dunnettreader + philosophy_of_social_science   72

List
Political science is divided between methodological individualists, who seek to explain political phenomena by reference to individuals and their interactions, and holists (or nonreductionists), who consider some higher-level social entities or properties such as states, institutions, or cultures ontologically or causally significant. We propose a reconciliation between these two perspectives, building on related work in philosophy. After laying out a taxonomy of different variants of each view, we observe that (i) although political phenomena result from underlying individual attitudes and behavior, individual-level descriptions do not always capture all explanatorily salient properties, and (ii) nonreductionistic explanations are mandated when social regularities are robust to changes in their individual-level realization. We characterize the dividing line between phenomena requiring nonreductionistic explanation and phenomena permitting individualistic explanation and give examples from the study of ethnic conflicts, social-network theory, and international-relations theory. - downloaded via iphone to Dbox
positivism  emergence  reductionism  causation-social  critical_realism  epistemology-social  article  methodology  jstor  social_history  causation  downloaded  philosophy_of_social_science  individualism-methodology 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Ilkka Pyysiainen - Religon: From mind to society and back (2012) | Academia.edu
Book chapter - Exploring the cognitive basis of the social sciences and trying to ground the social in the cognitive requires taking an explicit stance on reduction(ism) as discussed in philosophy of science. In social science and the humanities, the question of reductionism has been especially salient in the study of religion. This chapter begins with a philosophical analysis of reduction; after that, two relatively new research programs in the study of religious thought and behavior are discussed: the standard model of the cognitive science of religion and approaches based on gene-culture coevolutionary theories. Finally, the question of reductionism is addressed and the possibility of combining multilevel explanations of religious phenomena is evaluated. -- Downloaded to Tab S2
chapter  Academia.edu  downloaded  cognitive_science  religion  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  level_of_analysis  reductionism  religious_belief  religious_experience  neuroscience  cognition  cognition-social  gene-culture_coevolution  cultural_transmission  cultural_change  sociology_of_religion  naturalism  natural_selection  evolution-social  evolution-as-model  evolution-group_selection 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Harry Garretsen and Ron Martin - Rethinking (New) Economic Geography Models: Taking Geography and History More Seriously | Spatial Economic Analysis: Vol 5, No 2 (2010)
Harry Garretsen and Ron Martin -- Spatial Economic Analysis, Vol. 5 , Iss. 2, 2010 -- Two aspects of New Economic Geography models are often singled out for criticism, especially by geographers: the treatment of geography, typically as a pre-given, fixed and highly idealized abstract geometric space; and the treatment of history, typically as ‘logical’ time (the movement to equilibrium in a model's solution space) rather than real history. In this paper we examine the basis for these criticisms, and explore how far and in what ways NEG models might be made more credible with respect to their representation of geography and history, and particularly whether and to what extent the work of geographers themselves provides some insights in this regard. We argue that the conceptualization of space and time is in fact a challenge for both NEG theorists and economic geographers, and that, notwithstanding their ontological and epistemological differences, both groups would benefit from an interchange of ideas on this front. -- downloaded to Tab S2
article  downloaded  economic_theory  economic_sociology  geography-and-economics  geography  economic_models  philosophy_of_social_science  historical_sociology  historiography 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R Westphal - 'Analytic Philosophy
The definitive version of this article appears in:
The Owl of Minerva , 42.1–2 (2010–11):1–18.
Rejection of the philosophical relevance of history of philosophy remains pronounced within contemporary Anglophone analytic philosophy. The two main reasons for this rejection presuppose that strict deduction isboth necessary and sufficient for rational justification. However, this justificatory ideal of scientia holds only within strictly formal domains. This is confirmed by a neglected non-sequitur in van Fraassen’s original defence of ‘Constructive Empiricism’. Conversely, strict deduction is insufficient for rationaljustification in non-formal, substantive domains of inquiry. In non-formal, substantive domains, rational justification is also, in part, ineliminably social and historical, for sound reasons Hegel was the first to articulate. -- Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
history_of_philosophy  historical_sociology  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  deduction  contextualism  evolution-social  development_process  Hegel  contingency  intellectual_history  logic  historicism  evolution-as-model  philosophy_of_social_science  van_Frassen  article  downloaded  analysis-logic  epistemology  epistemology-social  empiricism 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Edward Slingerland - What Science Offers the Humanities: Integrating Body and Culture | Cambridge University Press (2008)
What Science Offers the Humanities examines some of the deep problems facing current approaches to the study of culture. It focuses especially on the excesses of postmodernism, but also acknowledges serious problems with postmodernism's harshest critics. In short, Edward Slingerland argues that in order for the humanities to progress, its scholars need to take seriously contributions from the natural sciences—and particular research on human cognition—which demonstrate that any separation of the mind and the body is entirely untenable. The author provides suggestions for how humanists might begin to utilize these scientific discoveries without conceding that science has the last word on morality, religion, art, and literature. Calling into question such deeply entrenched dogmas as the "blank slate" theory of nature, strong social constructivism, and the ideal of disembodied reason, Slingerland replaces the human-sciences divide with a more integrated approach to the study of culture. --
Introduction
Part I. Exorcising the Ghost in the Machine:
1. The disembodied mind
2. They live among us
3. Pulling the plug
Part II. Embodying Culture:
4. Embodying culture
Part III. Defending Vertical Integration:
5. Defending the empirical
6. Who's afraid of reductionism?
Conclusion.
Edward Slingerland, University of British Columbia, Vancouver - taught in the School of Religion and Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures at USC.... currently Associate Professor of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia and is Canada Research Chair in Chinese Thought and Embodied Cognition. His previous books include The Annalects of Confucius and Effortless Action: Wu-wei as Conceptual Metaphor and Spiritual Ideal in Early China, which won the American Academy of Religion's 2003 Best First Book in the History of Religions Award. -- downloaded Intro
books  kindle-available  downloaded  humanities  philosophy_of_social_science  cognition  mind  philosophy_of_religion  human_nature  Chinese_thought  embodied_cognition  naturalism  reductionism  postmodern  two_cultures  constructivism  cultural_history  religious_history  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Francesco Guala - Understanding Institutions: The Science and Philosophy of Living Together. (2016) | Princeton University Press
Understanding Institutions proposes a new unified theory of social institutions that combines the best insights of philosophers and social scientists who have written on this topic. Francesco Guala presents a theory that combines the features of three influential views of institutions: as equilibria of strategic games, as regulative rules, and as constitutive rules. Guala explains key institutions like money, private property, and marriage, and develops a much-needed unification of equilibrium- and rules-based approaches. Although he uses game theory concepts, the theory is presented in a simple, clear style that is accessible to a wide audience of scholars working in different fields. Outlining and discussing various implications of the unified theory, Guala addresses venerable issues such as reflexivity, realism, Verstehen, and fallibilism in the social sciences. He also critically analyses the theory of "looping effects" and "interactive kinds" defended by Ian Hacking, and asks whether it is possible to draw a demarcation between social and natural science using the criteria of causal and ontological dependence. Focusing on current debates about the definition of marriage, Guala shows how these abstract philosophical issues have important practical and political consequences. -- Francesco Guala is professor in the Department of Economics, Management, and Quantitative Methods at the University of Milan. He is the author of The Methodology of Experimental Economics and the coeditor, with Daniel Steel, of The Philosophy of Social Science Reader. Intro downloaded to Tab
books  kindle-available  downloaded  social_theory  philosophy_of_social_science  institutions 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Benjamin D. Crowe - Dilthey's Philosophy of Religion in the "Critique of Historical Reason": 1880-1910 (2005) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 66, No. 2 (Apr., 2005), pp. 265-283 -- The core of Dilthey's philosophy of religion during the period here under consideration is what I call the "immanence thesis," which is a "hermeneutical hypothesis" that Dilthey employs in interpreting various phenomena of religious life. The claim is that the subject matter and source of religion is human life rather than a transcendent reality beyond the bounds of human experience. Put another way Dilthey's view is that religious myths, symbols, concepts, and practices are all ways of articulating the immanent meaning or sense of histori-cal life. This thesis grounds the positive role that religious experience and the history of Christianity play in Dilthey's project in the Einleitung, i.e., the grounding of the human sciences in what he later called a "whole, full, and unmutilated" picture of human life. The "immanence thesis" also provides clues regarding Dilthey's own religious position, which, though certainly not Christian (or even theistic) "in the specific sense," nonetheless bears affinities with Romantic pantheism as well as with the "world-view" that Dilthey later calls "objective idealism." -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography-19thC  Germany  German_scholars  Dilthey  religious_belief  religious_practices  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_history  sociology_of_religion  German_historical_school  19thC  immanence  transcendence  theism  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey M. Hodgson - Conceptualizing Capitalism (summary) - Books & ideas - May 2015
Conceptualizing Capitalism: How the Misuse of Key Concepts Impedes our Understanding of Modern Economies -- One of the most commonly used concepts in modern humanities and social sciences, capitalism is also one of the most misunderstood. Away from politically biased takes on the subject, Geoffrey M. Hodgson proposes a new, law-based framework for understanding capitalism. Downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  economic_theory  economic_models  economic_sociology  political_economy  legal_theory  philosophy_of_social_science  capitalism  downloaded 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Fouré Lionel, « Le complément de sujet, de Vincent Descombes. », Le Philosophoire 1/2005
Fouré Lionel, « Le complément de sujet, de Vincent Descombes. », Le Philosophoire 1/2005 (n° 24) , p. 132-135
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-1-page-132.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.024.0132.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
downloaded  phenomenology  deconstruction  existentialism  structuralist  self  French_intellectuals  philosophy_of_language  subjectivity  consciousness  philosophy_of_social_science  reviews  mind  Wittgenstein  books  Peirce  postmodern  poststructuralist 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Lionel Fouré - Entretien avec Vincent Descombes (2005) - Cairn.info
Fouré Lionel, « Entretien avec Vincent Descombes. », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 7-20
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-2-page-7.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.025.0007.
elite_culture  human_nature  comparative_anthropology  modernity  mind  downloaded  epistemology  social_theory  French_intellectuals  philosophy_of_social_science  modernity-emergence  subjectivity  mass_culture  interview  identity  postmodern  neuroscience  nature-nurture 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Poirier - Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet (2003) - Cairn.info
Entretien préparé et réalisé par Fouré Lionel, Entretien préparé et réalisé par Poirier Nicolas, « Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet. », Le Philosophoire 1/2003 (n° 19) , p. 23-37
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2003-1-page-23.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.019.0023.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
representative_institutions  metaphysics  democracy  Gauchet  change-social  Freud  phenomenology  France  social_theory  cultural_critique  psychology  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  poststructuralist  French_intellectuals  19thC  governance  social_sciences-post-WWII  subjectivity  common_good  nation-state  republicanism  Lacan  social_history  philosophy_of_history  modernity  German_Idealism  structuralism  civil_liberties  human_nature  downloaded  epistemology  interview  Foucault  intellectual_history  Lefort  political_participation  epistemology-social  citizenship  community 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Louis Pinto - La philosophie, un « objet » pour le sociologue ? (2013) - Cairn.info
Est-il possible de soumettre la philosophie à un ensemble de démarches usuelles en sociologie, tout en tenant compte de sa spécificité ? Peut-on échapper à l’alternative du réductionnisme externaliste et du renoncement à parler de ce qui est présumé interne ? En quoi une approche sociologique déjouant pareille alternative serait-elle intéressante pour le philosophe ? Pour répondre à de tels questionnements, trois points sont envisagés à travers des illustrations. Le premier point concerne la sociologie (historique) de l’interprétation des textes. Un deuxième point est la façon sociologique d’aborder la question, à laquelle s’attachent traditionnellement les commentateurs, de l’unité et de la cohérence d’une œuvre. Le troisième point est celui du rapport entre classements sociaux et classements théoriques.
downloaded  philosophy_of_social_science  sociology_of_knowledge  methodology  intelligentsia  cultural_capital  social_theory  philosophy_of_science  cultural_authority  article  disciplines  social_capital 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell - Dislocated Rhetoric: The Anomaly of Political Theory | JSTOR The Journal of Politics (2006)
Dislocated Rhetoric: The Anomaly of Political Theory
John G. Gunnell
The Journal of Politics
Vol. 68, No. 4 (Nov., 2006), pp. 771-782
Although the estranged relationship between mainstream political science and much of the subfield of political theory has been properly attributed to developments during the last half of the twentieth century, the roots of this alienation are historically deeper. Many of the conversations of political theory are the progeny of a discursive form that attended the birth of modern social science. This genre was a legitimating rhetoric situated in the interstices of social science, philosophy, and politics. The study of the history of political thought originated as such a rhetoric, and it constitutes a paradigm case for examining the extent to which such a discourse can be transformed into a practice of knowledge. This field has succeeded to a greater extent than certain other elements of political theory which, transfixed by the tension between their practical aspirations and academic context, have become anomalous appendages to the social scientific study of politics. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
downloaded  sociology_of_knowledge  political_philosophy  political_science  political_discourse  behavioralism  article  public_policy  intellectual_history  US_history  disciplines  entre_deux_guerres  public_intellectuals  jstor  social_theory  social_sciences-post-WWII  20thC  philosophy_of_social_science 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
M. Ali Khan, The Irony in/of Economic Theory | JSTOR - MLN Vol. 108, No. 4 (Sep., 1993)
MLN, Vol. 108, No. 4, French Issue (Sep., 1993), pp. 759-803 -- DOI: 10.2307/2904961 -- via Eric Schliesser, attack on lack of reflexive thought by economists about the nature of their own enterprise and the assumptions undergirding their work -- starts with Samuelson's justification of the language of mathematics, and includes discussion of Kenneth Boulding's attack on his own profession for its failure to engage in philosophy of science, referring back positively to Veblen's critique -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_theory  economic_models  history_of_science  history-and-social_sciences  economic_history  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science  mathematization  Methodenstreit  Samuelson  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Beatrice Kobow - How to Do Things with Fictions: Reconsidering Vaihinger for a Philosophy of Social Sciences (2013) | Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44: 201 via Cambridge Realist Workshop
The article reconstructs three key concepts of Hans Vaihinger: the idea of mental fictions as self-contradictory, provisory, conscious, and purposeful; the law of the devolution of ideas stating that an idea oscillates between dogma, hypothesis, or fiction; and the underlying assumption about human consciousness that the psyche constructs thoughts around perceptions like an oyster produces a pearl. In a second, constructive part, these concepts are applied in a discussion of John Searle’s social ontologically extended theory of speech acts. The article introduces the Vaihingerian as-if to Searle’s account of declarations. The explanatory work in a model of social reality as Searle has proposed it rests on the ability to show a necessary connection between collective and individual intentionality facilitated through linguistic structure. The methodological individualism of the model requires that motivational assumptions about collective structures be realized in individual brains. The as-if stance of the declarer provides just this connection. -- Keywords as-if, fiction, status function declarations, double direction of fit, deonticity, collective intentionality, speech act theory, social ontology, Vaihinger, Searle - downloaded to iPhone from http://www.csog.econ.cam.ac.uk/Cambridge-Realist-Workshop/realist-images/HowtoDoThingswithFictions.pdf/at_download/file
article  ontology-social  cognition-social  fiction-cognition  methodological_individualism  critical_realism  perception  downloaded  hypothesis  Searle  as-if  speech_acts  logic  sociology_of_knowledge  cognition  philosophy_of_social_science 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicola Lacey - Jurisprudence, History, and the Institutional Quality of Law (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 919 (2015)
A cri de coeur for putting legal theory and history back together with social theory and empirical social sciences,. -- In the early part of my career, legal history and the history of legal ideas were closed books to me, as I made my way in a field of criminal law scholarship dominated by doctrinal scholarship and by concept-focused philosophical analysis of the foundations of criminal law. These 2 very different paradigms have 1 big thing in common: They tend to proceed as if the main intellectual task is to unearth the deep logic of existing legal doctrines, not infrequently going so far as to read them back onto history, as if things could never have been other than they are. (..)I have increasingly found myself turning to historical resources (1) [to examine] the contingency of particular legal arrangements, and (2) ...to develop causal and other theses about the dynamics which shape them and hence about the role and quality of criminal law as a form of power in modern societies. So, in a sense, I have been using history in support of an analysis driven primarily by the social sciences. (..) it is no accident that all of the great social theorists, from Marx to Foucault via Weber, Durkheim, and Elias, ..have incorporated significant historical elements into their interpretations .... Indeed, without the diachronic perspective provided by history (or the perspective offered by comparative study) we could have no critical purchase on social theory’s characterizations of or causal hypotheses about the dynamics of social systems. Hence, (...) my boundless gratitude to the historians whose meticulous research makes this sort of interpretive social theory possible). -- Lacey is not over-dramatizing -- see the "commentary" from a "legal philosopher" who believes the normative basis of criminal responsibility can be investigated as timeless "moral truths". -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  social_theory  historical_sociology  historical_change  institutions  institutional_change  philosophy_of_law  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_social_science  jurisprudence  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  concepts  morality-conventional  morality-objective  criminal_justice  responsibility  mind  human_nature  norms  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  power  Neoplatonism  neo-Kantian  a_priori  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  evidence  mental_health  social_order  epistemology  epistemology-moral  change-social  change-intellectual  comparative_law  comparative_anthropology  civil_liberties  women-rights  women-property  rights-legal  rights-political  access_to_services  discrimination  legal_culture  legal_system  legal_reasoning  Foucault  Marx  Weber  Durkheim  metaethics  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
K. Vela Velupillai - Conning Variations on the Theme of in :: SSRN - Journal of Economic Surveys, Vol. 21, Issue 3, pp. 466-505, July 2007
K. Vela Velupillai, National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG) - Department of Economics; Università degli Studi di Trento - Department of Economics and Management. -- The mathematization of economics is almost exclusively in terms of the mathematics of real analysis which, in turn, is founded on set theory (and the axiom of choice) and orthodox mathematical logic. In this paper I try to point out that this kind of mathematization is replete with economic infelicities. The attempt to extract these infelicities is in terms of three main examples and one general discussion: dynamics, policy and rational expectations and learning are the examples; a game theory without subjectivism, based on the axiom of determinateness, is discussed in general terms. The focus is on the role and reliance of standard fixed-point theorems in orthodox mathematical economics. -- Pages in PDF File: 40 -- via Lars Syll -- didn't download -- added to My Briefcase
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  mathematics  economic_theory  economic_models  deduction  rational_expectations  game_theory  mathematization 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Anne-Lise Rey, ed. - Méthode et histoire - Quelle histoire font les historiens des sciences et des techniques? (2014) | Classiques Garnier, coll.Histoire et philosophie des sciences
Les méthodes utilisées pour analyser la science d'hier et d'aujourd'hui peuvent-elles s'enrichir du débat, puis du dialogue des unes avec les autres? C'est le pari de cet ouvrage qui présente la pluralité des approches méthodologiques en histoire des sciences et des techniques et interroge son épistémologie. -- Can the methods used to analyse the science of yesterday and today be mutually enriched through debate and dialogue with each other? That is the wager of this book which presents the plurality of methodological approaches within the history of science and technology, and interrogates its epistemology. -- ISBN 978-2-8124-1419-0 -- 513 pages -- from TOC looks like several very interesting papers
books  history_of_science  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  epistemology-history  epistemology 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Turner, review essay - Searle's Social Reality | - Academia.edu
This is a survey and critique of Searle's thinking about social norms and collective intentionality up to 1999 or so, and provides an account of why his views evolved as they did. The essay also argues against the account of normativity that Searle espouses at this point and later revises.
Research Interests: Social Ontology, Collective Intentionality, John R. Searle, John Searle, and collective intentionality, Searle -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  social_theory  ontology-social  constructivism  Searle  intentionality-collective  norms  normativity  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_social_science  speech-act  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Turner - Max Weber and the Dispute Over Reason and Value (Routledge, 1984) | bookmark for book abstract - Academia.edu
The problem of the nature of values and the relation between values and rationality is one of the defining issues of twentieth-century thought and Max Weber was one of the defining figures in the debate. In this book, Turner and Factor consider the development of the dispute over Max Weber's contribution to this discourse, by showing how Weber's views have been used, revised and adapted in new contexts. The story of the dispute is itself fascinating, for it cuts across the major political and intellectual currents of the twentieth century, from positivism, pragmatism and value-free social science, through the philosophy of Jaspers and Heidegger, to Critical Theory and the revival of Natural Right and Natural Law. As Weber's ideas were imported to Britain and America, they found new formulations and new adherents and critics and became absorbed into different traditions and new issues. This book was first published in 1984 by Routledge. -- Research Interests: Ethics, Political Theory, Continental Philosophy, Max Weber (Philosophy), Social and Political Philosophy, and Max Weber
books  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Weber  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  epistemology  epistemology-social  positivism  rationality  values  fact-value  constructivism  pragmatism  German_scholarship  German_historical_school  hermeneutics  Heidegger  Frankfurt_School  critical_theory  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard N. Langlois - Knowledge, Consumption, and Endogenous Growth - January 2000 :: SSRN
University of Connecticut - Department of Economics -- working paper for Knowledge, Consumption, and Endogenous Growth. Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Vol. 11, No. 1. http://ssrn.com/abstract=257785 -- Abstract of article: In neoclassical theory, knowledge generates increasing returns-and therefore growth-because it is a public good that can be costlessly reused once created. In fact, however, much knowledge in the economy is actually tacit and not easily transmitted-and thus not an obvious source of increasing returns. Several writers have responded to this alarming circumstances by affirming hopefully that knowledge today is increasingly codified, general, and abstract-and increasingly less tacit. This paper disputes such a trend. But all is not lost: for knowledge does not have to be codified to be reused and therefore to generate economic growth. -- Abstract of paper adds -- This essay takes a skeptical view of the proposition that we are experiencing greater codification hand in hand with modern technology and economic growth. ... [and] an equally skeptical view ...that only codified knowledge, and never tacit knowledge, can generate economic growth. Knowledge can be externalized and made less idiosyncratic in ways that do not necessarily involve codification. Knowledge is structure. And knowledge can be externalized beyond an individual creator by being imbedded either in machines and other physical technology or in various kinds of social or behavioral structures that I will broadly call institutions. Using a wonderful 1912 essay by Wesley Clair Mitchell as a starting point, I examine, as a kind of case study, the way in which knowledge is embedded and shared in consumption -- an important and neglected aspect of the process of economic growth. -- Pages in PDF 38 -- Keywords: Tacit knowledge, Increasing returns, Growth theory, Knowledge reuse, Codification -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  institutions  institutional_economics  firms-theory  firms-structure  knowledge  knowledge_economy  know-how  public_goods  epistemology-social  technology  technology_transfer  technology-adoption  economic_growth  economic_sociology  Innovation  increasing_returns  bibliography  consumption  consumers  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Raymond Boudon - "Sociology that Really Matters" - Inaugural Lecture 2001, European Academy of Sociology
Responding to claims that sociology isn't a "science" or that it goes off the rails when its pretensions to scientific status dominate, he discusses 4 ideal-types of sociology -- Cognitive, Expressive, Descriptive (cameral) and Critical. The first, which he claims fits a range of the most important theories in philosophy of science, is represented by Tocqueville, Weber and Durkheim. The produced explanations of puzzling phenomena that linked micro and macro - why particular actions or choices were rational for classes of actors in the sense that the meaning was consistent with their beliefs and experiences given their position in social structures and the tools they had available to understand and control their situation consistent with their values. This type of causal explanation can be used, elaborated and built on for cumulative knowledge. The more popular bestseller works tend to be expressive and/or critical - speaking to people's current experiences, felt anxieties, or ideological orientation so they are useful, but not necessarily true - he gives Foucault on prisons as an example. The descriptive, which is directed towards policy ("cameral" in Schumpeter) grows increasingly dominant as we become increasingly data sensitive and driven. Topics tend to come in waves based on issues that have become prominent and a focus of political debates, social movements, etc. Thus only the cognitive is a truly scientific contribution to cumulative knowledge. Interesting remarks on the type of methodological individualism that's central to the cognitive but both different and sometimes inappropriate in the other ideal-types.
Scribd  social_theory  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  social_sciences  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_science  Tocqueville  Weber  Durkheim  Popper  positivism  individualism-methodology  causation-social  structuralist  agency  agency-structure  Foucault 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Lewis - Notions of Order and Process in Hayek: The Significance of Emergence (Cambridge Journal of Economics, 2014) :: SSRN
DOI: 10.1093/cje/beu043 -- King's College London - Department of Political Economy -- This article explores the notions of order and process to which Friedrich Hayek subscribed. It is argued that a satisfactory understanding of Hayek’s conceptions of ‘order’ and ‘process’ — and in particular a clear understanding of those how the two concepts relate to each other in his scheme of thought — requires an appreciation of the ontological categories of ‘emergence’ and ‘emergent properties.’ Ultimately, for Hayek the capacity of liberal market economies to co-ordinate people’s actions in the face of tacit and dispersed knowledge is an emergent property that arises only when people’s interactions are governed by certain sets of rules. This static analysis of the co-ordinative powers of the market as an emergent property of a given system of rules must be supplemented by a dynamic account of the process through which the set of rules in question comes into being. Hayek provides such an account in his account of society as developing through a multi-level evolutionary process. Key implications of Hayek’s accounts of order and process for debates about the co-ordinative powers of free market economies are drawn out. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 27 -- Keywords: Hayek, order, process, emergence, ontology, Austrian economics -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  social_theory  ontology-social  markets  markets-structure  social_order  emergence  heterodox_economics  Austrian_economics  evolution-social  social_process  coordination  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Lewis, review essay - Varieties of Emergence: Minds, Markets and Novelty (STUDIES IN EMERGENT ORDER, VOL 4 (2011): 170-192) :: SSRN
King's College London - Department of Political Economy -- This paper is an essay review of Richard Wagner's book, 'Mind, Society and Human Action'. It focuses on the ontological presuppositions of Wagner's account of of the social world (that is, on what Wanger's account presupposes about the nature of social reality). Issue discussed include the following: the nature of emergence and emergent properties; spontaneous order, and the shortcomings of Walrasian general equilibrium theory in modelling it; the significance of the impact of social interaction on peolpe's preferences and dispositions; and the role of novelty and innovation in Wagner's account of the market process. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 23 -- Keywords: Emergence, complexity, Austrian Economics, ontology, spontaneous order, novelty -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  review  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  social_theory  ontology-social  mind  social_order  social_process  preferences  emergence  equilibrium  heterodox_economics  Innovation  complexity  economic_models  utility  behavioral_economics  markets-psychology  markets  methodology  methodology-qualitative  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Lewis - Certainly Not! A Critical Realist Recasting of Ludwig Von Mises’s Methodology of the Social Sciences (Journal of Economic Methodology (2010), 17(3): 277-99) :: SSRN
King's College London - Department of Political Economy -- This paper focuses on Ludwig von Mises methodological apriorism. It uses Wittgenstein’s private language argument as the basis for a critique of Mises’s claim to have found apodictically certain foundations for economic analysis. It is argued instead that Mises’s methodology is more fruitfully viewed as an exercise in social ontology, the objective of which is to outline key features of the socio-economic world that social scientific research ought to take into account if it is to be fruitful. The implications of this perspective for three key methodological issues, namely the relationship between theory and history, the possibility of naturalism, and the place of Austrian economics within the discipline of economics as a whole, are brought out. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 22 -- Keywords: Austrian economics; Ludwig von Mises; praxeology; private language -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  social_theory  ontology-social  Mises  apriori  Wittgenstein  philosophy_of_language  economic_theory  economic_models  heterodox_economics  Austrian_economics  methodology  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Lewis - Tempered Steele? On the Merits of Critical Realism and the ‘Ontological Turn’ in Economics (2011: Critical Review, 23: 207-30) :: SSRN
King's College London - Department of Political Economy -- The discipline of economics can benefit a more explicit, systematic and sustained concern with ontology, that is, with the philosophical analysis of the nature of the social world. Contrary to the argument advanced in an article recently published in Critical Review (Steele 2005), the ontological analysis provided by critical realism can assist in the development of fruitful economic analysis in a number of ways: (i) by helping to identify research methods suitable for analysing economic issues; (ii) by promoting the development of key substantive economic concepts; and (iii) by helping to reveal and resolve inconsistencies in existing research. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 30 -- Keywords: Economics, ontology, critical realism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_sociology  social_theory  economic_theory  ontology-social  critical_realism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Lewis - Far from a Nihilistic Crowd: The Theoretical Contribution of Radical Subjectivist Austrian Economics ( Review of Austrian Economics, 2011, vol. 24: 185-98) :: SSRN
King's College London - Department of Political Economy -- This paper compares and contrasts the hermeneutic turn advocated by Don Lavoie in this 1985 essay on "The Interpretive Dimension of Economics" with the ontological turn that was gathering momentum amongst other groups of heterodox economists at about the same time. It is argued that an explicit focus on ontological issues can complement and support the ‘interpretive turn’, most notably by helping to show that the charge of nihilism that are sometimes levelled against Lavoie and his followers is unwarranted. The argument is illustrated by a case study of one of the inspirations of, and contributors to, Lavoie’s project, namely Ludwig Lachmann. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 20 -- Keywords: Austrian economics, hermeneutics, social order, nihilism, social ontology, emergence, Ludwig Lachmann, Don Lavoie. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_sociology  social_theory  economic_theory  hermeneutics  social_order  ontology-social  emergence  Austrian_economics  heterodox_economics  critical_realism  nihilism  intellectual_history  20thC  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Lewis - Peter Berger and His Critics: The Significance of Emergence ( Society (2010), vol. 47: 213-20) :: SSRN
King's College London - Department of Political Economy -- Peter Berger has attempted to develop an account of the relationship between social structure and human agency that navigates a middle way between voluntarism and determinism. Berger’s approach has been criticised by social theorists for reproducing, rather than transcending, the very errors of voluntarism and determinism that he strives to avoid. However, the critics have focused on Berger’s explicit, meta-theoretical pronouncements about the nature or ontology of the social world, whilst ignoring the more sophisticated account of the structure agency relationship that is implicit in, and presupposed by, his substantive sociological research. The notions of ‘emergence’ and ‘emergent properties’ are used to develop an account of the structure-agency relationship that is consistent with Berger’s concrete sociological work, whilst avoiding the shortcomings of his explicit reflections about the nature of the social world. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 21 -- Keywords: Berger, social ontology, structure-agency relationship -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  social_theory  structure  agency-structure  agency  social_order  ontology-social  emergence  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Lewis - Turning to Reality? A Review Essay on Tony Lawson's "Reorienting Economics" (2009) :: SSRN
King's College London - Department of Political Economy -- This essays explores various aspects of Tony Lawson's claim that the discipline of economics would benefit from a more explicit, systematic and sustained concern with ontology, that is with (philosophical analysis of) the nature of (what exists in) the social world, than it has hitherto displayed. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 13 -- Keywords: Social ontology, critical realism, heterodox economics, Austrian economics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  social_theory  critical_realism  philosophy_of_social_science  ontology-social  heterodox_economics  Austrian_economics  economic_theory  political_economy  methodology  methodology-qualitative  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul A. Lewis and Emily Chamlee-Wright - Social Embeddedness, Social Capital and the Market Process: An Introduction to the Special Issue on "Austrian Economics, Economic Sociology and Social Capital" (2008:: SSRN
Paul A. Lewis, King's College London - Department of Political Economy -- Emily Chamlee-Wright, Beloit College - Department of Economics and Management -- Two of the most influential concepts in social science over the past two decades have been 'social embeddedness' and 'social capital'. This essay introduces a special issue of the Review of Austrian Economics in which those concepts are examined from the perspective provided by Austrian economics. In particular, the contributors consider the compatibility of notions of 'embeddedness' and 'social capital' with the Austrian theory of the market process and explore whether reformulating those concepts in the light of Austrian ideas can contribute fresh insights. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 26 -- Keywords: Austrian economics, economic sociology, trust, social capital -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_sociology  social_theory  economic_theory  embeddedness  social_capital  trust  Austrian_economics  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Cambridge Realist Workshop - Tony Lawson - On the Nature of the Corporation (Feb 2015) — The Cambridge Social Ontology Group
The Nature of the Corporation...... And why Economics, including Economic Philosophy, and Social Theory more widely, need a turn to Social Ontology. -- paper distributed before Feb 23 seminar -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_theory  economic_sociology  social_theory  corporations  philosophy_of_social_science  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Sven Ove Hansson -Risk (updated 2011) | Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Since the 1970s, studies of risk have grown into a major interdisciplinary field of research. Although relatively few philosophers have focused their work on risk, there are important connections between risk studies and several philosophical subdisciplines. This entry summarizes the most well-developed of these connections and introduces some of the major topics in the philosophy of risk. It consists of six sections dealing with the definition of risk and with treatments of risk related to epistemology, the philosophy of science, the philosophy of technology, ethics, and the philosophy of economics.
1. Defining risk [including objective vs subjective and risk vs uncertainty - the latter comparison mostly formalized in decision tgeory]
2. Epistemology
3. Philosophy of science
4. Philosophy of technology
5. Ethics
6. Risk in economic analysis
Related Entries -- causation: in the law | causation: probabilistic | consequentialism | contractarianism | economics, philosophy of | game theory | luck: justice and bad luck | scientific knowledge: social dimensions of | technology, philosophy of
philosophy  epistemology  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  causation  causation-social  probability  Bayesian  moral_philosophy  utilitarianism  utility  rights-legal  game_theory  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_theory  behavioral_economics  financial_economics  sociology_of_knowledge  philosophy_of_law  risk  risk-mitigation  risk_management  uncertainty  rational_choice  rationality-economics 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Miika Vähämaa - Secrets, Errors and Mathematics: Reconsidering the Role of Groups in Social Epistemology « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (9): 36-51 (2013)
Special Issue 2: On the Future Direction of Social Epistemology (SE) -- This paper claims that analytic social epistemology (ASE) has slowed, if not halted, the development of SE and the social sciences in general. I argue that SE is unavoidably subjective due to its collective nature. SE as it is generally understood, consists of the study of socially shared propositions and how they are understood by those communities. However, socially shared propositions of knowledge are not constrained by propositional logic but are rather enabled by the limited quanta of reason and logic embedded in linguistic structure. From the view of Goldman and his supporters , “real” knowledge is constrained by propositional logic, which is derived from language and is constructed in social settings. This view errs in its attempt to collapse social knowledge into propositional logic, downplaying the many social groups and practices that produce, create, restore and distort knowledge. The “subjective” and group-oriented nature of SE is demonstrated in this text by examples of secrets, errors and mathematics as discrete social domains in which knowledge is created and maintained. Examples in both philosophy and social sciences are important, since they reveal the weaknesses of strict ASE. A simple real-life example may be appealing to emotions and personal experiences of life whereas Wittgensteinian truth tables are rarely matters of personal attachment to anyone. The social in SE can only be properly considered from the viewpoint of social groups. Following an argument presented by Fuller, I show that “knowledge” is not a self-maintaining quality of human life, but rather a qualia that is regenerated situationally. All epistemic activities build upon such reorganization as it is conducted within social groups which seek to regenerate knowledge both to make sense of the world and to make sense of their own selves. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  social_theory  epistemology  epistemology-social  epistemology-naturalism  analytical_philosophy  social_psychology  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_science  logic  knowledge  constructivism  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Dunham, review - W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 22, 2014
This volume is a hugely important contribution to scholarship on 19thC philosophy. ...for many important aspects of British philosophy in the 19thC the scholarship is almost non-existent. As Mander notes in the introduction, when we hear "19thC philosophy", we are more likely to think of 'the great systems of continental thought'. This volume shows that the British tradition boasts a remarkably rich and varied range of philosophical resources, and that it deserves the level of scholarship that the British traditions of the 17thC and 18thC are beginning to enjoy. In a review of another recent volume on 19thC philosophy Frederick Beiser argued that 'No period ... stands in more need of an original historian than 19thC philosophy. The standard tropes and figures do no justice to its depths, riches, and powers'. One of this present volume's greatest virtues is that it answers Beiser's plea as well as offering an impressive number of very original contributions.... It does an outstanding job of introducing a wide range of philosophical figures and ideas that will be unknown... It also includes excellent contributions on well-known philosophers and orientates the reader to the secondary literature.... The... volume provides a clear and comprehensive picture of how 19thC philosophy was practised and understood during the period. -- The Handbook has 6 parts: (1) Logic and Scientific Method; (2) Metaphysics; (3) Science and Philosophy; (4) Ethical, Social, and Political Thought; (5) Religious Philosophy; and, (6) The Practice of Philosophy. As Mander states, these classifications come from our contemporary perspective, and we should not expect the work of 19thC philosophers to neatly fit within them. Nonetheless, the individual authors [present] the aspects of a philosopher or school.. that fits within these categories while ... making clear how these aspects fit within a larger philosophical perspective ....
books  reviews  amazon.com  find  intellectual_history  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Common_Sense  German_Idealism  British_Idealism  Kant  Hegelian  Mill  Sidgwick  Marx  Newman_JH  metaphysics  epistemology  empiricism  mind  perception  ideas-theories  idealism-transcendental  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  social_theory  Coleridge  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  science-and-religion  scientific_method  Darwinism  evolution  evolution-as-model  evolutionary_biology  evolution-social  Spencer_Herbert  political_philosophy  intelligentsia  elite_culture  professionalization  university  Evernote 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
George Steinmetz - William Sewell's "Logics of History" as a Framework for an Integrated Social Science | JSTOR: Social Science History, Vol. 32, No. 4 (Winter, 2008), pp. 535-553
This essay surveys the contributions of William H. Sewell Jr.'s "Logics of History" and concludes that the book sketches a compelling agenda for an integrated historical social science. The author first summarizes Sewell's ontological and epistemological claims concerning social structure and event, history and temporality, and sociohistorical causality. The author then discusses five main areas in which ambiguities in Sewell's approach might be clarified or his arguments pushed farther. These concern (1) the relationship between historical event and traumatic event; (2) the idea of the unprecedented event or "antistructure"; (3) the theory of semiosis underlying Sewell's notion of a multiplicity of structures; and (4) the compatibilities and differences between the concepts of structure and mechanism (here the author argues that social structures are the distinctive "mechanisms" of the human or social sciences). Finally, (5) Sewell's call for "a more robust sense of the social" in historical writing locates the "social" mainly at the level of the metafield of power, or what regulation theory calls the mode of regulation; the author suggests a possible integration of this society-level concept with Pierre Bourdieu 's theory of semiautonomous fields. -- This is a Duke journal that only uses jstor for posting abstracts for the entire history of the journal
article  find  libraries  social_theory  historiography  historical_sociology  philosophy_of_social_science  methodology  mechanisms-social_theory  structure  event  causation-social  power  levels_of_analyis  Bourdieu  fields  ontology-social  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Tilly - Contentious Choices [overview of Special Issue: Current Routes to the Study of Contentious Politics and Social Change] | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 33, No. 3/4 (Jun. - Aug., 2004), pp. 473-481
Articles in this special issue address two choices faced by all analysts of contentious politics: 1) which features of political processes the analysts single out for description and explanation and 2) what sorts of conceptualizations and explanations of those processes they propose. On the first point, the articles split among a) variation and change in actors' strategies as well as consequences of those strategies, b) longer-term transformations of political context and consequences, c) grounding of contention in local circumstances. On the second, they choose among a) very general explanatory frameworks, b) particular causal mechanisms that produce similar effects across a wide variety of political circumstances, and c) explanation by means of careful attachment of episodes to local and regional settings. The articles therefore illustrate broad challenges in current studies of political contention. -- a late methodological essay on approaches to contentious politics and mechanisms, explanation, causation, generalizations etc in Tilly's career -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  philosophy_of_social_science  methodology  mechanisms-social_theory  causation-social  Tilly  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
William M. Dugger and William Waller - Radical Institutionalism: From Technological to Democratic Instrumentalism | JSTOR: Review of Social Economy, Vol. 54, No. 2 (SUMMER 1996), pp. 169-189
This article explains the nature and significance of radical institutionalism. Radical institutionalism does not represent a break with the institutionalist paradigm, but an attempt to move it beyond its outmoded, Ayresian philosophical foundation. Radical institutionalism involves the introduction of three new elements into the contemporary stream of institutionalist works. These three new elements include an emphasis on Veblenian fundamentals, a shift in research interests, and a reconsideration of the philosophical foundations of inquiry. -- interesting institutional bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  social_sciences-post-WWII  postmodern  critical_theory  social_theory  political_economy  institutional_economics  evolution-social  epistemology-social  philosophy_of_social_science  Veblen  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Asad Zaman - Normative Foundations of Scarcity | WEA Pedagogy Blog - September 2014
In my paper of this name (Real-World Economics Review, no. 61, September 2012) I show that the apparently objective concept of scarcity is built on THREE normative assumptions - contra the conventional assertion that economics is a POSITIVE study of facts of our economic existence, and does not involve value judgement. The three normative pillars on which scarcity stands as the fundamental principle of economics are: ONE: Private Property - If there is a cultural norm of sharing public resources, then the issue of scarcity would not arise (or at least, would be much less frequent). In conventional economics, the Pareto principle embodies the normative idea that the right to property takes precedence over the right to life. If a poor man is starving, the rich man is NOT obligated to provide for him. -- TWO: Consumer Sovereignty - Economists argue the we SHOULD not question consumer preferences as to where they come from and whether they are legitimate. Also, economists argue that we SHOULD design an economic system which fulfills ALL preferences (to the extent possible). The noxious NORMATIVE idea that the right of the super-rich to private jets trumps the right of the poor hungry child to bread is what leads to scarcity becoming the foundation of economics. -- THREE: WELFARE Lies in fulfillment of desires - Again this is a normative judgment about the purpose of life, which is taken to be fulfillment of desires. The normative preference of the economists for the homo economicus model creates an unhappy and lonely society, for those who buy into these assumptions. Abandoning these hidden normative commitments of economics, by allowing for more public spaces and common property, creating norms of social responsiblity, and encouraging simple lifestyles would remove scarcity as the central economic problem. QUOTE FROM FDR: “But while they prate of economic laws, men and women are starving. We must lay hold of the fact that economic laws are not made by nature. They are made by human beings. “
paper  philosophy_of_social_science  values  positivism  economic_theory  scarcity  economic_culture  property  Pareto_principle  utility  rationality-economics  normativity 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Alex Rosenberg - Paul Krugman’s Philosophy of Economics, and What It Should Be » 3:AM Magazine
All the New Classical economists need to defend the dominant “paradigm” in economics against Krugman and other dissenters are the tools he grants them—maximization and equilibrium. -- Rosenberg then goes into Keynes, Knight, Soros re uncertainty and reflexivity. Comes up with too strong a conclusion that since economics is an historical science, you can't make predictions. But there's a big difference between predictions of a long term outcome, or even a specific business cycle and yet have history-confirmed principles that, e.g. fiscal policy should be countercyclical or that a balance sheet recession is unlikely to push prices up, and monetary policy loses traction so it's not going to generate inflation, or a monetary union without a fiscal union and consolidated banking regulation is likely to blow up. Worse, Rosenberg is reiterating the false myth that the Keynesian thinking couldn't explain the 1970s and the New Classicals could. History contradicts the macro implications of EMH, Ricardian equivalence, RBC, etc. Actually it was Friedman monetarism that "explained" the 1970s, and when Friedman theory was attempted in the 1980s it had to be abandoned since it simply didn't work. The New Classicals were initially along for the monetarism ride and consolidated ideologically in academia by ignoring real world failures, which were relatively unimportant during the Great Moderation which they claimed to have produced or at least understood.
economic_history  intellectual_history  economic_theory  macroeconomics  microfoundations  neoclassical_economics  Keynesian  political_economy  philosophy_of_social_science  methodology  monetarism  monetary_policy  fiscal_policy  causation-social  mechanism  systems_theory  complexity  risk-systemic  uncertainty  probability 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, by Simon Blackburn | Answers.com
The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, by Simon Blackburn, Oxford University Press
This dictionary covers every aspect of philosophy from Aristotle to Zen. Entries include biographies of famous and influential philosophers, in-depth analysis of philosophical terms and concepts, a chronology of philosophical events from antiquity to the present day, and coverage of themes from Chinese, Indian, Islamic and Jewish philosophy.
books  etexts  reference  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_religion  metaphysics  metaethics  epistemology  ontology  logic  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  political_philosophy 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Friedrich August von Hayek - Prize Lecture: The Pretence of Knowledge -- Nobel Prize 1974
MLA style: "Friedrich August von Hayek - Prize Lecture: The Pretence of Knowledge". Nobelprize.org. Nobel Media AB 2014. Web. 9 Aug 2014. <http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/economic-sciences/laureates/1974/hayek-lecture.html> -- uses stagflation to attack demand side theories with a hint of liquidationism -- more interesting is his take on Popper and limits to positivism and quantitative methodologies -- can theirize certain patterns and examine empirical evidence re those patterns, but can't predict quantitative outcomes -- though stresses complexity, seems to be an issue of incomplete data (by definition inaccessible since it's in the heads of masses of heterogeneous agents reacting to their own, constantly changing, limited information) rather than emergent properties and complexity dynamics
intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  social_sciences-post-WWII  economic_theory  markets  information-markets  Labor_markets  unemployment  inflation  economic_policy  demand  empiricism  uncertainty  epistemology  positivism  quantitative_methods  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  Popper  Hayek  determinism  emergence  equilibrium  complexity  EF-add  scientism  scientific_method  sociology_of_knowledge 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Hayek on Prediction in the Social Sciences | Social Democracy for the 21st Century: A Post Keynesian Perspective: August 2014
Lord Keynes looking at Hayek's 1974 Nobel lecture -- If Hayek is saying here that the natural sciences could exactly predict everything about the game given enough information (including presumably the brain states of human players), then he is committed to the view that the world is completely deterministic, and that our uncertainty about it is merely epistemic and caused by the insuperable difficulties of gathering enough information for calculations. In contrast to this, Post Keynesians emphasise the ontological nature of uncertainty, and this commits them to a philosophical position quite different from that of Hayek. The notion of “spontaneous ordering forces” that bring order to markets (like Smith’s “invisible hand” metaphor) seems overrated too. “Spontaneous ordering forces” must be understood as emergent properties. That complex social and economic systems can display emergent properties that result in greater stability is not in doubt, but other emergent properties (e.g., the outcome of the paradox of thrift or distress selling in a market crash) can also be highly deleterious and destabilising. Hayek badly neglected such destabilising forces in his rhetoric about markets. -- see bookmark for html of lecture on Nobel Prize site
20thC  intellectual_history  economic_theory  macroeconomics  microeconomics  markets  information-markets  equilibrium  emergence  laisser-faire  Hayek  uncertainty  probability  determinism  Post-Keynesian  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  scientism  scientific_method  scientific_culture  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Decline of Natural Right [chapter] (2009) :: SSRN in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY, Allen Wood and Songsuk Susan Hahn, eds., Cambridge University Press
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-38 -- What happened to the doctrine of natural right in the 19thC? We know that it flourished in the 17thC and 18thC. We know that something like it - the doctrine of human rights and new forms of social contract theory - flourished again in the second half of the 20thC and continues to flourish in the 21stC. In between there was a period of decline and hibernation - ... in which to invoke natural right was always to invite intellectual ridicule and accusations of political irresponsibility. Thus article asks: How far can the decline of natural right in the 19thC be attributed to the reaction against the revolution in France? How far it was the effect of independent streams of thought, like positivism and historicism? Why was radical thought so ambivalent about natural right throughout the 19thC, and why was socialist thought in particular inclined to turn its back on it? As a framework for thought, natural right suffered a radical decline in the social and political sciences. But things were not so clear in jurisprudence, and natural right lived on to a much riper old age in the writings of some prominent economists. What is it about this theory that allowed it to survive in these environments, when so much of the rest of intellectual endeavor in the 19thC was toxic or inhospitable to it. Finally, I shall ask how far American thought represents an exception to all of this. Why and to what extent did the doctrine survive as a way of thinking in the United States, long after it had lost its credibility elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  natural_law  natural_rights  human_rights  counter-revolution  historicism  positivism  legal_theory  nationalism  national_interest  conservatism  socialism  social_contract  relativism  revolutions  1848_revolutions  French_Revolution  anticlerical  Bentham  Burke  Hume  Jefferson  Kant  Locke  Marx  Mill  Savigny  Spencer_Herbert  George_Henry  US_society  American_exceptionalism  liberalism  social_theory  social_sciences  Social_Darwinism  social_order  mass_culture  political_participation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter, Michael Weisberg - Why Evolutionary Biology is (so Far) Irrelevant to Law (2007, last revised 2014) :: SSRN
U of Texas Law, Law & Econ Research Paper No. 81 -- U of Texas Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 89 -- We argue that as the actual science stands today, evolutionary biology offers nothing to help with questions about legal regulation of behavior. -- Evolutionary accounts are etiological accounts of how a trait evolved. [A]n account of causal etiology could be relevant to law if (1) the account of causal etiology is scientifically well-confirmed, and (2) there is an explanation of how the well-confirmed etiology bears on questions of development (the Environmental Gap Objection). ....the accounts of causal etiology that might be relevant are not remotely well-confirmed by scientific standards. We argue, in particular, that (a) evolutionary psychology is not entitled to assume selectionist accounts of human behaviors, (b) the assumptions necessary for the selectionist accounts to be true are not warranted by standard criteria for theory choice, and (c) only confusions about levels of explanation of human behavior create the appearance that understanding the biology of behavior is important. We also note that no response to the Environmental Gap Objection has been proffered. In the concluding section of the article, we turn directly to the work of Prof Owen Jones, a leading proponent of the relevance of evolutionary biology to law, and show that he does not come to terms with any of the fundamental problems identified in this article. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_theory  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  evolution-social  evolutionary_biology  evo_psych  causation-social  causation-evolutionary  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"Legal Realism as Theory of Law" by Michael Steven Green
Michael Steven Green, Legal Realism as Theory of Law, 46 Wm. & Mary L. Rev. 1915 (2005), http://scholarship.law.wm.edu/wmlr/vol46/iss6/2 -- top of "downloaded" on bepress "Jurisprudence Commons" section -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  legal_theory  legal_history  legal_realism  philosophy_of_social_science  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little - Understanding Society: Why emergence? March 2014
It is a fair question to ask, whether the concept of emergence is perhaps less important than it initially appears to be. Part of the interest in emergence seems to derive from the impulse by sociologists and philosophers to try to show that there is a legitimate level of the world that is "social", and to reject the more extreme versions of reductionism. -- He gets very close to emergence, but is clearly uncomfortable with wholly autonomous ontology without some indications of explanatory causal mechanisms at lower level.
social_theory  ontology-social  emergence  philosophy_of_social_science  sociology  institutions  social_process  causation-social  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taylor - Foucault on Freedom and Truth | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 12, No. 2 (May, 1984), pp. 152-183
Downloaded pdf to Note -- 1st in what became a back and forth with Connolly -- maybe I'll figure out Taylor and Connolly if not Foucault. No bibliography on jstor information page but lengthy article.
article  jstor  political_philosophy  social_theory  moral_philosophy  epistemology  philosophy_of_social_science  freedom  autonomy  Taylor_Charles  Foucault  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - On Some Problems with Weak Intentionalism for Intellectual History [forum re Bevir's Logic] | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2, May, 2002
This paper argues that the notion of weak intentionalism in Mark Bevir's The Logic of the History of Ideas is incoherent. Bevir's proposal for weak intentionalism as procedural individualism relies on the argument that the object of study for historians of ideas is given by the beliefs that are expressed by individuals (whether authors or readers) since these beliefs constitute the historical meaning of the work for those individuals as historical figures. Historical meanings are thus hermeneutic meanings. In the case of insincere, unconscious, and irrational beliefs, however, the beliefs expressed by individuals are not in fact their actual beliefs, and their actual beliefs are now taken to be those expressed by the works. It thus turns out that it is not the beliefs expressed by individuals that are the object of study for historians but the works themselves, since the overriding requirement for historians of ideas is to "make sense of their material" and it is this requirement that determines whether or not the beliefs are to be construed as expressed by individuals or by the works. But once it is accepted that the beliefs that are the object of study for historians are expressed by the works and not by individuals, the original argument that such beliefs are historical hermeneutic meanings for historical figures no longer applies. The argument for weak intentionalism thus turns out to be incoherent. Bevir's argument fails to establish that the object of study for the history of ideas is external to the works, and the attempted distinction between interpreting a work and reading a text also fails. -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  philosophy_of_history  historiography  philosophy_of_social_science  historicism  intentionality  hermeneutics  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Marilyn Silverman and P. H. Gulliver - 'Common Sense' and 'Governmentality': Local Government in Southeastern Ireland, 1850-1922 | JSTOR: The Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, Vol. 12, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 109-127
Early paradigms in political anthropology identified formal government councils as a subject for cross-cultural comparison (structural functionalism) or as a political resource for goal-orientated actors (transactionalism). Recent concerns with power and regulation can also profit from a focus on local-level government councils by using them to explore the conceptual and empirical linkages between 'common sense' and 'governmentality'. In this article, as a point of entry, we highlight a key moment in the history of Britain's colonial and hegemonic project in Ireland, namely the orderly administrative transition from colony to state which occurred in Ireland after 1919. By constructing a historical narrative of a local government council in the southeast after 1850, and of its material and discursive bases, we show how the actions and ideologies of elite farmers were implicated in this orderly administrative transition and, therefore, how the concepts of governmentality, hegemony, and common sense might be linked. -- interesting discussion of 2nd half of 20thC shift from stucturalist-functionalist to transactionalism to seeing power everywhere but with different focus (Gramsci materialist and production of internally contradictory common sense) and Foucault (more discourse and self formation) with different views of verticality of power. With everything becoming political economic, loss of interest in governmental units that had been central to comparative stucturalist-functionalist system analysis.
article  jstor  social_theory  methodology  lit_survey  structuralist  poststructuralist  historical_change  agency  anthropology  philosophy_of_social_science  levels_of_analyis  Gramsci  Foucault  governmentality  local_government  government_officials  governing_class  political_culture  political_economy  hegemony  Ireland  19thC  20thC  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  local_politics  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Fritz Ringer - Max Weber on Causal Analysis, Interpretation, and Comparison | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2 (May, 2002), pp. 163-178
Max Weber's methodological writings offered a model of singular causal analysis that anticipated key elements of contemporary Anglo-American philosophy of the social and cultural sciences. The model accurately portrayed crucial steps and dimensions of causal reasoning in these disciplines, outlining a dynamic and probabilistic conception of historical processes, counterfactual reasoning, and comparison as a substitute for counterfactual argument. Above all, Weber recognized the interpretation of human actions as a sub-category of causal analysis, in which the agents' visions of desired outcomes, together with their beliefs about how to bring them about, cause them to act as they do. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  philosophy_of_social_science  causation-social  counterfactuals  Weber  methodology  historical_change  sociology-process  action-theory  belief  agency  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Historical Understanding and the Human Sciences [eScholarship] (2007)
Looks like this is the introductory article for a 2007 issue of the Journal of the Philosophy of History in which Bevir also contributed a separate article (on national histories? ) Starts with verstehen and then puts it into post-positivist context. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  historiography  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_social_science  verstehen  interpretivism  hermeneutics  postanalytic_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Bevir, Mark, and Kedar, Asaf - Concept Formation in Political Science: An Anti-Naturalist Critique of Qualitative Methodology [eScholarship] (2008)
Looks like a working paper by Bevir with PhD candidate - paper presented in 2006. The "naturalism" they criticize appears to reify social science concepts and doesn't have a place for anti-foundationalism "web of meaning" interpretation. Still not sure how this differs from hermeneutics other than perhaps not so focused on phenomenology or various versions of verstehen. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  eScholarship  philosophy_of_social_science  naturalism  anti-foundationalism  interpretivism  hermeneutics 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Anti-foundationalism [eScholarship] (2009)
Original Citation:
“Anti-foundationalism”, in M. Flinders, A. Gamble, C. Hay, and M. Kenny, eds., The Oxford Handbook of British Politics (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 115-137.

Keywords:
Anti-foundationalism, Interpretivism, British Politics, PostMarxism, Governmentality
article  eScholarship  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_language  epistemology-social  epistemology-history  anti-foundationalism  governmentality  holism  interpretivism  hermeneutics  post-Marxism  British_politics  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Timothy V. Kaufman-Osborn - Lead article, mini symposium: Political Theory as Profession and as Subfield of political science? | JSTOR: Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 63, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2010), pp. 655-673
How does the enterprise of political theory create and sustain the borders that account for its appearance as a distinguishable profession? In this article, the author considers and criticizes a recent effort to defend political theory's right to exist in the form of one of several subfields constitutive of the academic discipline of professional political science in the United States. The author closes by suggesting that theorists might be better positioned to think critically about politics, and the politics of liberalism more particularly, if this self-representation were to be unsettled and possibly jettisoned altogether. -- Mini-Symposium: Political Theory as a Profession and a Subfield in Political Science? (p. 654) Cornell W. Clayton and Amy G. Mazur. *--* (1) Political Theory as Profession and as Subfield? (pp. 655-673) Timothy V. Kaufman-Osborn -- downloaded pdf to Note *--* (2) Professing Political Theory (pp. 674-679) John G. Gunnell. *--* (3) Political Theory Is Not a Luxury: A Response to Timothy Kaufman-Osborn's "Political Theory as a Profession" (pp. 680-685) Wendy Brown. *--* (4) From Constitutive Outside to the Politics of Extinction: Critical Race Theory, Feminist Theory, and Political Theory (pp. 686-696) Mary Hawkesworth. *--* (5) The Marginalization of Political Philosophy and Its Effects on the Rest of the Discipline (pp. 697-701) Gregory J. Kasza
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_science  social_sciences-post-WWII  philosophy_of_social_science  sociology_of_knowledge  disciplines  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
John G. Gunnell - Dislocated Rhetoric: The Anomaly of Political Theory | JSTOR: The Journal of Politics, Vol. 68, No. 4 (Nov., 2006), pp. 771-782
Although the estranged relationship between mainstream political science and much of the subfield of political theory has been properly attributed to developments during the last half of the twentieth century, the roots of this alienation are historically deeper. Many of the conversations of political theory are the progeny of a discursive form that attended the birth of modern social science. This genre was a legitimating rhetoric situated in the interstices of social science, philosophy, and politics. The study of the history of political thought originated as such a rhetoric, and it constitutes a paradigm case for examining the extent to which such a discourse can be transformed into a practice of knowledge. This field has succeeded to a greater extent than certain other elements of political theory which, transfixed by the tension between their practical aspirations and academic context, have become anomalous appendages to the social scientific study of politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_history  social_sciences  political_science  rhetoric-political  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_science  disciplines  discourse-political_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric D. Beinhocker : Reflexivity, complexity, and the nature of social science - Journal of Economic Methodology [Soros special issue] - Volume 20, Issue 4 - Taylor & Francis Online
pages 330-342 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- In 1987, George Soros introduced his concepts of reflexivity and fallibility and has further developed and applied these concepts over subsequent decades. This paper attempts to build on Soros's framework, provide his concepts with a more precise definition, and put them in the context of recent thinking on complex adaptive systems. The paper proposes that systems can be classified along a ‘spectrum of complexity’ and that under specific conditions not only social systems but also natural and artificial systems can be considered ‘complex reflexive.’ The epistemological challenges associated with scientifically understanding a phenomenon stem not from whether its domain is social, natural, or artificial, but where it falls along this spectrum. Reflexive systems present particular challenges; however, evolutionary model-dependent realism provides a bridge between Soros and Popper and a potential path forward for economics.
article  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  epistemology  methodology  complexity  Soros  reflexivity  intentionality  evolution-as-model  Popper  scientific_method  downloaded  EF-add  systems-complex_adaptive  systems-reflexive  systems_theory  economic_theory  economic_models  EMH  rationality-economics  rational_expectations  information-markets  cognition  cognition-social  falsification  neuroscience  uncertainty  laws_of_nature  covering_laws  causation  explanation  prediction 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Contents | Yi-Cheng Zhang - The Structure of Information Economy [book chapter drafts]
TOC and links to chapter drafts. Zhang is at Fribourg, a physicist who uses Soros reflexivity insights as part of top level Darwinian inflected theory of NESS - non-equilibrium social sciences.
books  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_theory  evolution-as-model  evolution-social  Soros  reflexivity  information-markets  information-asymmetric  cognition  cognition-social  fallibility  Innovation  marketing  networks-social  supply_chains  equilibrium  networks-information  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Yi-Cheng Zhang :: Broader scopes of the reflexivity principle in the economy - Journal of Economic Methodology [Soros special issue] - Volume 20, Issue 4 -Taylor & Francis Online
pages 446-453 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The reflexivity principle of George Soros – that man's fallible understanding can have reflexivity impacts that shape reality – challenges mainstream economics in a fundamental way. This essay will outline a research program that corroborates the reflexivity principle and extends it to broader economic issues. We shall often use examples of consumer and finance markets, but the implications go beyond these examples. The following eight sections build up our main thesis that reflexivity plays an essential role in understanding the economy. -- see bookmark for his draft book on information economy (Oxford 2014 or 2015) and the project he leads on NESS non-equilibrium social sciences
article  philosophy_of_social_science  economic_theory  evolution-as-model  evolution-social  Soros  reflexivity  information-markets  information-asymmetric  cognition  cognition-social  fallibility  Innovation  marketing  networks-social  supply_chains  equilibrium  networks-information  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Anwar Shaikh : On the role of reflexivity in economic analysis - Journal of Economic Methodology [Soros special issue] - Volume 20, Issue 4 - Taylor & Francis Online
pages 439-445 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Soros' theory of reflexivity is meant to apply to a variety of social processes. In economics, it implies that many processes will be subject to “boom-bust” patterns in which expected outcomes deviate for a considerable time from the actual path, and that the actual path in turn deviates from the underlying fundamentals. This is in sharp contrast to the reigning notions in orthodox economics. The hypothesis of Rational Expectations (RE) requires that the views of all participants will converge to a “single set correct of expectations” and the Efficient Market Hypothesis (EMH) posits that actual outcomes deviate from equilibrium in a random manner save for occasional exogenous shocks. In this paper I show that Soros' argument is similar to the classical and Keynesian notions of equilibration as a turbulent process in which actual and expected variables gravitate around some fundamental value. But Soros makes the important further contribution of emphasizing that the fundamental value itself will generally be affected, but not fully determined, by (diverse) expectations and actual outcomes. I demonstrate that Soros' theory of reflexivity can be formalized and that the resulting system is stable in in the sense that expected and actual variables will gravitate around a possibly moving fundamental value. The paper ends with a discussion of an alternate economic paradigm in which the principle of reflexivity would be central.
article  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  economic_theory  macroeconomics  economic_models  classical_economics  Keynesianism  equilibrium  fundamentals  capital_markets  EMH  rationality-economics  rational_expectations  information-markets  reflexivity  uncertainty  financial_economics  financial_system  philosophy_of_social_science  methodology  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Alex Rosenberg :: Reflexivity, uncertainty and the unity of science - Journal of Economic Methodology [Soros special issue] - Volume 20, Issue 4 - Taylor & Francis Online
The paper argues that substantial support for Soros' claims about uncertainty and reflexivity in economics and human affairs generally are provided by the operation of both factors in the biological domain to produce substantially the same processes which have been recognized by ecologists and evolutionary biologists. In particular predator prey relations have their sources in uncertainty – i.e. the random character of variations, and frequency dependent co-evolution – reflexivity. The paper argues that despite Soros' claims, intentionality is not required to produce these phenomena, and that where it does so, in the human case, it provides no basis to deny a reasonable thesis of the methodological or causal unity of science. The argument for this conclusion is developed by starting with a biological predator/prey relation and successively introducing intentional components without affecting the nature of the process. Accepting the conclusion of this argument provides substantial additional inductive support for Soros' theory in its economic application. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  evolutionary_biology  reflexivity  scientific_method  epistemology  uncertainty  methodology  randomness  Soros 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
George Soros - Fallibility, reflexivity, and the human uncertainty principle - Journal of Economic Methodology [Soros special issue] - Volume 20, Issue 4 - Taylor & Francis Online
Lead article for special issue devoted to Soros and epistemology in social sciences more broadly compared with natural sciences and Popper's version of falsibility in scientific method -- He's making progress in formalizing his theory and putting it in context of other theorists - sees his fallibility and reflexivity combination as major factor in "Knightian uncertainty" - Downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  scientific_method  falsification  deduction  Popper  Soros  uncertainty  economic_theory  economic_models  financial_economics  capital_markets  FX  EMH  rationality-economics  rational_expectations  complexity  equilibrium  reflexivity  ontology-social  free_will  financial_crisis  financial_system  fallibility  downloaded  EF-add  fundamentals  methodology  cognition  agency  intentionality 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
TOC - Polity Forum: Institutions and Institutionalism | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 28, No. 1, Autumn, 1995
Polity Forum: Institutions and Institutionalism - [Introduction](p. 83) *--* (1) The Common Space of Social Science Inquiry (pp. 85-90) Philip J. Ethington and Eileen L. McDonagh. *--* (2) Order and Change (pp. 91-96) Stephen Skowronek. *--* (3) Ideas and Institutions (pp. 97-101) Karen Orren. *--* (4) Why I Am an Historical Institutionalist (pp. 103-106) Theda Skocpol. *--* (5) Rational Choice and the New(?) Institutionalism (pp. 107-115) Morris Fiorina. *--* (6) The Many Lives of Institutionalism in American Social Science (pp. 117-123) Dorothy Ross. *--* (7) Institutionalism, Rational Choice, and Historical Analysis (pp. 125-128) James T. Kloppenberg. *--* (8) Institutionalism and Institutions in the Stream of History (pp. 129-133) Terrence J. McDonald. *--* (9) Ideas, Institutions, and Strategic Choice (pp. 135-140) Rogers M. Smith
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_social_science  social_theory  social_sciences  political_science  institutions  institutional_change  institutionalization  historical_sociology  rational_choice  scientism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Farr, John Gunnell, Raymond Seidelman - Can Political Science History Be Neutral? | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 84, No. 2 (Jun., 1990), pp. 587-607
In the December 1988 issue of this Review, John Dryzek and Stephen Leonard argued the need for @'context-sensitive@' histories of the discipline of political science. In their view, disciplinary history must guide practical inquiry if it is to be most useful. The course of their argument draws the criticisms of three political scientists concerned about the history of political science--James Farr, John Gunnell, and Raymond Seidelman. Dryzek and Leonard respond to their critics and underscore their own rationale for enhanced interest in the history of the discipline. -- sociology_of_knowledge issues, early postmodern theory debates, perils of Whiggish history and sceptical Whiggism a la Scottish Enlightenment -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  social_theory  social_sciences  political_science  18thC  19thC  20thC  sociology_of_knowledge  philosophy_of_social_science  ideology  disciplines  discourse  postmodern  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1848_revolutions  Academia.edu  access_to_services  action-theory  agency  agency-structure  amazon.com  American_exceptionalism  analysis-logic  analytical_philosophy  anarchical_society  anthropology  anti-foundationalism  anticlerical  apriori  article  as-if  Austrian_economics  autonomy  a_priori  Bayesian  behavioralism  behavioral_economics  belief  Bentham  bibliography  big_data  books  Bourdieu  British_history  British_Idealism  British_politics  Burke  capitalism  capital_markets  causation  causation-evolutionary  causation-social  change-economic  change-intellectual  change-social  chapter  Chinese_thought  citizenship  civil_liberties  civil_society  classical_economics  cognition  cognition-social  cognitive_science  Coleridge  common_good  Common_Sense  community  comparative_anthropology  comparative_law  complexity  concepts  consciousness  conservatism  constructivism  consumers  consumption  contention  contextualism  contingency  coordination  corporations  counter-revolution  counterfactuals  covering_laws  criminal_justice  critical_realism  critical_theory  cultural_authority  cultural_capital  cultural_change  cultural_critique  cultural_history  cultural_transmission  Darwinism  deconstruction  deduction  demand  democracy  Derrida  determinism  development_process  Dilthey  disciplines  discourse  discourse-political_theory  discrimination  downloaded  Durkheim  ebooks  economic_culture  economic_growth  economic_history  economic_models  economic_policy  economic_sociology  economic_theory  EF-add  elite_culture  embeddedness  embodied_cognition  emergence  EMH  empiricism  English_School  entre_deux_guerres  epistemology  epistemology-history  epistemology-moral  epistemology-naturalism  epistemology-social  equilibrium  eScholarship  etexts  event  Evernote  evidence  evolution  evolution-as-model  evolution-group_selection  evolution-social  evolutionary_biology  evo_psych  existentialism  explanation  fact-value  fallibility  falsification  fiction-cognition  fields  financial_crisis  financial_economics  financial_system  find  firms-structure  firms-theory  fiscal_policy  Foucault  France  Frankfurt_School  freedom  free_will  French_intellectuals  French_Revolution  Freud  fundamentals  FX  game_theory  Gauchet  gene-culture_coevolution  geography  geography-and-economics  George_Henry  Germany  German_historical_school  German_Idealism  German_scholars  German_scholarship  governance  governing_class  governmentality  government_officials  Gramsci  Hayek  Hegel  Hegelian  hegemony  Heidegger  hermeneutics  heterodox_economics  historical_change  historical_sociology  historicism  historiography  historiography-19thC  history-and-social_sciences  history_of_philosophy  history_of_science  holism  humanities  human_nature  human_rights  Hume  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  hypothesis  idealism-transcendental  ideas-theories  identity  ideology  immanence  increasing_returns  individualism-methodology  inflation  information-asymmetric  information-markets  Innovation  institutionalization  institutional_change  institutional_economics  institutions  intellectual_history  intelligentsia  intentionality  intentionality-collective  interpretivism  interview  Ireland  IR_theory  Jefferson  journal  jstor  jurisprudence  Kant  Keynesian  Keynesianism  kindle-available  know-how  knowledge  knowledge_economy  Labor_markets  Lacan  laisser-faire  laws_of_nature  lecture  Lefort  legal_culture  legal_history  legal_realism  legal_reasoning  legal_system  legal_theory  levels_of_analyis  level_of_analysis  liberalism  libraries  lit_crit  lit_survey  local_government  local_politics  Locke  logic  Logical_Positivism  macroeconomics  marketing  markets  markets-psychology  markets-structure  Marx  mass_culture  mathematics  mathematization  mechanism  mechanisms-social_theory  mental_health  metaethics  metaphysics  Methodenstreit  methodological_individualism  methodology  methodology-qualitative  methodology-quantitative  microeconomics  microfoundations  Mill  mind  Mises  modernity  modernity-emergence  monetarism  monetary_policy  morality-conventional  morality-objective  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  nation-state  nationalism  national_interest  naturalism  natural_law  natural_rights  natural_selection  nature-nurture  neo-Kantian  neoclassical_economics  Neoplatonism  networks-information  networks-social  neuroscience  Newman_JH  nihilism  normativity  norms  ontology  ontology-social  paper  Pareto_principle  Peirce  perception  phenomenology  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  political_change  political_culture  political_discourse  political_economy  political_history  political_order  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_science  political_sociology  Popper  positivism  positivism-legal  post-Cold_War  post-foundational  Post-Keynesian  post-Marxism  post-WWII  postanalytic_philosophy  postmodern  poststructuralist  power  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  pragmatism  prediction  preferences  probability  professionalization  property  psychology  public_goods  public_intellectuals  public_policy  quantitative_methods  randomness  rationality  rationality-economics  rational_choice  rational_expectations  reductionism  reference  reflexivity  relativism  religion  religious_belief  religious_culture  religious_experience  religious_history  religious_practices  representative_institutions  republicanism  responsibility  review  reviews  revolutions  rhetoric-political  rights-legal  rights-political  risk  risk-mitigation  risk-systemic  risk_management  Samuelson  Savigny  scarcity  science-and-religion  scientific_culture  scientific_method  scientism  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scribd  Searle  self  Sidgwick  socialism  social_capital  social_contract  Social_Darwinism  social_history  social_movements  social_order  social_process  social_psychology  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_theory  sociology  sociology-process  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_religion  sociology_of_science  Soros  speech-act  speech_acts  Spencer_Herbert  SSRN  structuralism  structuralist  structure  subjectivity  supply_chains  systems-complex_adaptive  systems-reflexive  systems_theory  Taylor_Charles  technology  technology-adoption  technology_transfer  theism  Tilly  Tocqueville  transcendence  trust  two_cultures  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  uncertainty  unemployment  university  US_history  US_society  utilitarianism  utility  values  van_Frassen  Veblen  verstehen  video  Weber  Wittgenstein  women-property  women-rights 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: