dunnettreader + patriarchy   21

Joanne Bailey - Unquiet Lives: Marriage and Marriage Breakdown in England, 1660–1800 (2003) | Cambridge University Press
Drawing upon vivid court records and newspaper advertisements, this study challenges traditional views of married life in 18thC England. It reveals husbands' and wives' expectations and experiences of marriage to expose the extent of co-dependency between spouses. The book, therefore, presents a new picture of power in marriage and the household. It also demonstrates how attitudes towards adultery and domestic violence evolved during this period, influenced by profound shifts in cultural attitudes about sexuality and violence.
- An unusually detailed model of married life in the eighteenth century, which stresses co-dependency between husband and wife
- Charts thinking towards violence and adultery in the eighteenth century, focusing as much on men's needs and dependence as on those of women
1. Introduction: assessing marriage
2. 'To have and to hold': analysing married life
3. 'For better, for worse': resolving marital difficulties
4. 'An honourable estate': marital roles in the household
5. 'With all my worldly goods I thee endow': spouses' contributions and possessions within marriage
6. 'Wilt thou obey him and serve him': the marital power balance
7. 'Forsaking all other': marital chastity
8. 'Till death us do part': life after a failed marriage
9. 'Mutual society, help and comfort': conclusion
downloaded intro via AIR
books  downloaded  17thC  18thC  British_history  social_theory  gender_history  cultural_history  sex  chastity  adultery  marriage  family  property_rights  women-legal_status  authority  patriarchy  gender  identity  masculinity  femininity  violence  judiciary  Church_of_England  inheritance  children  church_courts  reform-social 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Jones (HBS Working Papers 2013) - Debating the Responsibility of Capitalism in Historical and Global Perspective
This working paper examines the evolution of concepts of the responsibility of business in a historical and global perspective. It shows that from the nineteenth century American, European, Japanese, Indian and other business leaders discussed the responsibilities of business beyond making profits, although until recently such views have not been mainstream. There was also a wide variation concerning the nature of this responsibility. This paper argues that four factors drove such beliefs: spirituality; self-interest; fears of government intervention; and the belief that governments were incapable of addressing major social issues.

Keywords: Rachel Carson; Sustainability; Local Food; Operations Management; Supply Chain; Business And Society; Business Ethics; Business History; Corporate Philanthropy; Corporate Social Responsibility; Corporate Social Responsibility And Impact; Environmentalism; Environmental Entrepreneurship; Environmental And Social Sustainability; Ethics; Globalization; History; Religion; Consumer Products Industry; Chemical Industry; Beauty and Cosmetics Industry; Energy Industry; Food and Beverage Industry; Forest Products Industry; Green Technology Industry; Manufacturing Industry; Asia; Europe; Latin America; Middle East; North and Central America; Africa
paper  downloaded  economic_history  business_history  imperialism  US  British_Empire  France  Germany  Japan  Spain  Dutch  Latin_America  Ottoman_Empire  India  18thC  19thC  20thC  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  business  busisness-ethics  business-and-politics  common_good  communitarian  environment  labor  patriarchy  paternalism  labor_standards  regulation  product_safety  inequality  comparative_economics  capital_as_power  capitalism  CSR  political_economy  economic_culture  economic_sociology  self-interest  ideology 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Rebecca Ann Bach - (Re)placing John Donne in the History of Sexuality | JSTOR: ELH, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Spring, 2005), pp. 259-289
Interesting challenge to readings that ignore Donne's religion, his culture's attitudes towards women and sex, and the blatant misogyny in his verse -as well as the question what "heterosexual identity" would have meant for him since readers interested in modern sexuality have identified him as where we can start identifying with him as a "modern" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  cultural_history  social_history  gender_history  lit_crit  historiography  17thC  English_lit  Donne  poetry  sexuality  heterosexuality  identity  self  self-fashioning  theology  patriarchy  misogyny  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Derek Hirst and Steven Zwicker - Andrew Marvell and the Toils of Patriarchy: Fatherhood, Longing, and the Body Politic | JSTOR: ELH, Vol. 66, No. 3 (Fall, 1999), pp. 629-654
More of Hirst and Zwicker repositioning Marvell and his poetry and politics after their important reading of Appleton House - they're especially interested in Marvell's personal tortured relations with father figures, patronage and loss of patrons, and homoeroticism -- didn't download
article  jstor  literary_history  lit_crit  political_philosophy  English_lit  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Restoration  Marvell  poetry  patronage  homosexuality  Cromwell  Biblical_allusion  patriarchy  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
FROM THE ARCHIVES: Review of David Cannadine, Ornamentalism: How the British Saw Their Empire (Allen Lane, 2001) | Pandaemonium
There may seem to be something wilfully perverse about the idea that 19thC Britain, or its empire, was ‘less racist’ than the contemporary nation. Nevertheless there is an element of truth to Cannadine’s argument. 19thC thinkers and administrators combined a belief in natural inequality with a belief in the ‘universality’ of the world – the conviction that they lived in ‘one vast interconnected world’, as Cannadine puts it. Today, in the post-Holocaust era, we have by and large rejected ideas of natural inequality – but also ideas of universality. Indeed, in the ‘West and the Rest’ tradition, universalism is itself regarded as a product of racism, a means by which the West has silenced the voices of the Rest. The consequence has been not the embrace of equality, but the reframing of inequality as ‘difference’. We have managed to combine today a formal belief in equality with the practical creation of a more fractious, fragmented, identity-driven world. Against this background, the moral of Cannadine’s story is not so much that an empire built ‘on individual inequality, had ways of dealing with race that contemporary societies, dedicated to collective equality do not’. It is rather that an age that enjoyed a bullish belief in the ‘sameness’ of the word possessed certain resources to cope with problems of difference that we no longer do, despite the fact that race and inequality were much more central aspects of the Victorian world-view. If we truly want to bury Victorian ideas of inequality, then we must repossess their belief in universality.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  social_order  hierarchy  patriarchy  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  global_system  universalism  identity  identity_politics  racism  equality  difference  Other  Victorian  national_ID  post-WWII  post-colonial  Great_Divergence  orientalism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d [1681] - Online Library of Liberty
James Tyrrell, Patriarcha non monarcha. The Patriarch unmonarch’d: Being Observations on a late treatise and divers other miscellanies, published under the name of Sir Robert Filmer Baronet. In which the falseness of those opinions that would make monarchy Jure Divino are laid open: and the true Principles of Government and Property (especially in our Kingdom) asserted. By a Lover of Truth and of his Country (London: Richard Janeway, 1681). 07/14/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2168> -- Tyrrell was a friend and supporter of John Locke who also joined in the battle against the ideas in support of the divine right of kings expressed in the work of Sir Robert Filmer. There is much in this book about the power of the husband over his wife and servants and to what extent these powers are applicable to a monarch who claims similar rights over his subjects. -- html version available for kindle or as pdf
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  1680s  Exclusion_Crisis  Whigs  English_constitution  government-forms  Tyrrell  Filmer  divine_right  limited_monarchy  authority  patriarchy  family  property  liberty  Absolutism  Locke  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Fred Clark - The Stupidest Thing I Have Ever Read | Slacktavist June 2014
-- This is from Religion Dispatches, by Patricia Miller titled, “The Story Behind the Catholic Church’s Stunning Reversal on Contraception” -- Here’s Miller: "The [papal] commission voted overwhelmingly to recommend that the ban against artificial means of birth control be lifted. -- Unhappy with the direction of the commission, the Vatican packed the last commission meetings with 15. But even the bishops voted 9 to 3 (3 abstained) to change the teaching, -- Despite the commission’s years of work and theologically unassailable conclusion that the church’s teaching on birth control was neither infallible nor irreversible, Pope Paul VI stunned the world on July 29, 1968, when he reaffirmed the church’s ban on modern contraceptives in Humanae Vitae. -- The pope had deferred to a minority report prepared by 4 conservative theologian priests that said the church could not change its teaching on birth control because admitting the church had been wrong about the issue for centuries would raise questions about the moral authority of the pope, especially on matters of sexuality, and the belief that the Holy Spirit guided his pronouncements. “The Church cannot change her answer because this answer is true. … It is true because the Catholic Church, instituted by Christ … could not have so wrongly erred during all those centuries of its history,” they wrote. As one of the conservative theologians famously asked one of the female members of the commission, what would happen to “the millions we have sent to hell” for using contraception if the teaching were suddenly changed.
religious_history  church_history  Catholics  Papacy  papal_infallibility  20thC  sexuality  feminism  patriarchy  women-work  women-rights  family  authority  tradition  links  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Tom Leng, review - Brodie Waddell. God, Duty and Community in English Economic Life, 1660-1720 (2012) | H-Net Reviews April 2013
In his first book, Brodie Waddell seeks to bring the realm of culture to bear upon the economic life of late Stuart England. This period has tended to be subsumed within the story of how the “moral economy” was vanquished by the market in the 18thC, to the neglect of what Waddell sees as its distinctive econom -- a larger question for historians interested in reconciling the cultural and the economic: what do we do with the concept of “interest”? ...is there a danger of replacing the “undersocialized” caricature of “homo economicus” with economic actors that sociologists would describe as “oversocialized,” the passive bearers of internalized norms and values? Doubtless “religiously inspired archetypes ... left an indelible impression on the economic lives of ordinary people”, but we should not neglect the role of material self-advancement or preservation (and other forms of “acquisitive” behavior—the acquisition of reputation, for example) as a motive force in economic life. ...we need to find a place for “interest,” which, after all, was a concept with which early modern English people were very familiar. -- But a full picture of economic lives and cultures needs to consider the interaction of potentially rival values and those who bore them. And this links back to the changing economic context of the period. Increasing engagement in long-distance markets could encourage farmers or manufacturers to refashion their communal loyalties in a way that undermined neighborly commitments; participation in the emerging stock market might suggest a different scale of economic values to those recounted in this book. -- the volume of printed attacks on various forms of economic immorality might suggest that the confrontation of divergent moral economies was far from uncommon in the period. In which case, does the clash between the market and other moral economies, if not the moral economy, have some explanatory power still?
books  reviews  historiography  change-social  17thC  18thC  British_history  economic_history  economic_culture  interest_groups  community  patriarchy  religious_culture  religion-established  religious_lit  religious_belief  mercantilism  local_government  local_politics  elites  popular_culture  moral_economy  self-interest  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Antonio - After Postmodernism: Reactionary Tribalism | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 106, No. 1 (July 2000), pp. 40-87
Revived Weimar‐era “radical conservatism” and fresh “New Right” and “paleoconservative” theories offer a radical cultural critique of global capitalism and liberal democracy. Expressing a broader retribalization and perceived failure of modernization, their defense of communal particularity attacks the multicultural nation‐state, liberal rights, and universal citizenship. This essay links reactionary tribalism to a recurrent 20th‐century theoretical tendency, the “total critique of modernity”—a fusion of oversimplified Nietzschean and Weberian ideas. Historically, total critique has promoted convergence between right and left, such as the current overlapping facets of “radical conservatism” and “strong‐program postmodernism.” Total critique counters the “historicist” method of “internal critique” and the “communication model” characteristic of reflexive social theory. The discussion uncovers the mediating role of social theory in the problematic relationship of science and partially disenchanted public spheres in plural, democratic cultures. -- 200+ references! -- in postmodernism includes range of "end of" thinkers from left and right, and the overlaps between far right and some of the postmodern cultural left -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  cultural_history  modernity  irrational  Germany  Weimar  Nazis  Heidegger  Nietzsche  Schmitt  Strauss  neo-Hegelian  right-wing  cultural_pessimism  Leftist  Marxist  historicism  cultural_critique  Habermas  Dewey  pragmatism  liberalism  democracy  patriarchy  nationalism  ethnic_ID  universalism  citizenship  nation-state  multiculturalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Markley - Aphra Behn's "The City Heiress": Feminism and the Dynamics of Popular Success on the Late 17thC Stage | JSTOR: Comparative Drama, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Summer 2007), pp. 141-166
Entertaining how she successfully turns the tables (eg ridicules male proprietary control over female chastity, turns the libertine wit into a failure at manipulation but an object of desire) and flips the gender valence with audience approval (other than Whig political attacks or general attacks on theatrical immorality) -- and gets into some Tory protofeminism with Astell -- didn't download
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  comedy  theatre-Restoration  Behn  feminism  Tories  Astell  irony  satire  patriarchy  sexuality  gender  libertine  desire  1680s  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Torrey Shanks - Feminine Figures and the "Fatherhood": Rhetoric and Reason in Locke's "First Treatise of Government" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 31-57
Traditionally neglected, Locke's First Treatise of Government has taken on new significance with feminist interpretations that recognize the importance of its sustained engagement with patriarchal power. Yet feminist interpreters, both critics and admirers alike, read Locke as a champion of the "man of reason," a figure seemingly immune to the influences of passions, imagination, and rhetoric. These interpreters wrongly overlook Locke's extended engagement with the power of rhetoric in the First Treatise, an engagement that troubles the clear opposition of masculine reason and its feminine exclusions. Taking Locke's rhetoric seriously, I argue, makes the First Treatise newly important for what it shows us about Locke's practice of political critique. In following the varied and novel effects of Locke's feminine figures, we find a practice of political critique that depends on a mutually constitutive relation between rhetoric and reason. -- paywall Sage -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  literary_history  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  17thC  Locke-1st_Treatise  women-rights  women-property  patriarchy  authority  metaphor  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Filmer  Dryden  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Charles_II  masculinity  femininity  reason  philosophy_of_language  emotions  practical_reason  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
J. S. Maloy: The Aristotelianism of Locke's Politics (2009)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 2 (Apr., 2009), pp. 235-257 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Locke takes up Aristotle attack in Plato mixing political with family power, which Filmer adopts
article  jstor  17thC  Britain  political_philosophy  Locke  Filmer  patriarchy  family  power  Aristotle  Plato  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Michael O’Malley : Free Silver and the Constitution of Man | Common-place April 2006
Michael O’Malley is associate professor of history and art history at George Mason University. He is studying the money question in American history, as well as studying the history of recorded sound..... The money debate and immigration at the turn of the century.....In 1889, Harvard economist Francis A. Walker described the "social effects of paper money" that ranged from bad taste—"wanton bravery of apparel and equipage"—to dangerous consumer desires, which undermined the father’s authority. Paper money, Walker observed, led to the "the creation of a countless host of artificial necessities in the family beyond the power of the husband and Father to supply without a resort to questionable devices or reckless speculations." Not only driven to recklessness, these fathers adopted "humiliating imitations of foreign habits of living." Paper money undermined "that fit and natural leadership of taste and fashion which is the best protection society can have against sordid material aims." And it elicited "manners at once gross and effeminate," which led to "democracy without equality or fraternity, and exclusiveness without pride or character." Paper money threatened patriarchy; it drove otherwise respectable men to immoral or dangerous speculations. Paper bills produced both "effeminacy" and coarseness, encouraging foreign habits. How did paper money manage this cultural crime spree? Not by raising prices—in this passage Walker never mentions higher prices. Instead, by removing society from a basis in "real values," paper money overturned natural laws and natural social hierarchies. It decentered the self.
19thC  US_history  economic_history  cultural_history  social_history  patriarchy  masculinity  family  money  monetary_policy  currency  hierarchy  status  migration  racialism  democracy  reformation_of_manners  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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