dunnettreader + national_id   86

W. James Booth - Culture and Continuity: A Response to Alan Patten's "Rethinking Culture: The Social Lineage Account" (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
Alan Patten's social lineage account of cultural continuity is the most recent effort to provide multicultural theory with a non-essentialist concept of culture, its continuity and loss that meets broadly liberal normative desiderata. In this essay, I argue that it too fails to offer an alternative essentialism, to meet standard liberal normative stipulations, and to construct a theory of continuity sufficient to underpin the present claims of involuntarily incorporated communities. That result is theoretically interesting for it shows the deep intractability of the problems at the core of liberal multiculturalism. - Downloaded via iphone
downloaded  jstor  identity-multiple  community  liberalism  article  multiculturalism  bibliography  political_culture  nationalism  immigration  political_theory  books  essentialism  culture_wars  reviews  cultural_change  political_sociology  minorities  political_science  national_ID 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Alan Patton - Cultural Preservation and Liberal Values: A Reply to William James Booth (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
William James Booth elaborates three main challenges to my social lineage account (Patten 2011). Conceptually, he finds the proposal to be question-beginning. Normatively, he thinks that it has objectionable implications. And, substantively, he claims that the proposal is unhelpful, that it fails to explain a case of theoretical importance for multiculturalism. In this reply, I argue that each of these challenges misses the target. The social lineage account continues to offer a promising, nonessentialist basis for normative multiculturalism. - Downloaded via iphone
cultural_change  social_theory  US_politics  indigenous_peoples  US_society  culture_wars  political_sociology  cultural_diversity  minorities  identity-multiple  political_culture  culture  essentialism  political_theory  downloaded  liberalism  multiculturalism  national_ID  article  bibliography  nationalism  political_science  jstor  cultural_transmission  community  US_politics-race  cultural_stability  mass_culture 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Matteo Bortolini - The trap of intellectual success: Bellah, the American civil religion debate, & sociology of knowledge (2012) | Theory & Society on JSTOR
The trap of intellectual success: Robert N. Bellah, the American civil religion debate, and the sociology of knowledge, Theory and Society, Vol. 41, No. 2 (March 2012), pp. 187-210 -- Current sociology of knowledge tends to take for granted Robert K. Merton's theory ofcumulative advantage: successful ideas bring recognition to their authors, successful authors have their ideas recognized more easily than unknown ones. This article argues that this theory should be revised via the introduction of the differential between the status of an idea and that of its creator: when an idea is more important than its creator, the latter becomes identified with the former, and this will hinder recognition of the intellectual's new ideas as they differ from old ones in their content or style. Robert N. Bellah 's performance during the "civil religion debate" of the 1970s is reconstructed as an example of how this mechanism may work. Implications for further research are considered in the concluding section. — Keywords Intellectuals • Success • Cumulative advantage • Robert N. Bellah • American civil religion -- downloaded via AIr to DBOX
article  downloaded  jstor  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  20thC  US_history  post-WWII  1960s  sociology_of_religion  sociology  social_theory  social_sciences-post-WWII  civil_society  US_society  national_ID  national_tale  exceptionalism  universalism  civil_religion 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Steven T. Engel - Rousseau and Imagined Communities (2005) | The Review of Politics on JSTOR
The Review of Politics, Vol. 67, No. 3 (Summer, 2005), pp. 515-537 -- Rousseau's relationship to the phenomenon of modern nationalism is a consistent theme of political theory and the history of ideas. This article argues that Rousseau's thought can be seen as providing the foundation for nationalism even if he would not have endorsed it. That Rousseau's thought bears this relationship to nationalism can be seen by reexamining his argument through the lens of Benedict Anderson's concept of nations as imagined communities. Rousseau's account of political psychology, sovereignty, and the proper limits of the nation provide the core of the analysis of this question.
article  jstor  18thC  Rousseau  nationalism  national_ID  nation-state  national_tale  sovereignty  political_philosophy  political_culture 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot, review - S. Chaumier, L'inculture pour tous - les effets pervers du démocratisme culturel (2011) - Cairn.info
Premier effet pervers du démocratisme culturel : le maintien dans un état d’inculture (non pas au sens anthropologique, on l’aura compris) de ceux qui n’étaient pas les « héritiers » d’un « capital culturel » familial – pour parler la langue de Bourdieu. Second effet pervers, très bien analysé par Serge Chaumier : la confusion de la culture et des loisirs fait le jeu du consumérisme. Les démocrates voulaient favoriser une contre-culture (celle de la rue, des banlieues, des cités, etc.), mais ils n’ont fait que faciliter la marchandisation de la culture
taste  working_class  France  Boudrieu  popular_culture  Malraux  cultural_history  hierarchy  21stC  egalitarian  national_ID  multiculturalism  postmodern  books  status  judgment-aesthetics  reviews  democratization  elite_culture  republicanism  culture_industries  French_intellectuals  education-civic  20thC  political_history  social_capital 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Dominique Schaffer - Du progrès indéfini de la démocratie ? (2911) - Cairn.info
Les sociétés démocratiques sont aujourd’hui affectées d’un malaise qui suscite bien des interrogations sur leur avenir. Ce malaise est un produit de la logique interne de ce type de régime. La fragilité est inscrite dans les principes mêmes de la démocratie, dans la mesure où elle peut être pensée comme un épuisement progressif de la transcendance politique, une marche vers l’égalité généralisée et un relativisme des valeurs et des opinions. De cette corruption, nous subissons concrètement en Occident les effets délétères dans notre vie quotidienne ; ils touchent la famille, l’éducation et, de proche en proche, toutes les relations sociales. -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
civil_liberties  identity  article  individualism  political_participation  governance  democracy  downloaded  common_good  national_ID  norms  republicanism  declinism  political_philosophy  citizenship 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
JEFFREY ANDREW BARASH - ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Oct 2011)
Fulltitle -- MYTH IN HISTORY, PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY AS MYTH: ON THE AMBIVALENCE OF HANS BLUMENBERG'S INTERPRETATION OF ERNST CASSIRER'S THEORY OF MYTH, History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 3 (October 2011), pp. 328-340 This essay explores the different interpretations proposed by Ernst Cassirer and Hans Blumenberg of the relation between Platonic philosophy and myth as a means of bringing to light a fundamental divergence in their respective conceptions of what precisely myth is. It attempts to show that their conceptions of myth are closely related to their respective assumptions concerning the historical significance of myth and regarding the sense of history more generally. Their divergent conceptions of myth and of history, I argue, are at the same time not simply matters of abstract speculation, but spring from fundamental presuppositions concerning myth's political significance. The present elucidation aims not only to set in relief one or another of the ways in which Cassirer or Blumenberg understood myth, nor even to present Blumenberg's critical reception of Cassirer's theories, but above all to contribute to the interpretation of the political implications of myth and of its historical potency in our contemporary epoch. -- most ftnts to Blumenberg in German, especially Work on Myth -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  historiography  cultural_history  political_culture  Blumenberg  Cassirer  myth  epistemology-history  epistemology-social  identity  national_tale  national_ID  symbols-political  symbols-religious  symbol  political_discourse  Platonism  Neoplatonism  German_Idealism  neo-Kantian  hermeneutics  political-theology  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Dafydd Moore - Patriotism, Politeness, and National Identity in the South West of England in the Late 18thC (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Fall, 2009), pp. 739-762 -- looks at Enlightenment sociability and culture and a focus on regional history as part of national identity to discuss one dimension of conservative reaction against French revolutionary radicalism -- part of bibliography covers "patriot" claims to historical sources of identity through 18thC, plus diversified approach to what constituted "conservatism" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  Enlightenment  18thC  1790s  French_Revolution  national_ID  regional_history  history_of_England  Antiquarianism  poetry  ancient_Britain  conservatism  anti-Jacobin  Patriots  patriotism  national_origins  national_tale  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert P. Irvine - Labor and Commerce in Locke and Early 18thC English Georgic (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 963-988 -- importance of (agricultural) labor from Locke’s 2nd Treatise to "naturakize" money not just within the economy but within politics of the mercantilist imperial state - comparing Virgil use of georgics to encompass the Roman imperial state. Contrasts political agendas of Philips (Cyder 1707) and Pope (Windsor Forest 1713) in their use of georgics, both working within the Lockean framework of property. Extensive lit survey - lots of recent work on 18thC georgics to say nothing of cultural dimensions of political economy of expanding trade, commercialization and imperialism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  literary_history  English_lit  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  mercantilism  imperialism  trade  commerce  commerce-doux  civility-political  politeness  civil_society  public_sphere  nature  parties  partisanship  Whigs  Whig_Junto  City  Tories  gentry  landed_interest  national_ID  national_interest  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Queen_Anne  Spectator  Addison  political_culture  economic_culture  British_politics  British_Empire  poetry  poetics  nature-poetry  nature-mastery  Virgil  Pope  1700s  1710s  peace  Peace_of_Utrecht  labor_theory_of_value  labor  agriculture  Davenant  political_economy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Louli, review - Emmanuel Fureix, François Jarrige, La modernité désenchantée - La Vie des idées - 10 juin 2015
Recensé : Emmanuel Fureix, François Jarrige, La modernité désenchantée, La Découverte 2015, 390 p., 25 €. -- Le XIXe siècle a longtemps été tenu pour le siècle du progrès. L’historiographie récente est plus attentive à ses contradictions et à ses aléas. Deux historiens proposent une histoire de l’histoire du XIXe siècle, illustrant la manière dont notre société se regarde elle-même. -- Ceci n’est pas un manuel sur le XIXe siècle, pourrait-on dire, en paraphrasant Magritte, à la première lecture de La modernité désenchantée. L’ouvrage des deux dix-neuvièmistes reconnus que sont E. Fureix et F. Jarrige est autrement plus ambitieux, et cherche à « esquisser un état des lieux (incomplet) de la façon dont les historiens d’aujourd’hui renouvellent les lectures du XIXe siècle, dans sa singularité » -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  19thC  historiography  historiography-19thC  modernity  modernity-emergence  progress  cultural_history  cultural_change  cultural_critique  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Industrial_Revolution  science-and-religion  science-and-politics  French_politics  working_class  bourgeoisie  national_ID  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
New Books intetview - Tabetha Ewing, "Rumor, Diplomacy, and War in Enlightenment Paris" (2014)
Tabetha Ewing's Rumor, Diplomacy and War in Enlightenment Paris (Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment, 2014) is all about the on dit, the word on the street that everyday Parisians might have picked up, and/or spread around town in the 1740s. Focused on rumor during the War of Austrian Succession that lasted from 1740-1748, Ewing's is a book that examines a range of urban voices and opinions across a pivotal decade of the Enlightenment. Taking very seriously the landscapes of gossip and fantasy, Rumor, Diplomacy, and War is intriguing in its subject matter and its methodology. Interested in the circulation of speech and ideas, Ewing tracks a variety of bruits–open and clandestine media, royal efforts to release and police information about matters of state and military conflict, and oral and written forms of communication. All this, with the aim of exploring a distinctively early-modern brand of political participation, and an "inchoate citizenship" that existed in the decades before the French Revolution. Questions of national identity, loyalty to the regime (or not), and political expression/representation were in the air during these years of war and Enlightenment. Ewing's is a book that shows us how much historians can hear if we listen carefully.
books  interview  audio  18thC  French_Enlightenment  French_politics  French_foreign_policy  military_history  political_culture  War_of_Austrian_Succession  public_opinion  diplomatic_history  publishing-clandestine  national_ID  national_interest  legitimacy  1740s  Louis_XV  political_press  political_participation  citizenship  representative_institutions  free_speech  public_sphere 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Norbert Lenoir, review - Catherine Colliot-Thélène, La Démocratie sans « Demos » ( 2011) | Books & ideas - July 2015
Reviewed : C. Colliot-Thélène, La Démocratie sans « Demos » [Democracy Without ‘Demos‘], PUF, 2011, 256 pages, 27 euros -- French version January 2012 -- translated by Michael C. Behrent -- Democracy is not the government of the people, by the people. Rather, it is a permanent process of conquering new rights. This is the argument of Catherine Colliot-Thélène’s book, which examines the tension, found throughout democracy’s history, between individual emancipation and political affiliation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
reviews  books  French_language  political_philosophy  democracy  civil_liberties  citizens  citizenship  authority  national_ID  identity-multiple  globalization  global_governance  political_culture  political_participation  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Barnes vs Reclaim Australia: does Khe Sanh work as a conservative protest song? | The Conversation - July 2015
Fascinating analysis of how a down-beat song re a Vietnam vet totally alienated when tried to reintegrate into life in Audtralia - ending with going to Hong Kong to get laid by a prostitute -- has become a sort of anthem, Ironically picked up by xenophobic right-wing natavists. Since the lyrics don't fit, what is it about the musical composition that has that sort of affective impact? A detailed analysis of how the song is structured -- with no chorus and the same tropes in each "verse" but with variety in sequencing the chird progressions.
Pocket  music  popular_culture  national_ID  music-popular  video  audio  Australia  from pocket
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Ariadne Lewanska - interview with Pierre Manent - Migration, patriotism and the European agendum - Eurozine - Sept 2011
Original in Polish -- Translation by Irena Maryniak -- First published in Res Publica Nowa 13 (2011) (Polish version); Eurozine (English version) --;A European patriotism can be generated only through political acts that create a sense of solidarity, says historian Pierre Manent. If invocations of Europe are to be anything but vacuous, Europe needs to be decisive in defining its interests and demarcating its boundaries. -- the interview was stimulated by the large waves of intra-EU migration, e.g. the Poles -- downloaded pdf to Note
interview  EU  Europe  EU_governance  European_integration  national_ID  patriotism  migration  assimilation  nation-state  identity-multiple  identity_politics  EU-foreign_policy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Eurozine - Europe's narrative bias - Erik Hammar - January 2012
Original in Swedish -- Translation by Anna Paterson -- First published in Arena 5/2011 (Swedish version); Eurozine (English version) -- Democracy, humanism and diversity have little to do with a "European inheritance". Yet EU cultural policy instrumentalizes cultural heritage to promote common identity. This narrative bias needs to be challenged, says Erik Hammar. -- EU cultural budgets and priorities being set by right wing pro-EU with focus on "the big 3" of England, France and Germany in languages and efforts to project "soft power" globally -- the purportedly universally shared European heritage and collective identity is "humanism, tolerance and enlightenment"
Europe  EU  culture  cultural_history  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  cultural_transmission  grand_narrative  collective_memory  identity  identity_politics  identity-multiple  national_ID  memory-cultural  Europe-exceptionalism  European_integration  EU_governance  political_culture  nation-state  national_tale  national_origins 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Krzysztof Pomian - European identity: Historical fact and political problem - Eurozine - August 2009 (original 2007)
An historian can define European identity descriptively, as Krzysztof Pomian demonstrates in a tour of European culture since the first millennium before Christ. But the real controversy lies elsewhere, in the political question: what of the European past is worth preserving? (..) What are we ready to abandon, and what are we attached to so strongly that under no circumstances will we allow ourselves be deprived of? To what extent must the future be patterned according to our expectations, rooted in the past, and to what extent are we ready to leave the shaping of it to forces we do not control, and which seem to be causing a growing estrangement from our familiar ideas about how that future should look? These questions, in many different forms, (..) must be addressed not to historians but to politicians, and in the last instance to the European citizenry, which as ultimate decision-maker must provide an answer. European identity is a historical fact. More and more, it is also becoming a political problem. -- Original in Dutch -- First published in L. Ornstein and L. Breemer (eds.), Paleis Europa. Grote denkers over Europa, as "De Europese identiteit : een historisch feit en een politiek problem", De Bezige Bij: Amsterdam 2007, 29-54 (Dutch version); Transit 37 (2009) (German version). -- downloaded pdf to Note
Europe  grand_narrative  collective_memory  identity  identity_politics  identity-multiple  national_ID  memory-cultural  cultural_history  Europe-exceptionalism  European_integration  EU  EU_governance  political_culture  nation-state  national_tale  national_origins  Roman_Empire  church_history  Christendom  Judeo-Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jay Tolson, Return of the Repressed - review of Michael Walzer, The Paradox of Liberation: Secular Revolutions and Religious Counterrevolutions | IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 17, No. 2 (Summer 2015)
Yale University Press, 2015 -- The paradox explored in this short book, which grew out of the Henry L. Stimson lectures at Yale University, can be summed up in a single question: Why did so many states that gained independence in the post–World War II era and were founded on secular and democratic ideals soon face the powerful challenges of religious revivalism? Walzer’s inquiry into the inability of “the leaders and militants of secular liberation…to consolidate their achievements and reproduce themselves” focuses on three cases: Israel, where the secularist ideology of Labor Zionism now meets with powerful opposition from champions of a more messianic strain of Zionism as well as ultra-Orthodox Judaism; Algeria, where the secularist (and, briefly, democratic) ideals of the National Liberation Front have been repeatedly challenged and were nearly overturned by militant Islamists; and India, where the ambitious reform program of Jawaharlal Nehru’s Congress party has come up against the fervor and electoral successes of Hindu nationalists determined to assert their primacy within the constitutional order. -- behind paywall
books  kindle-available  reviews  paywall  political_history  20thC  post-colonial  nationalism  national_ID  national_origins  national_tale  politics-and-religion  secularism  secularization  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  opposition  modernity  modernization_theory  images-political  Israel  Islamist_fundamentalists  Judaism  Algeria  India  Indian_religion  Hinduism  right-wing  civil_liberties  civil_society  civility-political  tolerance  majoritarian  constitutionalism  post-WWII  religion-fundamentalism  elite_culture  elites-self-destructive  populism 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jew and Judean: A Forum on Politics and Historiography in the Translation of Ancient Texts - Forum ebook | The Marginalia Review of Books [LA Review of Books] August 2014
Have scholars erased the Jews from Antiquity? -- Adele Reinhartz’s essay in MRB on June 24 set off a vibrant discussion in the comments section and in the MRB editors’ inboxes. The range of responses to the piece dotted the spectrum from full support to indignation, proving that a sizable readership wanted to debate these ideas further. The forum is released today only two months after the Reinhartz essay thanks to the good will and the efficiency of the participants. The essays, beginning with Reinhartz’s original piece and concluding with her response to the collection, investigate the political and historiographical considerations involved in the translation of ancient texts, in particular how modern translators and historians ought to deal with the translation of the Greek word ioudaios (Ἰουδαῖος). -- Along with the forum, MRB is excited to release an e-book version of the discussion free for our readers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
ebooks  religious_history  philology  antiquity  ancient_religions  ancient_Israel  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Judaism  Judaism-2nf_Temple  national_ID  religious_culture  translation  Greek_lit  koine  sociology_of_religion  politics-and-religion  religious_lit  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
The Reith Lectures, Nikolaus Pevsner: The Englishness of English Art: 1955 | BBC Radio 4
Home page for the 7 radio lectures in 1955, from Hogarth and Reynolds, Constable and Blake and onwards through 19thC and 20thC architecture -- how he sees each as illustrating distinctively English "character"
lecture  art_history  British_history  painting  architecture  18thC  19thC  20thC  Hogarth  Reynolds  Blake_William  Constable  landscape  portraits  illustrations  aesthetics  national_ID 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Martens, Rusconi and Leuze, eds. - New Arenas of Education Governance: The Impact of International Organizations and Markets on Educational Policy Making | Palgrave Macmillan - November 2007
Edited by Kerstin Martens, Alessandra Rusconi, Kathrin Leuze -- How and to what extent is education becoming a field of international and market governance? Traditionally, education policy making has been viewed as the responsibility of the nation state, falling within the realm of domestic politics. But recent years have witnessed the transformation of the state. Globalization has introduced new actors and led to the internationalization and marketization of education. This volume provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date account of these new arenas of education governance, examining the impact of international organizations and the role of the market in policymaking. It demonstrates how education policy is formulated at international levels and what the consequences for national policy making will be. -- excerpt = TOC, Introduction and index -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  public_policy  education  education-higher  education-training  education-privatization  education-finance  international_organizations  globalization  markets_in_everything  market_fundamentalism  privatization  public_goods  governance  global_governance  business-and-politics  business_influence  education-civic  values  accountability  Labor_markets  human_capital  competition  competition-interstate  development  distance_learning  IT  communication  nation-state  national_ID  knowledge_economy  OECD  World_Bank  WTO  trade-policy  trade-agreements  student_debt  democracy_deficit  political_participation  EU  EU_governance  standards-setting  testing  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Anne-Marie Thiesse, review - Sylvain Venayre on historians and The Myth of the French Nation - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French original 2013 - Instapaper)
Reviewed : Sylvain Venayre, Les Origines de la France. Quand les historien racontaient la nation, Paris, Le Seuil, collection L’Univers Historique, 2013, 430 p. -- review translated by Pascale Torracinta , -- Tags : nation | history | people | national identity -- Sylvain Venayre responds to politicians who, only yesterday, were asking historians to define national identity. With an exploration of the French nation’s roots, he deliberately shifts the question by proposing a history of how historians are themselves involved in the production of a collective identity. -- downloaded English translation pdf to Note -- French version saved to Instapaper
books  reviews  France  18thC  19thC  20thC  historiography-19thC  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  national_origins  political_culture  political_nation  intellectual_history  professionalization  university  downloaded  EF-add  Instapaper 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Kelley Vlahos - A Blackwater World Order | The American Conservative - Feb 2015
...a recent examination by Sean McFate, a former Army paratrooper who later served in Africa working for Dyncorp International and is now an associate professor at the National Defense University, suggests that the Pentagon’s dependence on contractors to help wage its wars has unleashed a new era of warfare in which a multitude of freshly founded private military companies are meeting the demand of an exploding global market for conflict. “Now that the United States has opened the Pandora’s Box of mercenarianism,” McFate writes in The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What they Mean for World Order, “private warriors of all stripes are coming out of the shadows to engage in for-profit warfare.” It is a menacing thought. McFate said this coincides with what he and others have called a current shift from global dominance by nation-state power to a “polycentric” environment in which state authority competes with transnational corporations, global governing bodies, non-governmental organizations (NGO’s), regional and ethnic interests, and terror organizations in the chess game of international relations. New access to professional private arms, McFate further argues, has cut into the traditional states’ monopoly on force, and hastened the dawn of this new era. McFate calls it neomedievalism, the “non-state-centric and multipolar world order characterized by overlapping authorities and allegiances.” States will not disappear, “but they will matter less than they did a century ago.” - copied to Pocket
books  global_system  global_governance  IR  IR_theory  military_history  Europe-Early_Modern  nation-state  transnational_elites  privatization  MNCs  NGOs  civil_wars  international_system  international_law  mercenaries  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Pentagon  Afghanistan  warfare-irregular  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  Pocket 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Anna Plassart - The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution (to be released April 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Historians of ideas have traditionally discussed the significance of the French Revolution through the prism of several major interpretations, including the commentaries of Burke, Tocqueville and Marx. This book argues that the Scottish Enlightenment offered an alternative and equally powerful interpretative framework for the Revolution, which focused on the transformation of the polite, civilised moeurs that had defined the 'modernity' analysed by Hume and Smith in the 18thC. The Scots observed what they understood as a military- and democracy-led transformation of European modern morals and concluded that the real historical significance of the Revolution lay in the transformation of warfare, national feelings and relations between states, war and commerce that characterised the post-revolutionary international order. This book recovers the Scottish philosophers' powerful discussion of the nature of post-revolutionary modernity and shows that it is essential to our understanding of 19thC political thought. **--** Part I. The Burke–Paine Debate and Scotland's Science of Man: 1. The Burke–Paine debate and the Scottish Enlightenment *-* 2. The heritage of Hume and Smith: Scotland's science of man and politics **--** Part II. The 1790s: 3. Scotland's political debate *-* 4. James Mackintosh and Scottish philosophical history *-* 5. John Millar and the Scottish discussion on war, modern sociability and national sentiment *-* 6. Adam Ferguson on democracy and empire **--** Part III. 1802–15: 7. The French Revolution and the Edinburgh Review *-* 8. Commerce, war and empire
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Smith  Hume  Hume-politics  civil_society  civilizing_process  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  IR_theory  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  nationalism  national_ID  historiography-18thC  historiography-Whig  military  Military_Revolution  mass_culture  levée_en_masse  conscription  sociability  social_order  empires  empire-and_business  imperialism  Great_Powers  balance_of_power  philosophy_of_history  progress  social_theory  change-social  change-economic  Burke  Paine  Mackintosh_James  Millar_John  Edinburgh_Review  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Scottish_politics  1790s  1800s  1810s  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  democracy  morality-conventional  norms  global_economy  mercantilism 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright, eds. - Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre Re forming Literature 1789–1837 (2006 pbk) | Cambridge University Press
Tilottama Rajan, University of Western Ontario and Julia M. Wright, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia **--** Romanticism has often been associated with lyric poetry, or otherwise confined within mainstream genres. As a result, we have neglected the sheer diversity and generic hybridity of a literature that ranged from the Gothic novel to the national tale, from monthly periodicals to fictionalized autobiography. In this new volume some of the leading scholars of the period explore the relationship between ideology and literary genre from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The introduction offers a fresh examination of how genre was rethought by Romantic criticism. **--** Introduction Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright **--** Part I. Genre, History, and the Public Sphere: 1. Godwin and the genre reformers: on necessity and contingency in romantic narrative theory - Jon Klancher *-* 2. Radical print culture in periodical form - Kevin Gilmartin *-* 3. History, trauma, and the limits of the liberal imagination: William Godwin's historical fiction - Gary Handwerk *-* 4. Writing on the border: the national tale, female writing, and the public sphere - Ina Ferris. **--** Part II. Genre and Society: 5. Genres from life in Wordsworth's art: Lyrical Ballads 1798 - Don Bialostosky *-* 6. 'A voice in the representation': John Thelwall and the enfranchisement of literature - Judith Thompson *-* 7. 'I am ill-fitted': conflicts of genre in Elisa Fenwick's Secresy - Julia M. Wright *-* 8. Frankenstein as neo-Gothic: from the ghost of the couterfeit to the monster of abjection - Jerrold E. Hogle **--** Part III. Genre, Gender, and the Private Sphere: 9. Autonarration and genotext in Mary Hays' Memoirs of Emma Courtney - Tilottama Rajan *-* 10. 'The science of herself': scenes of female enlightenment - Mary Jacobus *-* 11. The failures of romanticism Jerome McGann -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_history  British_history  British_politics  genre  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  literary_journals  literary_history  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  narrative  narrative-contested  Hunt_Leigh  censorship  Hazlitt_William  Godwin_Wm  historical_fiction  historical_change  necessity  contingency  women-intellectuals  authors-women  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  Shelley_Mary  imagination  magazines  newspapers  gender  gender_history  Wordsworth  poetry  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Romanticism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Forrest Capie, review - Eric Helleiner, The Making of National Money: Territorial Currencies in Historical Perspective | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), p. 594
Mostly a 19thC to 20thC phenomenon relying on creation of nation-state and industrial capacity. Discusses what countries did and do without national currency, challenges to establishing e.g. free banking, alternatives e.g. dollarization with or contra to government policy. Downloaded 1 page review to Note
books  reviews  jstor  economic_history  19thC  20thC  nation-state  national_ID  monetary_policy  fiscal_policy  currency  commerce  FX  dollarization  free_banking  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey A. Sheehan - The Legacy of Indonesia's Boediono - Knowledge@Wharton
Boediono served as Vice President of Indonesia from 2009 to October 20, 2014, when President Joko Widodo was elected and took office with Vice President Jusuf Kalla. In the following piece, Jeffrey A. Sheehan of Sheehan Advisory LLC — and former associate dean for international relations at Wharton — writes about Boediono, who he has known for 22 years. The material, which draws on public and private discussions, is excerpted from the manuscript of Sheehan’s forthcoming book, tentatively titled, “There Are No Foreign Lands.”
books  Indonesia  democracy  democratization  development  nation-state  state-building  emerging_markets  national_ID  globalization  global_governance  post-colonial  Dutch  20thC  21stC  bureaucracy  corruption 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
John Richard Moores - Representations of France and the French in English satirical prints, c. 1740-1832 (2011 PhD thesis) - White Rose Etheses Online - University of York
This thesis explores representations of France and the French in English satirical prints in the period c. 1740-1832. This was an era of rivalry and conflict between the two nations. It has been suggested that hostility towards France at this time contributed to the formation of English, or British, national identity. This coincided with England’s ‘golden age of caricature’. While much of the satirical art produced focussed on France, most studies of this material have dealt with how the English portrayed themselves and each other. Those which have discussed representations of the French have promoted the view that English perceptions of the French were principally hostile. While there is a temptation to employ such prints as evidence of English Francophobia, a closer investigation reveals greater satirical complexities at work which do not simply conceptualise and employ the French ‘Other’ as target of hatred. Informed by war and rivalry, as well as by trade, travel, and cultural exchange, the prints projected some positive characteristics onto the French ‘Other’, they contain varying degrees of sympathy and affinity with the French, and are demonstrative of a relationship more distinct and intimate than that shared with any other nation. At the same time, the prints expose many of the tensions and divisions that existed within Britain itself. French characters were employed to directly attack British political figures, while in other instances domestic anxieties were projected onto images of the French. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  France  Anglo-French  satire  cultural_history  social_history  national_ID  francophile  xenophobia  prints  popular_culture  popular_politics  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  travel  fashion  political_culture  political_press  art_history  caricature  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Restoration-France  July_Monarchy  reform-political  anti-Catholic  Catholic_emancipation  émigrés  exiles  ruling_class  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Hilde Eliassen Restad - Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 53-76
Most writers agree that domestic ideas about what kind of country the United States is affect its foreign policy. In the United States, this predominant idea is American exceptionalism, which in turn is used to explain US foreign policy traditions over time. This article argues that the predominant definition of American exceptionalism, and the way it is used to explain US foreign policy in political science, relies on outdated scholarship within history. It betrays a largely superficial understanding of American exceptionalism as an American identity. This article aims to clarify the definition of American exceptionalism, arguing that it should be retained as a definition of American identity. Furthermore, it couples American exceptionalism and US foreign policy differently than what is found in most political science literature. It concludes that American exceptionalism is a useful tool in understanding US foreign policy, if properly defined. -- extensive bibliography of both historians and IR theorists -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  US_history  American_Revolution  American_colonies  Puritans  American_exceptionalism  national_ID  nation-state  US_foreign_policy  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  IR  Founders  Manifest_Destiny  multilateralism  international_law  Jefferson  imperialism  republicanism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Joseph Dragovich - A Comparison Of Republican Roman and Han Chinese Barbarian Relations (2009 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2009 -- posted on History of the Ancient World website -- Abstract: Throughout the course of human history, the interaction and conflict between civilization and barbarism, whether real or perceived, has existed in historical memory. The conflict, which spans continents and centuries, can be found in the historical writings of many sedentary civilizations, who felt a need to differentiate between “Us” and “Them.” In fact, many early civilizations defined themselves in the presence of groups which they considered barbarous.The project looks at two civilizations which had such interactions. Late Republican Rome and Han China are well known for their conflicts with peripheral groups. This thesis compares how these two empires conquered and assimilated these barbarian groups, namely the Roman conquest of Gaul and the Chinese conquest of the Xiongnu, a nomadic people that inhabited modern day Mongolia. Despite these two empires separation by time and geography, their methods of conquest were very similar. Where they differed was in their assimilation of conquered peoples, a difference which stems from the way the two civilizations defined themselves.By comparing these events in history, we can gain an insight into the topic which can not be achieved by studying each civilization individually. The interface of disparate cultures is at the heart of many modern issues, from immigration to the war on terror. By studying these past events, it can be seen that this aspect of the human experience not only transcends East and West but also the centuries that separate us from the ancient world. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Han_China  Chinese_history  barbarians  center-periphery  conquest  national_ID  military_history  militarization-society  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Mrinalini Sinha, review - Kathleen Wilson, The Island Race: Englishness, Empire and Gender in the Eighteenth Century | JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 109, No. 1 (February 2004), pp. 253-254
Very enthusiastic -- 5 essays with "performativity" common thread in development of national ID. The theme of performance has less to do with postmodernism and Butler and more to do with the sort of work of 18thC scholarship on self and fluid categories capable of different performance, masquerading etc of Wahrman etc. Several essays linked to Captain Cook"s voyages -- e.g. how lower social status of the heroic captain could be accommodated in an emerging "empire of the seas" narrative. Wilson tracks how initial reports of cultures with extremely alien sexual practices get gradually framed in the rigid taxonomy that Wahrman showed appearing suddenly in last quarter of 18thC - Wilson links this more to evangelicals than ethnography per se. Downloaded pdf to Note
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Philippe Genet - La genèse de l'État moderne: Culture et société politique en Angleterre (2003) | Livres -- Amazon.fr
La genèse de l'État moderne est le fruit d'une lente évolution à partir de la seconde moitié du XIIIe siècle, qui a d'abord affecté les monarchies féodales d'Occident : il y a quelques années, elle a fait l'objet d'études systématiques de nombreux historiens en Europe, grâce au CNRS et à la Fondation européenne de la Science. Le présent ouvrage est une étude de cas, consacrée à l'Angleterre, à bien des égards la plus précoce et la plus cohérente des constructions politiques médiévales qui, paradoxalement, est peu étudiée par les historiens français. On y retrouve le primat de la guerre et de la fiscalité dans la dynamique de la genèse de l'État moderne, ainsi que la mise en place d'un système judiciaire garantissant la reproduction de la classe dominante dans des conditions satisfaisantes. Mais l'ouvrage permet surtout de relever et d'articuler la corrélation entre le développement et la vitalité de la société politique, dont l'existence est une condition sine qua non pour l'État moderne, et la mutation de la culture et du système de communication médiéval, tant au niveau des médias et de la langue qu'à celui des types de textes produits. Par l'analyse de plus de 2200 bio-bibliographies d'" auteurs " actifs dans les domaines de l'histoire et du politique, et au moyen d'une théorie des champs de production textuelle, se dégage ce qu'a été l'idéologie spécifique du féodalisme d'État. Alors naissent progressivement les catégories modernes du politique, ainsi que la notion d'une société politique " nationale " -- Recommended in Penguin history of England bibliographies
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Srinivas Aravamudan - Enlightenment Orientalism: Resisting the Rise of the Novel (2011) 360 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
A MUST BUY -- Srinivas Aravamudan here reveals how Oriental tales, pseudo-ethnographies, sexual fantasies, and political satires took Europe by storm during the eighteenth century. Naming this body of fiction Enlightenment Orientalism, he poses a range of urgent questions that uncovers the interdependence of Oriental tales and domestic fiction, thereby challenging standard scholarly narratives about the rise of the novel. More than mere exoticism, Oriental tales fascinated ordinary readers as well as intellectuals, taking the fancy of philosophers such as Voltaire, Montesquieu, and Diderot in France, and writers such as Defoe, Swift, and Goldsmith in Britain. Aravamudan shows that Enlightenment Orientalism was a significant movement that criticized irrational European practices even while sympathetically bridging differences among civilizations. A sophisticated reinterpretation of the history of the novel, Enlightenment Orientalism is sure to be welcomed as a landmark work in eighteenth-century studies.
books  kindle-available  buy  intellectual_history  cultural_history  literary_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  fiction  novels  lit_crit  literary_theory  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_lit  orientalism  Defoe  Swift  Voltaire  Diderot  Montesquieu  Behn  Manley  Montagu_Lady_Mary  realism  empiricism  moral_philosophy  self  subjectivity  self-examination  self-and-other  self-knowledge  travel  romances  satire  utopian  exploration  cultural_critique  Biblical_criticism  philology  antiquaries  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  chronology  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  xenophobia  national_ID  racialism  colonialism  imperialism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - The Origins Of Scottish Nationhood (Pluto Critical History Series) (2000) 144 pages | pbk (9780745316086): : Books amazon.com
The traditional view of the Scottish nation holds that it first arose during the Wars of Independence from England in the 13thC & 14thC. Although Scotland was absorbed into Britain in 1707, Scottish identity is supposed to have remained alive through separate institutions of religion, education, and the legal system. Davidson argues otherwise. The Scottish nation did not exist before 1707. The Scottish national consciousness we know today was not preserved by institutions carried over from the pre-Union period, but arose after and as a result of the Union, for only then were the material obstacles to nationhood – most importantly the Highland/Lowland divide – overcome. This Scottish nation was constructed simultaneously with and as part of the British nation, and the 18thC Scottish bourgeoisie were at the forefront of constructing both. The majority of Scots entered the Industrial Revolution with a dual national consciousness, but only one nationalism, which was British. The Scottish nationalism which arose in Scotland during the 20thC is therefore not a revival of a pre-Union nationalism after 300 years, but an entirely new formation. -- Customer review - Davidson refutes Linda Colley's idealist thesis that Protestantism, Francophobia, monarchism and empire formed the British nation. The first three of these were ideas, present, yes, but not formative. Empire was external to Britain, and so it was never part of people's experience of becoming British or Scottish. Scotland was a full partner, not a junior partner in the British (not English) Empire, unlike Ireland. The experience of becoming the workshop of the world formed Britain as a nation, creating our culture and identity. Industry, making things, and organising in our Britain-wide trade unions (which Davidson barely mentions) made us British. -- not on kindle
books  amazon.com  find17thC  18thC  Scotland  British_history  1707_Union  national_ID  nationalism  bourgeoisie  Industrial_Revolution  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Anglo-Irish_constitution  colonialism  imperialism  history_of_England  Kirk  legal_system  Highlands-Scotland  Lowland-Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Britannia 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - THE RESILIENCY OF THE NATION-STATE IN SCHOLARSHIP AND IN FACT | JSTOR: Review (Fernand Braudel Center), Vol. 34, No. 3, 2011
Introduction: "Globalization" and the Nation-State in the Modern World-System (pp. 253-258) - Denis O'Hearn and Thomas M. Wilson. *--* Nationalism in a Post-Hegemonic Era (pp. 259-283) - Richard Lachmann. *--* The State of States in International Organizations: From the WHO to the Global Fund (pp. 285-310) - Nitsan Chorev, Tatiana Andia Rey and David Ciplet. *--* On the Study of Social Optics: Foucault, Counter-Surveillance, and the Political Underground in Northern Peru (pp. 311-331) - David Nugent -- lots of interesting bibliography
article  journal  jstor  20thC  21stC  economic_history  political_history  political_economy  international_political_economy  cultural_history  globalization  global_governance  global_economy  global_system  global_history  social_theory  political_sociology  political_culture  political_nation  nation-state  national_ID  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  international_finance  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  hegemony  Foucault  IFIs  world_systems  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Rowland, review essay A new direction in political sociology (2014) | Academia.edu
C A new direction in political sociology?

Authors
Abstract

This essay reviews works in (political) sociology that offer alternatives to sociology-as-usual. Sociologists with even fleeting awareness of the recent history of political sociology are surely familiar with the cultural turn, the global turn, and the turn toward complexity; however, another turn seems to be afoot, one toward existential concerns that direct us to recover how people experience ‘the complex contradictions of the social and political world’ (Taylor). Complex experiences often leave behind residues or ‘traces,’ and contributors in a recently edited volume challenge sociologists to unlock the social significance of these traces and find new ways to capture what our methods capture so poorly, namely, popular forgettings, geographies of exclusion, and the slow erasure of deeds, memories, and other subjugated knowledges belonging to individuals who find themselves dismissed, dispelled, or disenfranchised by nation-states. Traces left behind by individuals navigating the complexities of contemporary experiments in human ‘being’ are just the sort of analysis that must, in principle, place the actor at the center of analysis, and, after careful study, we now appreciate that despite the analytical ease of assuming that actors are singular, sociologists should examine actors as plural and unearth their essential multiplicity. *-* 1. Graham Taylor, The New Political Sociology: Power, Ideology and Identity in an Age of Complexity, Palgrave Macmillan: New York, 2010; viii + 208 pp. *-* 2. Herman Gray, Macarena Gómez-Barris (eds), Toward a Sociology of the Trace, University of Minnesota Press: Minneapolis, 2010; xvi + 328 pp. *-* 3. Bernard Lahire , The Plural Actor, Polity: Malden, MA, 2011; xx + 280 pp. -- Keywords - Agency, Bourdieu, complexity, political sociology, social theory, trace -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  reviews  political_science  political_sociology  memory-group  identity  identity-multiple  identity_politics  national_ID  power-asymmetric  agency  complexity  social_theory  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, The History of Freedom and Other Essays, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1907). - Online Library of Liberty
Acton never completed his projected History of Liberty. We do have however several collections of his writings such as this one which contains 2 chapters from this planned history – on liberty in antiquity and Christianity – and many book reviews where one can piece together Acton’s approach to the writing of such a history. This volume consists of articles reprinted from the following journals: The Quarterly Review, The English Historical Review, The Nineteenth Century, The Rambler, The Home and Foreign Review, The North British Review, The Bridgnorth Journal. *--* CHRONICLE. *-* INTRODUCTION. *-* I: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN ANTIQUITY. *-* II: THE HISTORY OF FREEDOM IN CHRISTIANITY. *-* III: SIR ERSKINE MAY’S DEMOCRACY IN EUROPE. *-* IV: THE MASSACRE OF ST. BARTHOLOMEW. *-* V: THE PROTESTANT THEORY OF PERSECUTION *-* VI: POLITICAL THOUGHTS ON THE CHURCH. *-* VII: INTRODUCTION TO L. A. BURD’S EDITION OF IL PRINCIPE BY MACHIAVELLI. *-* VIII: MR. GOLDWIN SMITH’S IRISH HISTORY. *-* IX: NATIONALITY. *-* X: DÖLLINGER ON THE TEMPORAL POWER. *-* XI: DÖLLINGER’S HISTORICAL WORK. *-* XII: CARDINAL WISEMAN AND THE HOME AND FOREIGN REVIEW. *'* XIII: CONFLICTS WITH ROME. *-* XIV: THE VATICAN COUNCIL. *-* XV: A HISTORY OF THE INQUISITION OF THE MIDDLE AGES. By Henry Charles Lea. *-* XVI: THE AMERICAN COMMONWEALTH. By James Bryce. *-* XVII: HISTORICAL PHILOSOPHY IN FRANCE AND FRENCH BELGIUM AND SWITZERLAND. By Robert Flint. -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  liberty  Christianity  Christendom  antiquity  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  ancient_history  democracy  Reformation  persecution  Counter-Reformation  Inquisition  Wars_of_Religion  Bartholomew_Day_massacre  Huguenots  Protestants  national_ID  nationalism  Machiavelli  historiography-19thC  US_constitution  US_government  US_politics 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
FROM THE ARCHIVES: Review of David Cannadine, Ornamentalism: How the British Saw Their Empire (Allen Lane, 2001) | Pandaemonium
There may seem to be something wilfully perverse about the idea that 19thC Britain, or its empire, was ‘less racist’ than the contemporary nation. Nevertheless there is an element of truth to Cannadine’s argument. 19thC thinkers and administrators combined a belief in natural inequality with a belief in the ‘universality’ of the world – the conviction that they lived in ‘one vast interconnected world’, as Cannadine puts it. Today, in the post-Holocaust era, we have by and large rejected ideas of natural inequality – but also ideas of universality. Indeed, in the ‘West and the Rest’ tradition, universalism is itself regarded as a product of racism, a means by which the West has silenced the voices of the Rest. The consequence has been not the embrace of equality, but the reframing of inequality as ‘difference’. We have managed to combine today a formal belief in equality with the practical creation of a more fractious, fragmented, identity-driven world. Against this background, the moral of Cannadine’s story is not so much that an empire built ‘on individual inequality, had ways of dealing with race that contemporary societies, dedicated to collective equality do not’. It is rather that an age that enjoyed a bullish belief in the ‘sameness’ of the word possessed certain resources to cope with problems of difference that we no longer do, despite the fact that race and inequality were much more central aspects of the Victorian world-view. If we truly want to bury Victorian ideas of inequality, then we must repossess their belief in universality.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  cultural_history  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  social_order  hierarchy  patriarchy  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  global_system  universalism  identity  identity_politics  racism  equality  difference  Other  Victorian  national_ID  post-WWII  post-colonial  Great_Divergence  orientalism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michèle Mendelssohn - Henry James, Oscar Wilde and Aesthetic Culture (2007) - Edinburgh University Press
Challenges critical assumptions about the way Aestheticism responded to anxieties about nationality, sexuality, identity, influence, originality and morality -- This book, the first fully sustained reading of Henry James’s and Oscar Wilde’s relationship, reveals why the antagonisms between both authors are symptomatic of the cultural oppositions within Aestheticism itself. The book also shows how these conflicting energies animated the late 19thC’s most exciting transatlantic cultural enterprise.Richly illustrated and historically detailed, this study of James’s and Wilde’s intricate, decades-long relationship brings to light Aestheticism’s truly transatlantic nature through close readings of both authors’ works, as well as 19thC art, periodicals and rare manuscripts. As Mendelssohn shows, both authors were deeply influenced by the visual and decorative arts, and by contemporary artists such as George Du Maurier and James McNeill Whistler. Henry James, Oscar Wilde and Aesthetic Culture offers a nuanced reading of a complex relationship that promises to transform the way in which we imagine late 19thC British and American literary culture.
books  kindle-available  cultural_history  literary_history  art_history  19thC  British_history  English_lit  US  Atlantic  Aestheticism  James_Henry  Wilde  sexuality  nationalism  national_ID  cosmopolitanism  identity  creativity  moral_reform  painting  theater 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
MARTHA VANDREI - A VICTORIAN INVENTION? THOMAS THORNYCROFT'S ‘BOADICEA GROUP’ AND THE IDEA OF HISTORICAL CULTURE IN BRITAIN | The Historical Journal - Volume 57 / Issue 02 / June 2014, pp 485-508 - Abstract - Cambridge Journals Online -
King's College London -- DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X14000119, Published online: 08 May 2014 -- This article examines the figure of Boudica (or Boadicea), with a specific focus on Thomas Thornycroft's Westminster Bridge statue, and on the work of the seventeenth-century antiquary, Edmund Bolton. By synthesizing historiography which investigates the idea of ‘historical culture’ in the modern and early modern periods, this article attempts to bridge chronological and generic divisions which exist in the study of the history of history. It argues that to fully understand the genealogy of popular historical ideas like Boudica, it is imperative that historians of such subjects take a longue-durée approach that situates individual artists and writers, and the historical-cultural works they produce, within their broader political, cultural, and social contexts while simultaneously viewing these works as part of a long, discursive process by which the past is successively reinterpreted. As a consequence, this article eschews an analysis of Boudica which labels her an ‘imperial icon’ for Victorian Britons, and argues that the relationship between contemporary context and the re-imagined past is not as straightforward as it might initially appear. -- paywall -- may be interesting for development of Britannia imagery relevant to Bolingbroke and Patriots
article  paywall  find  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  cultural_history  antiquaries  British_history  British_politics  national_ID  art_history  literary_history  political_culture  Victorian  usable_past  iconography  periodization  Britannia  patriotism  Patriots  British_Empire  imperialism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Principle of Proximity (2011) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-08 -- How should we think about, how should we model the basis of political community. To the extent that it is a matter of choice, what should be the basis on which the people of the world divide themselves up into distinct political communities. This paper seeks to cast doubt on the proposition that it is a good idea for people to form a political community exclusively with those who share with them some affinity or trust based on culture, language, religion, or ethnicity. I want to cast doubt on that proposition by articulating an alternative approach to the formation of political communities, which I shall call the principle of proximity. People should form political communities with those who are close to them in physical space, particularly those close to them whom they are otherwise like to fight or to be at odds with. This principle is rooted in the political philosophies of Hobbes and Kant. The suggestion is that we are likely to have our most frequent and most densely variegated conflicts with those with whom we are (in Kant’s words) “unavoidably side by side”, and the management of those conflicts requires not just law (which in principle can regulate even distant conflicts) but law organized densely and with great complexity under the auspices of a state. The paper outlines and discusses the proximity principle, and the conception of law and state that it involves, and defends it against the criticism that it underestimates the importance of pre-existing trust in the formation of political communities. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 27 -- Keywords: community, conflict, ethnicity, Hobbes, identity, Kant, law, nationalism, proximity, state, state-building
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  community  community-virtual  conflict  political_culture  state-building  rule_of_law  trust  ethnic_ID  national_ID  nation-state  nationalism  Kant  Kant-politics  Kant-ethics  Hobbes  sociability  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert M. Calhoon, review - Craig Yirush. Settlers, Liberty, and Empire: The Roots of Early American Political Theory, 1675-1775 | H-Net Reviews - (May, 2012
Complex enthusiastic review - Calhoon 2009 book on "moderate" mid century - This attractively written, venturesome book is going to start several academic conversations because Yirush makes several intelligent, counterintuitive choices. At 277 pages, this is not a BIG book, not big like J. G. A. Pocock’s The Machiavellian Moment but big like, say, volume 2 of Barbarism and Religion, Pocock’s revisionist study of 18thC political culture in Scotland. Settlers, Liberty, and Empire could easily have been a hundred pages longer, much to the book’s benefit. When Yirush recommends to his readers Lee Ward, The Politics of Liberty in England and Revolutionary America [bookshelf], he already knows that a longer book on the roots of early American political thought would complement and overlap Ward’s magisterial study. The stark conciseness and precision of his book sends a signal more pointed than a conventional preface or introduction. Indeed, the first five pages of his introduction (on Massachusetts colonial agent Jasper Maudit) is an artful prologue in disguise. Teachers should schedule one class session for those five pages alone. Another hundred pages would have allowed Yirush to deal not just with identity in settler political thought, which he does with brio, but also with character--that older neo-Whig historical preoccupation that came alive in the 1950s in the scholarship of Edmund S. Morgan, Bernard Bailyn, Jack P. Greene, and Douglass Adair that Yirush knows well and has employed with implicit effect. In eighteenth-century usage, character meant both personal integrity and also reputation and credible public self-presentation. Choosing his battles thoughtfully, Yirush chose to subordinate character to identity. Reversing those priorities remains a road less travelled
books  reviews  kindle  bookshelf  historiography  revisionism  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  1720s  1730s  1740s  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Atlantic  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  English_constitution  political_press  Board_of_Trade  citizenship  liberty  Native_Americans  expansionism  conquest  Coke  Blackstone  land-grabs  British_foreign_policy  Locke-2_Treatises  property  property_rights  representative_institutions  national_ID  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Isabel Karremann and Anja Müller, eds. - Mediating Identities in Eighteenth-Century England (2011) | Ashgate
This volume engages in a critical discussion of the connection between historically specific categories of identity determined by class, gender, nationality, religion, political factions and age, and the media available at the time, including novels, newspapers, trial reports, images and the theatre. Recognizing the proliferation of identities in the epoch, these essays explore the ways in which different media determined constructions of identity and were in turn shaped by them. *--* Introduction: mediating identities in 18th-century England, Isabel Karremann; *--* Identifying an age-specific English literature for children, Anja Müller; *--* Found and lost in mediation: manly identity in Defoe's A Journal of the Plague Year, Isabel Karremann; *--* Gender identity in sentimental and pornographic fiction: Pamela and Fanny Hill, Franz Meier; *--* Paratexts and the construction of author identities: the preface as threshold and thresholds in the preface, Katharina Rennhak; *--* Owning identity: the 18th-century actress and theatrical property, Felicity Nussbaum; *--* Constructing identity in 18th-century comedy: schools of scandal, observation and performance, Anette Pankratz; *--* Material sites of discourse and the discursive hybridity of identities, Uwe Böker; *--* Constructions of political identity: the example of impeachments, Anna-Christina Giovanopoulos; *--* The public sphere, mass media, fashion and the identity of the individual, Christian Huck; *--* Topography and aesthetics: mapping the British identity in painting, Isabelle Baudino; *--* The panoramic gaze: the control of illusion and the illusion of control, Michael Meyer; *--* Peripatetics of citizenship in the 1790s, Christoph Houswitschka; *--* Critical responses, Rainer Emig, Hans-Peter Wagner and Christoph Heyl - downloaded introduction to Note
books  find  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  politics-and-literature  English_lit  literary_history  novels  theater  theatre-Restoration  gender  masculinity  partisanship  Whig_Junto  Tories  impeachment  Somers  Harley  public_sphere  Habermas  aesthetics  consumers  children  family  citizenship  national_ID  identity  identity_politics  Defoe  comedy  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Clarissa Campbell Orr, historiographical review - New Perspectives on Hanoverian Britain | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Jun., 2009), pp. 513-529
Reviewed work: War, State and Society in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland by Stephen Conway; Georgian Monarchy: Politics and Culture, 1714-1760 by Hannah Smith; Britain, Hanover and the Protestant Interest, 1688-1756 by Andrew C. Thompson; Hanover and the British Empire, 1700-1837 by Nick Harding -- paywall Cambridge journals -- quite long and looks very useful
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  paywall  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  British_foreign_policy  Britain-Continent  Hanover-Britain_relations  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  monarchy  diplomatic_history  court_culture  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  political_culture  popular_politics  religious_culture  Whigs-oligarchy  Protestant_International  nationalism  national_ID  military_history  British_Empire  British_Army  British_Navy  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  Anglo-French  Anglo-Dutch  Holy_Roman_Empire  Austria  Prussia 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Benedict S. Robinson -Harry and Amurath | JSTOR: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 399-424
Before his coronation, as he announces his intention to invade France, and as he proposes marriage to Katharine, Henry V invokes the specter of a Turkish double. These moments in Shakespeare’s play punctuate the major political transitions of his reign; moreover, they condense a pattern of thought vital to these plays, one that concerns the constitution of English nationalist discourse from the often recalcitrant materials of a Christian political imaginary. In the 16thC, Christendom remained the object of powerful emotional cathexis, but the forms of allegiance and action it authorized were in dispute. Henry redirects the energies that once coalesced around the political and communal ideal of a Christian commonwealth to the commonwealth of England. But as Henry invokes the Turk as his opposite, he also suggests his resemblance to that figure. In this, Henry V opens up some serious questions about the “political theology” of the nation. In revealing the constitution of national community as a translated theology, Shakespeare suggests that this is a troubled process. Recent accounts of early modern nationalism have tended to downplay or forget Christendom as a transnational space of belonging both instrumental to the nation and still in competition with it. The strange relations between “Harry” and “Amurath” evoked in 2 Henry IV and Henry V are the traces of a wider struggle between Christendom and the nation as theopolitical spaces, a struggle that takes place in significant measure over the figure of Muslim difference. -- lots of cites to English constitutional history links to national identity (eg Pocock & critics), Blumenberg and Schmitt debates -- paywall
article  jstor  Project_MUSE  paywall  find  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Tudor  national_ID  Christendom  Ottomans  Reformation  Christianity-Islam_conflict  political-theology  Shakespeare  political_culture  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  ancient_constitution  nationalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Biddick, The Shock of Medievalism (2012) eBook: Amazon.com
Biddick explores the 19thC foundations of medieval studies as an academic discipline as well as certain unexamined contemporary consequences of these origins. By pairing debates over current academic trends and issues with innovative readings of medieval texts, Biddick exposes the presuppositions of the field of medieval studies and significantly shifts the objects of its historical inquiry. Biddick describes how the discipline of medieval studies was defined by a process of isolation and exclusion—a process that not only ignored significant political and cultural issues of the 19thC but also removed the period from the forces of history itself. Wanting to separate themselves from popular studies of medieval culture, and valuing their own studies as scientific, 19thC academics created an exclusive discipline whose structure is consistently practiced today, despite the denials of most contemporary medieval scholars. Biddick supports her argument by discussing the unavowed melancholy that medieval Christians felt for Jews and by revealing the unintentional irony of nineteenth-century medievalists’ fabrication of sentimental objects of longing (such as the “gothic peasant”). The subsequent historical distortions of this century-old sentimentality, the relevance of worker dislocation during the industrial revolution, and other topics lead to a conclusion in which Biddick considers the impact of an array of factors on current medieval studies. Simultaneously displacing disciplinary stereotypes and altering an angle of historical inquiry, this book will appeal to readers who are interested in how historicizing processes can affect the development of academic disciplines
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-19thC  medieval_history  19thC  historicism  social_history  economic_culture  political_culture  intelligentsia  Industrial_Revolution  class_conflict  working_class  bourgeoisie  academia  disciplines  scientism  national_ID  folklore  nostalgia  sentimentalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Allan - The Age of Pericles in the Modern Athens: Greek History, Scottish Politics, and the Fading of Enlightenment | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 2 (Jun., 2001), pp. 391-417
This article explores changing responses among late Georgian Scots towards Greek history in general and classical Athens in particular. Tracing the early study of Greece through some of the more innovative Scottish Enlightenment scholars, it argues that Periclean Athens long remained a difficult and controversial topic, mainly because eighteenth-century authors found it hard to offer a fully sympathetic treatment of a historical subject strongly associated with radical political democracy. With the defeat of Napoleon, however, and as new ways were sought to celebrate Scotland's own recent imperial, economic, and intellectual achievements, Athenianism gained in credibility, assisted by the rising tide of cultural Hellenism and political Hellenophilia throughout Britain. Plans were laid for a national monument in Edinburgh, modelled on the Athenian Parthenon. Nevertheless, insufficient support was forthcoming and by 1830 the project had stalled. Not least among the causes of this debacle - popularly known as 'Scotland's Disgrace' - were the contradictions involved in Athenian symbolism: the abandoned monument ultimately served to represent only the failings of Scotland's tory establishment. -- interesting bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_culture  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  18thC  19thC  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Tories  British_politics  national_ID  Athens  ancient_Greece  Hellenism  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Hudson - "Britons Never Will be Slaves": National Myth, Conservatism, and the Beginnings of British Antislavery | Eighteenth-Century Studies 34.4 (2001) 559-576 - Project MUSE
According to a virtual consensus in modern scholarship on the abolition of slavery, this event marked a historic victory for nonconformist, radical, or otherwise antiestablishment elements in British culture. A recent historian has connected the rise of antislavery with "Wilkite" tendencies in the British middle class, and others have located abolitionism in a "reform complex" devoted to the radical overhaul of the British political system. It has been widely assumed that British slavery was generally excused by the established Anglican church and that the abolitionist movement was dominated by "Quakers, evangelicals and Rational Dissenters." -- This scholarship exemplifies a "Whig" historiography that routinely looks for the sources of social change in the attack of peripheral or nontraditional groups on the center. -- the most resonant voices against slavery during the 18thC belonged to men and women with strong backgrounds in the Anglican Church and conservative views on social and political issues in Britain. These include Samuel Johnson, William Warburton, Edmund Burke, ... -- we find that these humanitarian objections emerged from within the groups and ideologies that conceived of Britain as fundamentally Anglican, royal, and hierarchical. -- it is, in fact, inaccurate to identify mainstream British values with the merchants and colonists who controlled the slave-trade. As I will contend, antislavery took shape amidst an essentially ideological conflict about the very nature of "Britain" between proponents of unbridled free-market capitalism and the essentially conservative and traditionalist outlook of those who wished to contain capitalism within the constraints of morality, religion, and their patriotic image of Britons as a freedom-loving people. -- copy 1st 2 pages in Simple Note
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  West_Indies  American_colonies  slavery  dissenters  Radical_Enlightenment  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-Radicals  Whigs-opposition  Tories  national_ID  British_Empire  abolition  plantations  planters  Anglican  Royalists  Wilkes  Johnson  Warburton  Burke  conservatism  historiography-Whig  nationalism  merchants  finance_capital  moral_economy  political_economy  capitalism  patriotism  Patriots  Patriot_King  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Colin Kidd - Race, Empire, and the Limits of 19thC Scottish Nationhood | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 46, No. 4 (Dec., 2003), pp. 873-892
Scotland's Unionist culture has already become a world we have lost, investigation of which is hampered by the misleading notion of a 'Celtic fringe'. Nineteenth-century Lowland Scots were not classified as Celts; indeed they vociferously projected a Teutonic racial identity. Several Scots went so far as to claim not only that the Saxon Scots of the Lowlands were superior to the Celts of the Highlands, but that the people of the Lowlands came from a more purely Anglian stock than the population of southern England. For some Scots the glory of Scottish identity resided in the boast that Lowlanders were more authentically 'English' than the English themselves. Moreover, Scottish historians reinterpreted the nation's medieval War of Independence - otherwise a cynosure of patriotism - as an unfortunate civil war within the Saxon race. Curiously, racialism - which was far from monolithic - worked at times both to support and to subvert Scottish involvement in empire. The late nineteenth century also saw the formulation of Scottish proposals for an Anglo-Saxon racial empire including the United States; while Teutonic racialism inflected the nascent Scottish home rule movement as well as the Udal League in Orkney and Shetland. -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  19thC  nationalism  national_ID  British_history  1707_Union  Scotland  Lowland-Scotland  racialism  British_Empire  Teutonic  Anglo-Saxons  Anglo-Scot  Highlands-Scotland  historiography-19thC  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Pascal Emmanuel Gobry - What Is Citizenship? | Cato Unbound Sept 2013
National service debate - In his essay, Mr. Kuznicki is right to take me to task for being guilty of a bit of a sleight-of-hand, which is blurring the distinction between the Ancients’ view of liberty and the Moderns’. I confess to the blurring. First, because I think they are blurred – as much as we try to get rid of them, we can’t seem to be able to; less “great-grandfathers,” the Ancients are more older brothers, or perhaps Jiminy Crickets, to the Moderns.

And second, I think the distinction should be blurred. Mr. Kuznicki writes that “when the ancients wrote of liberty, they meant something like an obligation to participate actively in government.” I certainly agree that they thought it was part of it, but it is not reducible to that. It is perhaps more accurate to say that the Ancients thought of liberty as something like participation in a just moral order.
political_philosophy  political_culture  nation-state  national_ID  social_contract  liberalism  libertarianism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  citizens  political_participation  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven Johnston - This Patriotism Which Is Not One | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Spring, 2002), pp. 285-312
The essay explores the resurgence of patriotic thought, focusing on the recent work of Richard Rorty and a classic essay by John Schaar. Patriotism, it is argued, names a permanent possibility lodged in the human predicament. It routinely seeks transcendent assistance to support its political operations. This move, in turn, may help account for patriotism's narcissistic, self-destructive character and the danger it ultimately poses to democracy. For both Rorty and Schaar, curiously, the Vietnam War looms large in their narratives. By engaging them on the question of Vietnam, the dangers and cruelties endemic to patriotism emerge full-blown. Subsequently, any patriotism worthy of the name, it is suggested, would have to end by suspending itself. -- useful bibliography of communitarian inflected theorists pre 9/11 -- from the quotes, looks like the "self hating liberals" phenomenon leaves them exposed to precisely the sort of weaknesses they proposed to shore up with patriotic gestures -- may be helpful when need to look at recent patriotism discussions, though the focus on one essay by Schaar probably too limiting -- didn't download
article  jstor  liberalism  communitarian  national_ID  patriotism  Rorty  Taylor_Charles  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative [eScholarship] (2007)
"National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative", Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2007), 293-317. -- Keywords: Nation, National Histories, Postnational, State, Transnationalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  political_culture  nation-state  national_ID  nationalism  territory  globalization  history_of_England  historiography-Whig  historians-and-politics  groups-identity  memory-group  memory_studies  narrative-contested  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Bernard Yack: The Art of Theory : the art of theory – a quarterly journal of political philosophy
Includes discussion of his Nationlism and the Moral Psychology of Community (Chicago UP, 2012) -- on kindle. Interesting on Aristotle as realist political philosopher in Bernard Williams sense. Judith Shklar was his dissertation adviser. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  kindle  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  community  communitarian  liberalism  individualism  self-interest  altruism  cosmopolitanism  global_governance  nationalism  national_ID  legitimacy  democracy  sovereignty  EF-add  downloaded 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
James Shedel, review - Pieter M. Judson, Exclusive Revolutionaries: Liberal Politics, Social Experience, and National Identity in the Austrian Empire, 1848–1914 | JSTOR: The Journal of Modern History, Vol. 72, No. 1 (March 2000), pp. 254-256
Reviewed work(s): Exclusive Revolutionaries: Liberal Politics, Social Experience, and National Identity in the Austrian Empire, 1848–1914. By Pieter M. Judson. Social History, Popular Culture, and Politics in Germany. Edited by Geoff Eley. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1996. Pp. xiii+304. $49.50. -- James Shedel, Georgetown University -- a corrective that Viennese liberals weren't entirely gormless. Contributed in part to Habsburgs relative success in latter part of 19thC.
books  reviews  jstor  political_history  political_culture  19thC  20thC  1848_revolutions  Fin-de-Siècle  Austria  Vienna  Austro-Hungarian_Empire  Habsburgs  liberalism  national_ID  nationalism  rule_of_law  state-building  nation-state  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan G. W. Conlin - High Art and Low Politics: A New Perspective on John Wilkes | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 64, No. 3/4 (2001), pp. 356-381
Fascinating for mid to late 18thC issues for both Continental Enlightenment and British thinkers and artists re scope of public sphere and state responsibility for promotion of the arts, its benefits for polite culture including middle classes with polite aspirations -- Wilkes connections with philosophes including Holbach and Diderot -- and how Wilkes wove his political reforms and promotion of arts and industry together. Useful discussion of range of historian takes on Wilkes, who he mobilized, relation with older republican opposition and later dissenters and radical opposition. Hume opposition to Wilkes' anti monarchy and anti aristocracy republicanism leads to different assessment of progress in civilizing arts and role of doux commerce. Each historian seems to put Wilkes in their own narrative resulting in dramatically different assessments of both Wilkes himself and his impact. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  art_history  18thC  French_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  George_III  Wilkes  Hume  Diderot  d'Holbach  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  republicanism  opposition  public_sphere  public_opinion  governing_class  political_nation  political_culture  accountability  Parliament  franchise  Septennial_Act  nationalism  national_ID  xenophobia  anti-monarchy  anti-aristocracy  middle_class  merchants  state-roles  Grand_Tour  patriotism  Prussia  Frederick_the_Great  Catherine_the_Great  Walpole  Walpole_Horace  museums  academies  bibliography  enlightened_absolutism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Smyth - 'Like Amphibious Animals': Irish Protestants, Ancient Britons, 1691-1707 | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Dec., 1993), pp. 785-797
Ireland in the 1690s was a protestant state with a majority catholic population. These protestants sometimes described themselves as `the king's Irish subjects' or `the people of Ireland', but rarely as `the Irish', a label which they usually reserved for the catholics. In constitutional and political terms their still evolving sense of identity expressed itself in the assertion of Irish parliamentary sovereignty, most notably in William Molyneux's 1698 pamphlet, The case of Ireland's being bound by acts of parliament in England, stated. In practice, however, the Irish parliament did not enjoy legislative independence, and the political elite was powerless in the face of laws promulgated at Westminster, such as the 1699 woollen act, which were detrimental to its interests. One possible solution to the problem of inferior status lay in legislative union with England or Great Britain. Increasingly in the years before 1707 certain Irish protestant politicians elaborated the economic, constitutional and practical advantages to be gained from a union, but they also based their case upon an appeal to the shared religion and ethnicity of the sovereign's loyal subjects in the two kingdoms. In short the protestants insisted that they were English. This unionist episode thus illustrates the profoundly ambivalent character of protestant identity in late seventeenth-and early eighteenth-century Ireland. -- useful references -- Downloaded pdf to Note -- probably captures Swift's ambivalence including his hostility to Union of 1707 with Scotland and not Ireland
article  jstor  political_history  Ireland  British_politics  national_ID  Protestants-Ireland  Anglo-Irish_constitution  trade-policy  1707_Union  Three_Kingdoms  1690s  1700s  Molyneux  Swift  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jacqueline Hill - Convergence and Conflict in 18thC Ireland | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 44, No. 4 (Dec., 2001), pp. 1039-1063
Recent writing shows that eighteenth-century Irish society was both less and more divided than was supposed by Lecky, whose "History of Ireland in the eighteenth century" (now over a century old) dominated so much subsequent historiography. Because Lecky enjoyed access to records that were subsequently destroyed his work will never be entirely redundant, but this article looks at ways in which his views have been and continue to be modified. It surveys the various interpretative models now being used to open up the period, which invite comparisons not merely with England, Scotland, Wales, and colonial America but also with Europe. It also considers how that endlessly fascinating decade, the 1790s, has emerged from the spotlight turned on it by a plethora of bicentenary studies. -- fabulous bibliography of work in last few decades -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  18thC  Ireland  political_history  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  Anglo-Irish_constitution  Catholics-Ireland  Protestants-Ireland  Whigs-oligarchy  local_government  gentry  penal_laws  Catholic_emancipation  Jacobite-Ireland  Anglican  United_Irishmen  Irish_Rebellion  Union_1800  Britain-invasion  British_foreign_policy  British_Empire  republicanism  patriotism  national_ID  Atlantic  Three_Kingdoms  Ancien_régime  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  American_Revolution  governing_class  government_officials  church_history  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Patchen Markell - Making Affect Safe for Democracy?: On "Constitutional Patriotism" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 28, No. 1 (Feb., 2000), pp. 38-63
Is there a distinction between ethic and constitutional nationalism? Do liberal democracies need a non ethnic variety of patriotism? - huge bibliography and extensively cited -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  liberalism  nationalism  national_ID  constitutionalism  patriotism  cosmopolitanism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Manzer - Hume's Constitutionalism and the Identity of Constitutional Democracy | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 90, No. 3 (Sep., 1996), pp. 488-496
Modern constitutional democracy entails a particular kind of political self-understanding that uniquely centers on a constitution. While many recent studies have focused on how constitutional text shapes this self-understanding, little attention has been paid to the implications of different views of constitutional authority. This is a critical consideration, however, because constitutional authority has always been intrinsically fragile within constitutional democracy, and never more so than at present. In this article, I explore the potential of constitutional science to generate a conception of constitutional authority and collective identity. I focus on David Hume's effort to use constitutional science to shape opinion about liberty and the nature of the political community. This analysis also provides a basis for reflecting on the problematic relation of democracy to constitutionalism and on the peculiar problem of constitutional opinion in constitutional democracy. -- extensive bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  British_history  Hume  Hume-politics  constitutionalism  democracy  public_opinion  legitimacy  national_ID  community  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Richard J. Finlay - Feeling British: Sympathy and National Identity in Scottish and English Writing, 1707-1832 by Evan Gottlieb | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 47, No. 4 (Oct., 2008), pp. 945-946
Looks useful on Scottish 18thC approach not binary identity - Scots litterati like Arbuthnot as or more important in working on a combined British identity than the English - may be useful for Bolingbroke's sensitivity on this score
books  reviews  jstor  18thC  19thC  British_history  Anglo-Scot  1707_Union  English_lit  Scottish_Enlightenment  moral_sentiments  sympathy  politics-and-literature  national_ID  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Janet Sorensen - Poems of Nation, Anthems of Empire: English Verse in the Long 18thC by Suvir Kaul | JSTOR: The Journal of English and Germanic Philology, Vol. 102, No. 3 (Jul., 2003), pp. 444-446
Looks quite interesting - sees historicist and colonial interlinked - close readings get at both a nationalist imperialism, anxiety re imperialism, the translatio imperii tradition, and concerns of empire,slavery, over extension etc -- starts with Marvell and Dryden, works through the long baggy poems, looking at their different roles and status relative to other writing by the close of the 18thC
books  reviews  17thC  18thC  English_lit  poetry  British_Empire  commerce  nationalism  national_ID  imperialism  colonialism  slavery  Marvell  Dryden  Pope  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Cosma Shalizi -review- Ernest Gellner, Nations and Nationalism
This book contains the most convincing theory of nationalism I've seen, and has profound implications for anyone concerned with modern history, contemporary politics, or the possibilities of multi-culturalism.

Pre-modern socities which possess agriculture and literacy, the inhabitants of what Gellner sometimes calls "Agraria," were economically static and internally culturally diverse, at least compared to their industrial successors. Cultural differences in fact often went with economic specializations, and so served to fix people in their inherited professions. It is Gellner's thesis that economic change requires cultural homogeneity, and that the demand for cultural homogeneity, and the state apparatus to provide it, is what drives nationalism.
books  bookshelf  reviews  nation-state  political_economy  nationalism  national_ID  Industrial_Revolution  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Patrick Deneen: Mobility and the Rise of Progressive Nationalism | The American Conservative Nov 2013
Starts with Turner's closing the frontier thesis -- One can turn to other historians for further exploration of the “frontier” thesis in the automobile era and for further discussion of this paradoxical and parasitic relationship between individualism and Statism. One good source is Frederick Lewis Allen, who devotes a chapter to “The Automobile Revolution” in his book The Big Change: America Transforms Itself 1900-1950. Suddenly, with the automobile, the frontier seemed again to open, so soon after it had been declared closed. In tones reminiscent of Turner, Allen wrote that “the automobile weakened the roots that held a family to one spot. Always a mobile people in comparison with the peoples of Europe, now Americans followed the economic tides more readily than ever before…” However, as James Flink notes in his book The Automobile Age, this experience of liberty now rested on massive government support—just as Turner suggested would need to happen. In particular, this massive outlay of support for the automobile culture came at the exclusion of public support for mass transportation, based on the American desire to experience independence and individual mobility—even if massively subsidized by the government that they otherwise so often deplored for undermining their independence.
US_history  US_politics  19thC  20thC  national_ID  nationalism  infrastructure  transport  historiography-Progressive  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
J. C. D. Clark: Historiography review - Protestantism, Nationalism, and National Identity, 1660-1832 (2000)
JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 43, No. 1 (Mar., 2000), pp. 249-276 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- National identity, nationalism, patriotism, state formation, and their present-day policy implications now constitute one of the most vital areas of scholarship on British history. In no other period is the debate currently as focused as it is in the long eighteenth century, that crucially contested territory in which older assumptions about a fundamental transition between pre-modernity and modernity have now been called in doubt. This article offers an overview of recent work. It argues that much writing on these years has framed misleading models both of state formation and of national identity. It adds that this period is nevertheless a key one in revealing that the processes at work in sustaining collective identities in the British Isles did not originate with `nationalism' in its historically correct meaning, and need not follow its trajectory.
article  jstor  lit_survey  historiography  British_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  Ancien_régime  national_ID  nationalism  Protestant_International  state-building  Three_Kingdoms  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
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