dunnettreader + original_sin   13

Joanna Picciotto - Reforming the Garden: The Experimentalist Eden and "Paradise Lost" (2005) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 72, No. 1 (Spring, 2005), pp. 23-78 -- very long article with vast numbers of references to literary, naturao philosophy, and religious works of 17thC and early 18thC plus lit survey of work on sociology of knowledge, English lit since the cultural turn, and religious culture. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  British_history  English_lit  experimental_philosophy  Bacon  Boyle  Locke  Milton  Royal_Society  Evelyn  religious_culture  religious_lit  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  microscope  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  scientific_method  curiosity  Fall  original_sin  Paradise_Lost  improvement  instruments  Hooke  Donne  poetry  virtuosos  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  nature-mastery  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Garry Wills - Augustine's "Confessions" - The “great sinner” myth « The Immanent Frame - March 21 2011
Excerpted from Augustine’s Confessions: A Biography, published by Princeton University Press © 2011. Posted by permission. Come to the launch of Princeton University Press’s “Lives of Great Religious Books” series on Thursday, March 24, in New York City, hosted by the Institute for Public Knowledge at NYU and the SSRC Program on Religion and the Public Sphere.—ed. -- popular version of Augustine as a sex hound, and that he had an obsession with chastity that had pernicious effects on readers through the centuries doesn't match a review of his writings on sin, etc. -- downloaded pdf to Note in folder "Biographies of Religious Texts - PUP series "
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  religious_history  Augustine  original_sin  depravity  Biblical_exegesis  theology  Catholic-doctrine  Christianity  sexuality  chastity  celibacy  sex-religious_attitudes  guilt  spirituality  prayers  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - The last crusade - Eurozine - Nov 2011
Original in The New Humanist June 2011 -- The claim that Christianity provides the bedrock of Western culture might serve the interests of extremists, but it is a betrayal of a far more complex history. In the warped mind of Anders Breivik, his murderous rampages in Oslo and Utoya earlier this year were the first shots in a war in defence of Christian Europe. Not a religious war but a cultural one, to defend what Breivik called Europe's "cultural, social, identity and moral platform". Few but the most psychopathic can have any sympathy for Breivik's homicidal frenzy. Yet the idea that Christianity provides the foundations of Western civilisation, and of its political ideals and ethical values, and that Christian Europe is under threat, from Islam on the one side and "cultural Marxists" on the other, finds a widespread hearing. The erosion of Christianity, in this narrative, will lead inevitably to the erosion of Western civilisation and to the end of modern, liberal democracy. -- useful roundup of the pundits and publishers churning out these claims -- downloaded pdf to Note
Europe  cultural_history  identity_politics  collective_memory  cultural_authority  grand_narrative  culture_wars  Christianity  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Christendom  bad_history  narrative-contested  morality-Christian  morality-divine_command  relativism  modernity  anti-secularization  post-secular  rights-legal  rights-political  human_rights  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  right-wing  Judeo-Christian  secular_humanism  anti-humanism  religious_history  religious_culture  Islamic_civilization  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Stoicism  New_Testament  Augustine  original_sin  memory-cultural  memory-group  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Karl Giberson (part 2 of 2) creating Adam, again and again - Peter Enns - June 2015
Today’s post is the second of two by Karl Giberson and is adapted from his newly published Saving the Original Sinner: How Christians Have Used the Bible’s… -- not clear whether they take up the first shock to the historical Adam centuries before Darwinism - discovery of the New World, and then moves toward scientific racism that debated whether humans were single or multiple species - and during same period, geology pushing back age of the earth far beyond an historically plausible frame for the literalist reading of Genesis
Instapaper  books  religious_history  Christianity  theology  change-intellectual  change-religious  creation  Adam  original_sin  theodicy  Bible-as-history  Early_Christian  Augustine  evolution  evolutionary_biology  cosmology  death  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_authority  science-and-religion  Darwinism  Fall  Genesis  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Parker, review - Radcliffe G. Edmonds III, Redefining Ancient Orphism: A Study in Greek Religion (2013) | Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2014.07.13
This learned and intelligent work [seeks] to give us an Orphism without original sin, without, that is, the myth that mankind carries a burden of inherited guilt because they were born from the Titans who devoured the baby Dionysus, son of Persephone. -- His Orphism has no fixed traditions, no central myths, nor could it have them, given the unstable channels through which religious traditions were diffused in the ancient world. --The label ‘Orphic’, he writes, is as vague as ‘New Age’, ‘a set of ideas loosely defined by their distance from mainstream religious activity’. -- Yet he does not jettison ‘Orphism’ completely. If one thinks in terms not of an essence but of Wittgenstein’s family resemblances, the family of Orphic rituals and ideas is marked for Edmonds by (claims to) ‘extraordinary purity, sanctity, antiquity, and strangeness’. -- Suppose one follows Edmonds in removing mankind’s descent from the slayers of Dionysus from our picture of Orphism: what then? We are still left with the extraordinary wild Orphic variants on theogonic myth to try to understand; in particular, the point of the Titans’ crime against the baby Dionysus has become obscure. We are still left with Orphic doctrines of the soul that imply a drastic rejection of accepted Greek views about life in the body. There is still an association with vegetarianism. There is still a descent from Titans which may have left us polluted. -- Orphism surely is exceptional within Greek religion — or perhaps one should rather say ‘early Orphism’, with M.P. Nilsson. The link between books and rites so marked in the early testimonia fades away in the hellenistic period, and Orphism virtually disappears as a distinct and dynamic force in lived religion , until it re-emerges in late antiquity in a quite new form. I cling — habit or obstinacy perhaps — to several aspects of a pre-Edmonds vision of Orphism. But let me stress that this is a lucid, powerful and thoroughly instructive work, a major contribution.
books  reviews  religious_history  religious_culture  ancient_Greece  Hellenism  late_antiquity  Orphism  ritual  sacred_texts  soul  immortality  underworld  ancient_religions  gods-antiquity  purification  original_sin 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop - CHRISTIANITY AND LIBERALISM | Pandaemonium Jan 2014
Review of "Inventing the Individual" by Larry Siedentop -- ‘The characteristic of historical writing in recent centuries’, Siedentop observes, ‘is an inclination to minimize the moral and intellectual distance between the modern and the ancient world, while at the same time maximizing the moral and intellectual distance between modern Europe and the middle ages.’ I am not sure that it makes much sense to talk about a ‘characteristic of historical writing’ that stretches over ‘centuries’. This is particularly so given that one the characteristics of recent historiography has been the opposite: the tendency to blur the distinction between the Middle Ages and modernity. Inventing the Individual is very much part of this revisionist trend. The trouble is, in revising the previous approach Siedentop now makes the ancient world too alien and modernity not distinctive enough. -- at least it's a counter to the mournful Thomist condemnation of liberal individualism by MacIntyre, Taylor et al.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  religious_culture  political_culture  political_philosophy  Christianity  liberalism  equality  free_will  original_sin  hierarchy  authority  individualism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jessica Riskin, review essay - Newton and Monotheism | JSTOR: Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences, Vol. 40, No. 3 (Summer 2010), pp. 399-408
Reviewed work(s): (1) Peter Dear. The Intelligibility of Nature: How Science Makes Sense of the World. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007. xii + 242 pp., illus., index. ISBN 978-0-226-13949-4. $17.00 (paper). ; *--* (2) Stephen Gaukroger. The Emergence of a Scientific Culture: Science and the Shaping of Modernity 1210–1685. Oxford: Clarendon, 2006. ix + 563 pp., illus., index. ISBN 978-0-199-55001-2. $39.95 (paper). ; *--* (3) Peter Harrison. The Fall of Man and the Foundations of Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. xi + 300 pp., index. ISBN 978-0-521-87559-2. $43.00 (paper). ; *--* (4) George Saliba. Islamic Science and the Making of the European Renaissance. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2007. xi + 315 pp., illus., index. ISBN 978-0-262-19557-7. $43.00 (hardcover).
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  kindle-available  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  science-and-religion  Scientific_Revolution  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  Islam  monotheism  Newtonian  original_sin  Fall  epistemology  cultural_history  scientific_culture  religious_culture  intelligentsia  intellectual_freedom  Islamic_civilization  Renaissance  Islam-Greek_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rebecca M. Wilkin - Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2008), pp. 533-567
This essay examines the determination by Cartesians to explain the maternal imagination's alleged role in the formation of birthmarks and the changing notion of monstrosity. Cartesians saw the formation of birthmarks as a challenge through which to demonstrate the heuristic capacity of mechanism. Descartes claimed to be able to explain the transmission of a perception from the mother's imagination to the fetus' skin without having recourse to the little pictures postulated by his contemporaries. La Forge offered a detailed account stating that the failure to explain the maternal imagination's impressions would cast doubt on mechanism. Whereas both characterized the birthmark as a deformation or monstrosity in miniature, Malebranche attributed a role to the maternal imagination in fashioning family likenesses. However, he also charged the mother's imagination with the transmission of original sin. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  theology  science-and-religion  17thC  mechanism  reproduction  mothers  imagination  original_sin  monstrosity  Descartes  Malebranche  Cartesian  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Nancy Rochelle Bradley: The weapons of the "true warfaring Christian": Right reason and free will in seventeenth-century literature - 2009 thesis - Udini
Abstract: Milton writes in Areopagitica of the "true warfaring Christian" who can "apprehend and consider vice with all her baits and seeming pleasures, and yet abstain, and yet distinguish, and yet prefer that which is truly better." Though many reformers saw both human nature and the faculty of reason as depraved after the fall, Milton and other radical writers in the period emphasized the role that reason can and should play in the experience of spiritual warfare. The dissertation therefore begins by considering the theological contexts within which writers of the English Reformation understood evil and human encounters with evil, especially in the form of temptations, but also in the form of disturbing dreams and satanic presences. It then considers some epistemological problems as related to the experience of such conflicts: reason, especially right reason; knowledge, conscience and memory; and free will. Focusing on the texts of John Milton, Aemilia Lanyer, Richard Norwood, and John Bunyan, this study shows that these radical religious writers refuse to conform to the general tendency in Reformation theology to discount the use of reason. Eve's dream in Milton's Paradise Lost reveals the proper use of right reason in spiritual warfare, while the actual temptation scenes in Paradise Lost and Lanyer's Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum point to a fundamental failure of reason in the fall. Norwood's Confessions , Milton's Comus , and Milton's Samson Agonistes portray the triumphs of human reason over evil and temptation, though there remains an awareness of the constraints placed upon reason by their fallen nature such that reason needs the aid of divine grace to function as right reason. Milton's Paradise Regained and Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress point to the extraordinary victories gained by Christ and Christian through the use of right reason and memory to direct the will toward the highest goods. These texts offer a counter-voice to those who would dismiss the possibilities of the powers of right reason. Despite the awareness of the inherent limits of fallen reason, these radical reformists generally find reason an indispensable tool in spiritual battles that helps direct their wills to the highest good.
thesis  17thC  British_history  English_lit  theology  Milton  reason  original_sin  evil  grace  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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