dunnettreader + piety   3

Susan Royal, review - Matthew Milner. The Senses and the English Reformation | H-Net Reviews
Milner points outthat the scholarship on this topic has inherited “protestant” views of late medieval sensuality... the first half of the book is devoted to a deep analysis of the senses and sensual experiences of worship prior to the Reformation. Chapter 1 lays out late medieval theories of sensing, explaining the usurpation of Augustinian principles by the revival of Aristotelian thought (chiefly Thomist). Milner explains the way sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch affected the components of tripartite anthropology, the body, spirit, and soul. -- ... the Renaissance rationalization of sense experiences, detailing the critique of medieval epistemological hierarchies and ...a shift from the tripartite anthropology of body, spirit, and soul to a dualist model of body and mind. Milner demonstrates the persistence of Aristotelian sensory theories in Tudor thought, -- Chapter 6 focuses mainly on the 1530s and 1540s, ...how reformers grappled with their position on sensual affectivity: while it was easy to reject aspects of traditional piety, it was much harder to describe how English churchgoers were supposed to connect sensibly with newly reformed practices. ...the senses into early doctrinal debates over justification and sanctification that would not be resolved until late in Elizabeth’s reign. ... -- the transition from recognizing abuse and misuse of traditional religion to its complete rejection with iconoclasm as the antidote. ...how parishioners were taught to replace traditional Eucharistic piety with spiritual communion, arguing that this in fact offered an even more sensuous experience of the sacred. -- the complex debates among conformists and nonconformists about sensing during worship in Elizabethan England. Milner argues that divisions ...concerning extemporaneous prayer, set readings, and even preaching were firmly rooted in concerns about hearing practices, and that the vestment controversy and arguments over the sign of the cross at baptism were connected to tensions about sight. Sitting somewhat awkwardly among all of these debates were those evangelicals receptive to the notion of adiaphora,..another source of conflict between conformists and nonconformists.
books  reviews  religious_history  church_history  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  British_history  Church_of_England  religious_culture  liturgy  Puritans  perception  psychology  moral_psychology  soul  mind-body  Augustinian  Aristotelian  Thomism  Renaissance  salvation  piety  sacraments  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader

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