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Kristine Haugen - Imagined Universities: Public Insult and the Terrae Filius in Early Modern Oxford (2000) | Academia.edu
Abstract: The 17th-century University of Oxford was plagued by an extremely insulting Latin commencement speaker known as the terrae filius, or "son of the earth." The speakers were routinely expelled from the university, while manuscript copies proliferated -- a few speeches were even owned by John Locke. How did such a custom arise, what were the social effects of the filius' speeches, and what forces surrounded the filius' eventual suppression? It's argued that in the heyday of the filius, his insults actually served a sort of rhetoric of the rotten apple: the observed transgressions of the few were held up against an imagined and far more virtuous, decorous, and pious Oxford. Meanwhile, the filius himself might be understood in terms of two long-established university social types -- the disputant and the tour guide.
More Info: History of Universities 16,2 (2000): 1-31 -- Publication Date: Jan 1, 2000 -- Publication Name: HISTORY OF UNIVERSITIES-OXFORD-
Research Interests: Rhetoric, Sociology of Knowledge, 17th-Century Studies, History of Universities, Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English Literature, 18th Century British Literature, 17th Century British (Literature), University of Oxford, and Academic Satire
article  Academia.edu  17thC  18thC  cultural_history  British_history  university  Oxford  education-higher  satire  English_lit  rhetoric  sociology_of_knowledge  identity-institutions  downloaded  institution-building  intellectual_history  status  cultural_critique  cultural_capital  Amhurst  Craftsman  Bolingbroke  Bourdieu 
july 2016 by dunnettreader

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