dunnettreader + optics   4

Richard Marshall interview - Jeffrey K. McDonough -Leibniz, Berkeley, Kant, Frege; bees, toasters and Julius Caesar » 3:AM Magazine - September 2014
Good overview of different approaches to Leibniz. Causation and relation of divine and creaturely activity - Scholastics, Berkeley, Malebranche, Leibniz. Difference between Malebranche and Berkeley’s idealism. Kant on refutation of idealism re Cartesian scepticism of external world.
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Leibniz  Berkeley  Malebranche  Kant  substance  metaphysics  causation  teleology  theodicy  creation  mind-body  volition  mechanism  physics  philosophy_of_science  history_of_science  optics  idealism  scepticism  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - Science and Civilization under William and Mary | JSTOR: Notes and Records of the Royal Society of London, Vol. 43, No. 2, Jul., 1989
TOC -- (1) The Crown, the Public and the New Science, 1689-1702 (pp. 99-116) M. C. W. Hunter. (2) William III and His Two Navies (pp. 117-132) J. R. Bruijn. (3) 'Bright Enough for All Our Purposes': John Locke's Conception of a Civilized Society (pp. 133-153) J. M. Dunn. (4) Clockmaking in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 155-165)
J. H. Leopold. (5) The Glorious Revolution and Medicine in Britain and the Netherlands (pp. 167-190) Simon Schaffer. (6) Leeuwenhoek and Other Dutch Correspondents of the Royal Society (pp. 191-207) L. C. Palm. (7) Christiaan Huygens and Newton's Theory of Gravitation (pp. 209-222) H. A. M. Snelders. (8) Huygens' 'Traité de la Lumière' and Newton's 'Opticks': Pursuing and Eschewing Hypotheses (pp. 223-247) A. E. Shapiro. (9) The Leeuwenhoek Lecture, 1988. Antoni van Leeuwenhoek 1632-1723 (pp. 249-273) A. R. Hall
article  jstor  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  science-and-politics  17thC  18thC  British_history  Dutch  Glorious_Revolution  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  community-virtual  Locke  British_Navy  William_III  Nine_Years_War  technology  instruments  Huygens  Newton  medicine  university  optics  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Davide Panagia - Delicate Discriminations: Thomas Hobbes's Science of Politics | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 36, No. 1 (Oct., 2003), pp. 91-114
In the following, I argue that the Cold War image of Hobbes that presents him as a proponent of a state-centered conception of political power is misguided: it overlooks the aesthetic dimensions of 'representation' (a term that Hobbes infamously introduces in Leviathan, Chapter XVI) that, for someone writing in the seventeenth century, could not be distinguished from an account of 'political representation.' By focusing on Hobbes's scientific experiments in optics (within the Mersenne Circle) and the trompe-l'oeil artistic heritage whence these experiments derive, I show how Hobbes could not have been the kind of nominalist many historians of political thought make him out to be. Furthermore, Hobbes's persistent use of the theatre metaphor exemplifies a twinned aesthetic and political aspect of representation suggesting that citizens do not stop 'representing' once they consent to a sovereign. Rather, as the frontispiece Hobbes designed for Leviathan suggests, the sovereign is perpetually visible and hence subject to the spectator's ongoing discrimination and evaluation. In this regard, the sovereign is as much a subject of the citizen's opinion as she is a centripetal force guaranteeing stability; and, as an object of aesthetico-political evaluation, the sovereign occasions the perpetual production and circulation of opinions rather than merely unifying individual wills into a coherent and stable whole. -- a useful point re Hobbes needing to account for change, though not sure where "nominalism" comes in, but this doesn't contradict a state centric notion of power
jstor  article  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  optics  representation  representative_institutions  political_spectacle  public_opinion  sovereignty  authority 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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