dunnettreader + philosophy_of_history   81

Terry Pinkard, Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice - review by Christopher Yeomans | NDPR - June 2017
Terry Pinkard
Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice

Terry Pinkard, Does History Make Sense?: Hegel on the Historical Shapes of Justice, Harvard University Press, 2017, 272pp., $49.95 (hbk), ISBN 9780674971776.
Reviewed by Christopher Yeomans, Purdue University
books  reviews  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  Hegel  19thC  Germany  German_Idealism 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus - Saeculum: History & Society in the Theology of St Augustine (1970, rev 2007) | Cambridge University Press
Significant intro to rev'd edition, included in downloaded frontmatter along with TOC and original Preface. -- In this book Professor Markus's main concern is with those aspects of Augustine's thought which help to answer questions about the purpose of human society, and particularly with his reflections on history, society and the Church. He relates Augustine's ideas to their contemporary context and to older traditions, and shows which aspects of his thought he absorbed from his intellectual environment. Augustine appears from this study as a thinker who rejected the 'sacralization' of the established order of society, and the implications of this for a theology of history are explored in the last chapter. -- Downloaded frontmatter, excerpt & index via Air to DBOX - added to Evernote
books  downloaded  intellectual_history  theology  philosophy_of_history  Late_Antiquity  Early_Christian  Augustine  human_nature  eschatology  social_order  Providence  teleology  religion-established  politics-and-religion  religious_culture  Roman_Empire  paganism  pluralism  secularism  Roman_religion  secularization  Papacy  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Benjamin D. Crowe - Dilthey's Philosophy of Religion in the "Critique of Historical Reason": 1880-1910 (2005) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 66, No. 2 (Apr., 2005), pp. 265-283 -- The core of Dilthey's philosophy of religion during the period here under consideration is what I call the "immanence thesis," which is a "hermeneutical hypothesis" that Dilthey employs in interpreting various phenomena of religious life. The claim is that the subject matter and source of religion is human life rather than a transcendent reality beyond the bounds of human experience. Put another way Dilthey's view is that religious myths, symbols, concepts, and practices are all ways of articulating the immanent meaning or sense of histori-cal life. This thesis grounds the positive role that religious experience and the history of Christianity play in Dilthey's project in the Einleitung, i.e., the grounding of the human sciences in what he later called a "whole, full, and unmutilated" picture of human life. The "immanence thesis" also provides clues regarding Dilthey's own religious position, which, though certainly not Christian (or even theistic) "in the specific sense," nonetheless bears affinities with Romantic pantheism as well as with the "world-view" that Dilthey later calls "objective idealism." -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  historiography-19thC  Germany  German_scholars  Dilthey  religious_belief  religious_practices  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_history  sociology_of_religion  German_historical_school  19thC  immanence  transcendence  theism  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Reading Hegel: The Introductions - open access book (2008) | re-press,org
Editors’ Introduction: The Circle of Knowledge
Chapter 1: Phenomenology of Spirit
Chapter 2: Science of Logic
Chapter 3: Philosophy of Right
Chapter 4: Philosophy of History
Chapter 5: Philosophy of Fine Art
Chapter 6: Philosophy of Religion
Chapter 7: History of Philosophy
Editors’ Epilogue: The End of Introductions
Further Readings
Index
Hegel-philosophy_of_right  19thC  Hegel-aesthetics  books  Germany  philosophy_of_history  open_access  ontology  Kant  Absolute_idealism  Hegel-logic  Hegel  etexts  downloaded  German_Idealism  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_science 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Poirier - Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet (2003) - Cairn.info
Entretien préparé et réalisé par Fouré Lionel, Entretien préparé et réalisé par Poirier Nicolas, « Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet. », Le Philosophoire 1/2003 (n° 19) , p. 23-37
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2003-1-page-23.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.019.0023.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
representative_institutions  metaphysics  democracy  Gauchet  change-social  Freud  phenomenology  France  social_theory  cultural_critique  psychology  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  poststructuralist  French_intellectuals  19thC  governance  social_sciences-post-WWII  subjectivity  common_good  nation-state  republicanism  Lacan  social_history  philosophy_of_history  modernity  German_Idealism  structuralism  civil_liberties  human_nature  downloaded  epistemology  interview  Foucault  intellectual_history  Lefort  political_participation  epistemology-social  citizenship  community 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Pascal Chabot - Progrès utile et progrès subtil (2011) - Cairn.info
La notion de progrès est ambiguë. Pour continuer à l’utiliser, l’auteur cherche d’abord à la dégager de trois interprétations erronées : l’interprétation messianique, la compréhension linéaire et la capture par les sciences et les techniques. Il propose ensuite la distinction nouvelle entre un progrès utile et un progrès subtil, ce dernier pouvant aussi s’appliquer aux domaines artistiques et philosophiques. Enfin, il s’interroge sur les relations entre progrès utile et progrès subtil, en réintroduisant la catégorie d’équilibre. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
philosophy_of_history  article  downloaded  sociology_of_science_ 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Sylvie Taussig - Déclin et progrès chez Blumenberg (2011) - Cairn.info
La question du sens de l’histoire est un leitmotiv de la pensée moderne. La cosmologie issue de la révolution copernicienne a remis en cause la vision chrétienne qui posait de la Parousie au terme de l’histoire. Que des philosophies de l’histoire totalisantes aient pris le relais constitue une part de la sécularisation. Hans Blumenberg affirme la dimension indépassable de l’historicité tout en s’opposant aux tentatives de conférer un sens global à cette condition d’historicité de l’existence. Les Temps modernes, débarrassée des interminables discussions sur le progrès ou le déclin, sont légitimes. La sécularisation est ce processus dans lequel les ruines de l’âge ancien hantent la pensée moderne et l’aveuglent sur les enjeux de sa nouveauté – la mise à nu de sa contingence existentielle et du rôle humanisant de la culture
evolution-as-model  declinism  evolution-social  Blumenberg  progress  anti-modernity  secularization  secularism  modernity  historicism  Counter-Enlightenment  politico-theology  article  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Louis Pinto - Un héritage devenu projet : la philosophie sociale de Sartre (2008) - Cairn.info
Les sciences sociales en France doivent compter avec les résistances que lui opposent notamment les philosophes qui se posent en défenseurs de la position éminente de cette discipline dans l’espace des disciplines académiques. À travers ses hiérarchies, ses valeurs et surtout les schèmes cognitifs et rhétoriques qui structurent le travail d’apprentissage, l’École tend à doter les agents d’une conception de la philosophie conforme à la formule scolaire mise au point il y a plus d’un siècle dans un contexte très singulier. Étant la « discipline du couronnement », située au-dessus des savoirs, des autres disciplines, la philosophie se veut discours sur les fondements.
Le cas de Sartre est d’un intérêt majeur en ce qu’il offre une illustration des tensions entre l’héritage scolaire et la quête d’originalité qui peut comporter, entre autres défis, celui d’avoir à se situer sur le terrain des sciences sociales. Si l’intérêt de Sartre pour ces disciplines était très réel, on peut comprendre certains aspects de son œuvre (autrui, la dialectique) comme un effort pour préserver les hiérarchies philosophiques
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
philosophy_of_history  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_sciences  social_theory  dialectic  sociology_of_knowledge  existentialism  political_philosophy  article  intellectual_history  downloaded  political_culture  moral_philosophy  Sartre  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  intelligentsia 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Bernard Dantier, L'esprit du monde et l'esprit des sciences dans l'histoire et son étude : G.W.F. Hegel, Introduction à la philosophie de l'histoire — La raison dans l'histoire
“L’esprit du monde et l’esprit des sciences dans l’histoire et son étude :
Hegel, Introduction à la philosophie de l’histoire”.
Extrait de: G.W.F. Hegel, Introduction à la philosophie de l’histoire – La raison dans l’histoire, Paris, Plon – 10/18, 1965, traduction Kostas Papaioannou, pp. 5-56.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
downloaded  Hegel  philosophy_of_science  etexts  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-social  social_theory 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Melissa Lane - Doing Our Own Thinking for Ourselves: On Quentin Skinner's Genealogical Turn on JSTOR
Doing Our Own Thinking for Ourselves: On Quentin Skinner's Genealogical Turn - in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 71-82 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  Cambridge_School  Skinner  history-and-social_sciences  political_philosophy  political_discourse  language-politics  language-history  speech-act  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  genealogy-method  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
David Wootton - Narrative, Irony, and Faith in Gibbon's Decline and Fall | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 1994)
History and Theory, Vol. 33, No. 4, Theme Issue 33: Proof and Persuasion in History (Dec., 1994), pp. 77-105 -- thinks Momigliano didn't see that Gibbon was Hume's follower and their "school" was defining on a number of elements for what "history" came to be understood as - Thinks Wormersley doesn't fully appreciate Gibbon's handling of religion and the various challenges to Christianity in both antiquity and Enlightenment -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  history_of_England  Gibbon  Momigliano  Enlightenment  religious_belief  religious_history  scepticism  miracles  Middleton_Conyers  irony  narrative  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
R. G. Collingwood - The Limits of Historical Knowledge (1928) | JSTOR - Journal of Philosophical Studies
The Limits of Historical Knowledge, R. G. Collingwood, Journal of Philosophical Studies, Vol. 3, No. 10 (Apr., 1928), pp. 213-222 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  Collingwood  British_Idealism  20thC  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
ADRIAN BLAU - UNCERTAINTY AND THE HISTORY OF IDEAS | JSTOR - History and Theory (Oct 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 358-372 -- Intellectual historians often make empirical claims, but can never know for certain if these claims are right. Uncertainty is thus inevitable for intellectual historians. But accepting uncertainty is not enough: we should also act on it, by trying to reduce and report it. We can reduce uncertainty by amassing valid data from different sources to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of competing explanations, rather than trying to "prove" an empirical claim by looking for evidence that fits it. Then we should report our degree of certainty in our claims. When we answer empirical questions in intellectual history, we are not telling our readers what happened: we are telling them how strong we think our evidence is—a crucial shift of emphasis. For intellectual historians, then, uncertainty is subjective, as discussed by Keynes and Collingwood; the paper thus explores three differences between subjective and objective uncertainty. Having outlined the theoretical basis of uncertainty, the paper then offers examples from actual research: Noel Malcolm's work shows how to reduce and report uncertainty about composition, and David Wootton's work shows how to reduce and report uncertainty about beliefs. -- VERY Anti Straussian based on extensive bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  intellectual_history-distorted  philosophy_of_history  hermeneutics  hermeneutics_of_suspicion  Strauss  Straussians  epistemology-history  evidence  coherence  uncertainty  Keynes  Keynes-uncertainty  Collingwood  objectivity  positivism  post-foundational  Cambridge_School  author_intention  reception  audience  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
J DEN HOLLANDER, H PAUL & R PETERS - INTRO: THE METAPHOR OF HISTORICAL DISTANCE | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 1-10 -- What does "historical distance" mean? Starting with Johan Huizinga, the famous Dutch historian who refused to lecture on contemporary history, this introductory article argues that "historical distance" is a metaphor used in a variety of intellectual contexts. Accordingly, the metaphor has ontological, epistemological, moral, aesthetic, as well as methodological connotations. This implies that historical distance cannot be reduced to a single "problem" or "concept." At the same time, this wide variety of meanings associated with distance helps explain why an easily recognizable tradition of scholarly reflection on historical distance does not exist. In a broad survey of nineteenth-and twentieth-century historical theory, this article nonetheless attempts to show that distance has been a major, if seldom explicitly articulated, theme in European and American philosophy of history. In doing so, it pays special attention to those few authors who in recent years have taken up the metaphor for critical study. Finally, the paper summarizes some of the main arguments put forward in the articles comprising this issue on historical distance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  historiography-postWWII  postmodern  epistemic_virtue  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
JAAP DEN HOLLANDER - CONTEMPORARY HISTORY AND THE ART OF SELF-DISTANCING | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 51-67 -- According to founding fathers like Ranke and Humboldt, temporal distance is required to discern historical "ideas" or forms. The argument may have some plausibility, but the presupposition is plainly false, since we cannot see the past at all. This leaves us with the question of what to make of the so-called historical forms. This article discusses three different views. The first, historicist, view is objectivist and localizes historical forms in the past. The second, narrativist, view is subjectivist and localizes historical forms in the realm of imagination and representation. The third view goes beyond the other two in that it considers both sides. It does not use a one-sided but a two-sided concept of form, which hinges on the idea of a distinction. This means that historical forms occupy both sides of the subject-object distinction or the present-past distinction. Because the subject-object terminology is confusing, the essay employs an alternative distinction between first-and second-order observation. With the help of this distinction, it is possible to redescribe the distance metaphor in such a way that the theoretical status of contemporary history becomes less enigmatic. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
HERMAN PAUL - DISTANCE AND SELF-DISTANCIATION: INTELLECTUAL VIRTUE AND HISTORICAL METHOD AROUND 1900 | JSTOR History and Theory ( Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 104-116 -- What did "historical distance" mean to historians in the Rankean tradition? Although historical distance is often equated with temporal distance, an analysis of Ernst Bernheim's Lehrbuch der historischen Methode reveals that for German historians around 1900 distance did not primarily refer to a passage of time that would enable scholars to study remote pasts from retrospective points of view. -- the metaphor rather conveys a need for self-distanciation. Self-distanciation is not a Romantic desire to "extinguish" oneself, but a virtuous attempt to put one's own ideas and intuitions about the working of the world between brackets in the study of people who might have understood the world in different terms. Although Bernheim did not explicitly talk about virtue, the article shows that his Lehrbuch nonetheless considers self-distanciation a matter of virtuous behavior, targeted at an aim that may not be fully realizable, but ought to be pursued with all possible vigor. For Bernheim, then, distance requires epistemological virtue, which in turn calls for intellectual character, or what Bernheim's generation considered scholarly selfhood {wissenschaftliche Persönlichkeit). Not a mapping of time onto space, but a strenuous effort to mold "scholarly characters," truly able to recognize the otherness of the past, appears to be characteristic of Bernheim's view of historical distance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-19thC  historicism  philosophy_of_history  German_scholarship  historians  epistemology-history  virtue  epistemic_virtue  character  character-formation  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
MARK BEVIR - WHY HISTORICAL DISTANCE IS NOT A PROBLEM | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 24-37 -- concerns about historical distance arose along with modernist historicism, and they disappear with postfoundationahsm. The developmental historicism of the 19thC appealed to narrative principles to establish continuity between past and present and to guide selections among facts. In the 20thC, modernist historicists rejected such principles, thereby raising the specter of historical distance: that is, the distorting effects of the present on accounts of the past, the chasm between facts and narrative. The modernist problem became: how can historians avoid anachronism and develop accurate representations of the past? Instead of using narrative principles to select facts, modernist historicists appealed to atomized facts to validate narratives. However, in the late 20thC, postmodernists (Frank Ankersmit and Hayden White) argued that there was no way to close the distance between facts and narratives. The postmodern problem became: how should historians conceive of their writing given the ineluctable distance between facts and narratives? Today, postfoundationahsm dispels both modernist and postmodernist concerns with historical distance; it implies that all concepts (not just historical ones) fuse fact and theory, and it dissolves issues of conceptual relativism, textual meaning, and re-enactment. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historicism  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  historiography-postWWII  Modernism  postmodern  post-foundational  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
MARK SALBER PHILLIPS - RETHINKING HISTORICAL DISTANCE: FROM DOCTRINE TO HEURISTIC | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 11-23 -- I argue that distance needs to be reconceived in terms of the wider set of engagements that mediate our relations to the past, as well as the full spectrum of distance-positions from near to far. Re-imagined in these terms, distance sheds its prescriptiveness and becomes a valuable heuristic for examining the history of historical representation. When distance is studied in relation to the range of mediations entailed in historical representation, it becomes evident that the plasticities of distance/proximity are by no means limited to gradients of time; rather, temporality is bound up with other distances that come from our need to engage with the historical past as (simultaneously) a realm of making, oí feeling, of doing, and of understanding. Thus for every historical work, we need to consider at least four basic dimensions of representation as they relate to the problem of mediating distance: 1. the genres, media, and vocabularies that shape the history's formal structures of representation; 2. the affective claims made by the historical account, including the emotional experiences it promises or withholds; 3. the work's implications for action, whether of a political or moral nature; and 4. the modes of understanding on which the history's intelligibility depends. These overlapping, but distinctive, distances—formal, affective, ideological, and conceptual—provide an analytic framework for examining changing modes of historical representation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  historicism  philosophy_of_history  historians  genre  rhetoric-writing  literary_theory  reception  epistemology-history  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
CHINATSU KOBAYASHI and MATHIEU MARION - GADAMER AND COLLINGWOOD ON TEMPORAL DISTANCE AND UNDERSTANDING | JSTOR History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 81-103 -- we begin by suggesting an intuitive model of time embodying a notion of temporal distance that we claim is at work in Gadamer's hermeneutics, while it is rejected in Collingwood's theory of interpretation. To show this, after a brief review of the influence of Collingwood on Gadamer and of their disagreement over the possibility of recovering an author's intention, we examine in turn their answers to the problem of transposition, upon which the philosophy of Dilthey supposedly foundered. We show that Gadamer embraced the idea of temporal distance in his solution, which consisted in claiming that the distance between an author from the past and us is filled in by tradition, which opens access to the text for us, while Collingwood considered explanations of the actions of historical agents, and by extension understanding of a text, in intentional or rational terms. Furthermore, he thought that such explanations are not causal, and that the thoughts involved in them do not stand within the flow of physical time, which is involved in any notion of temporal distance. This is why Collingwood felt entitled to anti-relativistic conclusions about the recovery of authorial intentions, conclusions that prompted Gadamer to claim that "the dimension of hermeneutical mediation which is passed through in every act of understanding" escaped him. We then discuss the underlying notions of time at work in both Gadamer and Collingwood, showing that Ricoeur had a better appreciation of the issue, since he saw that Collingwood's moves parallel, up to a point, Heidegger's critique of "vulgar time," albeit with an entirely different result. We also point to the importance in Collingwood's thinking of his notion of "incapsulation." -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  phenomenology  hermeneutics  20thC  Gadamer  Collingwood  Ricoeur  Heidegger  historicism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
G. A. Wells - Herder's Two Philosophies of History (1960) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas - Vol. 21, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1960), pp. 527-537 - reviews reception of Herder's 2 stages of writing about history, how they have been characterized and debated since the late 18thC, and which he thinks says as much re German intellectual currents and historicism than Herder's own thought -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  18thC  19thC  20thC  Herder  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historicism  philosophy_of_history  German_scholarship  declinism  cycles  metaphor  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Leo Catana - Lovejoy's Readings of Bruno: Or How 19thC History of Philosophy Was "Transformed" into the History of Ideas | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 71, No. 1 (Jan., 2010)
Lovejoy's Readings of Bruno: Or How Nineteenth-Century History of Philosophy Was "Transformed" into the History of Ideas, Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 71, No. 1 (Jan., 2010), pp. 91-112 -- no abstract -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  philosophy_of_history  historiography-20thC  Lovejoy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
David Luban - Time-Mindedness and Jurisprudence: A Commentary on Postema's "Jurisprudence, the Sociable Science" | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 903 (2015)
Postema offers two general programmatic suggestions for jurisprudence besides greater historical consciousness: sociability and synechism. Sociability, has two dimensions. First, it means interdisciplinarity—a continual dialogue with the study of legal phenomena by the sciences, humanities, and even theology. Second, it means embedding jurisprudence in general philosophy, ... [Sellars]: “not only ‘cabbages and kings’, but numbers and duties, possibilities and finger snaps, aesthetic experience and death.” Synechism is a less familiar idea, drawn from the philosophy of C.S. Peirce. It is the commitment to seek continuity among phenomena. Peirce was metaphysically committed to the existence of actual continua everywhere in nature, history, and human psychology. So synechism will impose a certain demand on all systematic studies, namely discerning those continua.(..) a certain kind of historiography: The historian’s job is to unearth continuities between past and present rather than studying ruptures. This, it seems to me, is a contestable commitment that rules out a great deal of important historical work. Peirce understood synechism to imply that ideas are intrinsically temporal and historical phenomena. Although Postema does not endorse this general thesis, he does argue for a special case of it, namely that law is “intrinsically temporal.” This conclusion is central to his argument against the possibility of time-slice legal systems. It, too, is contestable; but, I shall suggest, Postema can reach his conclusion on grounds other than synechism, and I agree with him about law’s intrinsic temporality. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  pragmatism  historiography  historical_change  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  analytical_philosophy  legal_history  continuity  change-social  change-intellectual  intellectual_history  Peirce  social_sciences  legal_culture  legal_realism  philosophy_of_history  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Barzun and Dan Priel - Jurisprudence and (Its) History - Symposium Introduction | Virginia Law Review 101 Va. L. Rev. 849 (2015)
Whereas legal philosophers offer “analyses” that aim to be general, abstract, and timeless, legal historians offer “thick descriptions” of what is particular, concrete, and time-bound. But surface appearances can deceive. Perhaps unlike other areas of philosophy, the subject matter of jurisprudence is at least partially (if not entirely) a social phenomenon. Courts, legislatures, judicial orders, and statutes are the products of human efforts, both collective and individual, and they only exist as legislatures, courts, and the like insofar as they possess the meaning they do in the eyes of at least some social group. For this reason, legal philosophers since at least H.L.A. Hart have recognized their task to be a “hermeneutic” one—one which aims to discern or make explicit the “self-understanding” of legal actors. At the same time, legal historians aim not simply to record legal rules that existed at some given point in history, but to unearth the meaning that actual people—judges, lawyers, politicians, and ordinary citizens—have attached to law. When they do so, they might be seen as uncovering evidence of those same “self-understandings” that philosophers claim constitute law. Perhaps, then, philosophical and historical inquiries about law do not differ so radically from each other after all. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_language  ordinary_language_philosophy  jurisprudence  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  historiography  legal_history  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  constitutional_law  Founders  originalism  contextualism  change-social  change-economic  change-intellectual  norms  hermeneutics  positivism-legal  philosophy_of_history  institutional_change  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Christophe Litwin, review essay - Stéphane Van Damme on Living the Enlightenment | Books & ideas -- French original June 2014, translation May 2015 by Michael C. Behrent
Original French http://www.laviedesidees.fr/La-vie-des-Lumieres.html -- Stéphane Van Damme, À toutes voiles vers la vérité [On Course to the Truth]: Une autre histoire de la philosophie au temps des Lumières, Seuil, 2014, 386 p., 24 €.Van Damme’s project is to write an alternative history of philosophy (...) not by writing a history of ideas, but rather a “historian’s history” of philosophy. Rather than beginning with a canonical body of texts or doctrines (the selection of which is frequently incomplete or ideological), Van Damme, building on Bruno Latour’s work in the history of science and Antoine Lilti’s and Etienne Anheim’s work in the journal Annales, (and..) the historical geographer Jean-Marc Besse, approaches the history of philosophy in a manner that is decidedly contextual, material, and pragmatic. Unlike literature, art, and science, Van Damme notes, philosophy had, until the past decade, largely avoided cultural history’s probing gaze. (..) the recent literature in the field is daunting—(see the..)abundant critical and bibliographical apparatus (305-375)—a history of philosophy conceived as an early modern cultural practice had yet to be written. Where, when, how, and in what circumstances were the activities we refer to by such terms as “knowing,” “living philosophically,” “being a philosopher,” and “teaching,” “doing,” “reading,” and “writing” philosophy practiced? Can the tools and methods of cultural history offer insight, in this way, into Enlightenment philosophy’s distinctive “truth regime”? (..)This pragmatic approach covers a remarkably wide range of topics and methodologies (many in) previously published articles (organized..) by situating philosophical practice in 3 types of spaces: the public sphere, geography, and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note for both languages
books  reviews  amazon.fr  buy  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  France  Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  geography  political_history  political_culture  sociology_of_knowledge  philosophy  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_history  natural_philosophy  epistemology  epistemology-social  bibliography  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicolaas P. Barr Clingan, review essay on Edward Skidelsky and Tobias Bevc histories of the philosophy of Ernst Cassirer (March 2010) | H-Net Reviews - H-German
Nicolaas P. Barr Clingan. Review of Bevc, Tobias, Kulturgenese als Dialektik von Mythos und Vernunft: Ernst Cassirer und die Kritische Theorie and Skidelsky, Edward, Ernst Cassirer: The Last Philosopher of Culture. H-German, H-Net Reviews. March, 2010. Skidelsky offers a welcome, broad introduction of Cassirer's work, but one that is problematic in its approach to broader issues of philosophy and politics. His more polemic claims, often asserted rather than argued, are unlikely to persuade specialists in intellectual history and may misguide general readers about the complex political contours of continental philosophy. Bevc, in contrast, offers a more focused and systematic comparison of Cassirer's philosophy and Critical Theory. His argument is generally compelling. He also skillfully draws a number of significant parallels that would seem to have been precluded by Adorno's dismissive comment, although Bevc does occasionally overstep in the case of the Frankfurt School. But perhaps this faux pas is fitting for a scholar whose efforts at intellectual and political conciliation were so recklessly dismissed in his own time and remain, as Skidelsky observes, foreign to our contentious age.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_culture  20thC  Germany  entre_deux_guerres  Cassirer  Frankfurt_School  Heidegger  culture  symbol  symbols-religious  myth  reason  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  phenomenology  existentialism  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  human_nature  humanism  anti-humanism  culture_industries  irrationalism  rationalization-institutions  modernity  Marxist  continental_philosophy  neo-Kantian  Adorno 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Anna Plassart - The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution (to be released April 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Historians of ideas have traditionally discussed the significance of the French Revolution through the prism of several major interpretations, including the commentaries of Burke, Tocqueville and Marx. This book argues that the Scottish Enlightenment offered an alternative and equally powerful interpretative framework for the Revolution, which focused on the transformation of the polite, civilised moeurs that had defined the 'modernity' analysed by Hume and Smith in the 18thC. The Scots observed what they understood as a military- and democracy-led transformation of European modern morals and concluded that the real historical significance of the Revolution lay in the transformation of warfare, national feelings and relations between states, war and commerce that characterised the post-revolutionary international order. This book recovers the Scottish philosophers' powerful discussion of the nature of post-revolutionary modernity and shows that it is essential to our understanding of 19thC political thought. **--** Part I. The Burke–Paine Debate and Scotland's Science of Man: 1. The Burke–Paine debate and the Scottish Enlightenment *-* 2. The heritage of Hume and Smith: Scotland's science of man and politics **--** Part II. The 1790s: 3. Scotland's political debate *-* 4. James Mackintosh and Scottish philosophical history *-* 5. John Millar and the Scottish discussion on war, modern sociability and national sentiment *-* 6. Adam Ferguson on democracy and empire **--** Part III. 1802–15: 7. The French Revolution and the Edinburgh Review *-* 8. Commerce, war and empire
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Smith  Hume  Hume-politics  civil_society  civilizing_process  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  IR_theory  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  nationalism  national_ID  historiography-18thC  historiography-Whig  military  Military_Revolution  mass_culture  levée_en_masse  conscription  sociability  social_order  empires  empire-and_business  imperialism  Great_Powers  balance_of_power  philosophy_of_history  progress  social_theory  change-social  change-economic  Burke  Paine  Mackintosh_James  Millar_John  Edinburgh_Review  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Scottish_politics  1790s  1800s  1810s  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  democracy  morality-conventional  norms  global_economy  mercantilism 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright, eds. - Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre Re forming Literature 1789–1837 (2006 pbk) | Cambridge University Press
Tilottama Rajan, University of Western Ontario and Julia M. Wright, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia **--** Romanticism has often been associated with lyric poetry, or otherwise confined within mainstream genres. As a result, we have neglected the sheer diversity and generic hybridity of a literature that ranged from the Gothic novel to the national tale, from monthly periodicals to fictionalized autobiography. In this new volume some of the leading scholars of the period explore the relationship between ideology and literary genre from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The introduction offers a fresh examination of how genre was rethought by Romantic criticism. **--** Introduction Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright **--** Part I. Genre, History, and the Public Sphere: 1. Godwin and the genre reformers: on necessity and contingency in romantic narrative theory - Jon Klancher *-* 2. Radical print culture in periodical form - Kevin Gilmartin *-* 3. History, trauma, and the limits of the liberal imagination: William Godwin's historical fiction - Gary Handwerk *-* 4. Writing on the border: the national tale, female writing, and the public sphere - Ina Ferris. **--** Part II. Genre and Society: 5. Genres from life in Wordsworth's art: Lyrical Ballads 1798 - Don Bialostosky *-* 6. 'A voice in the representation': John Thelwall and the enfranchisement of literature - Judith Thompson *-* 7. 'I am ill-fitted': conflicts of genre in Elisa Fenwick's Secresy - Julia M. Wright *-* 8. Frankenstein as neo-Gothic: from the ghost of the couterfeit to the monster of abjection - Jerrold E. Hogle **--** Part III. Genre, Gender, and the Private Sphere: 9. Autonarration and genotext in Mary Hays' Memoirs of Emma Courtney - Tilottama Rajan *-* 10. 'The science of herself': scenes of female enlightenment - Mary Jacobus *-* 11. The failures of romanticism Jerome McGann -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_history  British_history  British_politics  genre  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  literary_journals  literary_history  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  narrative  narrative-contested  Hunt_Leigh  censorship  Hazlitt_William  Godwin_Wm  historical_fiction  historical_change  necessity  contingency  women-intellectuals  authors-women  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  Shelley_Mary  imagination  magazines  newspapers  gender  gender_history  Wordsworth  poetry  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Romanticism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Gorman - Hayden White as analytical philosopher of mind | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue : Hayden White’s " Metahistory " 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Philosophers and historians in Cambridge did not recognise either the relevance or the importance of Metahistory when it was published in 1973. The reasons are here explained in terms of the nature of the analytical tradition: the principled distinctiveness of analytical philosophy from (1) history, (2) speculative metaphysics, and (3) political morality. Following an analysis of ‘analysis’, Metahistory is argued to be an exercise in the recovery of paradigm cases in Strawsonian descriptive metaphysics that offers the outlines of an advanced philosophy of mind and philosophy of time. -- Jonathan Gorman is Emeritus Professor of Moral Philosophy at the Queen's University of Belfast. His books in philosophy of history are The Expression of Historical Knowledge (Edinburgh 1982), Understanding History (Ottawa 1992) and Historical Judgement (Stocksfield 2007), and he has many articles and reviews in theory of history journals and collections. He continues to apply analytic pragmatic philosophy to historical thought, and writes also in other branches of philosophy and in legal theory.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  historiography  narrative  analytical_philosophy  ordinary_language_philosophy  speech-act  philosophy_of_history  mind  time  metaphysics  Strawson_PF  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Gabrielle M. Spiegel - Above, about and beyond the writing of history: a retrospective view of Hayden White's "Metahistory" | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue: Hayden White’s "Metahistory" 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Since its publication 40 years ago, Hayden White's Metahistory has been recognized as a foundational work for the literary analysis of historical writing. Long thought to be primarily concerned with questions of narrative, new interpretations have recently revised our understanding of White's principal aims as a theorist and philosopher of history. What has emerged from these works is a novel view of the status and meaning of tropes in Metahistory, the underlying existentialist engagements that guided White's thinking about them, and the ways in which both served his encompassing goal not only to critique the reigning Rankean paradigm of ‘history’ but to free contemporary historians and historiography altogether from the ‘burden of history’ for the sake of a morally responsible future. The article analyses the ways in which these new interpretations of White alter our understanding of the corpus of his work, from his early article on the ‘burden of history’ to his most recent writings on ‘the practical past’, with a principal focus on the re-readings of Metahistory itself. -- Gabrielle M. Spiegel is Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of history at Johns Hopkins University and a past president of the American Historical Association. She has written extensively on historical writing in the Middle Ages in Latin and Old French and on the implications of contemporary critical theory for the practice of historiography.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  historiography  narrative  lit_crit  philosophy_of_history  constructivism  usable_past  historicism  historiography-19thC  Ranke  existentialism  White_Hayden 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
David D. Roberts - Rethinking Hayden White's treatment of Croce | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue: Hayden White’s "Metahistory" 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Hayden White began as a partisan of the earlier Italian thinker Benedetto Croce. After 1963, however, White gradually turned against Croce, finally, in Metahistory, casting Croce's position as the limiting ironic outcome of nineteenth-century historiographical realism. Croce putatively left the historian as a passive observer, cut off from using historical understanding to help shape events. Whereas most students of White say little about White's encounter with Croce, this article argues that both thinkers were seeking to establish a post-realist cultural framework. Although White had plausible reasons to dissent from Croce, he sidestepped the challenge of the Crocean alternative by forcing Croce into a limiting mold as a time-bound, bourgeois ideological spokesman. This was to restrict unnecessarily and unfortunately the terms of post-realist debate. -- David D. Roberts is Albert Berry Saye Professor of History, Emeritus, at the University of Georgia (U.S.A.). His most recent books are The Totalitarian Experiment in Twentieth-Century Europe: Understanding the Poverty of Great Politics (Routledge, 2006) and Historicism and Fascism in Modern Italy (Toronto, 2007). Among his earlier writings on Benedetto Croce are Benedetto Croce and the Uses of Historicism (California, 1987); Nothing but History: Reconstruction and Extremity after Metaphysics (California, 1995); and Una nuova interpretazione del pensiero di Croce: Lo storicismo crociano e il pensiero contemporaneo (Istituti Editoriali e Poligrafici Internazionali, 1995).
article  paywall  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  historiography  historiography-19thC  realism  narrative  philosophy_of_history  historicism  White_Hayden  Croce  postmodern  epistemology-history  historians-and-politics 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jose Rabasa, Masayuki Sato, Edoardo Tortarolo, Daniel Woolf - The Oxford History of Historical Writing: Volume 3: 1400-1800 : : Amazon.com:
Volume III of The Oxford History of Historical Writing contains essays by leading scholars on the writing of history globally during the early modern era, from 1400 to 1800. The volume proceeds in geographic order from east to west, beginning in Asia and ending in the Americas. It aims at once to provide a selective but authoritative survey of the field and, where opportunity allows, to provoke cross-cultural comparisons. This is the third of five volumes in a series that explores representations of the past from the beginning of writing to the present day, and from all over the world. -- only hdbk
books  amazon.com  find  libraries  historiography  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  Renaissance  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historians-and-state  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  China  India  Ottomans  Italy  Germany  France  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  philosophes  philosophy_of_history  philology  antiquaries  evidence  scepticism 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, by Simon Blackburn | Answers.com
The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, by Simon Blackburn, Oxford University Press
This dictionary covers every aspect of philosophy from Aristotle to Zen. Entries include biographies of famous and influential philosophers, in-depth analysis of philosophical terms and concepts, a chronology of philosophical events from antiquity to the present day, and coverage of themes from Chinese, Indian, Islamic and Jewish philosophy.
books  etexts  reference  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_religion  metaphysics  metaethics  epistemology  ontology  logic  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  political_philosophy 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
RANDOLPH C. HEAD -- DOCUMENTS, ARCHIVES, AND PROOF AROUND 1700 (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 909-930 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RANDOLPH C. HEAD - University of California, Riverside -- Jean Mabillon's De re diplomatica, whose importance for diplomatics and the philosophy of history is well recognized, also contributed to the seventeenth-century European debate over the relationship among documents, archives, and historical or juridical proof. This article juxtaposes early works on diplomatics by Mabillon, Daniel Papebroche, and Barthélémy Germon against German ius archivi theorists including Rutger Ruland and Ahasver Fritsch to reveal two incommensurate approaches that emerged around 1700 for assessing the authority of written records. Diplomatics concentrated on comparing the material and textual features of individual documents to authentic specimens in order to separate the genuine from the spurious, whereas the ius archivi emphasized the publica fides (public faith) that documents derived from their placement in an authentic sovereign's archive. Diplomatics' emergence as a separate auxiliary science of history encouraged the erasure of archivality from the primary conditions of documentary assessment for historians, however, while the ius archivi's privileging of institutional over material criteria for authority foreshadowed European state practice and the evolution of archivistics into the twentieth century. This article investigates these competing discourses of evidence and their implications from the perspective of early modern archival practices.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  historians  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  France  Germany  humanism  evidence  archives  manuscripts  Mabillon  Académie_des_Inscriptions  scepticism  Europe-Early_Modern  philosophy_of_history  authority  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick H. Hutton - Vico and the End of History | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 537-558
Uses Paul Kennedy as comparator for finding patterns in the past to think about the future, and Fukuyama for apocalyptic philosophy of history -- downloaded pdf to Note - in separate folder for the papers from this special issue
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  Vico  Hegelian  eschatology  declinism  cycles  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Alexander U. Bertland - The Significance of Tacitus in Vico's Idea of History | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 517-535
Suggests Vico found in Tacitus a 3 stage cycle that concludes with "the barbarism of reflection" though in Vico's own narrative he doesn't make the link explicit but slides over the decline and fall of the Roman Empire -- downloaded pdf to Note - in separate folder for the papers from this special issue
article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  Vico  Tacitus  historiography-18thC  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  cycles  stadial_theories  declinism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick H. Hutton - Vico for Historians: An Introduction [dedicated issue to Vico for historians for our time] | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 479-493
Introduction gives a brief biography and discusses each of the papers in the issue, plus a short "further reading" -- Contents *--* Community, Prereflective Virtue, and the Cyclopean Power of the Fathers: Vico's Reflections on Unexpected Consequences (pp. 495-515) Edmund E. Jacobitti. *--* The Significance of Tacitus in Vico's Idea of History (pp. 517-535) Alexander U. Bertland. *--* Vico and the End of History (pp. 537-558) Patrick H. Hutton. *--* Vico, Rhetorical Topics and Historical Thought (pp. 559-585) Catherine L. Hobbs. *--* Situating Vico Between Modern and Postmodern (pp. 587-617) Sandra Rudnick Luft. *--* Interpretations and Misinterpretations of Vico (pp. 619-639) Cecilia Miller -- Introduction and all papers downloaded to Note and in separate folder in Dropbox
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Vico  Enlightenment  historicism  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  ancient_history  poetry  rhetoric  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  stadial_theories  Tacitus  oral_culture  postmodern  reading  reader_response  readership  cycles  human_nature  humanism  hermeticism  hermeneutics  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Historical essays & studies (1907) - Google Books
Contents -- WOLSEY AND THE DIVORCE OF HENRY VIII. *--* The Borgias and their Latest Historian. *--* Secret History of Charles II. *--* The Civil War in America. *--* The Rise and Fall of the Mexican Empire. *--* Cavour. *--* The Causes of the Franco-Prussian War. *--* The War of 1870 *--* German Schools of History *--* Talleyrands Memoirs. *--* The Life of Lord Houghton. *--* A History of the Papacy during the Period of the Reformation. *--* A Sketch Political and Military. *--* Mabillon et la Société de l'Abbaye de Saint Germain des Pres a la Fin du XVIIeme Siècle. *--* A History of England 1837-1880 *--* A History of the French Revolution. *--* George Eliots Life. *--* Mr Buckles Thesis and Method. *--* Mr Buckles Philosophy of History. *--* Wilhelm von Giesebrecht *--* Appendix - Letter to Bishop Creighton -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  intellectual_history  19thC  British_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-17thC  historicism  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Papacy  Henry_VIII  Renaissance  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  French_Revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  Romanticism  German_Idealism  philosophy_of_history  US_Civil_War  Italy  diplomatic_history  Talleyrand  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleon_III  empires  French_Empire  Eliot_George  Franco-German_relations  Franco-Prussian_war  Victorian  Edwardian  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Ends [Blumenberg on infinite progress] - Waggish (2008)
From Chapter 3 of The Legitimacy of the Modern Age -- Nevertheless the idea of infinite progress also has a safeguarding function for the actual individual and for each actual generation in history. If there were an immanent final goal of history, then those who believe they know it and claim to promote its attainment would be legitimized in using all the others who do not know it and cannot promote it as mere means. Infinite progress does make each present relative to its future, but at the same time it renders every absolute claim untenable. This idea of progress corresponds more than anything else to the only regulative principle that can make history humanly bearable, which is that all dealings must be so constituted that through them people do not become mere means.
intellectual_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  17thC  18thC  progress  philosophy_of_history  Blumenberg 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Alexandre Kojeve, The Notion of Authority (trans Hager Weslati) | Kindle Store Amazon.com:
Alexandre Kojève has been an often subterranean influence on twentieth century thought. With his profound interpretation of Hegel he became a key reference for such varied thinkers as Jean-Paul Sartre, André Breton, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, and Leo Strauss. He returned to prominence after the collapse of the Soviet Union, as the surprise inspiration for Francis Fukuyama's notorious thesis in The End of History.

In The Notion of Authority, written in the 1940s in Nazi-occupied France, he uncovers the conceptual premises of four primary models of authority and examines the practical application of their derivative variations from the Enlightenment to Vichy France. This foundational text, here translated into English for the first time, is the missing piece in any discussion of sovereignty and political authority, ready to take its place alongside the work of Weber, Arendt, Schmitt, Agamben or Dumézil. The Notion of Authority is a short and sophisticated introduction to Kojève's philosophy of right, while in the context of his biography its significance resides in the fact it captures his puzzling intellectual interests at a time when he retired from the profession of philosophy and was about to become one of the pioneers of the Common Market and the idea of the European Union.
books  kindle-available  20thC  intellectual_history  social_theory  political_philosophy  sovereignty  authority  Hegelians-French  Hegelian  philosophy_of_history  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall review - Erich Auerbach, Time, History and Literature » 3:AM Magazine
Erich Auerbach, Time, History, and Literature, Princeton University Press 2013 - blurb -- "Time, History, and Literature presents a wide selection of Auerbach’s essays, many of which are little known outside the German-speaking world. Of the 20 essays culled for this volume from the full length of his career, 12 have never appeared in English before, and one is being published for the first time. Foregrounded in this major new collection are Auerbach’s complex relationship to the Judaeo-Christian tradition, his philosophy of time and history, and his theory of human ethics and responsible action. Auerbach effectively charts out the difficult discovery, in the wake of Christianity, of the sensuous, the earthly, and the human and social worlds. A number of the essays reflect Auerbach’s responses to an increasingly hostile National Socialist environment. These writings offer a challenging model of intellectual engagement, one that remains as compelling today as it was in Auerbach’s own time.” -- James I. Porter is professor of classics and comparative literature at the University of California, Irvine. His books include Nietzsche and the Philology of the Future and The Origins of Aesthetic Thought in Ancient Greece. Jane O. Newman is professor of comparative literature at the University of California, Irvine. Her books include The Intervention of Philology and Benjamin’s Library.’ They’ve put together a terrific book.
books  reviews  amazon.com  intellectual_history  philology  historicism  historiography  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_religion  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  Vico  Hegel  20thC  Germany  entre_deux_guerres  bildung  Judaism  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  Christianity  Early_Christian  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - On Some Problems with Weak Intentionalism for Intellectual History [forum re Bevir's Logic] | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 41, No. 2, May, 2002
This paper argues that the notion of weak intentionalism in Mark Bevir's The Logic of the History of Ideas is incoherent. Bevir's proposal for weak intentionalism as procedural individualism relies on the argument that the object of study for historians of ideas is given by the beliefs that are expressed by individuals (whether authors or readers) since these beliefs constitute the historical meaning of the work for those individuals as historical figures. Historical meanings are thus hermeneutic meanings. In the case of insincere, unconscious, and irrational beliefs, however, the beliefs expressed by individuals are not in fact their actual beliefs, and their actual beliefs are now taken to be those expressed by the works. It thus turns out that it is not the beliefs expressed by individuals that are the object of study for historians but the works themselves, since the overriding requirement for historians of ideas is to "make sense of their material" and it is this requirement that determines whether or not the beliefs are to be construed as expressed by individuals or by the works. But once it is accepted that the beliefs that are the object of study for historians are expressed by the works and not by individuals, the original argument that such beliefs are historical hermeneutic meanings for historical figures no longer applies. The argument for weak intentionalism thus turns out to be incoherent. Bevir's argument fails to establish that the object of study for the history of ideas is external to the works, and the attempted distinction between interpreting a work and reading a text also fails. -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  philosophy_of_history  historiography  philosophy_of_social_science  historicism  intentionality  hermeneutics  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Symposium: Assessing and Extending Bevir's "The Logic of the History of Ideas" | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 4, October 2012
(1) Revisiting the Middle Way: "The Logic of the History of Ideas" after More Than a Decade (pp. 583-592) Daniel I. O'Neill *--* (2) "The Logic of the History of Ideas": Mark Bevir and Michael Oakeshott (pp. 593-607) Martyn P. Thompson. *--* (3) A Moderate Logic of the History of Ideas (pp. 609-625) A. P. Martinich. *--* (4) "The Logic of the History of Ideas" and the Study of Comparative Political Theory (pp. 627-641) Sara R. Jordan and Cary J. Nederman. *--* (5) The Logic of the Historian and the Logic of the Citizen (pp. 643-655) Amit Ron. *--* (6) Post-Analytic Historicism (pp. 657-665) Mark Bevir -- update - no longer behind paywall - downloaded all to Note
books  journal  article  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  postanalytic_philosophy  post-foundational  historicism  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Power: A Response to Critics [eScholarship] | Rethinking History (2000)
This is Bevir's response to the roundtable of articles on his book, The Logic of the History of Ideas -- Additional Info: This is an electronic version of an article published in Rethinking History© 2000 Copyright Taylor & Francis; Rethinking History is available online at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13642529.asp -- Keywords:
hermeneutics, intentionality, philosophy, power, rationality, rhetoric
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  concepts  historical_change  historiography  narrative  White_Hayden  power  Foucault  intentionality  meaning  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rationality  agency  individualism-methodology  philosophy_of_language  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - The Logic of the History of Ideas [eScholarship] | Rethinking History (2000)
A summary of his main arguments in his book of the same name. The journal followed with a symposium, to which Bevir resoonded -- see separate bookmark. -- This is an electronic version of an article published in Rethinking History© 2000 Copyright Taylor & Francis; Rethinking History is available online at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13642529.asp -- Keywords: belief, hermeneutics, history, ideas, philosophy, Wittgenstein -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  historiography  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  ideology  belief  Wittgenstein  post-foundational  interpretivism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Historical Understanding and the Human Sciences [eScholarship] (2007)
Looks like this is the introductory article for a 2007 issue of the Journal of the Philosophy of History in which Bevir also contributed a separate article (on national histories? ) Starts with verstehen and then puts it into post-positivist context. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  historiography  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_social_science  verstehen  interpretivism  hermeneutics  postanalytic_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Anglophone Historicism: From Modernist Method to Post-analytic Philosophy [eScholarship] (2009)
Original Citation:
Mark Bevir, “Anglophone Historicism: From Modernist Method to Post-analytic Philosophy”, Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (2009), 211-224

Keywords:
Historicism, Modernism, Postanalytic Philosophy, Quentin Skinner
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  historiography  20thC  historicism  Modernism  positivism  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  concepts  meaning  Skinner  Cambridge_School  contextualism  postanalytic_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Georg G. Iggers - Historicism: The History and Meaning of the Term | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 56, No. 1 (Jan., 1995), pp. 129-152
Supplements his discussion in his historiography book, I hope. Published before but same year as Ankersmit's article. Jstor information page has no abstract or bibliography. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  19thC  20thC  Germany  historicism  Ranke  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  Methodenstreit  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Wim Weymans - Michel de Certeau and the Limits of Historical Representation | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 43, No. 2 (May, 2004), pp. 161-178
The polymath Michel de Certeau is traditionally seen as one of a group of French post-structuralist thinkers who reject constructs in the social sciences in favor of the diversity of the everyday or the past. However, in this paper I will show that, as a historian, Certeau did not discard these constructs, but rather valued them as a means of doing justice to the "strangeness" of the past. The position that Certeau adopts can be seen most clearly from his theoretical debate with Paul Veyne, which is the starting point of this article. I then show how Certeau's first major historical work, The Possession at Loudun, exemplifies his theoretical position. An analysis of this work demonstrates how the historian's active reconstruction of interactions between exorcists, medical doctors, state officers, and possessed nuns helps us to perceive the complexity of the past in a way that can be seen as a microhistory avant la lettre. I will suggest that during his writing of the history of Loudun, Certeau implicitly raises more theoretical and epistemological problems, and in so doing he "practices" a theory of history. The most elusive aspect of the story at Loudun turns out to be the drama around the priest Grandier. This article demonstrates how Certeau pays tribute to Grandier by using "scientific" methods, thus showing the "limits of representation" through disciplinary means. Finally, the article explores the implications of Certeau's theory and practice of the writing of history for understanding historiography at large. The historian not only appears as a tramp who looks for remains that are forever lost to us, but is also a "scientist" who uses both models and concepts in order to put them to the test. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  20thC  historicism  new_historicism  poststructuralist  postmodern  microhistory  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
F. R. Ankersmit - Reply to Professor Iggers | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Oct., 1995), pp. 168-173
Forum: The Meaning of Historicism and Its Relevance for Contemporary Theory -- Professor Iggers's main target in his critique of my essay is my preference for the historicist over the Enlightenment conception of the past. I agree with Iggers that in contemporary historical theory and contemporary philosophy of language many effective arguments against historicism can be found. I argue, however, that these arguments lose much of their cogency if we recognize that the historicist notion of "the historical idea" can be redefined to satisfy both the requirements of actual historical practice and contemporary philosophy of language. The main task of the contemporary theoretician is not to reject historicism but to recognize and to discover its intellectual riches, and to repair it whenever and wherever necessary. -- see both Ankersmit's original article and Iggers response to article -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  historicism  style-history  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Georg G. Iggers - Comments on F. R. Ankersmit's Paper, "Historicism: An Attempt at Synthesis" | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Oct., 1995), pp. 162-167
"Forum: The Meaning of Historicism and Its Relevance for Contemporary Theory" -- My differences with F. R. Ankersmit's essay are historiographical and theoretical. On the historiographical plane I disagree with the sharp distinction he draws between the "ontological realism" of Enlightenment historiography and the historical outlook of classical historicism. An examination of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire shows that Gibbon indeed takes into account internal changes in the Roman Empire. Ranke and Droysen on the other hand assume that the subjects of their study, whether the Papacy or the Prussian state, preserve their identity through time. And in their attempt to "raise history to the rank of a science" (Droysen), historicists in seeking to show wie es eigentlich gewesen (Ranke), go farther in the direction of realism than do Enlightenment historians who are keenly aware of the role of perspective and of the literary and aesthetic aspects of historical writing. On the theoretical plane, although I agree with Ankersmit that metaphor occupies a central role in historical discourse, I disagree when he writes that "coherence has its source either in reality or in the language we use for speaking about it. There is no third possibility." I argue that while reality can be approached only through the mediation of language and metaphor, these presuppose a reality which can be known, no matter how complex and mediated the process of cognitive approximation may be. Rejecting historical realism, Ankersmit nevertheless wants to "encounter the past with the same directness with which anthropologists encounter the alien culture," and thus to escape "all the ideological and emancipatory pretensions of its historiographical predecessor." Yet the very "new cultural history" he takes as an example shows that this cannot be done. -- see both Ankersmit's original article and Ankersmit's response essay downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Gibbon  Germany  historicism  historical_change  style-history  metaphor  Ranke  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
F. R. Ankersmit - Historicism: An Attempt at Synthesis | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Oct., 1995), pp. 143-161
Lead article in "Forum: The Meaning of Historicism and Its Relevance for Contemporary Theory" -- According to German theorists historicism was the result of a dynamization of the static world-view of the Enlightenment. According to contemporary Anglo-Saxon theorists historicism resulted from a de-rhetoricization of Enlightenment historical writing. It is argued that, contrary to appearances, these two views do not exclude but support each other. This can be explained if the account of (historical) change implicit in Enlightenment historical writing is compared to that suggested by historicism and, more specifically, by the historicist notion of the "historical idea." Aspects of the contemporary debate about the nature and the task of historical writing can be clarified from the perspective of the differences between Enlightenment and historicist historical writing. -- see response article by Iggers and Ankersmit's response -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Germany  historicism  philosophy_of_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  belles-lettres  rhetoric-writing  historical_change  prose  style-history  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Allan Megill, review - Thomas R. Flynn, Sartre, Foucault, and Historical Reason. Volume 1: Toward an Existentialist Theory of History | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2000), pp. 233-235
Reviewed work(s): Sartre, Foucault, and Historical Reason. Volume 1: Toward an Existentialist Theory of History. By Thomas R. Flynn. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1997. Pp. xvi+340. $55.00 (cloth); $18.95 (paper). -- Allan Megill, University of Virginia Part 1, embracing chapters 1–4, seems to me of compelling interest. In the first two chapters Flynn recounts Sartre's early confrontation, in the period before L'Être et le néant, with Aron and with the French Hegelians, and in the next two he addresses the ethical concern that became manifest in Cahiers pour une morale. -- Against Aron he articulated a historical realism; in conversation with the Hegelians he attempted to show how history has an overall shape and unity. -- In the two chapters of part 3 Flynn turns to the poetics of history (drawing on recent work by Frank Ankersmit and others) and to Foucault's inversion of Sartre. Here, too, the discussion is generally interesting because of the aliveness of the issues addressed.

To this reader what is most important, in a book rich in insights, is its highlighting of the relation between history and ethics. After the poetics and aesthetics of history, perhaps now the ethics? In this regard, to look at Foucault in tandem with Sartre seems a promising project: beginning in a Nietzschean vein as a critic of the ethical, Foucault turned in his final work to “the constitution of the moral self.”
books  reviews  jstor  kindle-available  intellectual_history  20thC  philosophy_of_history  Sartre  Aron  existentialism  Hegelians-French  Foucault  ethics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Allan Megill, review - Thomas R. Flynn, Sartre, Foucault, and Historical Reason, volume 2: A Poststructuralist Mapping of History | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 79, No. 2 (June 2007), pp. 389-391
Reviewed work(s): Sartre, Foucault, and Historical Reason, volume 2: A Poststructuralist Mapping of History . By Thomas R. Flynn. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2005. Pp. xviii+390. $25.00. -- Allan Megill, University of Virginia -- Flynn insists... that from 1961 onward Foucault’s oeuvre was of a piece. Rather than giving an account of Foucault’s development over time, Flynn elaborates on ...three persisting “axes” in Foucault’s work. The first axis was his concern with knowledge, or truth; the second, his concern with power, or governmentality; and the third, his concern with “subjectivation,” or ethics (144). “Subjectivation” refers to the process by which different kinds of human subjects arise under different regimes of knowledge and power. This “making” of subjects has a close relation to ethics, for in the Foucauldian conceptual universe ethics is a matter of one’s mode of relation to oneself. According to Flynn, these three objects of attention—knowledge, power, and subjectivation—correlate with three Foucauldian “methods”: “archaeology,” “genealogy,” and a third method that Flynn, following some hints by Foucault, calls “problematization.” This last so‐called method involves a probing of how, in Flynn’s words, “a practice shifts from unexceptional to problematic in the cultural life of a community” (17).
books  kindle  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  philosophy_of_history  Foucault  Sartre  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomasa H. Brobjer - Nietzsche's Relation to Historical Methods and Nineteenth-Century German Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 46, No. 2 (May, 2007), pp. 155-179
Nietzsche is generally regarded as a severe critic of historical method and scholarship; this view has influenced much of contemporary discussions about the role and nature of historical scholarship. In this article I argue that this view is seriously mistaken (to a large degree because of the somewhat misleading nature of Vom Nutzen und Nachtheil der Historie für das Leben). I do so by examining what he actually says about understanding history and historical method, as well as his relation to the founders of modem German historiography (Wolf, Niebuhr, Ranke, and Mommsen). I show, contrary to most expectations, that Nietzsche knew these historians well and that he fundamentally affirmed their view of historical method. What he primarily objected to among his contemporaries was that historical scholarship was often regarded as a goal in itself, rather than as a means, and consequently that history was placed above philosophy. In fact, a historical approach was essential for Nietzsche's whole understanding of philosophy, and his own philosophical project.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  19thC  Nietzsche  historicism  Germany  Study_and_Uses  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC -- De la vérité: Pragmatisme, historicisme et relativisme | JSTOR: Rue Descartes, No. 5/6, Novembre 1992
Avant-propos (pp. 9-10) *-* PART 1 *-* A-t-on besoin du vrai ? Le défi pragmatique *-* *-- (1) Qu'est-ce que le pragmaticisme ? (pp. 13-21) Charles Sanders Peirce and Jacques Poulain. *-- (2) Le partage de l'héritage anticartésien de C.S. Peirce : D. Davidson, H. Putnam et R. Rorty (pp. 23-52) Jacques Poulain. *-- (3) Dewey entre Hegel et Darwin (pp. 53-71) Richard Rorty and Patrick Sauret. *-- (4) Wittgenstein, la vérité et le passé de la philosophie (pp. 73-93) Hilary Putnam and Patrick Sauret. *-* PART 2 *-* Historicisme ou essentialisme ? L'alternative épistémologique. *-- (5) L'état de la théorie du langage chez Richard Rorty (pp. 97-109) Henri Meschonnic. *-- (6) Des tournants historiques (pp. 111-120) Jonathan Rée. *-- (7) La réalisation linguistique de la vérité (pp. 121-141) Aldo G. Gargani and Patrick Sauret. *-* PART 3 Les fins de l'histoire pragmatique : la justice libérale et le Bien communautaire *-* *-- (8) Les limites du libéralisme. De l'éthique politique aux États-Unis aujourd'hui (pp. 145-157) Axel Honneth and Patrick Sauret. *-- (9) Les Lumières et l'esprit juif ou la raison des vaincus (pp. 159-175) Reyès Maté and Catherine Ballestero. *-- (9) Vérité, contingence et modernité (pp. 177-194) Albrecht Wellmer and Marie-Noëlle Ryan. *-* PART 4 *-* Le « bonheur » de l'homme pragmatique *-* *-- (10) L'esthétique pragmatique de Rorty (pp. 197-208) Rainer Rochlitz. *-- (11) L'esthetique postmoderne du rap (pp. 209-228) Richard Shusterman
journal  article  jstor  20thC  historiography  epistemology  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  aesthetics  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  cultural_critique  modernity  contingency  continental_philosophy  pragmatism  historicism  relativism  postmodern  liberalism  critical_theory  Peirce  Dewey  Rorty  Putnam  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eelco Runia - Presence | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 45, No. 1 (Feb., 2006), pp. 1-29
For more than thirty years now, thinking about the way we, humans, account for our past has taken place under the aegis of representationalism. In its first two decades, representationalism, inaugurated by Hayden White's Metahistory of 1973, has been remarkably successful, but by now it has lost much of its vigor and it lacks explanatory power when faced with recent phenomena such as memory, lieux de mémoire, remembrance, and trauma. It might be argued that many of the shortcomings of representationalism spring from the fact that it is exclusively geared to "transfer of meaning." This essay posits that what may be called "presence" ("the unrepresented way the past is present in the present") is at least as important as "meaning." "Presence" can be dealt with by employing a "topical" view of history (in the manner of, for example, Vico) in which the whole of history is stored in "places" (that is, "institutions") that can be "visited" on the plane of the present. Presence can be said to be stored in metonymy. Whereas metaphor is instrumental in the"transfer of meaning," metonymy brings about a "transfer of presence." A metonymy is a "presence in absence" not just in the sense that it presents something that isn't there, but also in the sense that in the absence (or at least the radical inconspicuousness) that is there, the thing that isn't there is still present. The presence of the past thus does not reside primarily in the intended story or the manifest metaphorical content of the text, but in what story and text contain in spite of the intentions of the historian. One might say that historical reality travels with historiography not as a paying passenger but as a stowaway. As a stowaway, as what is absently and unintentionally present on the plane of time, metonymy is a metaphor for discontinuity, or, rather, for the entwinement of continuity and discontinuity.
article  jstor  historiography  philosophy_of_history  meaning  presence  absence  deconstruction  memory_studies 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Alexander Macfie, review Experience and its Modes | Reviews in History
In order to understand the character of history, the philosopher, in Oakeshott’s view, must first discover the system of postulates that underlies it – the differentia of the historical mode. In Oakeshott’s opinion the five most important of these are: the idea of past, of fact, of truth, of reality and of explanation. The past, as a postulate of history, is not the remembered past. Nor is it the practical (useful) past, the fancied (imagined) past, or the whole past. It is the past conceived ‘for its own sake’ as a dead past, inferred from the evidence of a past that has survived into the present. The ‘historical past’, in other words, is a constructed past, made up of ‘what the evidence obliges us to believe’.... only inferred. To attempt to construct a history that somehow corresponds to ‘what was’, ‘what really happened’, would be to pursue a phantom .... As such history (the historically understood past) contains no lessons, justifies no meaning and sends no messages. Such interpretations of experiences belong purely to the practical mode of understanding, which should not be confused with the historical.... [In later] essays Oakeshott continued to think of history as an autonomous mode of understanding the world, but he no longer identified philosophical experience as ‘experience without presupposition, reservation, arrest or modification’, and history as a defective mode of that experience, as he had done in Experience and Its Modes. And where, in Experience and Its Modes he had tended to underestimate the importance of language in understanding, in On History he paid it much more attention, placing each mode of understanding separately in an autonomous universe of discourse.
books  reviews  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_science  20thC  Oakeshott 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adam Timmins, review - Kerwin Lee Klein, From History to Theory (2011) | Reviews in History
Recommended -- Timmins gives high marks for 1st chapters from professionalization thru logical positivism and obsession with covering laws. Next 2 (linguistic and cultural turns) weaker mostly because they had little impact on actual practice of historians. Tyen picks up with Memory Studies. "However, the Holocaust argument is not the only one that can made to account for the rise of Memory. Pierre Nora has argued that ‘we are obsessed with memory because we have destroyed it with historical consciousness’. Another argument posits that memory ‘is a new category of experience that grew out of the modernist crisis of the self in the nineteenth century and then gradually evolved into our current usage’. A third states that ‘memory is a mode of discourse natural to people without a history, and so its emergence is a salutary feature of decolonization’. However, none of these explanations on their own can fully account for the memory boom. The roots of the rise in memory lead into Klein’s’ final chapter, which ‘takes off the academic gown’ and examines how memory is used by the right-wing Christian movement in the US to reduce history to eschatology."
books  reviews  intellectual_history  historiography  20thC  Logical_Positivism  analytical_philosophy  philosophy_of_history  linguistic_turn  postmodern  memory_studies  right-wing  eschatology 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adam Timmins, review - Peter Icke, Frank Ankersmit's Lost Historical Cause: A Journey from Language to Experience (2011) | Reviews in History IHR
The lesson here for all philosophers of history is that one has to do due diligence when entering the realm of the philosophy of science – more often than not, cherry picking will come back to haunt one...... Icke quotes Martin Davies/ George Steiner to the effect that the past is thinkable and knowable only through the current semiotic or symbolic system – history in the human sense is a language net cast backwards. The inference seems to be that language provides an inescapable conceptual scheme which must inevitably circumscribe how we view historical evidence, or the remains of the-past-in-itself. Therefore, unmediated access to the past itself is impossible. But the fact that we cannot gain unmediated access to the past does not mean that we cannot find out anything about it at all..... Indeed, many philosophers of science are now arguing for something like anti-representationalist theory of objectivity, or at the very least, a modest form of realism. Herein lies one of the problems with postmodernist historical theorists – the pendulum swings from one extreme to the other. Historians are attributed with striving for a hard version of epistemic realism; a position which is then rejected, and the conclusion is drawn that all that is left is an equally extreme constructivism. As William Child, writing about Davidson’s moderate realism points out, ‘the realists’ claim that some [conceptual] classifications are more natural than others need not appeal to Archimedean points or the imagined comparisons between them’.
books  reviews  historiography  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  ontology  epistemology  postmodern  Rorty  Kuhn 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
ETHAN KLEINBERG -- BACK TO WHERE WE'VE NEVER BEEN: HEIDEGGER, LEVINAS, AND DERRIDA ON TRADITION AND HISTORY | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 51, No. 4 (December 2012), pp. 114-135
This paper will address the topic of "tradition" by exploring the ways that Martin Heidegger, Emmanuel Levinas, and Jacques Derrida each looked to return to traditional texts in order to overcome a perceived crisis or delimiting fault in the contemporary thought of their respective presents. For Heidegger, this meant a return to the pre-Socratics of "early Greek thinking." For Levinas, it entailed a return to the sacred Jewish texts of the Talmud. For Derrida, it was the return to texts that embodied the "Western metaphysical tradition," be it by Plato, Descartes, Rousseau, or Marx. I then want to ask whether these reflections can be turned so as to shed light on three resilient trends in the practice of history that I will label positivist, speculative or teleological, and constructivist. By correlating the ways that Heidegger, Levinas, and Derrida utilize and employ "tradition" with the historical trends of positivism, speculative/teleological history, and constructivism, I hope to produce an engagement between theorists whose concerns implicate history even though they may not be explicitly historical, and historians who may not realize the ways that their work coincides with the claims of these theorists.
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  historiography  20thC  Heidegger  Derrida  tradition 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian O’Connor interviewed by Richard Marshall - Adorno’s negative dialectic and so on » 3:AM Magazine Nov 2013
Brian O’Connor ponders the appeal of philosophy, German Idealism, Adorno and his response, the idea of a damaged life, the catastrophe of the Nazi era, what there is about Adorno that drives Hegelians crazy, on the conditions for understanding the social world, about philosophy’s historical situation, Adorno’s negative dialectic, immanent vs transcendent criticism, on Adorno’s moral theory, his relationship to music, his relationship with Benjamin, on self-constitution and autonomy and on the foolishness of analytic/continental restrictions. They should sell postcards for this one…
20thC  Germany  intellectual_history  continental_philosophy  German_Idealism  Enlightenment_Project  philosophy_of_history  Hegelian  moral_philosophy  aesthetics  modernity  Modernism  Frankfurt_School  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Donald R. Kelley: Eclecticism and the History of Ideas (2001)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 62, No. 4 (Oct., 2001), pp. 577-592 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- work for his book Descent of Ideas -- history of intellectual history
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  18thC  19thC  20thC  Lovejoy  eclecticism  philosophy_of_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Tim Lacy - The Lovejovian Roots of Adler's Philosophy of History: Authority, Democracy, Irony, and Paradox in Britannica's Great Books of the Western World (2010)
Project MUSE - Tim Lacy. "The Lovejovian Roots of Adler's Philosophy of History: Authority, Democracy, Irony, and Paradox in Britannica's Great Books of the Western World." Journal of the History of Ideas 71.1 (2010): 113-137......Downloaded pdf to Note - also available in html -- This article explores how Mortimer J. Adler's philosophy of history, as it developed from the 1930s through the 1950s, affected the construction of Encyclopedia Britannica's Great Books of the Western World and the same set's Syntopicon. A thorough examination of Adler's influences (e.g. Arthur O. Lovejoy, Jacques Maritain, and Columbia University faculty) demonstrates that his philosophy of history derived from a coincidental confluence of developments in the fields of literature, history, and philosophy. Adler's processing of these trends reveals both irony and paradox, and also explains some philosophical objections articulated by later foes of the great books idea.

"Depending on one's own philosophy of history and beliefs about human nature, the Syntopicon either embodied Adler's paradox and the fallacy of presentism, or else stood as a tall marker against the fallacy of historicism. Ultimately, the maxim of the eighteenth-century author Henry St. John, the Lord Viscount Bolingbroke, best approximates Adler's professional commitment: "History is philosophy teaching by examples." "-- NOOOOOO,!!!!
article  Project_MUSE  intellectual_history  historiography  20thC  anti-Communist  culture_wars  philosophy_of_history  canon  Lovejoy  Bolingbroke  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
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