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Folgerpedia - Folger Shakespeare Library
Founded on 9 July 2014, Folgerpedia is the Folger Shakespeare Library's collaboratively-edited, search-based encyclopedia of all things "Folger." Content of the articles has been contributed by various departments within the institution, as well as Folger readers and other scholars. The articles address each topic as it relates to the Folger and the Folger collection. There is a variety of article types that can be found on Folgerpedia, including: lists; how tos; and encyclopedic entries concerning items in the collection, Shakespeare's works and characters, and his works in performance.

To read more about Folgerpedia, check out the Folger research blog, The Collation.
Reformation  Tudor  stagecraft  printing  political_culture  Italian_lit  English-language  English_lit  Europe-Early_Modern  religious_culture  Shakespeare  James_I  theater  Renaissance  digital_humanities  history_of_book  intellectual_history  British_history  publishing  plays  website  literary_language  cultural_history  actors  London  event  playwrights  Latin_lit  politics-and-literature  Elizabeth 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
MELINDA C. FINBERG, Review -- Tiffany Stern, Rehearsal from Shakespeare to Sheridan (OUP 2000) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 140-141 -- issued in pbk 2007 -- delightful review summarizing the ways the playwright was lowest on the pecking order for producing the "final" version, and the process of actors separately learning lines without run throughs, and adjusting parts to fit the "character" the audience came to see etc -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  theater  Shakespeare  theatre-Restoration  theatre-production  actors  playwrights  audience  16thC  17thC  18thC  Sheridan  theatre-sentimental  Garrick 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Alzada Tipton - Caught between "Virtue" and "Memorie": Providential and Political Historiography in Samuel Daniel's the Civil Wars | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 3/4 (1998), pp. 325-341
Daniel had Essex connections that got him in trouble for a play - his Civil Wars dealt with Lancaster and York from deposition of Richard Ii - another sensitive topic. Tension among ambitions as courtier, patronage limks with factions in upper elite, and artistic and historiographical standards that he intended to meet to obtain reputation as an author, though those standards were unclear and in the process of shifting in late Elizabethan and early Jacobean culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  history_of_England  14thC  15thC16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Wars_of_the_Roses  patronage  faction  censorship  historians-and-politics  exempla  Providence  courtiers  court_culture  playwrights  Elizabethan  Essex_rebellion  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Khan, B. - An Economic History of Copyright in Europe and the United States | EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. March 16, 2008
The US created a utilitarian market-based model of intellectual property grants which created incentives for invention, with the primary objective of increasing social welfare and protecting the public domain. The checks and balances of interest group lobbies, the legislature and the judiciary worked effectively as long as each institution was relatively well-matched in terms of size and influence. However, a number of scholars are concerned that the political influence of corporate interests, the vast number of uncoordinated users over whom the social costs are spread, and international harmonization of laws have upset these counterchecks, leading to over-enforcement at both the private and public levels. International harmonization with European doctrines introduced significant distortions in the fundamental principles of US copyright and its democratic provisions. One of the most significant of these changes was also one of the least debated: compliance with the precepts of the Berne Convention accorded automatic copyright protection to all creations on their fixation in tangible form. This rule reversed the relationship between copyright and the public domain that the US Constitution stipulated. According to original US copyright doctrines, the public domain was the default, and copyright a limited exemption to the public domain; after the alignment with Berne, copyright became the default, and the rights of the public and of the public domain now merely comprise a limited exception to the primacy of copyright. The pervasive uncertainty that characterizes the intellectual property arena today leads risk-averse individuals and educational institutions to err on the side of abandoning their right to free access rather than invite challenges and costly litigation. Many commentators are also concerned about other dimensions of the globalization of intellectual property rights, such as the movement to emulate European grants of property rights in databases, which has the potential to inhibit diffusion and learning.
article  economic_history  publishing  property  property_rights  legal_history  legal_system  IP  regulation-harmonization  natural_rights  natural_law  copyright  patents  US_constitution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  international_law  France  French_Revolution  censorship  British_history  authors  artists  playwrights  democracy  knowledge_economy  Internet  globalization  global_economy  digital_humanities  transparency  open_access  scientific_culture  science-public  education  R&D  education-higher  common_law  civil_code  civil_society  civic_humanism  US_legal_system 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Alessandra Villa - Le partage des ‘droits’ sur l’œuvre littéraire à la renaissance. Les cas d’Isabella d’Este | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 45-71
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.116. **--** la marquise s’avéra préférer, lorsqu’une œuvre lui était offerte, l’exclusivité de l’objet et le privilège de posséder une œuvre peu répandue et dont elle pouvait contrôler la diffusion ultérieure. Tout en répondant parfaitement à l’image d’une femme que l’historiographie dépeint véhémente, voire tyrannique, cette idée était très familière aux mécènes de la Renaissance et, à vrai dire, de tous les temps, du fait que la rareté est l’un des critères principaux pour estimer la valeur d’une quelconque collection, qu’elle soit d’œuvres d’art ou de livres. D’autre part, si les reproductions des œuvres d’art ne gardaient pas aux yeux des contemporains toute la valeur des originaux, les œuvres littéraires, ainsi que les œuves théâtrales et musicales, possédaient un haut degré de ‘volatilité’, pouvant être copiées à peu de frais et sans porter préjudice à leur valeur intrinsèque. Leur reproduction n’impliquait pas une perte d’aura. -- Pour protéger les trésors de leurs bibliothèques, les seigneurs se montraient jaloux et méfiants : ils prêtaient peu volontiers, et seulement à des amis fiables, auxquels ils demandaient cependant des garanties, parfois même en argent. Le prêt des œuvres était réglé par la loi du do ut des, et l’emprunteur était soumis au serment, implicite ou explicite, de ne pas trahir la confiance du prêteur en divulguant ultérieurement le manuscrit. Selon Luzio et Renier, on pourrait écrire une histoire de la littérature italienne de la période en étudiant les dédicaces offertes à Isabella. Vu la qualité et la quantité des œuvres et des auteurs intéressés par un tel recensement, cela paraît une affirmation bien fondée. Mais outre l’honneur, Isabella semble avoir réclamé un autre genre de prérogatives, plus matériel et à la fois plus indéterminé : le droit de partager avec l’auteur leur gestion. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  15thC  16thC  cultural_history  literary_history  intellectual_history  Italy  Italian_lit  Renaissance  court_culture  courtiers  elite_culture  patronage  patrons  authors  playwrights  publishing  publishing-piracy  IP  copyright  property_rights  dedications-author  economics_of_cultural_production  bibliophiles  manuscripts  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
T.S. Eliot - "Notes on the Blank Verse of Christopher Marlowe" - The Sacred Wood; Essays on Poetry and Criticism (1921) | bartleby.com
The comparative study of English versification at various periods is a large tract of unwritten history. To make a study of blank verse alone, would be to elicit some curious conclusions. It would show, I believe, that blank verse within Shakespeare’s lifetime was more highly developed, that it became the vehicle of more varied and more intense art-emotions than it has ever conveyed since; and that after the erection of the Chinese Wall of Milton, blank verse has suffered not only arrest but retrogression. That the blank verse of Tennyson, for example, a consummate master of this form in certain applications, is cruder (not “rougher” or less perfect in technique) than that of half a dozen contemporaries of Shakespeare; cruder, because less capable of expressing complicated, subtle, and surprising emotions. -- The development of blank verse may be likened to the analysis of that astonishing industrial product coal-tar. Marlowe’s verse is one of the earlier derivatives, but it possesses properties which are not repeated in any of the analytic or synthetic blank verses discovered somewhat later.
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  19thC  20thC  English_lit  literary_history  lit_crit  poetry  Elizabethan  Marlowe  Shakespeare  theater  playwrights  Milton  Tennyson  blank_verse  poetics  Eliot_TS 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Hutchings - The ' Turk Phenomenon' and the Repertory of the Late Elizabethan Playhouse | Early Modern Literary Studies Special Issue 16 (October, 2007) 10.1-39
"Turk plays" popular up to Charles I - late-Elizabethan theatre drew on a conventional narrative of fear that was also.. one of fascination. ?..also energised by 2 linked events: the Reformation and Elizabeth's promotion of Anglo-Ottoman relations after excommunication by Pope Pius V in 1570. ?..in the last decade or so of the 16thC a sizeable proportion of the playhouse repertory became deeply influenced by this development... a complex artistic, ideological, and commercial phenomenon. -- In shifting from "author"-centred approaches that many theorists believe to be anachronistic to an emphasis on how companies operated, scholars have drawn attention to ...early modern theatre as a collective enterprise. - By its very nature the staging of the Ottoman Empire was sustained by artistic cross-fertilisation that was, in a broader sense collaborative .. as well as competitive. -- These plays were not necessarily mere ciphers of the historical past or present. The Jew of Malta far from endorses the behaviour of the besieged Christians in 1565. It is remarkable for its resistance to the Malta narrative in Christian accounts where the Turkish defeat (like at Lepanto) was celebrated. - While the Tamburlaine plays and their spin-offs called attention to Turkish tyranny and the Ottoman threat, the move away from the Marlovian aesthetic signalled a more ironic approach. Thus in Henry V, Henry's proposal to Katherine that they should produce a son to recapture Constantinople (an anachronism) is undercut by the ambiguous, "Shall we not?" For the audience a deeper irony is available - "the original phrase 'to go to Constantinople to take the Turk by the beard' became a repository for vacuous ideals, a phrase that could only be rehearsed with an increasing sense of self-satire" -- online journal html
article  English_lit  theater  genre  16thC  Tudor  Elizabethan  Marlowe  Shakespeare  Ottomans  cultural_history  playwrights  actors  trade-policy  consumers  exotic  orientalism  diplomatic_history  Reformation  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Papacy-English_relations  Counter-Reformation  elite_culture  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader

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