- Domaine(s) : Histoire -- Mots-clés : Moyen-Orient | islam | démocratie | Moyen Âge -- Aux clichés tenaces sur le despotisme oriental ou l’incompatibilité de l’islam avec la démocratie, Jocelyne Dakhlia répond par l’enquête historique sur les formes et les logiques du pouvoir dans les sociétés musulmanes. Son œuvre prolifique, qui s’étend des cours sultaniennes du Moyen Âge à la Tunisie contemporaine, redéfinit les contours de la Méditerranée et invite à penser autrement l’histoire de l’Europe. -- downloaded pdf to Note
Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islamic_law  political_order  political-theology  political_history  religious_history  religious_culture  government-forms  orientalism  despotism  democracy  democratization  liberal_democracy  MENA  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  Mediterranean  North_Africa  19thC  20thC  21stC  historiography  modernity  Europe-exceptionalism  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Stacking the deck: Thomas Pfau’s strange history of the West « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Kahn continues her attack on anti-modernity readings of Renaissance, Reformation and Early Modern intellectual history to justify claims for the "necessity" of political theology, with emphasis on (Catholic Thomist) theology as the foundation and organizing thread. Pfau goes beyond the Schmitt readings of the illegitimacy of the post French Revolution secular political to deny post Ockham intellectual legitimacy to any theorist who follows Ockham's voluntarism -- while totally ignoring the social, political, cultural and religious changes. The result is a Hobbes as villain of the piece that conveniently ignores a century and a half of religious warfare. And as she notes, she neither recognizes herself in any of the roles in Pfau’s morality play, nor can she see where he even offers a place for contemporary secular women. Downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  theology  modernity  self  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Hobbes  secularism  political-theology  Reformation  Europe-Early_Modern  political_philosophy  religious_wars  religious_culture  religious_belief  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - Nicholas McDowell, The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630–1660 | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 44, No. 2 (April 2005), pp. 368-369
Reviewed work(s): Nicholas McDowell. The English Radical Imagination: Culture, Religion, and Revolution, 1630–1660. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. Pp. 219. $72.00 (cloth). ISBN 0‐19‐926626‐3. -- The review puts the book in histriographical debates since Christopher Hill and his "world turned upside down" thesis of radicalism originating from below. Milton wasn't unusual as highly educated among committed radical authors. The review shorthands the historiography debates unfortunately - Peter Lake is a star, but what and who he was revising? where was there pushback? Who else beyond Lake and David Cuomo a couple of other names tossed out? Also mentions parallels with Spinoza and confirming Pocock claim Enlightenment parentage via radicals. -- McDowell has a literary history PhD - this is reworked dissertation - so he's great on digging out obscure texts and tracking authorship, but not a wide scope to his background in all the interrelated streams of political, religious etc thought -- Review this again after looking at more of the last 2 decades of historiography for 17thC intellectual_history and political thought.
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  radicals  Commonwealthmen  cultural_history  university  scholastics  education-higher  education-civic  reform-political  reform-social  elite_culture  religious_culture  dissenters  Levellers  political-theology  political_participation  political_press  pamphlets  to_read  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
"BEYOND THEOCRACY AND SECULARISM (PART I): TOWARD A NEW PARADIGM FOR LA" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
To move beyond theocracy (pre-modern) and secularism (modern), this article closes by identifying the trajectory for a new constructive postmodern paradigm that embraces legal indeterminacy and secularizing the text of the law but argues that a plurality of religious convictions implicitly legitimates and thereby desecularizes the law. Desecularizing the law does not result in the imposition of the religion of the ruler (theocracy) in a pluralistic democratic society. Rather, the constructive postmodern paradigm of law and religion allows for the religious pluralism in society to provide a plurality of religious ontologies that implicitly legitimate the law and close the ontological gap between legal theory and legal practice. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "BEYOND THEOCRACY AND SECULARISM (PART I): TOWARD A NEW PARADIGM FOR LAW AND RELIGION" Mississippi College Law Review 27.1 (2008): 159-233. -- downloaded pdf to Note
philosophy_of_law  ontology  ontology-social  social_theory  foundationalism  moral_philosophy  secularism  secular_humanism  post-secular  postmodern  legal_indeterminancy  values  pluralism  legal_theory  legal_culture  political-theology  politics-and-religion  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Popish_Plot  Rye_House_Plot  tolerance  prerogative  Glorious_Revolution  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Mary  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  loyalty_oaths  Royalists  dissenters  parties  faction  Church_of_England  resistance_theory  religion-established  ecclesiology  nonjurors  defacto_rule  Norman_Conquest  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 1 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 1. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/810> -- Volume I consists of pamphlets written from the reign of James I to the Restoration (1620-1660). -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Benedict S. Robinson -Harry and Amurath | JSTOR: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 399-424
Before his coronation, as he announces his intention to invade France, and as he proposes marriage to Katharine, Henry V invokes the specter of a Turkish double. These moments in Shakespeare’s play punctuate the major political transitions of his reign; moreover, they condense a pattern of thought vital to these plays, one that concerns the constitution of English nationalist discourse from the often recalcitrant materials of a Christian political imaginary. In the 16thC, Christendom remained the object of powerful emotional cathexis, but the forms of allegiance and action it authorized were in dispute. Henry redirects the energies that once coalesced around the political and communal ideal of a Christian commonwealth to the commonwealth of England. But as Henry invokes the Turk as his opposite, he also suggests his resemblance to that figure. In this, Henry V opens up some serious questions about the “political theology” of the nation. In revealing the constitution of national community as a translated theology, Shakespeare suggests that this is a troubled process. Recent accounts of early modern nationalism have tended to downplay or forget Christendom as a transnational space of belonging both instrumental to the nation and still in competition with it. The strange relations between “Harry” and “Amurath” evoked in 2 Henry IV and Henry V are the traces of a wider struggle between Christendom and the nation as theopolitical spaces, a struggle that takes place in significant measure over the figure of Muslim difference. -- lots of cites to English constitutional history links to national identity (eg Pocock & critics), Blumenberg and Schmitt debates -- paywall
article  jstor  Project_MUSE  paywall  find  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Tudor  national_ID  Christendom  Ottomans  Reformation  Christianity-Islam_conflict  political-theology  Shakespeare  political_culture  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  ancient_constitution  nationalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kristen Irwin, review - Nicholas Wolterstorff, The Mighty and the Almighty: An Essay in Political Theology // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
The Mighty and the Almighty takes on the task of theorizing a political theology for the Christian. [T]his book originated in his 1998 Stone Lectures at Princeton... [and] retains both the advantages and the disadvantages of its original lecture format: astonishingly clear and accessible, but a relatively light sketch ...Despite the specifically Christian orientation of his project, Wolterstorff asks for the attention of the nonreligious: "In a participatory democracy such as ours, it's important that we each be open with and open to our fellow citizens concerning the deep sources of how we think about political issues". -- Though political theology is not nearly so popular as in the days of Augustine or Calvin -- two of Wolterstorff's foils -- Wolterstorff argues that it's overdue for careful contemporary consideration.-- a substantive account of the relationship between political authority and divine authority. -- The most innovative part of the book is Wolterstorff's use of the above distinction to offer a rereading of Romans 13... Rather than counseling universal submission to civil authorities, Wolterstorff argues, Paul is counseling submission to civil authorities insofar as they are executing "the God-assigned task of government to curb injustice. . . . to protect the rights of the public". Government clearly has the positional authority to issue whatever directives it deems appropriate to its citizens, but insofar as its directives violate justice or the rights of the public, government forfeits its performance-authority. The corollary is that "the directives that the government issues to the public for the purpose of curbing injustice are binding". -- In other words, the political authority of the state as the institution responsible for "protecting members of the public from being wronged by their fellows" can be derived both from natural rights, and from divine authority.
books  reviews  kindle-available  political_philosophy  political-theology  liberalism  liberalism-public_reason  authority  obligation  natural_rights  Early_Christian  Paul  Augustine  Calvinist  resistance_theory  passive_obedience  justice  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Review essay by Susan Shell - Meier on Strauss and Schmitt | JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 53, No. 1 (Winter, 1991), pp. 219-223
Discussion of Meier book that looks at how Schmitt's Concept of the Political evolved over 3 editions (through 1933) as political context changed and where he appears to have taken on board critique by Strauss in reviews (eg he realizes Hobbes doesn't help him but is, as Strauss intimates, the source of what Schmitt hates). -- Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss, und "Der Begriff des Politischen": Zu einem Dialog unter Abwesenden. Carl Schmitt, Leo Strauss et la Notion de Politique: Un Dialogue entre Absents by Heinrich Meier; Françoise Manent -- didn't download
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  political_philosophy  political-theology  Schmitt  Strauss  Hobbes  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
EARLY MODERN RESEARCH GROUP - COMMONWEALTH: THE SOCIAL, CULTURAL, AND CONCEPTUAL CONTEXTS OF AN EARLY MODERN KEYWORD | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 659-687
Group includes Mark Knights? -- The article explores 'commonwealth' both as a term and a conceptual field across the early modern period, with a particular focus on the Anglophone world. The shifts of usage of 'commonwealth' are explored, from a term used to describe the polity, to one used to describe a particular, republican form of polity, through to its eclipse in the eighteenth century by other terms such as 'nation' and 'state'. But the article also investigates the variety of usages during any one time, especially at moments of crisis, and the network of related terms that constituted 'commonwealth'. That investigation requires, it is argued, not just a textual approach but one that embraces social custom and practice, as well as the study of literary and visual forms through which the keyword 'commonwealth' was constructed. The article emphasizes the importance of social context to language; the forms, metaphors and images used to describe and depict the polity; and to show how linguistic change could occur through the transmutation of elements of the conceptual field that endowed the keyword with its meaning. -- lots of references -- looks immensely useful, of course cites original version of Skinner on Bolingbroke -- paywall Cambridge journals
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_politics  commonwealth  body_politic  common_good  republicanism  Whigs-Radicals  macro-microcosm  keywords  political_press  images-political  English_lit  metaphor  concepts  metaphor-political  political-theology  Bolingbroke  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
DMITRI LEVITIN -- MATTHEW TINDAL'S "RIGHTS OF THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH" (1706) AND THE CHURCH—STATE RELATIONSHIP | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 717-740
Matthew Tindal's Rights of the Christian church (1706), which elicited more than thirty contemporary replies, was a major interjection in the ongoing debates about the relationship between church and state in late seventeenth- and early eighteenth-century England. Historians have usually seen Tindal's work as an exemplar of the 'republican civil religion' that had its roots in Hobbes and Harrington, and putatively formed the essence of radical whig thought in the wake of the Glorious Revolution. But this is to misunderstand the Rights. To comprehend what Tindal perceived himself as doing we need to move away from the history of putatively 'political' issues to the histories of ecclesiastical jurisprudence, patristic scholarship, and biblical exegesis. The contemporary significance of Tindal's work was twofold: methodologically, it challenged Anglican patristic scholarship as a means of reaching consensus on modern ecclesiological issues; positively, it offered a powerful argument for ecclesiastical supremacy lying in crown-in-parliament, drawing on a legal tradition stretching back to Christopher St Germain (1460—1540) and on Tindal's own legal background. Tindal's text provides a case study for the tentative proposition that 'republicanism', whether as a programme or a 'language', had far less impact on English anticlericalism and contemporary debates over the church—state relationship than the current historiography suggests. -- extensive references of Cambridge_School articles, refers to Goldie a great deal, whether for support of particular episodes or to attack is unclear -- the quarrel over patristic claims of the Church_of_England important for Bolingbroke's argument re Tillotson etc -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political-theology  ecclesiology  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  church_history  Church_of_England  religion-established  patristic_scholarship  Biblical_exegesis  Erastianism  crown-in-parliament  Whigs-Radicals  anticlerical  republicanism  Harrington  Hobbes  civil_religion  High_Church  Convocation  Tindal_Matthew  free-thinkers  religious_lit  political_press  pamphlets  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Vickie B. Sullivan - Neither Christian nor Pagan: Machiavelli's Treatment of Religion in the "Discourses" | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 26, No. 2 (Winter, 1993), pp. 259-280
Is Machiavelli to be understood as entirely sympathetic to either Christianity or paganism? This article examines the Discourses, the work in which Machiavelli praises paganism most lavishly, and argues that Machiavelli actually criticizes paganism for engendering Christianity. To overcome the politically deleterious consequences of Christianity, the author goes on to contend, Machiavelli appeals to certain Christian doctrines-entirely divorced from their theological context-to support his vision of an earthly discipline that exercises the strength that Machiavelli views as essential to sustain political life. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  Renaissance  Machiavelli  political_philosophy  republicanism  neo-Roman  Livy  religious_culture  political-theology  politics-and-religion  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Anne McLaren - Rethinking Republicanism: "Vindiciae, contra tyrannos" in Context | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 23-52
The article takes issue with current orthodoxy concerning early modern republicanism, centred on Quentin Skinner's model of classical republicanism. I argue that historians of political thought need to return to first principles in their practice in order to understand early modern republicanism, and I provide an example by using those principles to reassess one canonical text, Philippe de Plessis Mornay's Vindiciae, contra tyrannos. Reading the Vindiciae in context reveals it as a work whose radicalism lies, not in its engagement with the Roman law tradition, but in its express conviction that each and every individual is responsible for maintaining a covenanted relationship with God. My reassessment tracks the political, and specifically regicidal, consequences of commitment to that belief in England from the late sixteenth through the mid-seventeenth centuries. It destabilizes the anachronistic distinction between 'political' and 'religious' modes of thought that historians of political thought too often use to characterize early modern political discourse, and it points to the common ground shared and articulated by theorists including, inter alia, John Ponet, George Buchanan, and John Milton. The conclusion considers what this investigation reveals about republicanism as a political phenomenon in Europe and America from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political-theology  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  France  British_history  British_politics  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Wars_of_Religion  English_Civil_War  monarchy  republicanism  neo-Roman  civic_humanism  Buchanan  Milton  Reformation  Skinner  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Political Theology Start-Up Kit from Ted A. Smith | Religion in American History Jan 2014
List of 10 books starting with Schmitt and Benjamin, then late 20thC angles from philosophy (eg critical theory), history (older works like King's Two Bodies), cultural studies. And an attack on postmodernism undermining rationality. Winds up with Mark Lilla criticism of dismantling the walls constructed post wars of religion and Reformation between politics and religion. Smith has a comment on each category he has selected.
books  bibliography  political_philosophy  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  political-theology  critical_theory  postmodern  find  amazon.com  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Edward Andrew, review - Jeremy Waldron. God, Locke and Equality: Christian Foundations of Locke’s Political Thought JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 44, No. 2 (April 2005), pp. 370-372
Destroys Waldron, mostly on the basis that Waldron treats Locke as consistent, yet handwaves re women, slavery, hunting down and killing criminals, stealing land from Indians, etc. As somehow not relevant to the question of equality. And though he treats equality as capable of being founded only on Christianity, he ignores Locke's particular Christology. -- downloaded pdf to Note for references to problems in Locke and some of the recent debates (Dunn, Wooton, Marshall etc)
books  reviews  kindle-available  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Locke  17thC  liberalism  equality  political-theology  tolerance  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Tracy B. Strong - How to Write Scripture: Words, Authority, and Politics in Thomas Hobbes | JSTOR: Critical Inquiry, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Autumn, 1993), pp. 128-159
See re Pettit and Skinner treatment of Hobbes, rhetoric and "constructivist" approach to social and political reality, sovereignty, authority erc -- downloaded pdf to Note -- followed up with comment be Victoria Silver and response
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  religious_history  religious_belief  Biblical_authority  rhetoric-political  hermeneutics  authority  religion-established  politics-and-religion  political-theology  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Biddick, review - Davis, Kathleen. Periodization and Sovereignty: How Ideas of Feudalism and Secularization Govern the Politics of Time. - The Medieval Review
Read book as Kindle rental -- the 1st part on feudalism was fascinating but the sovereignty stuff, and the whole Schmitt vs Blumenberg on importing theological structures of thought and power relations into European modern history, Agabiem on the exception, sovereignty as miracles, non Christians as excluded due to lack of miracle power, etc was just too "theory" to be understood. The reviwer, Kathleen Biddick, just thinks it's the cat's meow. Periodization should be questioned re the assumptions and motivations for carving at particular joints. But the universalizing impulse of discovering patterns of power and domination across eras and cultures is equally suspicious. And medievalists, who rightly point to lots more continuity across time and geography than traditional periodization allows, seem to be going to opposite extreme and getting a bit too ambitious re the scope of their discipline. The 18thC or the 20thC wasn't the 12thC, and Blumenberg has a point that recasting the modern era in medieval vocabulary doesn't necessarily tell us much re the 20thC. Seems to be the same sort of mischief that Davis describes in the application of the newly invented "feudalism" to colonial India.

The Medieval Review 09.04.06 [date is wrong book published in 2008] --

Davis, Kathleen. Periodization and Sovereignty: How Ideas of Feudalism and Secularization Govern the Politics of Time. The Middle Ages Series. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. Pp. 208 --

Composed in two parts, it intentionally folds in on itself in order to mark performatively the double bind of periodization--a mimesis of temporality and a Western juridical concept of sovereignty. Her aim is to explicate how the time of periodization is the time of sovereignty, or, put another way, sovereignty is a mode of temporality. Davis is at her most insightful when she shows the violent imbrications of periodization, sovereignty, and colonial enslavement. Does periodization ever let go?
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december 2013 by dunnettreader

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