dunnettreader + natural_philosophy   88

Martin Mulsow - Ambiguities of the Prisca Sapientia in Late Renaissance Humanism (2004) | JHI on JSTOR
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 1-13 -- the assertion of a concordance between these early philosophies and their accordance with Christianity-in the sense of a Christian Platonism- implied the synthesis of fragementary philosophemes into a fully developed doctrine (...)
This program was formulated in a variety of ways during the 16th-17thC with differing protagonists and with diverse aims. Thus one could supplement the genealogy in a cabalist vein, introduce biblical characters such as Solomon or Moses, or (as was done by Bruno) use it to contest Christian doctrine. The genealogy could be read as culminating in various notable modem figures such as for example, Paracelsus. Aristotle could be included or excluded from it, depending on whether one wanted to assimilate the Aristotelian tradition or to distance oneself from it; and one could leave the end of this genealogical lineage open in order to exhort the necessity of a scientific and moral reform.
(...) the question of what became of this program during the late Renaissance, when two developments took place simultaneously: on the one hand, the utopia of the prisca sapientia set about to conquer the field formerly reserved to the Aristotelians, namely, natural philosophy; on the other hand, the first doubts arose about the overall validity of the historical-philological foundation of the program, especially the dating of the works of Hermes Trismegistus. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  natural_philosophy  Neoplatonism  Aristotelian  Kabbalah  alchemy  prisca_sapientia  Hermes_Trismegistus  Bible-as-history  chronology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_religions  Moses  ancient_Egypt  Renaissance  philology  downloaded 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Kuni Sakamoto - Pierre Gassendi's Reception of Keplerian Ideas | JSTOR Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2009)
The German Hercules's Heir: Pierre Gassendi's Reception of Keplerian Ideas -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 69-91 -- big interesting bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  ancient_philosophy  natural_philosophy  natural_history  Plato  Aristotle  Pliny_the_Elder  Albert_Magnus  medieval_philosophy  astronomy  astrology  cosmology  Kepler  Gassendi  atomism  generation  divine_intellect  causation  mathematization  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Adam Takahashi - Nature, Formative Power and Intellect in the Natural Philosophy of Albert the Great | JSTOR - Early Science and Medicine (2008)
Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 5 (2008), pp. 451-481 -- The Dominican theologian Albert the Great (ca. 1200-1280) was one of the first to investigate into the system of the world on the basis of an acquaintance with the entire Aristotelian corpus, which he read under the influence of Islamic philosophers. The present study aims to understand the core of Albert's natural philosophy. Albert's emblematic phrase, "every work of nature is the work of intelligence" (omne opus naturae est opus intelligentiae), expresses the conviction that natural things are produced by the intellects that move the celestial bodies, just as houses are made by architects moving their instruments. Albert tried to fathom the secret of generation of natural things with his novel notion of "formative power" (virtus formativa), which flows from the celestial intellects into the sublunary elements. His conception of the natural world represents an alternative to the dominant medieval view on the relationship between the artificial and the natural. -- large bibliography of secondary sources post WWII -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  medieval_philosophy  13thC  Albert_Magnus  natural_philosophy  Aristotle  Aristotelian  causation  cosmology  laws_of_nature  divine_intellect  generation  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Aude Doody - Pliny's "Natural History: Enkuklios Paideia" and the Ancient Encyclopedia | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2009)
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 70, No. 1 (Jan., 2009), pp. 1-21 -- interesting re expectations when use encyclopedia to think about the work - comparisons with other "desire for universal knowledge" authors, compilers etc -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  antiquity  genre  encyclopedia  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  natural_philosophy  natural_history  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  Pliny_the_Elder  Varro 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Desmond M. Clarke - French Philosophy, 1572-1675 (June 2016) | Oxford University Press - History of Philosophy Series
Desmond M. Clarke presents a thematic history of French philosophy from the middle of the 16thC to the beginning of Louis XIV's reign. While the traditional philosophy of the schools was taught throughout this period by authors who have faded into permanent obscurity, a whole generation of writers who were not professional philosophers--some of whom never even attended a school or college--addressed issues that were prominent in French public life. Clarke explores such topics as the novel political theory espoused by monarchomachs, such as Beze and Hotman, against Bodin's account of absolute sovereignty; the scepticism of Montaigne, Charron, and Sanches; the ethical discussions of Du Vair, Gassendi, and Pascal; innovations in natural philosophy that were inspired by Mersenne and Descartes and implemened by members of the Academie royale des sciences; theories of the human mind from Jean de Silhon to Cureau de la Chambre and Descartes; and the novel arguments in support of women's education and equality that were launched by De Gournay, Du Bosc, Van Schurman and Poulain de la Barre. The writers involved were lawyers, political leaders, theologians, and independent scholars and they acknowledged, almost unanimously, the authority of the Bible as a source of knowledge that was claimed to be more reliable than the fragile powers of human understanding. Since they could not agree, however, on which books of the Bible were canonical or how that should be understood, their discussions raised questions about faith and reason that mirrored those involved in the infamous Galileo affair.
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  France  political_philosophy  sovereignty  Bodin  Montaigne  scepticism  academies  Gassendi  Pascal  Descartes  mind  mind-body  theology  natural_philosophy  Biblical_authority  women-education  women-intellectuals 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
THE WARBURG INSTITUTE: Translation
Translation and the Circulation of Knowledge in Early Modern Science

Friday 28 June 2013
Programme - Poster

In recent decades, scholars have offered myriad new insights into the exchange and propagation of scientific ideas in the early modern Republic of Letters. Within this vibrant field, however, the part played by translation and translators remains little studied. This colloquium will explore the role of translation in early modern science, providing a forum for discussion about translations as well as the translators, mediators, agents, and interpreters whose role in the intellectual history of the period remains ill defined and deserves greater attention.

Organized by: Sietske Fransen (Warburg Institute) and Niall Hodson (Durham University)

Keynote speaker: Sven Dupré (Max Planck Institute for the History of Science and Freie Universität Berlin)

Speakers: Felicity Henderson (Royal Society), Charles van den Heuvel (Huygens ING), Niall Hodson (Durham University), Ana Carolina Hosne (Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg), Jan van de Kamp (Independent), Clare Griffin (UCL), Margaret O. Meredith (Maastricht University), José Maria Pérez Fernandez (Universidad de Granada), Iolanda Plescia (Sapienza – Università di Roma), Fabien Simon (Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7)
history_of_science  conference  sociology_of_knowledge  video  YouTube  networks-information  translation  Republic_of_Letters  17thC  intellectual_history  natural_philosophy 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Kristin M. Girten - Unsexed Souls: Natural Philosophy as Transformation in Eliza Haywood's Female Spectator (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 55-74 -- Though love and marriage are Eliza Haywood's central concerns in The Female Spectator, the first periodical written by a woman with a primarily female audience in mind, in a series of issues devoted to the study of Baconian empiricism, Haywood turns her attention away from such concerns to the natural world. This essay aims to determine what is at stake in the Female Spectator's philosophical interactions with nature. It argues that, for Haywood, natural philosophy is a tool with which women may expand the horizon of, and thereby reshape, the sphere to which they are consigned.-- lots of primary sources from Margaret Cavendish and Robert Boyle through 1st few decades of 18thC plus lit survey on gender, patriarchy etc in last few decades in literary history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  gender_history  17thC  18thC  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  women-intellectuals  empiricism  Haywood  1700s  1710s  Boyle  virtue_epistemology  self-development  self-knowledge  domesticity  science-public  publishing-women  Spectator  Cavendish_Margaret  Astell  bibliography 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Gerard Passannante - Homer Atomized: Francis Bacon and the Matter of Tradition (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 1015-1047 -- extensive primary and secondary bibliography from Renaissance philology through Montaigne, Bacon, Vico and 18thC German challenges to Homeric "authorship" as well as ancient literary tradition, epistemology, cosmology and physics - Stoics, Epicureans -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography  cosmology  epistemology  philology  natural_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Homer  atomism  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  authors  author_intention  text_analysis  time  void  chance  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  17thC  18thC  scepticism  Montaigne  Bacon  Vico  Nietzsche  tradition  cultural_transmission  knowledge  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Alex Wetmore - Sympathy Machines: Men of Feeling and the Automaton (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 37-54 -- Recent discussions of the automaton in eighteenth-century British culture have situated this figure in relation to shifting concepts of feminine identity. However, comparatively little attention has been spent on the automaton's relation to masculinity. In light of this, my essay considers parallels between automata and representations of men of feeling in the sentimental novels of Sterne, Smollett, and Mackenzie. Juxtaposing these novels with spectacles of automata like Cox's Museum reveal at least two interesting insights: (1) the man of feeling's automatically-reactive sensibility destabilizes eighteenth-century conceptual boundaries between humans and machines; and (2) in breaching these boundaries, men of feeling point to important shifts in the relationship between the mechanical and the virtuous as the century progresses. -- looks like a useful lit survey -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  Enlightenment  natural_philosophy  mechanism  materialism  psychology  physiology  moral_philosophy  automatons  sensibility  man-of-feeling  moral_sentiments  masculinity  sentimentalism  novels  Sterne  Smollett  social_theory  civil_society  politeness  manners  authenticity  self  self-knowledge  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Goulding - Histories of Science in Early Modern Europe: Introduction to special issue (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 33-40 **--** Articles in the issue *--* James Steven Byrne, Humanist History of Mathematics? Regiomontanus's Padua Oration in Context (pp. 41-61) *--* Robert Goulding, Method and Mathematics: Peter Ramus's Histories of the Sciences (pp. 63-85) *--* Nicholas Popper, "Abraham, Planter of Mathematics": Histories of Mathematics and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (pp. 87-106) *--* Lauren Kassell, "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (pp. 107-122) -- helpful on recent historiography on humanists, science and history writing -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  history_of_science  mathematics  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  humanism  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  astrology  magic  education-higher  natural_philosophy  reading  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-writing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Lauren Kassell - "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 107-122 - in issue devoted to histories of science -- looking at how histories of magic were framed with respect to work in mathematics, medicine and natural philosophy, especially to carve out legitimate intellectual inquiry from derogatory attacks linked to supposed magic -- tracks especially from mid 17thC how the discourses that involved magic were shifting -- probably puts Keith Thomas in more recent historiography on "religion and the decline of magic" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  religious_history  history_of_science  historiography  magic  medicine  natural_philosophy  alchemy  religious_culture  religious_belief  historiography-17thC  evidence  experimental_philosophy  publishing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Ralph Cudworth - The True Intellectual System of the Universe - Vol 1 of 3 ( 1845 ed with Johann Lorenz Mosheim annotations ) - Google Books
The True Intellectual System of the Universe: Wherein All the Reason and Philosophy of Atheism is Confuted, and Its Impossibility Demonstrated, with a Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality, Volume 1 -- T. Tegg, 1845 -- Oxford library -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  intellectual_history  theology  17thC  Cudworth  materialism  natural_philosophy  theism  atheism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Ralph Cudworth - True Intellectual System of the Universe - Vol 3 of 3 (1845 ed with Johann Lorenz Mosheim annotations) - Google Books
The True Intellectual System of the Universe: Wherein All the Reason and Philosophy of Atheism is Confuted, and Its Impossibility Demonstrated, with a Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality, Volume 3 -- T. Tegg, 1845 -- NYPL -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  intellectual_history  theology  17thC  Cudworth  materialism  natural_philosophy  theism  atheism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Raloh Cudworth - True Intellectual System of the Universe - Vol 2 of 3 (1845 ed with Johann Lorenz Mosheim annotations ) - Google Books
The True Intellectual System of the Universe: Wherein All the Reason and Philosophy of Atheism is Confuted, and Its Impossibility Demonstrated, with a Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality, Volume 2 -- T. Tegg, 1845 -- NYPL -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  intellectual_history  theology  17thC  Cudworth  materialism  natural_philosophy  theism  atheism  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Danton B. Sailor - Cudworth and Descartes (1962) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1962), pp. 133-140 -- followup to 1960 JHI article on Descartes and the Cambridge Platonists, which claims in focusing on John Smith, it misrepresents Cudworth on both theological and philosophical issues - Cudworth was enthusiastic re Cartesian natural philosophy, and embraced particular claims of Descartes that contradicted Hobbes’s views on corpuscularian transmission of motion that had implications for some of his theological oppositions to Hobbes
article  jstor  intellectual_history  theology  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  Descartes  Cudworth  Hobbes  Cambridge_Platonists  Cartesian  materialism  motion  bibliography  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Hadot, Pierre | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Table of Contents -- 1. Biography **--** 2. Philology and Method **--** 3. Early Work: Plotinus and the Simplicity of Vision **--** 4. What is Ancient Philosophy? -- (a) Philosophical Discourse versus Philosophy -- (b) Philosophy as a Way of Life -- (b) The Figure of Socrates -- (c) The Figure of the Sage **--** 5. Spiritual Practices -- (a) Askesis of Desire -- (b) Premeditation of Death and Evils -- (c) Concentration on the Present Moment -- (d) The View from Above -- (e) Writing as Hypomnemata, and The Inner Citadel **--** 6. The Transformation of Philosophy after the Decline of Antiquity -- (a) The Adoption of Spiritual Practices in Monasticism -- (b) Philosophical Discourse as Handmaiden to Theology and the Natural Sciences -- (c) The Permanence of the Ancient Conception of Philosophy **--** 7. References and Further Reading -- (a) Works in French. -- (b) Works in English. -- (c) Selected Articles on Hadot -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Socrates  eudaimonia  Stoicism  Epicurean  spiritual_practices  self-knowledge  self-sufficiency  self-development  self  self-control  passions  emotions  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  desire  judgment-emotions  meditation  Plotinus  Neoplatonism  transcendence  late_antiquity  monasticism  theology  philosophy_of_religion  natural_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Hadot_Pierre  French_intellectuals  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  Hellenism  bibliography  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Design Arguments for the Existence of God | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Table of Contents -- 1. The Classical Versions of the Design Argument -- a. Scriptural Roots and Aquinas's Fifth Way -- b.The Argument from Simple Analogy -- c. Paley's Watchmaker Argument -- d. Guided Evolution **--** 2. Contemporary Versions of the Design Argument. -- a. The Argument from. -- b. Irreducible Biochemical Complexity -- c. The Argument from Biological Information. -- d. The Fine-Tuning Arguments -- (i) The Argument from Suspicious Improbability -- (ii) The Confirmatory Argument. **--** 3. The Scientifically Legitimate Uses of Design Inferences. **--** 4.References and Further Reading -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  philosophy_of_religion  theology  natural_religion  rational_religion  Newtonianism  creation  design-nature  God-existence  God-attributes  Aquinas  analogy  Paley  complexity  cosmology  cosmological-fine-tuning  intelligent_design  creationism  natural_philosophy  evolution  Bible-as-history  bibliography  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Priel - Toward Classical Legal Positivism (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 987 (2015)
I have two major aims: (1) set the historical record straight(...) Hobbes’s and Bentham’s work that seeks to understand their views on law not by isolating it from the rest of their wide-ranging body of work, but by understanding their jurisprudential work as part of a broader project. (2) My main aim is to contribute to contemporary jurisprudential debates and to suggest that the largely neglected approach of earlier positivists is superior to the view held by most contemporary legal positivists. (...) to what extent it is useful for us to call Hobbes and Bentham “legal positivists.” My answer to this question consists of three interrelated points. The first is that we draw an explicit link between their ideas and the view that (some time later) would come to be known as “positivism,” roughly the view that the methods of the “human sciences” are essentially the same as those of the natural sciences. The second point is that the classical legal positivists’ decisive break with natural law ideas prevalent in their day is to be found exactly here, in their views about metaphysics and nature. The third point is that this aspect of their work has been, in my view regrettably, abandoned by contemporary legal positivists. Though all three points are related, in this Article I will say relatively little about the first point, as I discussed it in greater detail elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Hobbes  Bentham  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  natural_philosophy  nature  human_nature  scientific_method  social_theory  social_sciences  positivism  positive_law  Methodenstreit  methodology-quantitative  epistemology  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey A. Pojanowski - Positivism(s): A Commentary on Priel's "Toward Classical Legal Positivism" | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 1023 (2015)
Anglo-American jurisprudence, before it insulated itself in conceptual analysis and defined itself in opposition to broader questions, was properly a “sociable science,” to use Professor Postema’s phrase from his symposium article. And, in part due to the exemplars of history, so it may become again. By drawing on Bentham and Hobbes, Professor Dan Priel’s Toward Classical Positivism points forward toward more fruitful methods of jurisprudence while illuminating the recent history and current state of inquiry. His article demonstrates the virtues and promise of a more catholic approach to jurisprudence. It also raises challenging questions about the direction to take this rediscovered path, and I am not sure I always agree with his suggested answers. Any misgivings I have about Priel’s particular approach, however, do not diminish my appreciation; I find even the points of disagreement to be live and meaningful, and that itself is refreshing. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Hobbes  Bentham  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  natural_philosophy  nature  human_nature  scientific_method  social_theory  social_sciences  positivism  positive_law  Methodenstreit  methodology-quantitative  epistemology  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Justin E.H. Smith - Nature, Human Nature, and Human Difference: Race in Early Modern Philosophy (2015) | Princeton University Press
People have always been xenophobic, but an explicit philosophical and scientific view of human racial difference only began to emerge during the modern period. Why and how did this happen? Surveying a range of philosophical and natural-scientific texts, dating from the Spanish Renaissance to the German Enlightenment, (Smith) charts the evolution of the modern concept of race and shows that natural philosophy, particularly efforts to taxonomize and to order nature, played a crucial role. Smith demonstrates how the denial of moral equality between Europeans and non-Europeans resulted from converging philosophical and scientific developments, including a declining belief in human nature’s universality and the rise of biological classification. The racial typing of human beings grew from the need to understand humanity within an all-encompassing system of nature, alongside plants, minerals, primates, and other animals. While racial difference as seen through science did not arise in order to justify the enslavement of people, it became a rationalization and buttress for the practices of trans-Atlantic slavery. From the work of François Bernier to Leibniz, Kant, and others, Smith delves into philosophy’s part in the legacy and damages of modern racism. -- Smith is university professor of the history and philosophy of science at the Université Paris Diderot—Paris VII. ...author of Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life (PUP), coeditor and cotranslator of The Leibniz-Stahl Controversy -- downloaded introduction to Note -- only hdbk, will be in ebook
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  racism  racialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  exploration  Spanish_Empire  Spain  Renaissance  natural_philosophy  biology  taxonomies  Latin_America  West_Indies  North_America  Native_Americans  indigenous_peoples  slavery  West_Africa  Africa  African_trade  life_sciences  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  French_Enlightenment  Leibniz  Kant  anatomy  Adam  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  science-and-religion  science-public  science_of_man 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Christophe Litwin, review essay - Stéphane Van Damme on Living the Enlightenment | Books & ideas -- French original June 2014, translation May 2015 by Michael C. Behrent
Original French http://www.laviedesidees.fr/La-vie-des-Lumieres.html -- Stéphane Van Damme, À toutes voiles vers la vérité [On Course to the Truth]: Une autre histoire de la philosophie au temps des Lumières, Seuil, 2014, 386 p., 24 €.Van Damme’s project is to write an alternative history of philosophy (...) not by writing a history of ideas, but rather a “historian’s history” of philosophy. Rather than beginning with a canonical body of texts or doctrines (the selection of which is frequently incomplete or ideological), Van Damme, building on Bruno Latour’s work in the history of science and Antoine Lilti’s and Etienne Anheim’s work in the journal Annales, (and..) the historical geographer Jean-Marc Besse, approaches the history of philosophy in a manner that is decidedly contextual, material, and pragmatic. Unlike literature, art, and science, Van Damme notes, philosophy had, until the past decade, largely avoided cultural history’s probing gaze. (..) the recent literature in the field is daunting—(see the..)abundant critical and bibliographical apparatus (305-375)—a history of philosophy conceived as an early modern cultural practice had yet to be written. Where, when, how, and in what circumstances were the activities we refer to by such terms as “knowing,” “living philosophically,” “being a philosopher,” and “teaching,” “doing,” “reading,” and “writing” philosophy practiced? Can the tools and methods of cultural history offer insight, in this way, into Enlightenment philosophy’s distinctive “truth regime”? (..)This pragmatic approach covers a remarkably wide range of topics and methodologies (many in) previously published articles (organized..) by situating philosophical practice in 3 types of spaces: the public sphere, geography, and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note for both languages
books  reviews  amazon.fr  buy  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  France  Enlightenment  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  geography  political_history  political_culture  sociology_of_knowledge  philosophy  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_history  natural_philosophy  epistemology  epistemology-social  bibliography  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
L'Europe des Lumières - Classiques Garnier - collection directors Michel Delon, Jacques Berchtold et Christophe Martin
De ce qu'on appelle la crise de la conscience européenne à la Révolution française, la littérature et la pensée ont pour espace une Europe, souvent francophone, éprise d'idées nouvelles et d'expérimentations formelles. La collection rend compte de recherches qui sollicitent des disciplines et des méthodes diverses pour mieux connaître et comprendre la vie intellectuelle, scientifique, artistique et littéraire du XVIIIe siècle, ainsi que l'histoire des idées et des représentations. -- From what has been designated as a "crisis of conscience" to the Revolution, literature and thought play in a European space, often French-speaking, entranced by new ideas and formal experiments. The collection covers research which calls on a variety of disciplines and methods in order to better know and understand the intellectual, scientific, artistic and literary life of the 18th century, as well as the history of ideas and representations.
books  18thC  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  art_history  literary_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  philosophes  Republic_of_Letters  public_sphere  publishing 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Caroline Jacot Grapa - Dans le vif du sujet - Diderot, corps et âme ( 2009) | Classiques Garnier - collection L'Europe des Lumières
Ce livre est un essai sur le style du matérialisme de Diderot, sa psychologie, sa métaphysique et sur les figures de l'intériorité des Lumières. La langue de l'intériorité, apanage de la spiritualité, se retrempe au contact sensible des métaphores de l'époque. Elles donnent accès à un savoir nouveau de la vie corporelle. L'actualité de cet essai tient au dialogue qu'il engage avec la phénoménologie et les neurosciences. -- This work is an essay on the style of Diderot's materialism, his psychology and his metaphysics. Its modern pertinence stems from the dialogue established with phenomenology and neurosciences. -- ISBN 978-2-8124-0046-9 -- 504 pages -- looks extremely interesting -- tracking reception of British empiricism, debates over various Cartesian proposals for dealing with animals, and the new directions taken both in life sciences and psychology and the metaphysics of materialism -- downloaded TOC as pdf to Note
books  find  amazon.fr  libraries  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  natural_philosophy  18thC  France  Diderot  d'Alembert  d'Holbach  Cartesian  Locke  Newton  Newtonian  Encyclopédie  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Vitalism  psychology  thinking_matter  anatomy  physiology  scientific_method  organism  subject  subjectivity  phenomenology  neuroscience  materialism  metaphysics  mind  mind-body  soul  human_nature  metaphor  French_language  French_lit  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
François Duchesneau - La Physiologie des Lumières - Empirisme, modèles et théories (2012) | Classiques Garnier, coll. Histoire et philosophie des sciences
Cet ouvrage décrit et analyse les modèles de l'être vivant qui, dans le cadre de la révolution scientifique des Temps modernes, ont dessiné un parcours intellectuel menant à l'invention de la biologie comme science. Tout au long du xviiie siècle, la physiologie définit ses méthodes et ses concepts fondamentaux. Mobilisant les savoirs empiriques disponibles, elle en extrait les principes d'une véritable science des corps organisés. -- ISBN 978-2-8124-0783-3 -- 739 pages -- mostly Germans and French, including Leibniz and Wolff and Maupertuis and Buffon as significant stages in the debates
books  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  biology  anatomy  physiology  scientific_method  17thC  18thC  life_sciences  empiricism  Leibniz  Wolff_Christian  Maupertuis  Buffon 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Frédérique Aït-Touati, Stephen Gaukroger, Le monde en images. Voir, représenter, savoir, de Descartes à Leibniz (2015) | Classiques Garnier, coll. « Histoire et philosophie des sciences »
Frédérique Aït-Touati, Stephen Gaukroger, Le monde en images. Voir, représenter, savoir, de Descartes à Leibniz, Paris, Classiques Garnier, coll. « Histoire et philosophie des sciences », 2015, 128 p., ISBN : 978-2-8124-2589-9. -- Dans les débats classiques des 17thC-18thC, la représentation est considérée avant tout comme une question rhétorique et psychologique, mais à la fin du 18thC, elle devient une question épistémologique. Cet ouvrage explore le contexte de cette transformation et ses sources. l’émergence du problème de la représentation -- not edited collection, but co-authored study of a bit over 100 pages -- Chapters in TOC -- 1. Rhétorique et théorie de l’image vive 2. la révolution cartésienne  3. représenter l’invisible - Philosophie naturelle et visualisation chez Robert Hooke   4. les limites de la visualisation - Le débat entre Newton et Leibniz sur l’algèbre (a) La géométrie contre l’analyse  (b) L’analyse infnitésimale et la question de la preuve directe (c) La géométrie contre le calcul diférentiel  (d) Visualisation et capacités cognitives humaines  (e) Visualisation -- online pruce 19€
books  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  astronomy  ontology  epistemology  17thC  18thC  Descartes  representation-metaphysics  ideas-theories  Hooke  Leibniz  Newton  scientific_method  scientific_culture  instruments  microscope  telescope  unobservables  mathematics  geometry  calculus  cognition  analysis-logic  images  rhetoric  rhetoric-visual 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Peter Elmer, review - Paul Kleber Monod, Solomon's Secret Arts: the Occult in the Age of Enlightenment (Yale University Press 2013) | Reviews in History
Peter Elmer, University of Exeter -- This important work provides the first informed, well-researched and highly nuanced account of the fortunes of ‘occult’ thought and practice in England from the mid17thC to its demise at the end of the 18thC. Building on the work of a wide range of scholars from various disciplines, (..) the fortunes of the occult are argued to have peaked in the second half of the 17thC, dipped in the period from the Glorious Revolution to 1760, and then re-emerged in the last 4 decades of the 18thC in somewhat different but revitalized form. As Monod shows (..) the occult (defined broadly as alchemy, astrology and natural magic) was rarely perceived as a uniform movement of ideas, its adherents frequently picking and choosing those elements of the ‘occult’ which most appealed to them. It was thus a protean body of ideas, susceptible to frequent re-interpretation according to the personal preoccupations of the initiated. At the same time, while some of its adherents may have (in the earlier period especially) seen it as a body of ideas capable of replacing older systems of science and philosophy, it more often than not was studied and developed alongside other, competing systems of thought. (..) What is invigoratingly original here is Monod’s application of the same accommodating features of occult thinking with regard to Newtonianism and the Enlightenment in the later period. (..) it is hard to disagree with his conclusion that ‘the assumption of many historians, that occult thinking was debunked by experimental science … is essentially wrong’.(..) all the arguments against astrology, alchemy and natural magic had been fully developed long before 1650. This is equally true of witchcraft, (..) The occult was not simply argued out of existence. Only wider factors can help to explain this process. (..) in order to understand this process, we need to pay more heed to the wider social, religious and political context in which these ideas were promoted and debated. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  religious_history  religious_culture  religious_belief  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_culture  Enlightenment  natural_philosophy  occult  chemistry  alchemy  medicine  Newtonian  astronomy  astrology  magic  hermeticism  esotericism  publishing  Charles_II  court_culture  Church_of_England  witchcraft  political_culture  Tories  dissenters  Evangelical  Whigs  Defoe  Thompson_EP  rationality  reason  social_history  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Della Rocca, review - Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide (2013) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 2014
Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 264pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780521111607. -- Reviewed by Michael Della Rocca, Yale University -- What explains the continuing power the Meditations has over us, its ability to shape our ways of philosophical thinking even today? As influential as Descartes' arguments have been, it is certainly not the rational compellingness of those arguments that gives the book its exalted place in philosophy. And while Descartes' departures from Aristotelian philosophy (to the extent that he broke with it) are historically and philosophically important, they do little to explain the lasting and powerful attraction of the Meditations. I will return to this mysterious power at the end of this review. But first I want to show how the many fine and well-selected essays in Karen Detlefsen's volume collectively confirm the widespread conviction that engagement with Descartes remains vital to philosophy. -- first rate group of authors, including Garber on Descartes's response to Hobbes's objections re substance
books  reviews  17thC  intellectual_history  Descartes  Hobbes  Locke  metaphysics  epistemology  substance  scepticism  cogito  perception  qualia  natural_philosophy  self  self-knowledge  self-examination  theology  scholastics  Aristotelian  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Matteo Residori - Néoplatonisme et scepticisme dans le Malpiglio secondo du Tasse | Italique, V, 2002, p. 93-108.
« «Del fuggir la moltitudine ». Néoplatonisme et scepticisme dans le Malpiglio secondo du Tasse », Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.150 **--** La composition, en 1584-1585, du dyptique de dialogues consacré à Vincenzo et à Giovanlorenzo Malpiglio semble destinée à illustrer la double vocation de l’œuvre dialogique du Tasse, telle que l’auteur la définit à la même époque dans son discours sur le dialogue.1Le malpiglio overo de la corte, qui a pour protagoniste le gentilhomme lucquois Vincenzo Malpiglio, trésorier du duc de Ferrare, est un exemple parfait de dialogue « civil ou moral », portant sur les problèmes éthiques et politiques de la vie de cour. Le malpiglio secondo overo del fuggir la moltitudine semble pencher plutôt du côté du genre « spéculatif », qui a pour objet les questions concernant « la science et la vérité ». Mais cette définition n’est pas assez précise. En mettant en scène le fils de Vincenzo, Giovanlorenzo, jeune homme brillant qui aspire à l’otium littéraire et philosophique, le Tasse propose dans le malpiglio secondo une réflexion sur les fondements mêmes de l’activité spéculative, et, de ce fait, sur la légitimité de sa propre entreprise littéraire. Dans la lecture du dialogue il faudra tenir compte de cette dimension réflexive, tout en essayant d’en préciser les circonstances et la portée réelle. D’autre part, la complexité du parcours que le Tasse dessine dans le texte, qui compte parmi les plus ambigus des dialogues, demande au lecteur de porter une attention particulière aux modèles qui en organisent la texture composite. C’est dans cette direction que nous avons orienté notre lecture, pour essayer de démonter la machine complexe du malpiglio secondo et d’éclairer ainsi quelques uns de ses enjeux essentiels. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  16thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Italy  Renaissance  Tasso  dialogue  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  metaphysics  epistemology  Neoplatonism  scepticism  otium  natural_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 9 (Letters and Misc. Works) - Online Library of Liberty
Letters in Latin reflecting correspondence in Republic of Letters; miscellaneous writings on topics he was interested in, including viticulture for the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury, a history of navigation, and his book collection Of particular interest, a collection published in 1719 - A COLLECTION OF SEVERAL PIECES OF Mr. JOHN LOCKE. published by Mr. DESMAIZEAUX, under the direction of ANTHONY COLLINS, Esq. *-* THE character of Mr. Locke, by Mr. Peter Coste. *-* The fundamental constitutions of Carolina. *-* A letter from a person of quality to his friend in the country; giving an account of the debates and resolutions of the house of lords, in April and May 1675, concerning a bill, intitled, “An act to prevent the dangers which may arise from persons disaffected to the government.” *-* Remarks upon some of Mr. Norris’s books, wherein he asserts F. Malebranche’s opinion of “our seeing all things in God.” *-* A letter to Mr. Oldenburg, secretary to the Royal Society. *-* Letters to Anthony Collins, Esq. *-* A letter to * * * on Dr. Pococke. *-* Letters to the Rev. Mr. Richard King. *-* Rules of a society which met once a week, for their improvement in useful knowledge, and for the promoting of truth and christian charity --- in Vol 2 of this edition, Elements of natural philosophy. *-* Some thoughts concerning reading and study for a gentleman. -- downloaded mobi to Note
books  etexts  downloaded  Liberty_Fund  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  natural_philosophy  political_philosophy  British_history  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  American_colonies  Carolina  constitutions  Republic_of_Letters  Royal_Society  Collins_Anthony  Malebranche  ideas-theories  Whigs  Charles_II  James_II  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  maritime_history  epistemology  free-thinkers  House_of_Lords  opposition 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Locke, vol. 2 (An Essay concerning Human Understanding Part 2 and Other Writings) [1824 edition] - Online Library of Liberty
Conclusion of the Essay plus some of his important secondary works re epistemology, education plus Elements of Natural Philosophy *--* OF THE CONDUCT of the UNDERSTANDING. *--* SOME THOUGHTS concerning READING AND STUDY for a GENTLEMAN. *--* ELEMENTS of NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. *--* A NEW METHOD of a COMMON-PLACE-BOOK. translated out of the french from the second volume of the bibliotheque universelle. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Locke  epistemology  natural_philosophy  education  gentleman  methodology  scientific_method  Republic_of_Letters 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Colin Dickey, review - One Book Opens Another: On Lawrence Principe, “The Secrets of Alchemy” | The Los Angeles Review of Books - Nov 2012
Great review! -- more central: any study of alchemy reveals the stubborn fact that early modern thought was far more universalizing in its scope than our own age’s tendency to compartmentalize fields of knowledge, and approaching alchemy on its own terms means rethinking our own relationship to the intellectual past. Whereas we regard art, chemistry, religion, and philosophy as separate, discrete areas of study, the early moderns didn’t think like this. Alchemy blends together a variety of disciplines, methods, and philosophies, and any attempt to isolate its chemistry or its symbolism out from the rest is a willful misreading. As Principe stresses repeatedly, “premoderns tended to conceive of and visualize the world in multivalent terms, where each individual thing was connected to many others by webs of analogy and metaphor. This view stands in contrast to the modern tendency to compartmentalize and isolate things and ideas into separate disciplines.” The lasting value of a book like this one is its reminder that we misunderstand the past because we constantly look for ourselves in it.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  religious_history  natural_philosophy  alchemy  ancient_history  medieval_history  Islamic_civilization  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  19thC  20thC  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Karl Marx - The Difference Between the Democritean and Epicurean Philosophy of Nature. with an Appendix - Doctoral Dissertation of Karl Marx | marxists.org
Written: March 1841; - First Published: 1902; -- Source: Marx-Engels Collected Works Volume 1; -- Publisher: Progress Publishers; -- Transcription/Markup: Andy Blunden; -- Online Version: Brian Baggins (marxists.org) 2000.
etexts  19thC  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  intellectual_history  Marx  Hegel  natural_philosophy  cosmology  atomism  laws_of_nature  Democritus  Epicurean  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - "Embryological Models in Ancient Philosophy" by | Phronesis 50.1 (2005): 1-42.
Devin Henry, The University of Western Ontario -- Historically embryogenesis has been among the most philosophically intriguing phenomena. In this paper I focus on one aspect of biological development that was particularly perplexing to the ancients: self-organisation. For many ancients, the fact that an organism determines the important features of its own development required a special model for understanding how this was possible. This was especially true for Aristotle, Alexander, and Simplicius who all looked to contemporary technology to supply that model. However, they did not all agree on what kind of device should be used. In this paper I explore the way these ancients made use of technology as a model for the developing embryo. However, my purpose here is more than just the historical interest of knowing which devices were used by whom and how each of them worked; I shall largely ignore the details of how the various devices actually worked. Instead I shall look at the use of technology from a philosophical perspective. As we shall see, the different choices of device reveal fundamental differences in the way each thinker understood the nature of biological development itself. Thus, the central aim of this paper is to examine, not who used what devices and how they worked, but why they used those particular devices and what they thought their functioning could tell us about the nature of embryological phenomena. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  natural_philosophy  history_of_science  ancient_Greece  biology  generation  inheritance  development-biological  embryology  scientific_culture  scientific_method  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry. "Organismal Natures" | Apeiron: a journal for ancient philosophy and science (2008): 47-74.
Aristotle agrees with the negative conclusion of Galen that the growth and development of living things cannot be due to material forces operating according to chance. For Aristotle, the process of development is structured according to the form of the organism being generated by it. Development ‘follows upon’ the organism’s substantial being and exists for the sake of it rather than vice versa. This confers a certain order and direction on the process that cannot be accounted for in terms of the random motions of atoms or the undirected actions of Love and Strife (Empedocles). He accepts that natural generation involves material-level forces of the sort Democritus proposed; however, he insists that when operating by themselves these undirected causes would only produce a living thing by chance. And generation is far too regular for that. But Aristotle rejects the further inference — endorsed by Galen — that the teleological structure imposed on a developing organism must be traced to an intelligent agent that puts the organism together according to its end like some kind of internalized Demiurge. Nature, Aristotle says, does not deliberate. -- By invoking ‘natures’ as the cause of development, Galen says, Aristotle offers an account which is entirely vacuous. On the other hand, Denis Walsh has recently argued that the concept of Aristotelian natures plays the same role in development as the modern concept of phenotypic plasticity and that in this sense Aristotelian natures have an indispensable role to play contemporary evolutionary biology. -- My aim in this paper is not to defend an Aristotelian approach to modern biology but rather to explore the concept of organismal natures in the context of Aristotle’s teleology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Aristotle  natural_philosophy  history_of_science  biology  generation  inheritance  development-biological  teleology  design-nature  materialism  Democritus  Empedocles  Galen  forms  evolutionary_biology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Lennon, Thomas M., Stainton, Robert J. (Eds.) 2008 The Achilles of Rationalist Psychology
Downloaded Introduction pdf to Note -- Series: Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind, Vol. 7 -- newly written papers addressing each of the main contributors to the discussion of the Achilles. Despite the historical importance and intrinsic interest of the argument, very little has been written about it. *--* Contents. *--* Did Plato Articulate the Achilles Argument?. *-- Aristotle on the Unity of Consciousness. *-- The Neoplatonic Achilles. *-- The Unity of the Soul and Contrary Appetites in Medieval Philosophy. *-- Hume, Spinoza and the Achilles Inference. *-- Locke and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Reverse Achilles in Locke. *-- Cudworth and Bayle: An Odd Couple?. *-- The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke Collins Correspondence. *-- Leibniz’s ‘Achilles’. *-- Hume’s Reply to the Achilles Argument. *-- Kant and Mendelssohn on the Implications of the ‘I Think’. *-- Kant on the Achilles Argument. *-- William James and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Binding Problem: Achilles in the 21st Century.
books  intellectual_history  mind  mind-body  consciousness  perception  thinking_matter  materialism  soul  immortality  substance  Plato  Neoplatonism  Aristotle  Aquinas  Duns_Scotus  Ockham  Augustine  Descartes  Spinoza  Malebranche  Cartesian  Bayle  Locke  Clarke  Collins_Anthony  Leibniz  Hume  Kant  Mendelssohn  Fichte  cognition  neuroscience  psychology  natural_philosophy  metaphysics  rationalist  James_William  history_of_science  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - "The Failure of Evolution in Antiquity" in Blackwell Companion to Ancient Science, Medicine and Technology (2014)
Devin Henry, The University of Western Ontario -- This paper traces the emergence and rejection of evolutionary thinking in antiquity. It examines Empedocles' original theory of evolution and why his ideas failed to gain traction among his predecessors. -- Devin Henry. "The Failure of Evolution in Antiquity" Blackwell Companion to Ancient Science, Medicine and Technology. Ed. Georgia Irby. Blackwell-Wiley, 2014. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  natural_philosophy  biology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  evolutionary_biology  evolution  time  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century - Online Library of Liberty
Hugh Trevor-Roper, The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, the Reformation and Social Change (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2001). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/719> -- The Crisis of the Seventeenth Century collects nine essays by Trevor-Roper on the themes of religion, the Reformation, and social change. As Trevor-Roper explains in his preface, “the crisis in government, society, and ideas which occurred, both in Europe and in England, between the Reformation and the middle of the seventeenth century” constituted the crucible for what “went down in the general social and intellectual revolution of the mid-seventeenth century.” The Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution in England laid the institutional and intellectual foundations of the modern understanding of liberty, of which we are heirs and beneficiaries. Trevor-Roper’s essays uncover new pathways to understanding this seminal time. Neither Catholic nor Protestant emerges unscathed from the examination to which Trevor-Roper subjects the era in which, from political and religious causes, the identification and extirpation of witches was a central event. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- see his introduction for discussion of historiography on topics covered in each essay since they were written, some from mid 1950s
books  etexts  17thC  Europe-Early_Modern  intellectual_history  historiography  revisionism  Reformation  Catholics-England  Papacy  Church_of_England  Puritans  witchcraft  religious_culture  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religious_wars  Calvinist  Arminian  English_constitution  monarchy  Parliament  Aristotelian  natural_philosophy  science-and-religion  theology  moral_philosophy  human_nature  historiography-17thC  scepticism  colonialism  Scotland  James_I  Charles_I  Thirty_Years_War  France  Germany  Spain  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
George Turnbull, Observations upon Liberal Education, in All its Branches [1742], ed. Terrence O. Moore, Jr. - Online Library of Liberty
George Turnbull, Observations upon Liberal Education, in All its Branches, ed. Terrence O. Moore, Jr. (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/892> -- Turnbull was the first member of the Scottish Enlightenment to provide a formal treatise on the theory and practice of education. He applied his ideas on the moral sense to the education of youth. Turnbull showed how a liberal education enables youth to realize a true “inward liberty” and moral strength and thus prepares them to live responsibly and happily in a free society.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Turnbull_George  Hutcheson  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  moral_sentiments  education  education-higher  education-civic  mind  habit  Common_Sense  humanities  natural_philosophy  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
George Turnbull, The Principles of Moral and Christian Philosophy. Vol. 1: The Principles of Moral Philosophy, ed. Alexander Broadie - Online Library of Liberty
George Turnbull, The Principles of Moral and Christian Philosophy. Vol. 1: The Principles of Moral Philosophy, ed. and with an Introduction by Alexander Broadie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1342> The Principles of Moral and Christian Philosophy presents the first masterpiece of Scottish Common Sense philosophy. This two-volume treatise is important for its wide range of insights about the nature of the human mind, the foundations of morals, and the relationship between morality and religion. In order to understand the Enlightenment in Scotland, Turnbull’s work must be put next to that of Francis Hutcheson. In the first volume, The Principles of Moral Philosophy, Turnbull presents a detailed study of the faculties of the human mind and their interrelations. He contends that moral philosophy should be treated as one part, the highest part, of natural philosophy, and not as a field requiring its own distinctive methodology.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Turnbull_George  Hutcheson  Shaftesbury  Berkeley  Butler  moral_philosophy  Common_Sense  human_nature  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  mind  psychology  natural_philosophy  ideas-theories  empiricism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
George Turnbull, The Principles of Moral and Christian Philosophy, 2 vols. [1740], ed. Alexander Broadie - Online Library of Liberty
George Turnbull, The Principles of Moral and Christian Philosophy, ed. and with an Introduction by Alexander Broadie (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 2 vols. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1821> -- The Principles of Moral and Christian Philosophy presents the first masterpiece of Scottish Common Sense philosophy. This two-volume treatise is important for its wide range of insights about the nature of the human mind, the foundations of morals, and the relationship between morality and religion. In order to understand the Enlightenment in Scotland, Turnbull’s work must be put next to that of Francis Hutcheson. In the first volume, The Principles of Moral Philosophy, Turnbull presents a detailed study of the faculties of the human mind and their interrelations. He contends that moral philosophy should be treated as one part, the highest part, of natural philosophy, and not as a field requiring its own distinctive methodology. - Vol 1 downloaded to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Turnbull_George  Hutcheson  Shaftesbury  Berkeley  Butler  moral_philosophy  Common_Sense  human_nature  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  mind  psychology  natural_philosophy  ideas-theories  empiricism  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Israel - “Radical Enlightenment” – Peripheral, Substantial, or the Main Face of the Trans-Atlantic Enlightenment (1650-1850) | Diametros
“Radical Enlightenment” and “moderate Enlightenment” are general categories which, it has become evident in recent decades, are unavoidable and essential for any valid discussion of the Enlightenment broadly conceived (1650-1850) and of the revolutionary era (1775-1848). Any discussion of the Enlightenment or revolutions that does not revolve around these general categories, first introduced in Germany in the 1920s and taken up in the United States since the 1970s, cannot have any validity or depth either historically or philosophically. “Radical Enlightenment” was neither peripheral to the Enlightenment as a whole, nor dominant, but rather the “other side of the coin” an inherent and absolute opposite, always present and always basic to the Enlightenment as a whole. Several different constructions of “Radical Enlightenment” have been proposed by the main innovators on the topic – Leo Strauss, Henry May, Günter Mühlpfordt, Margaret Jacob, Gianni Paganini, Martin Mulsow, and Jonathan Israel – but, it is argued here, the most essential element in the definition is the coupling, or linkage, of philosophical rejection of religious authority (and secularism - the elimination of theology from law, institutions, education and public affairs) with theoretical advocacy of democracy and basic human rights. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Radical Enlightenment moderate Enlightenment democracy aristocracy universal education equality emancipation republicanism mixed government poverty economic oppression crypto-radicalism positivism American revolution -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  politics-and-religion  historiography  economic_history  political_economy  17thC  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  religious_culture  authority  anticlerical  Absolutism  secularism  democracy  natural_rights  civil_liberties  egalitarian  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  Spinozism  education  aristocracy  poverty  Ancien_régime  mixed_government  tolerance  positivism  natural_law  domination  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  natural_philosophy  British_history  Dutch  Germany  Atlantic  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Republic_of_Letters  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Przemysław Gut - The Legacy of Spinoza. The Enlightenment According to Jonathan Israel | Diametros
Dr hab. Przemysław Gut, Assistant Professor, Department of the History of Modern and Contemporary Philosophy, Institute of Theoretical Philosophy, Faculty of Philosophy, The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin -- The aim of the paper is to present and analyze the interpretation of the Enlightenment which has recently been proposed by Jonathan Israel, with the focus on its philosophical aspect as opposed to the historical one. The paper consists of two parts. The task of the first part is reconstructive: it attempts to explore Israel’s most characteristic statements concerning the Enlightenment. The second and more extensive part has a polemical character: it endeavours to furnish the reader with an answer to the question of the degree to which the understanding of the Enlightenment proposed by Israel can be considered a satisfying interpretation of this period. The paper suggests that the main problem which may undermine Israel’s account of the Enlightenment is associated with the unduly selective interpretation of Spinoza’s philosophy and its position in the intellectual society of that time. -- Keywords - Enlightenment Spinoza historiography naturalism pantheism atheism human nature -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Spinoza  Spinozism  natural_philosophy  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  human_nature  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Margaret C. Jacob - How Radical Was the Enlightenment? What Do We Mean by Radical? | Diametros
Distinguished Professor of History, UCLA Email: mjacob@history.ucla.edu
-- The Radical Enlightenment has been much discussed and its original meaning somewhat distorted. In 1981 my concept of the storm that unleashed a new, transnational intellectual movement possessed a strong contextual and political element that I believed, and still believe, to be critically important. Idealist accounts of enlightened ideas that divorce them from politics leave out the lived quality of the new radicalism born in reaction to monarchical and clerical absolutism. Taking the religious impulse seriously and working to defang it of bellicosity would require years of labor. First all the world’s religions had to be surveyed, see Picart’s seven folio volumes; and Rousseau’s Savoyard vicar had to both preach and live religion simply as true virtue; and finally Jefferson editing the Bible so as to get the irrational parts simply removed, thus making people more fit to grant a complete religious toleration. Throughout the century all these approaches to revealed religion may be legitimately described as radical. Each produced a different recommendation for its replacement. As I have now come to see, the pantheism I identified in 1981 would lead in many directions, among them lay the search to understand all human religiosity and to articulate a universal natural religion. -- Keywords - Atheism materialism absolutism French Protestant refugees Dutch cities religious toleration Bernard Picart Jonathan Israel English freethinkers Papal condemnation Rousseau pantheism Jefferson -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  Dutch  British_history  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  political_culture  politics-and-religion  religion-established  religious_belief  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  monotheism  natural_religion  natural_philosophy  materialism  tolerance  natural_rights  naturalism  pantheism  atheism  atheism_panic  anticlerical  Absolutism  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  publishing  public_sphere  Picart  Rousseau  Jefferson  revelation  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Biblical_criticism  Huguenots  free-thinkers  Papacy  papal_infallibility  censorship  Republic_of_Letters  rational_religion  American_colonies  Early_Republic  ecclesiology  querelle_des_rites  virtue  moral_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric Schliesser - Toland and Adam Smith’s Posthumous Work | Diametros
In this paper I offer a speculative answer to the question why Adam Smith, who burned nearly all of his papers, arranged for posthumous publication for a number of his essays. I rely on a number of hints in those essays and put them in the context of eighteenth century natural philosophy. I argue that those hints trace back to John Toland and Spinozism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  natural_philosophy  Spinozism  Toland  Smith  Scottish_Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
JOSE R. TORRE - The Teleology of Political Economy and Moral Philosophy in the Age of the Anglo-American Enlightenment | JSTOR: Early American Studies, Vol. 8, No. 3 (Fall 2010), pp. 646-671
"An Inward Spring of Motion and Action": The Teleology of Political Economy and Moral Philosophy in the Age of the Anglo-American Enlightenment -- The Enlightenment-era narratives of political economy and moral philosophy shared an epistemic base and theory of causation that understood the human experience as a self-realizing or immanent teleology driving toward a providential and benevolent outcome. In political economy the pursuit of personal wealth and satisfaction tended naturally to a benevolent equilibrium without the knowledge or intent of the agent. In moral philosophy the agent acted intuitively and unconsciously to satisfy immediate emotional desires that culminated in pleasure but nevertheless improved society. The teleology of both these narratives derived from a series of larger shifts in human psychology and ideas from an early modern and Reformation-era theological voluntarism to an Enlightenment-era Neoplatonic and Aristotelian theory of humanity and nature. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  British_history  Atlantic  American_colonies  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  moral_sentiments  moral_philosophy  political_economy  causation  teleology  human_nature  moral_psychology  passions  Neoplatonism  voluntarism  Augustinian  Aristotelian  natural_philosophy  natural_law  cosmology  Providence  hedonistic  utilitarianism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Heyd - From a Rationalist Theology to Cartesian Voluntarism: David Derodon and Jean-Robert Chouet | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1979), pp. 527-542
Shift from proto Leibniz determinism to extreme Voluntarism - 1660 and later in Geneva - Chouet introduced Cartesian mechanism to French Reformed - a perspective on the relationship between theology and 17thC mechanical philosophy -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  religious_history  science-and-religion  17thC  Geneva  Calvinist  rational_religion  God-attributes  determinism  voluntarism  laws_of_nature  Descartes  Cartesian  mechanism  natural_philosophy  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview with Lisa Downing - Early Mod philosophy » 3:AM Magazine - May 2014
Lisa Downing is the philosopher who thinks all the time about the early modern philosophers of Europe, especially 17th and 18th century philosophy, about how philosophical analysis and historical exactitude compliment each other, on adding to the canonical philosophers of the period, on why Malebranch is the closest to re-entry, and Robert Boyle, on Descartes vs Newton, on avoiding anachronism, on the dynamism of the period, on primary and secondary qualities, on resisting the idea that historical views have to be relevant, on Berkeley, on tensions in Locke, on women philosophers of the time and on rejecting the occult. This one is kick-ass! Yo!
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Descartes  Cartesian  Malebranche  Locke  Boyle  Berkeley  Newton  Clarke  Leibniz  Hobbes  mind-body  causation  God-attributes  Providence  mechanism  substance  metaphysics  Aristotelian  qualia  perception  natural_philosophy  free_will  Scientific_Revolution  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
J. V. Golinski - A Noble Spectacle: Phosphorus and the Public Cultures of Science in the Early Royal Society | JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 80, No. 1 (Mar., 1989), pp. 11-39
Huge bibliography of both primary and secondary literature -- chemistry and link to medicine were important for experimental_philosophy, but the flashiness of experiments for the public could both attract public interest and provide ammunition for enemies -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  17thC  British_history  Royal_Society  sociology_of_knowledge  experimental_philosophy  natural_philosophy  medicine  chemistry  magic  alchemy  Boyle  Hooke  Harvey  science-public  scientific_culture  Scientific_Revolution  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Harrison - Descartes on Animals | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 42, No. 167 (Apr., 1992), pp. 219-227
Some support for Cottingham thesis that Descartes wasn't the monster toward animals that Cartesians like Malebranche were. Further bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  theology  moral_philosophy  natural_philosophy  17thC  Descartes  Cartesian  Malebranche  animals  reason  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Simon Schaffer - Dévots et philosophes mécanistes: Ames et esprits dans la philosophie de la Nature, à l'époque de la Restauration anglaise | JSTOR: Ethnologie française, nouvelle serie, T. 23, No. 3 (Septembre 1993), pp. 316-335
Recent historiography of the Scientific Revolution has challenged the assumption that the achievements of seventeenth-century natural philosophy can easily be described as the mechanization of the world-picture. The clock-work world was triumphant and inevitably so. However, a close examination of one key group of natural philosophers working in England during the 1670s shows that their program necessarily incorporated souls and spirits, attractions and congruities, within both their ontology and their epistemology. Any natural philosophical strategy which excluded spirits and sympathies from its world was condemned as tending to subversion and irreligion. Through a description of the historical context of experimental work, the present article sets out to show how a philosophy of matter and spirit was deliberately constructed by the end of the seventeenth century. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  17thC  British_history  natural_philosophy  experimental_philosophy  mechanism  soul  mind-body  Boyle  More_Henry  scepticism  atheism_panic  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Identity, Practice, and Trust in Early Modern Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1125-1145
Historians of early modern science face a serious problem, in that there was no science in early modern society. There were, however, other enterprises in the early modern period devoted to the understanding and manipulation of the physical world. This review identifies important trends in historians' attempts to comprehend those enterprises. In particular, it identifies four leading currents. The first is the move to characterize these different enterprises themselves, and in particular to understand natural philosophy and the mathematical sciences as distinct practical endeavours. The second is the attention now being paid to the social identity of the investigator of nature. The third is the attempt to understand the history of science as a history of practical enterprises rather than propositions or theories. The fourth, finally, is the understanding of natural knowledge in terms of systems of trust, and in particular in terms of the credit vested in rival claimants. In a combination of these, the review suggests, lies a future for a discipline that has otherwise lost its subject. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  historical_sociology  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  technology  Innovation  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  natural_philosophy  mathematics  mechanism  corpuscular  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
J. R. Jacob - Boyle's Atomism and the Restoration Assault on Pagan Naturalism | JSTOR: Social Studies of Science, Vol. 8, No. 2 (May, 1978), pp. 211-233
This paper places Boyle's atomism in its social context, and describes the political motives which underlay it. Boyle's physico-theology was designed to answer the ideological challenges thrown up by the turbulent events of mid-seventeenth-century England. After the Restoration, Boyle and the Royal Society continued to use his natural philosophy to this end. One important example is Boyle's A Free Enquiry... (written in 1666, but not published until 1686). This addresses itself to the heretical implications of scholastic natural philosophy. Scholasticism, argues Boyle, assumes a universe in which a purposive rationality works quite apart from God and divine providence, and in which there is no distinction between 'nature' and 'providence'; this may lead to some form of 'paganizing naturalism', and so must be overthrown. Boyle's strategy is first to show that the scholastic conception is not scientifically valid, and then to offer his corpuscular philosophy as a superior alternative. However, Boyle's real enemy was not scholastic theory per se, but those who relied on it - papists and paganizing deists. In showing that both cherished outmoded assumptions about nature, Boyle attacked both kinds of idolatry simultaneously. The timing of the appearance of A Free Enquiry also added to its effectiveness as a shrewd piece of Anglican apologetics. It was published just when, because of James II's religious policy, the threat of subversion by papists and 'atheists' bulked larger than ever before in the minds of Anglican churchmen. -- extensive bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  religious_history  church_history  natural_philosophy  17thC  Boyle  corpuscular  experimental_philosophy  Royal_Society  pagans  Deism  scholastics  anti-Catholic  natural_religion  Providence  God-attributes  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven Shapin - Descartes the Doctor: Rationalism and Its Therapies | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 131-154
During the Scientific Revolution one important gauge of the quality of reformed natural philosophical knowledge was its ability to produce a more effective medical practice. Indeed, it was sometimes thought that philosophers who pretended to possess new and more potent philosophical knowledge might display that possession in personal health and longevity. René Descartes repeatedly wrote that a better medical practice was a major aim of his philosophical enterprise. He said that he had made important strides towards achieving that aim and, on that basis, he offered practical medical advice to others and advertised the expectation that, taking his own advice, he would live a very long time. This paper describes what Cartesian medicine looked like in practice and what that practice owed to the power of modernist Reason. -- huge bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  medicine  17thC  Descartes  Bacon  natural_philosophy  physiology  psychology  emotions  mind-body  diet  aging  humours  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Perez Zagorin - Hobbes's Early Philosophical Development | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 54, No. 3 (Jul., 1993), pp. 505-518
Re attributed work, A Short Tract on First Principles -- Richard Tuck had challenged the attribution -- Zagorin reviews the evidence and considers connection of principles with development of scepticism -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  Hobbes  natural_philosophy  scepticism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Geoffrey Gorham - Mind-Body Dualism and the Harvey-Descartes Controversy | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 55, No. 2 (Apr., 1994), pp. 211-234
Looks quite helpful - different explanations of Descartes concern with Harvey showing heart as autonomic engine of circulation -- some attribute it to rationalist vs empiricist methodology, others to different ways of being empiricist, others to Descartes's metaphysical objection that an apparently self generating motion didn't fit with his mechanism hypothesis -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  physiology  anatomy  experimental_philosophy  rationalist  empiricism  mind-body  17thC  Descartes  Harvey  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Epicureanism in Renaissance Moral and Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 53, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1992), pp. 573-583
Short but looks helpful - compares Lorenzo Valla attack on Aristotelian virtue ethics and Scholastics Christian Aristotelian hybrid with far more extensive engagement by Gassendi with Epicureanism. But both contributed to Christianity incorporating some notions of pleasure into sin and salvation. -- not much bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  theology  15thC  17thC  Renaissance  Europe-Early_Modern  Italy  France  Gassendi  Epicurean  virtue_ethics  Aristotelian  sin  salvation  pleasure  hedonistic  Christianity  materialism  corpuscular  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eyal Chowers - The Physiology of the Citizen: The Present-Centered Body and Its Political Exile | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 30, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 649-676
Shift from civic humanism's optimistic view of man's capacity to build for the future and control sociopolitical environment to pessimistic view of capacity of citizens under raison d'Etat -- 16thC and 17thC increasingly focused on multipart, shifting self and passions vs reason rather than the development of a stable character that Renaissance humanism concerned with. Ties shift to new views of anatomy (eg Harvey) and connections between physiology and psychology and impact on different notions of time relative to self, society and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  cultural_history  natural_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  British_history  France  Italy  Italian_Wars  Renaissance  humanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  raison-d'-état  Absolutism  emotions  physiology  psychology  medicine  self  time  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Descartes  Gassendi  Hobbes  Locke  Harrington  Harvey  identity  character  mechanism  thinking_matter  mind  mind-body  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Jenner - The Politics of London Air John Evelyn's Fumifugium and the Restoration | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Sep., 1995), pp. 535-551
Historians have commonly described John Evelyn's pamphlet about London smoke pollution, Fumifugium, as a precocious example of environmental concern. This paper argues that such an interpretation is too simple. Evelyn's proposals are shown to be closely related to political allegory and the panegyrics written to welcome the newly restored Charles II. However, the paper also shows that Fumifugium was not simply a literary conceit; rather it exemplified the mid-seventeenth-century English interest in the properties of air that is visible in both the Hartlib circle and the early Royal Society. --didn't download
article  jstor  political_history  political_culture  history_of_science  British_history  Restoration  environment  London  pollution  natural_philosophy  experimental_philosophy  Hartlib_Circle  Royal_Society  Evelyn  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Urmi Bhowmik: Facts and Norms in the Marketplace of Print: John Dunton's Athenian Mercury (2003)
JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 36, No. 3 (Spring, 2003), pp. 345-365 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay discusses the division of knowledge within the context of a popular periodical, the Athenian Mercury (1691-1697). The separation of fields of knowledge in the Enlightenment was merely the prelude to the attempt to establish disciplines on a common basis. I trace a similar process in the Mercury', which treated questions about natural science and moral dilemmas as if they shared an analogous structure—of particular instantiations of universal laws. I argue that this identification of facts and norms constituted the public subject simultaneously as subject to the law and the authority before which the law must legitimate itself.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  cultural_history  17thC  1690s  publishing  Dunston  public_sphere  sociology_of_knowledge  disciplines  natural_law  natural_philosophy  moral_philosophy  norms  facts  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review essay: Ryan Patrick Hanley - Cambridge's Enlightenment [18thC philosophy &political thought] (2008)
JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Aug., 2008), pp. 634-640 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Works reviewed: --**-- The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy by Knud Haakonssen;  --**-- The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Political Thought by Mark Goldie; Robert Wokler
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  philosophy  metaphysics  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  natural_philosophy  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Britain  France  Germany  style-philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Gary Marker: Standing in St. Petersburg Looking West, Or, Is Backwardness All There Is? | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Marker, Gary. “Standing in St. Petersburg Looking West, Or, Is Backwardness All There Is?.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/35. -- in "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This strange symbiosis of Russia and Europe, at least from the sixteenth century onward, has been conveyed primarily through metaphors of teleology: primitive (or not), uncivil (or not); ignorant, crude, superstitious, uneducated, undeveloped. In short, backward. For European (and many Russian) literati “backward” and “Russian” were virtually interchangeable in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, and as such they resided in a state of misfortune needing to be overcome.
article  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  Russia  Peter_the_Great  cultural_history  Republic_of_Letters  Enlightenment  Franklin_Ben  nationalism  historians-and-state  history_of_science  natural_philosophy  development  modernization  academies  language-politics  education  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
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