dunnettreader + poetics   28

O. Bradley Bassler, The Pace of Modernity: Reading With Blumenberg (2012) | re-press publishers
Wittgenstein said that philosophers should greet each other, not by saying “hello,” but rather “take your time.”  But what is time?  Time is money, but this points to an even better answer to this basic question for our modern epoch: time is acceleration.  In a cultural system which stresses economic efficiency, the quicker route is always the more prized, if not always the better one.  Wittgenstein’s dictum thus constitutes an act of rebellion against the dominant vector of our culture, but as such it threatens to become (quickly) anti-modern.  We need an approach to “reading” our information-rich culture which is not reactionary but rather meets its accelerated condition.  In this book, O. Bradley Bassler develops a toolkit for acute reading of our modern pace, not through withdrawal but rather through active engagement with a broad range of disciplines.  The main characters in this drama comprise a cast of master readers: Hannah Arendt, Jean Starobinski, Harold Bloom, Angus Fletcher, Hans Blumenberg and John Ashbery, with secondary figures drawn from the readers and critics whom this central group suggests.  We must develop a vocabulary of pacing, reflecting our modern distance from classical sources and the concomitant acceleration of our contemporary condition.  Only in this way can we begin to situate the phenomenon of modernity within the larger scales of human culture and history.

About the Author
O. Bradley Bassler studied in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago and took a second Ph.D. in Mathematics at Wesleyan University.  He has published in areas ranging from philosophy and history of philosophy to literary studies and the foundations of mathematics, with essays appearing in New German Critique, Heidegger Studies, Review of Metaphysics and other journals.  He is also a published poet.  He currently is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Georgia, Athens, USA.
biocultural_evolution  etexts  change-social  technology  open_access  Arendt  dualism  lit_crit  phenomenology  metaphor  Montaigne  Husserl  individualism  books  poetics  modernity  social_theory  Blumenberg  rhetoric  human_nature  Heidegger  Scribd  philosophical_anthropology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Dr Seamus Perry - Annual Wordsworth Lecture: 'What Did Wordsworth Make of Coleridge?' (2012) | School of Advanced Study, University of London
Coleridge was the single most important influence on the great philosophical and autobiographical poetry for which Wordsworth is now famous. But how exactly did the influence work? How much did Wordsworth absorb from the thought of his charismatic friend and how much did he re-shape in his own image? This lecture will return to the earliest days of their intimacy to consider the play of ideas and languages between some of their most celebrated poems, including 'Frost at Midnight' and 'The Prelude'.

Seamus Perry is a tutorial fellow at Balliol College, Oxford, and a Trustee of the Wordsworth Trust. His interests lie principally in the field of English Romantic poetry and thought, especially Coleridge and Wordsworth, and in post-Romantic English poetry, especially Tennyson, Eliot, Auden, Larkin, and their circles. He also has an interest in the modern history of criticism, reflected in articles on A.C. Bradley, William Empson, F.W. Bateson, and M.H. Abrams. He is co-editor, with Christopher Ricks, of the journal Essays in Criticism: A Quarterly Journal of Literary Criticism (OUP), and the general editor of the new series, 21st-Century Oxford Authors (OUP). He is currently working on an edition of Arnold for the 21st Century Oxford Authors, editorial work on Empson's study of pastoral, and an edition of Coleridge's poems for Longman.
lecture  19thC  poetics  Coleridge  poetry  English_lit  Wordsworth  video  18thC  Romanticism 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Sheehan - The Poetics and Politics of Theodicy (2007) | JSTOR - Prooftexts
Prooftexts, Vol. 27, No. 2, Special Issue: Before and After The Art of Biblical Narrative (Spring 2007), pp. 211-232 -- If Exodus was the paradigm of revolutionary politics in the seventeenth century, Job was the book that most resonated in the Enlightenment, a period when political, aesthetic, and religious ambitions far exceeded their real powers. Poetry emerged as a central concern at precisely the moment when these limitations were realized, both as a vehicle for recuperating the Biblical text and for imagining a certain divine and political order. Job's theodicy provided a meeting ground for an entwined poetics and politics during the Enlightenment and, this essay suggests, today as well. The Enlightenment, I suggest, illuminates that version of Biblical poetry articulated by Robert Alter, backlighting it to show some of the political implications of a poetic Bible. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  literary_history  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  theodicy  Bible-as-literature  poetry  poetics  Exodus  Job  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Pfau - Romantic Moods: Paranoia, Trauma, and Melancholy, 1790–1840 (2005 hbk only) | JHU Press
Thomas Pfau reinterprets the evolution of British and German Romanticism as a progress through three successive dominant moods, each manifested in the "voice" of an historical moment. Drawing on a multifaceted philosophical tradition ranging from Kant to Hegel to Heidegger—incorporating as well the psychosocial analyses of Freud, Benjamin, and Adorno—Pfau develops a new understanding of the Romantic writer's voice as the formal encryption of a complex cultural condition. Pfau focuses on 3 specific paradigms of emotive experience: paranoia, trauma, and melancholy. Along the trajectory of Romantic thought paranoia characterizes the disintegration of traditional models of causation and representation during the French Revolution; trauma, the radical political, cultural, and economic restructuring of Central Europe in the Napoleonic era; and melancholy, the dominant post-traumatic condition of stalled, post-Napoleonic history both in England and on the continent. (..) positions emotion as a "climate of history" to be interpretively recovered from the discursive and imaginative writing in which it is objectively embodied. (..) traces the evolution of Romantic interiority by exploring the deep-seated reverberations of historical change as they become legible in new discursive and conceptual strategies and in the evolving formal-aesthetic construction and reception of Romantic literature. In establishing this relationship between mood and voice, Pfau moves away from the conventional understanding of emotion as something "owned" or exclusively attributable to the individual and toward a theory of mood as fundamentally intersubjective and deserving of broader consideration in the study of Romanticism.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  Romanticism  social_psychology  self  subjectivity  self-examination  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  political_culture  political_discourse  aesthetics  cultural_history  Radical_Enlightenment  radicals  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  worldviews  social_history  change-social  change-intellectual  poetics  rhetoric-political  prose  facebook 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Timothy Michael - British Romanticism and the Critique of Political Reason (Dec 2015) | JHU Press
What role should reason play in the creation of a free and just society? Can we claim to know anything in a field as complex as politics? And how can the cause of political rationalism be advanced when it is seen as having blood on its hands? These are the questions that occupied a group of British poets, philosophers, and polemicists in the years following the French Revolution. (..) argues that much literature of the period is a trial, or a critique, of reason in its political capacities and a test of the kinds of knowledge available to it. For Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Burke, Wollstonecraft, and Godwin, the historical sequence of revolution, counter-revolution, and terror in France—and radicalism and repression in Britain—occasioned a dramatic reassessment of how best to advance the project of enlightenment. The political thought of these figures must be understood, Michael contends, in the context of their philosophical thought. Major poems of the period, including The Prelude, The Excursion, and Prometheus Unbound, are in this reading an adjudication of competing political and epistemological claims. This book bridges for the first time two traditional pillars of Romantic studies: the period’s politics and its theories of the mind and knowledge. Combining literary and intellectual history, it provides an account of British Romanticism in which high rhetoric, political prose, poetry, and poetics converge in a discourse of enlightenment and emancipation.
books  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  literary_history  British_history  English_lit  political_philosophy  political_culture  Enlightenment  epistemology  moral_philosophy  mind  Romanticism  poetry  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Shelley  Burke  Wollstonecraft  Godwin_Wm  reason  rationality  perception  judgment-political  judgment-independence  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  political_discourse  poetics  rhetoric-political  freedom  civil_liberties  civil_society  liberty-positive  scepticism 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Works by Kenneth Burke | KB Journal - Bibliographies
Lengthy -- divided into categories, e.g. books (non-fiction), essays, poetry, fiction -- notes the main changes and additions to each edition of his major works, including tracking hardback and paperback versions, which is almost impossible to sort out on Amazon -- they note the bibliographies are updated (probably mostly the secondary works page) -- downloaded as pdf to Note
Burke_Kenneth  bibliography  US_history  20thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  cultural_critique  social_theory  economic_theory  lit_crit  literary_theory  literary_language  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-moral_basis  political_culture  political_sociology  action-theory  philosophy_of_language  epistemology  epistemology-social  dialectic  dialogue  historiography  English_lit  Shakespeare  poetry  poetics  theater  psychology  meaning  perspectivism  pragmatism  progressivism  socialism  communism  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Edelstein, ed. - The Super-Enlightenment: Daring to Know Too Much | Voltaire Foundation -Jan 2010
Historians of 18thC thought have implied a clear distinction between mystical or occult writing, often termed ‘illuminist’, and better-known forms of Enlightenment thinking and culture. But where are the boundaries of ‘enlightened’ human understanding? (..the.) contributors (..) put forward a completely new way of configuring these seemingly antithetical currents of thought, and identify a grey area that binds the two, a ‘Super-Enlightenment’. (..) exploring the social, religious, artistic, political and scientific dimensions of the Super-Enlightenment, contributors demonstrate the co-existence of apparent opposites: the enlightened and the esoteric, empiricism and imagination, history and myth, the secretive and the public, mysticism and science. The Enlightenment can no longer be seen as a sturdy, homogeneous movement defined by certain core beliefs, but one which oscillates between opposing poles in its social practices, historiography and even its epistemology: between daring to know, and daring to know too much. ** Dan Edelstein, Introduction to the Super-Enlightenment -- I. What limits of understanding? ** Peter Reill, The hermetic imagination in the high and late Enlightenment ** David Bates, Super-epistemology ** Jessica Riskin, Mr Machine and the imperial me -- II. The arts of knowing ** Liana Vardi, Physiocratic visions ** Anthony Vidler, For the love of architecture: Claude-Nicolas Ledoux and the Hypnerotomachia ** Fabienne Moore, The poetry of the Super-Enlightenment: the theories and practices of Cazotte, Chassaignon, Mercier, Saint-Martin and Bonneville -- III. Sacred societies ** Natalie Bayer, What do you seek from us? Wisdom? Virtue? Enlightenment? Inventing a Masonic science of man in Russia ** Kris Pangburn, Bonnet’s theory of palingenesis: an ‘Enlightened’ account of personal resurrection? ** Dan Edelstein, The Egyptian French Revolution: antiquarianism, Freemasonry and the mythology of nature ** Tili Boon Cuillé, From myth to religion in Ossian’s France
books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  hermeticism  Freemasonry  antiquaries  epistemology  ancient_religions  ancient_Egypt  occult  immortality  myth  religion  comparative_religion  French_lit  poetics  Russia  Physiocrats  laws_of_nature  La_Mettrie  noble_savage  national_origins  antiquity  historiography-18thC 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst, review - The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell (Yale ed., 2 vols) and The Poems of Andrew Marvell (Nigel Smith ed.) | JSTOR: Albion: A Quarterly Journal Concerned with British Studies, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Winter, 2004), pp. 697-700
Review of (1) The Prose Works of Andrew Marvell, eds, Annabel Patterson; Martin Dzelzainis, Nicholas von Maltzahn, N. H. Keeble and (2) The Poems of Andrew Marvell, ed. Nigel Smith -- the poetry volume is dinged for not fully reflecting new work on Marvell, not surprisingly since Hirst with Zwicker have led the way on repositioning Marvell's biography (ambiguous sexuality, fraught relationships with families and the constantly shifting system of patronage, and childhood abuse) to see both his politics and poetry dufferently, The more substantive critique of the 2 volume prose works is Patterson hauling Marvell and her co-editors into a "liberal avant la lettre" frame where Marvell generally doesn't belong. Par for Patterson who wants to claim all good things in 17thC and 18thC English_lit to liberalism and "Whig culture" -- 3 pgs, didn't download
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  English_lit  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Marvell  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  English_constitution  anti-absolutism  tolerance  popery  poetry  poetics  political_press  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  political_discourse  pamphlets  censorship  British_foreign_policy  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst and Steven Zwicker - High Summer at Nun Appleton, 1651: Andrew Marvell and Lord Fairfax's Occasions | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 2 (Jun., 1993), pp. 247-269
Andrew Marvell's country-house epic, Upon Appleton House, has long been understood as a meditation on conventional philosophical themes. An exact dating allows us to see the topical and polemical force of those themes. Moreover, situating the poem within particular chronological and geographical confines, the summer of 1651 and the household of the recently retired Lord General as well as the political geography of the vale of York, reveals the continuities and the patronage-afflicted contours of the poet's engagement with the crisis of the English revolution, a crisis he had so searchingly explored in An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's return from Ireland. -- Major paper as part of rethinking and repositioning Marvell's poetry and politics -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Marvell  political_philosophy  poetry  poetics  sexuality  Cromwell  patronage  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
HEATHER ELLIS - 'This starting, feverish heart': Matthew Arnold and the Problem of Manliness | JSTOR: Critical Survey, Vol. 20, No. 3, Victorian Masculinities (2008), pp. 97-115
Fascinating re Victorian obsession with sturdy, active "manliness" uncorrupted by effeminate activities like poetry or scholarship - Arnold greatly influenced by Cardinal Newman's revaluation of Christian manliness with what were feminine stereotypes - love of poetry, contemplation, etc. But Arnold also quasi idolized his father, Thomas Arnold, arch critic of Newman and promoter of all the vigorous manly virtues. Lots of quotes across much of 19thC from the literary journals, where conflicts over cultural ideals were waged re education, literary form and style, appropriate models for exemplary history and so on. Among Arnold's critics James Fitzjames Stephen. Leslie Stephen's brother was a nasty piece of work. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  English_lit  19thC  British_history  Victorian  masculinity  culture_wars  Newman_JH  Arnold_Matthew  cultural_critique  Tractarians  Oxford  education-higher  education-civic  Stephen_Leslie  literary_journals  poetics  High_Church  high_culture  downloaded 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Gavin Alexander - Fulke Greville and the Afterlife | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 3/4 (1999), pp. 203-231
Fascinating re both Grevill's history writing - his discussion of Sir Philip Sidney in publishing his work (Arcadia) not only influenced Sidney reception but framed Queen Elizabeth as a wise ruler in contrast with the Stuarts. Discussion of how, given "nothing new under the sun" and constancy of human nature, poetry, drama and prose could all be read as speaking to current events -- e, g. Robert Devereaux, Earl of Essex rebellion. Greville treatment of Sidney as in retrospect prophetic re foreign relations especially with Dutch, forms of government -- Greville using Aristotle and Polybius re patterns of historical change. Greville in both his history and prose writing and his poetry and plays was always looking to readers after his death. Suggestive re development of an increasingly sophisticated historiography in 17thC that wrestled with tensions in using history as exemplary vs informing practical reason for contingencies of statecraft as well as hermeneutics for readers in the present and future. Provides a publication history of Greville's works during Commonwealth and Restoration, how it was used politically at different moments, including Exclusion_Crisis. Worden has published articles or chapters in collections that look at the generation of Sidney and Greville as some proto classical republican writings. Also may be useful for Bolingbroke's treatment of Elizabeth as model in Remarks and Study and Uses -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  16thC  17thC  Elizabeth  James_I  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Anglo-Dutch  English_lit  poetry  poetics  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-political  historians-and-politics  historical_change  politics-and-literature  hermeneutics  reader_response  readership  publishing  scribal_circulation  manuscripts  Remarks_on_History_of_England  Study_and_Uses  political_philosophy  republicanism  Polybius  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Howard D. Weinbrot - Alexander Pope and Madame Dacier's Homer: Conjectures concerning Cardinal Dubois, Sir Luke Schaub, and Samuel Buckley | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 1/2 (1999), pp. 1-23
Intrigue involving local press censorship (Tonson printing Buckingham works edited by Pope and supressed by the ministry), diplomatic relations with Catholic Europe and Pope's reputation in England under attack -- early 1720s. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  British_history  British_politics  Whigs-oligarchy  diplomatic_history  cultural_history  18thC  1720s  Pope  DuBois  France  Anglo-French  Homer  translation  lit_crit  Ancients_v_Moderns  Dacier_Mme  poetics  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
André Gendre - La Pléiade entre Bembo et l’Arioste | Italique, VI, 2003, p. 7-36
Italique [En ligne], VI | 2003, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.134 **--** L’imitation, en matière de poésie amoureuse par exemple, n’implique pas toujours la reconnaissance, fût-elle éphémère, d’une doctrine philosophique, d’une expérience commune, d’une affinité de sentiments ; elle est souvent comme un masque du sens qu’on emprunte pour le rendre ensuite. Elle correspond aussi à une séduction formelle momentanée. Ces pratiques aléatoires paraissent condamner la recherche d’une influence très particulière exercée sur nos poètes. Il est vrai que la Pléiade ne choisit souvent Bembo ou l’Arioste que pour leurs lieux communs pétrarquistes.Mais ces modèles sont trop grands poètes pour ne pas déterminer plus spécifiquement ceux qu’ils inspirent. -- Plan -- La sérénité néo-platonicienne de bembo. -- Le pittoresque de bembo -- L’arioste stimul. -- l’imaginaire sensuel des poètes de la pléiade. -- L’arioste et le portrait érotique. -- L’arioste inspire des imitations variées. -- Les Azolains éclairent-ils la composition des recueils français ? -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  Renaissance  Italy  France  Italian_lit  poetry  poetics  Ariosto  Bembo  French_lit  Pléiade  imitation  influence-literary  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Francisco Rico - Pétrarque au partage de midi | Italique, VII, 2004, 9-26
Italique [En ligne], VII | 2004, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.124. **--** dans voi ch’ascoltate comme en bien des endroits de l’œuvre de Pétrarque – qu’il s’agisse de prose ou de vers, de latin ou de langue vulgaire –, «errore» constitue à peu de choses près un terme technique emprunté à la tradition stoïcienne pour désigner la falsa opinio qui trouble la vision du commun des mortels, alimente les « speranze », le « dolore » et les autres affectus ou perturbationes animi, provoque la désagrégation de l’esprit en « pensieri » aussi « sparsi » que les rimes venant les refléter. De toute évidence, Pétrarque apparaît ici comme un « altr’ uom » : il n’est plus ce qu’il était autrefois, il arbore désormais l’air grave du sage stoïcien et n’hésite pas à dénoncer les poèmes du canzoniere comme autant de rerum vulgarium fragmenta dans leur fond et dans leur forme, comme de vulgaires morceaux dignes du « popol » ignorant. Il ne s’agit pas ici d’une simple fiction plus ou moins placée sous le signe des précédents bien connus offerts par la littérature latine et les troubadours : à plusieurs reprises, l’illustre Italien dont nous commémorons le septième centenaire a voulu se convertir en « altr’ uom » et y est parvenu. -- J’aimerais attirer un instant votre attention sur un des moments décisifs de cette trajectoire passionnée et émouvante : ce moment du partage de midi où, à la croisée des chemins, déjà à l’âge mûr, Pétrarque résout les incertitudes qui l’avaient hanté durant ses longues années de formation et s’engage d’un pas ferme sur la voie qui le conduira à son plein épanouissement, à la fois en tant qu’écrivain et en tant qu’homme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  intellectual_history  religious_history  14thC  Italy  Renaissance  humanism  Italian_lit  Petrarch  poetry  poetics  Stoicism  epistemology  epistemology-moral  perception  moral_philosophy  theology  self-examination  self-fashioning  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Lina Bolzoni - Les Asolani de Pietro Bembo, ou le double portrait de l’amour | Italique, IX, 2006, p. 9-27
Italique [En ligne], IX | 2006, mis en ligne le 29 mai 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.103. **--** Les Asolani réalisent en outre une synthèse complexe de traditions et de modèles différents, littéraires et philosophiques, anciens et modernes, latins et en langue vulgaire. Ainsi la tradition du dialogue latin, classique et humaniste, est réécrite en vulgaire et utilisée également comme cadre et comme commentaire à un choix de poésies ; si le cadre narratif renvoie à son tour au Décaméron, le choix de poésies s’inspire de plus en plus du Pétrarque du Canzoniere. Différentes traditions philosophiques – en particulier la réflexion moderne sur l’amour des néoplatoniciens florentins – sont utilisées pour donner une nouvelle dignité théorique à la tradition lyrique en vulgaire et en même temps pour réaliser une difficile réconciliation entre vie et littérature, entre autobiographie et création d’un modèle idéal. La célébrité des asolani n’est pas seulement italienne : une traduction française, par Jean Martin, est publiée à Paris en 1545 et elle sera réimprimée plusieurs fois au cours du XVIe siècle.En outre, il ne faut pas oublier que Bembo est le protagoniste du dernier livre du cortegiano grâce justement à l’autorité dont il jouissait pour avoir écrit les asolani ; la célébrité européenne du cortegiano contribue à amplifier aussi la renommée de notre texte. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  Italy  Venice  France  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  16thC  Bembo  Petrarch  Dante  Boccaccio  poetry  poetics  prose  style  style-philosophy  elite_culture  Renaissance  courtiers  sprezaturra  love  humanism  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  reception  vernacular  neo-Latin  dialogue  publishing  manners  gentleman  otium  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - « Qual l’alto Ægeo... » : Montaigne et l’essai des poètes italiens | Italique, XI, 2008, p.109-129.
Italique [En ligne], XI | 2008, mis en ligne le 01 février 2012, DOI : 10.4000/italique.213. **--** La poésie est l’expression privilégiée de l’émotion pour Montaigne.1Il cite tout au long des Essais d’innombrables vers, par lesquels il exprime tout ce que sa prose ne peut dire. Ces citations contribuent à un effet d’hétérogénéité stylistique et linguistique, qui définit l’originalité même du livre, dans le cadre d’une « rhétorique des citations » et d’une esthétique de la surprise et de la varietas. Ces vers sont en latin pour la plupart d’entre eux, constituant une véritable anthologie, d’Ovide et de Virgile, cités dès le chapitre 2 du premier livre, à Horace, qui conclut le dernier chapitre du livre III. Montaigne cite également 70 vers de poètes italiens. Ces fragments en langue italienne sont plus importants que les vers français, si l’on excepte, dans les trois premières éditions, le recueil des 29 sonnets d’Etienne de La Boétie, qui constitue à lui seul la matière d’un chapitre dédié à la comtesse de Guiche. La langue italienne, sous le règne de Henri III, était un signe de distinction. De tels vers étaient l’expression ostentatoire d’une culture mondaine, que le livre partageait avec ses lecteurs, dames et gentilshommes dont Montaigne voulait être le pédagogue sans pédantisme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  French_lit  Italian_lit  Latin_lit  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  poetry  poetics  vernacular  epic  epigrammes  prose  style-philosophy  Montaigne  intertextual  influence-literary  elite_culture  Petrarch  Ariosto  Dante  Virgil  Tasso  Lucretius  Seneca  Pléiade  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Volker Kapp - Les Exempla dans les Triumphi et la culture oratoire de Pétrarque | Italique, XII, 2009, p. 9-31.
Italique [En ligne], XII | 2009, mis en ligne le 01 novembre 2012 - DOI : 10.4000/italique.220 *--* Les réserves des lecteurs du XXIe siècle contrastent avec le succès fulminant des Triumphi au Quattrocento dans les domaines littéraire et artistique. Le nombre élevé de manuscrits, ... confirme la haute estime dont ils jouirent pendant la Renaissance...pour ne pas parler des tableaux consacrés au thème du triomphe et influencés, plus ou moins, par Pétrarque. Pour expliquer ce changement surprenant des paramè­tres de la réception, on peut invoquer les divergences qui nous séparent de la civilisation humaniste.-- Et n’est-il pas légitime de renvoyer à la rhétorique qui caractérise l’humanisme européen précisément depuis Pétrarque dont on connaît l’ambition de se détacher par-là de la littérature et de la philosophie médiévales ? ...Nous proposons d’analyser cette problématique en insistant sur la figure rhétorique de l’exemplum. Afin de saisir l’impact de ce procédé à l’intérieur de la culture oratoire de Pétrarque, il faudra identifier quelques figures dans cette poésie, situer celle-ci parmi les formes du discours et évaluer ce qu’on a qualifié de « passion archéologique » de notre auteur, passion, dont relèvent les exempla tant dans son œuvre historique que dans les Triumphi. -- montrer que les exempla servent à mettre en scène le théâtre de la mémoire dans lequel le 'je' lyrique explore les présupposées et les enjeux de son éloge lyrique de Laure. Toute réflexion sur la rhétorique de Pétrarque doit partir de l’affinité entre l’art oratoire et la philosophie morale qu’il ne cesse de postuler. Cette convic­tion qu’il tire de Cicéron marque le dialogue intitulé De eloquentia du De remediis utriusque fortune. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  Petrarch  poetics  neo-Latin  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  humanism  Renaissance  Cicero  moral_philosophy  exempla  oratory  self-examination  reception  rhetoric-moral_basis  eloquence  Quintillian  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Gabriele Bucchi - Au delà du tombeau: Pyrame et Thisbé dans deux réécritures de la Renaissance italienne | Italique, XIII, 2010, p. 53-80
Italique [En ligne], XIII | 2010, mis en ligne le 23 juin 2014, URL : http://italique.revues.org/282 ; DOI : 10.4000/italique.282 *--* La fable de Pyrame et Thisbé tirée des Métamorphoses d’Ovide (iv 55-166) fut pendant le Moyen Âge et la Renaissance une des plus connues parmi celles du poème latin. -- je voudrais prendre en considération deux réécritures, parues à une année de distance l’une de l’autre dans deux recueils poétiques de la Renaissance italienne: la Favola di Piramo e Tisbe des Amori di Bernardo Tasso (1534) et du poème du même titre paru une année plus tard dans les Rime toscane (1535) du mystérieux «Amomo», un poète italien exilé en France, que Nicole Bingen a récemment proposé d’identifier avec le Napolitain Antonio Caracciolo. -- je souhaiterais mettre en évidence la présence d’intertextes qui opèrent dans la réécriture de l’auteur classique. En effet, tout en restant dans un dialogue privilégié avec le texte latin, les deux auteurs se montrent néanmoins sensibles aux suggestions d’autres textes en langue vulgaire qui s’étaient à leur tour inspirés des Métamorphoses. C’est le cas, comme on le verra, de la paraphrase de Boccace dans le De claris mulieribus et surtout de deux épisodes de l’Orlando Furioso, dont le modèle se révèle (surtout pour Amomo) un vrai paradigme pour la scène de l’adieu des amants in articulo mortis. Finalement, je voudrais suggérer une lecture parallèle de l’épisode des funérailles de Clorinde dans la Gerusalemme liberata de Torquato Tasso (xii) avec un passage de la fable ovidienne réécrite par son père. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  Italian_lit  16thC  Renaissance  vernacular  Ovid  imitation  intertextual  Tasso  Boccaccio  Ariosto  fable  poetry  poetics  literary_history  influence-literary  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas Hunkeler - Dante à Lyon : des « rime petrose » aux « durs épigrammes » | Italique IX, 2008, p. 9-27
Journal - Italique: poèsie italienne de la Renaissance -- Dante traverse le seizième siècle français de façon spectrale, à l’ombre quasi totale de son plus célèbre confrère et compatriote Pétrarque. Au succès de ce dernier semble répondre négativement ce qu’Arturo Farinelli a appelé, de façon certes un peu schématique, la sfortuna di dante : l’infortune de Dante en France.En effet, l’écart entre ces deux couronnes d’Italie ne cessera de se creuser : tandis que le poète du canzoniere est en passe de donner naissance à une dynamique véritablement européenne, Dante au contraire se trouve relégué, et cela pour de longues années encore, dans la préhistoire poussiéreuse de la seule littérature italienne. Aux yeux des poètes de la Pléiade, Du Bellay et Ronsard en tête, Dante doit être écarté des modèles à imiter ; précisément, pourrait-on dire, parce que son œuvre, et peut-être surtout la divine comédie, paraissent inimitables et inassimilables. Le canzoniere de Pétrarque, en revanche, semble se prêter à merveille à des usages visant en fin de compte l’appropriation de sa substance et de son prestige, et la transformation de ce qui paraît étrange ou étranger en un corpus de référence désormais maîtrisé. Dans la grande entreprise de défense et illustration de la culture française engagée par la Pléiade, Dante ne peut pas avoir de place puisque son œuvre résiste, contrairement à celle de Pétrarque, à toute forme de translatio – même lorsqu’elle est traduite. Mais ce qui est vrai pour la France en général ne l’est pas forcément pour Lyon -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  French_lit  16thC  Renaissance  Italian_lit  Dante  Petrarch  imitation  Pléiade  poetry  poetics  cultural_change  cultural_authority  cultural_history  French_language  vernacular  literary_history  literary_language  elite_culture  high_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
T.S. Eliot - "Notes on the Blank Verse of Christopher Marlowe" - The Sacred Wood; Essays on Poetry and Criticism (1921) | bartleby.com
The comparative study of English versification at various periods is a large tract of unwritten history. To make a study of blank verse alone, would be to elicit some curious conclusions. It would show, I believe, that blank verse within Shakespeare’s lifetime was more highly developed, that it became the vehicle of more varied and more intense art-emotions than it has ever conveyed since; and that after the erection of the Chinese Wall of Milton, blank verse has suffered not only arrest but retrogression. That the blank verse of Tennyson, for example, a consummate master of this form in certain applications, is cruder (not “rougher” or less perfect in technique) than that of half a dozen contemporaries of Shakespeare; cruder, because less capable of expressing complicated, subtle, and surprising emotions. -- The development of blank verse may be likened to the analysis of that astonishing industrial product coal-tar. Marlowe’s verse is one of the earlier derivatives, but it possesses properties which are not repeated in any of the analytic or synthetic blank verses discovered somewhat later.
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  19thC  20thC  English_lit  literary_history  lit_crit  poetry  Elizabethan  Marlowe  Shakespeare  theater  playwrights  Milton  Tennyson  blank_verse  poetics  Eliot_TS 
august 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  1700s  1710s  1720s  action-theory  Addison  aesthetics  African-Americans  agriculture  Ancients-and-Moderns  Ancients_v_Moderns  ancient_Egypt  ancient_Greece  ancient_religions  Anglo-Dutch  Anglo-French  anti-absolutism  antiquaries  antiquity  Arendt  Ariosto  Arnold_Matthew  article  audio  belles-lettres  Bembo  Bible-as-literature  bibliography  biocultural_evolution  Black_churches  Black_literature  Black_scholars  blank_verse  Blumenberg  Boccaccio  books  bookshelf  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_history  British_politics  Burke  Burke_Kenneth  Byron  canon  censorship  change-intellectual  change-social  Cicero  City  civility-political  civil_liberties  civil_society  Coates  Coleridge  comedy  commerce  commerce-doux  communism  comparative_religion  Counter-Enlightenment  counter-revolution  courtiers  court_culture  criminal_justice  Cromwell  cultural_authority  cultural_change  cultural_critique  cultural_history  culture_wars  Dacier_Mme  Dante  Davenant  dialectic  dialogue  diplomatic_history  downloaded  dualism  DuBois  economic_culture  economic_theory  Edinburgh_Review  education-civic  education-continuing  education-higher  EF-add  Eliot_TS  elite_culture  Elizabeth  Elizabethan  eloquence  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  English_lit  Enlightenment  entre_deux_guerres  epic  epigrammes  epistemology  epistemology-moral  epistemology-social  etexts  Exclusion_Crisis  exempla  Exodus  fable  facebook  figurall_anguage  France  freedom  Freemasonry  French_Enlightenment  French_language  French_lit  French_Revolution  French_Revolution-impact  French_Revolutionary_Wars  gentleman  gentry  Godwin_Wm  government-forms  Greek_lit  groups-social_capital  Hazlitt_William  Heidegger  hermeneutics  hermeticism  High_Church  high_culture  historians-and-politics  historical_change  historical_fiction  historicism  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-antiquity  historiography-Renaissance  Homer  humanism  human_nature  Husserl  imitation  immortality  imperialism  individualism  influence-literary  Instapaper  intellectual_history  Interregnum  intertextual  interview  irony  Italian_lit  Italy  James_I  Jeffrey_Francis  Job  jstor  judgment-independence  judgment-political  Keats  labor  labor_theory_of_value  landed_interest  Latin_lit  laws_of_nature  La_Mettrie  lecture  liberty-positive  links  literary_history  literary_journals  literary_language  literary_theory  literature-and-morality  lit_crit  lit_survey  Locke-2_Treatises  love  Lucretius  manners  manuscripts  Marlowe  Marvell  masculinity  meaning  mercantilism  metaphor  Milton  mind  Modernism  modernity  Montaigne  moral_philosophy  music  musical_theater  music_history  myth  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  narrative  national_ID  national_interest  national_origins  nature  nature-mastery  nature-poetry  neo-Latin  Neoplatonism  Newman_JH  new_historicism  noble_savage  novels  occult  open_access  oral_culture  oratory  otium  Ovid  Oxford  pamphlets  parties  partisanship  patriarchy  patronage  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  perception  periodization  perspectivism  Petrarch  phenomenology  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_language  Physiocrats  playwrights  Pléiade  Pocket  poetics  poetry  police  politeness  political_culture  political_discourse  political_economy  political_philosophy  political_press  political_sociology  politics-and-literature  politics-and-religion  Polybius  Pope  popery  popular_culture  post-WWII  postmodern  pragmatism  print_culture  progressivism  property  prose  psychology  public_sphere  publishing  Queen_Anne  Quintillian  racism  racism-structural  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  rationality  readership  reader_response  reason  reception  religion  religious_history  religious_lit  Remarks_on_History_of_England  Renaissance  republicanism  Restoration  reviews  revues.org  rhetoric  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-writing  romances  Romanticism  Russia  scepticism  scribal_circulation  Scribd  segregation  self  self-examination  self-fashioning  Seneca  sexuality  Shakespeare  Shelley  socialism  social_history  social_psychology  social_theory  Spectator  sprezaturra  Stephen_Leslie  Stoicism  Study_and_Uses  style  style-philosophy  subjectivity  sublime  subscriptions  Tasso  technology  Tennyson  theater  theodicy  theology  tolerance  Tories  Tractarians  trade  tragedy  translation  unemployment  urban_politics  US_history  US_legal_system  US_politics  US_society  Venice  vernacular  Victorian  video  Virgil  War_of_Spanish_Succession  website  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whig_Junto  white_flight  white_supremacy  Wollstonecraft  Wordsworth  worldviews 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: