dunnettreader + nation-state   109

Karaman
Theoretical work on taxation and state-building borrows heavily from early modern European experience. While a number of European states increased centralized tax revenues during this period, for others revenues stagnated or even declined and these variations have motivated alternative arguments for the determinants of fiscal and state capacity. This study reviews the arguments concerning the three determinants that have received most attention, namely warfare, economic structure, and political regime, and tests them by making use of a new and comprehensive tax revenue dataset. Our main finding is that these three determinants worked in interaction with each other. Specifically, when under pressure of war, it was representative regimes in more urbanized-commercial economies and authoritarian regimes in more rural-agrarian economies that tended to better aggregate domestic interests towards state-building. - Downloaded via iphone
tax_collection  taxes  state-building  nation-state  urban_politics  competition-interstate  political_culture  political_participation  agriculture-surplus  Absolutism  government_finance  fiscal-military_state  agriculture  Europe-Early_Modern  economic_history  article  bibliography  political_sociology  central_government  19thC  financial_instiutions  downloaded  18thC  15thC  urban_elites  military_history  political_economy  17thC  governing_class  constitutional_regime  local_government  fiscal_policy  16thC  government-forms  jstor  Crown_finance  financial_system 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
DUMAS, Alexandre – Henri IV | Litterature audio.com
Reader - Cocotte - 6 hr 29 mn - Henri IV fait partie de la série Les Grands Hommes en robe de chambre, écrite par Alexandre Dumas en 1855 et 1856.
Roman_Catholicism  Catholics-France  Dumas  17thC  16thC  Huguenots  French_history  audio-books  Papacy  Wars_of_Religion  biography  nation-state  court_culture  French_language  French_lit  Henri_IV  19thC 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
Steven T. Engel - Rousseau and Imagined Communities (2005) | The Review of Politics on JSTOR
The Review of Politics, Vol. 67, No. 3 (Summer, 2005), pp. 515-537 -- Rousseau's relationship to the phenomenon of modern nationalism is a consistent theme of political theory and the history of ideas. This article argues that Rousseau's thought can be seen as providing the foundation for nationalism even if he would not have endorsed it. That Rousseau's thought bears this relationship to nationalism can be seen by reexamining his argument through the lens of Benedict Anderson's concept of nations as imagined communities. Rousseau's account of political psychology, sovereignty, and the proper limits of the nation provide the core of the analysis of this question.
article  jstor  18thC  Rousseau  nationalism  national_ID  nation-state  national_tale  sovereignty  political_philosophy  political_culture 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Poul F. Kjaer - The Function of Justification in Transnational Governance (2015) | Academia.edu
WZB Berlin Social Science Center Discussion Papers, SP IV 2015-808, 2015 - Developing a sociological informed social theory perspective, this article asks the question why social praxis’ of justification has moved to the centre-stage within the debate on transnational ordering. In contrast to perspectives which see the relationship between national and transnational forms or ordering as characterised by a zero-sum game, the coevolutionary and mutually reinforcing relationship between national and transnational forms of ordering is emphasised. It is, moreover, argued that this complementarity can be traced back to the fundamentally different function and position of national and transnational forms of ordering in world society. The widespread attempt to analyse transnational developments on the basis of concepts of law and the political which emerged in national contexts are therefore seen as problematic. Instead context adequate concepts of transnational law and politics are needed. It is on this background, that a discourse on justification has emerged in relation to transnational settings. Transnational justificatory praxis’ can be understood as functional equivalents to democracy in transnational settings in so far as both can be understood as reflexivity increasing instruments. The central difference is, however, that democratic frameworks implies an ex ante form of the political in contrast to the ex post emphasis of justificatory praxis’. In addition, law gains a central role as the framework through which justificatory praxis’ are structured in transnational settings. - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  Academia.edu  downloaded  sociology_of_law  political_sociology  nation-state  transnational_power  transnational_law  nation-state_decline  state-transnatiinal_relations  supranational_institutions  legitimacy  legitimacy-international  justice  democracy_deficit  political_participation  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  global_governance  regulation-harmonization  regulatory_avoidance  civil_society  NGOs  government-forms  government-roles  international_law  international_political_economy  MNCs 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Les usages de la peur dans la mondialisation: Entretien avec Zygmunt Bauman - Desaunay, Fœssel and Padis | JSTOR - Esprit 2005
Les usages de la peur dans la mondialisation: Entretien avec Zygmunt Bauman -- Zygmunt Bauman, Cécile Desaunay, Michaël Fœssel and Marc-Olivier Padis, Esprit, No. 316 (7) (Juillet 2005), pp. 71-98 -- Loin d'uniformiser la planète, la mondialisation provoque un morcellement des espaces et une montée de la peur. Comment, dans ces conditions, penser une mondialisation positive qui ne signifierait pas l'abandon de la politique sociale, pensée jusqu'ici dans le cadre de l'État-nation? -- downloaded pdf to Note
interview  jstor  political_economy  globalization  French_intellectuals  French_language  EU_governance  European_integration  global_governance  universalism  fragmentation  competition  status  hierarchy  inequality  inequality-global  nation-state  imagined_communities  welfare_state  neoliberalism  solidarity  social_theory  economic_sociology  economic_culture  social_order  social_democracy  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Poirier - Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet (2003) - Cairn.info
Entretien préparé et réalisé par Fouré Lionel, Entretien préparé et réalisé par Poirier Nicolas, « Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet. », Le Philosophoire 1/2003 (n° 19) , p. 23-37
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2003-1-page-23.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.019.0023.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
representative_institutions  metaphysics  democracy  Gauchet  change-social  Freud  phenomenology  France  social_theory  cultural_critique  psychology  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  poststructuralist  French_intellectuals  19thC  governance  social_sciences-post-WWII  subjectivity  common_good  nation-state  republicanism  Lacan  social_history  philosophy_of_history  modernity  German_Idealism  structuralism  civil_liberties  human_nature  downloaded  epistemology  interview  Foucault  intellectual_history  Lefort  political_participation  epistemology-social  citizenship  community 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Guido Alfani, Wouter Ryckbosch - Income inequality in pre-industrial Europe | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal 06 November 2015
Thomas Piketty and others have prompted renewed interest in understanding long-term patterns of inequality. This column presents evidence from pre-industrial Europe. Inequality rose even during the success stories of early modern Europe, but it can hardly have been the sole requisite for growth. In both economic history and today’s economic theory, the idea of a universal trade-off between growth and inequality needs to be replaced by stronger attention to social processes and institutional developments. -- brief but extensive lit review of how thinking of economic historians has been evolving -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_history  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  economic_growth  inequality  capital_formation  new_institutionalism  institutional_economics  political_economy  state-building  nation-state  human_capital  urbanization  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  consumer_revolution  consumer_demand  wages  growth-equity_tradeoff  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Bourke, R.: Empire and Revolution: The Political Life of Edmund Burke. (eBook and Hardcover)
Drawing on the complete range of printed and manuscript sources, Empire and Revolution offers a vivid reconstruction of the major concerns of this outstanding statesman, orator, and philosopher.In restoring Burke to his original political and intellectual context, this book strips away the accumulated distortions that have marked the reception of his ideas. In the process, it overturns the conventional picture of a partisan of tradition against progress. In place of the image of a backward-looking opponent of popular rights, it presents a multifaceted portrait of one of the most captivating figures in eighteenth-century life and thought. While Burke was a passionately energetic statesman, he was also a deeply original thinker. Empire and Revolution depicts him as a philosopher-in-action who evaluated the political realities of the day through the lens of Enlightenment thought, variously drawing on the ideas of such figures as Montesquieu, Rousseau, and Hume. A boldly ambitious work of scholarship, this book challenges us to rethink the legacy of Burke and the turbulent era in which he played so pivotal a role. -- Richard Bourke is professor in the history of political thought and codirector of the Centre for the Study of the History of Political Thought at Queen Mary University of London. He is the author of Peace in Ireland: The War of Ideas and the coeditor of Political Judgement. -- Big early chunk on Vindication of Natural Society -- TOC and Intro (24 pgs) downloaded to Note
books  buy  biography  kindle-available  Bolingbroke  Burke  18thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  social_sciences  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  imperialism-critique  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  parties  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-grandees  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  representative_institutions  political_participation  political_press  moral_philosophy  psychology  religion-established  Church_of_England  Catholics-and-politics  Catholics-Ireland  Catholics-England  Catholic_emancipation  aesthetics  Montesquieu  Hume-ethics  Hume-politics  Rousseau  American_colonies  American_Revolution  India  French_Revolution  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolutionary_Wars  politics-and-religion  politics-and-history  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  hierarchy  George_III  Pitt_the_Elder  Pitt_the_Younger  English_lit  human_rights  human_nature  philosophical_anthropology  sentimentalism  moral_sentiments  morality-Christian  morality-conventional  Enlightenment-conservative  British_Em 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Ariadne Lewanska - interview with Pierre Manent - Migration, patriotism and the European agendum - Eurozine - Sept 2011
Original in Polish -- Translation by Irena Maryniak -- First published in Res Publica Nowa 13 (2011) (Polish version); Eurozine (English version) --;A European patriotism can be generated only through political acts that create a sense of solidarity, says historian Pierre Manent. If invocations of Europe are to be anything but vacuous, Europe needs to be decisive in defining its interests and demarcating its boundaries. -- the interview was stimulated by the large waves of intra-EU migration, e.g. the Poles -- downloaded pdf to Note
interview  EU  Europe  EU_governance  European_integration  national_ID  patriotism  migration  assimilation  nation-state  identity-multiple  identity_politics  EU-foreign_policy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Eurozine - Europe's narrative bias - Erik Hammar - January 2012
Original in Swedish -- Translation by Anna Paterson -- First published in Arena 5/2011 (Swedish version); Eurozine (English version) -- Democracy, humanism and diversity have little to do with a "European inheritance". Yet EU cultural policy instrumentalizes cultural heritage to promote common identity. This narrative bias needs to be challenged, says Erik Hammar. -- EU cultural budgets and priorities being set by right wing pro-EU with focus on "the big 3" of England, France and Germany in languages and efforts to project "soft power" globally -- the purportedly universally shared European heritage and collective identity is "humanism, tolerance and enlightenment"
Europe  EU  culture  cultural_history  cultural_capital  cultural_authority  cultural_transmission  grand_narrative  collective_memory  identity  identity_politics  identity-multiple  national_ID  memory-cultural  Europe-exceptionalism  European_integration  EU_governance  political_culture  nation-state  national_tale  national_origins 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Krzysztof Pomian - European identity: Historical fact and political problem - Eurozine - August 2009 (original 2007)
An historian can define European identity descriptively, as Krzysztof Pomian demonstrates in a tour of European culture since the first millennium before Christ. But the real controversy lies elsewhere, in the political question: what of the European past is worth preserving? (..) What are we ready to abandon, and what are we attached to so strongly that under no circumstances will we allow ourselves be deprived of? To what extent must the future be patterned according to our expectations, rooted in the past, and to what extent are we ready to leave the shaping of it to forces we do not control, and which seem to be causing a growing estrangement from our familiar ideas about how that future should look? These questions, in many different forms, (..) must be addressed not to historians but to politicians, and in the last instance to the European citizenry, which as ultimate decision-maker must provide an answer. European identity is a historical fact. More and more, it is also becoming a political problem. -- Original in Dutch -- First published in L. Ornstein and L. Breemer (eds.), Paleis Europa. Grote denkers over Europa, as "De Europese identiteit : een historisch feit en een politiek problem", De Bezige Bij: Amsterdam 2007, 29-54 (Dutch version); Transit 37 (2009) (German version). -- downloaded pdf to Note
Europe  grand_narrative  collective_memory  identity  identity_politics  identity-multiple  national_ID  memory-cultural  cultural_history  Europe-exceptionalism  European_integration  EU  EU_governance  political_culture  nation-state  national_tale  national_origins  Roman_Empire  church_history  Christendom  Judeo-Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Eurozine - Where is the power? - Wojciech Przybylski, Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz A conversation with Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz - July 2015
Original in Polish -- Translation by Aleksandra Malecka
First published in Res Publica, Nowa 30 (2015) -- In Europe all political thought is imperialist, says Bartlomiej Sienkiewicz. This means that politics as we know it today incorporates the experience of imperial politics from the sixteenth to the nineteenth century, when the foundations of what we call "the political" were forged. -- downloaded pdf to Note
geopolitics  Europe  Europe-Early_Modern  empires  state-building  nation-state  national_interest  EU  EU_governance  imperial-soft  Germany  Germany-Eurozone  Russia  Russian_foreign_policy  Poland  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  post-Cold_War  empire-and_business  globalization  sovereignty  hierarchy  authority  public_policy  policymaking  public_opinion  political_culture  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Luca Corchia - Europe: Streeck replies to Habermas, and the debate goes on | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - April 2014
The task of this brief presentation is to “establish a dialogue” with Streeck’s text, attempting to fill the hiatus between the answer and the original question that Habermas’ interpretation intended to pose to those wishing to simply dispose of economic and monetary union, ending up by dismantling the political and cultural integration project that inspired the founding fathers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_economy  international_finance  EU  EU_governance  ECB  Greece-Troika  monetary_union  Eurozone  Habermas  Europe-federalism  European_integration  nationalism  nation-state  national_interest  political_press  political_culture  economic_culture  financial_crisis  finance_capital  Great_Recession  democracy_deficit  public_opinion  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Luca Corchia - Europe: The debate between Habermas and Streeck about the Left and Europe’s future | Reset Dialogues on Civilizations - 25 March 2014
Over the next few months the press and television networks will one again focus on European events, returning the interest of Italian public opinion to these matters, and this will take place on the basis of the pressing timeframe dictated by political issues. In a few weeks’ time the election campaign for a European Union’s parliament, scheduled for May 22-25, will be fully under way in all 28 member states. -- check out footnotes -- downloaded pdf to Note
EU  EU_governance  Eurozone  ECB  Great_Recession  financial_crisis  Greece-Troika  democracy  democracy_deficit  legitimacy  elections  capitalism-systemic_crisis  capitalism-varieties  capital_as_power  Eurosceptic  European_integration  elites  elites-self-destructive  parties  social_democracy  right-wing  nationalism  nation-state  national_interest  political_press  political_culture  economic_culture  Habermas 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Kwass, review essay - Reassessing Enlightenment Economics - Reinert's "Translating Empire" | Books & ideas - 25 March 2013
Reviewed: Sophus A. Reinert, Translating Empire: Emulation and the Origins of Political Economy. Harvard University Press, 438 pp - Resurrecting the life of John Cary’s Essay on the State of England, a book which travelled all over Europe throughout the 18th century, S.A. Reinert challenges our understanding of Enlightenment economics, while calling for a more nuanced and historically-informed understanding of political economy in general. (..) By resurrecting the life of a text that scholars have dismissed as “mercantilist” and repositioning that work at the center of 18th-century political economy, Reinert challenges our basic understanding of Enlightenment economics, so often reduced to the free-trade doctrines of the physiocrats and Adam Smith. He argues that the diffusion of Cary’s work demonstrates that state-centered approaches to the creation of wealth enjoyed wide resonance at the very moment when discussions of economic policy were expanding beyond state chambers to engage a broader public. Far from being eclipsed by theories of laissez-faire economics, as conventional histories of economic thought would have us believe, such approaches became “the absolute mainstream in Europe” by the late 18th century -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle  18thC  economic_history  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  political_economy  Enlightenment  economic_theory  mercantilism  laisser-faire  Physiocrats  Smith  British_history  British_foreign_policy  nation-state  economic_growth  development  public_policy  public_goods  government-roles  Italy  Austria  Germany  readership  history_of_book  print_culture  information-intermediaries  networks-information  networks-business  networks-policy  Republic_of_Letters  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Forum - Samuel Moyn's "Christian human rights" - overview page | The Immanent Frame
In 2010, Samuel Moyn published The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History, which offered an alternative historical explanation for the origins of human rights. He rejected narratives that viewed human rights as a long-term historical product of the Judeo-Christian tradition, The French Revolution, or Enlightenment rationalism, arguing that human rights as it is now understood began to emerge only during the 1970s. Prior to this, according to Moyn, rights were connected to the nation-state and had nothing to do with an international standard of morality or justice. In addressing critiques of The Last Utopia, Moyn has given considerable attention to the relationship between human rights and religion, conceding that there is, undoubtedly, a relationship between Christianity—Catholicism in particular—and human rights, but arguing that the “death of Christian Europe” by the 1960s “forced a complete reinvention of the meaning of human rights embedded in European identity both formally and really since the war”. Contributors offer their thoughts on Moyn’s article “Personalism, Community, and the Origins of Human Rights,” which became a central focus (see excerpt) in his forthcoming book, Christian Human Rights (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015). Contributors also respond to “Christian Human Rights,” the introductory essay written for this series. -- downloaded pdfs but their footnotes and links don't work, so collected them in Evernote them
books  intellectual_history  narrative-contested  bad_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  church_history  moral_philosophy  theology  human_rights  natural_rights  medieval_philosophy  Europe-Medieval  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  French_Revolution  IR  Europe  20thC  WWI  WWII  entre_deux_guerres  post-Cold_War  post-colonial  nation-state  genocide  Holocaust  UN  international_law  natural_law  law_of_nations  law_of_the_sea  justice  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  equality  liberty  Christendom  Judeo-Christian  links  Evernote 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Arthur Goldhammer - The Old Continent Creaks | Democracy Journal: Summer 2015
not so long ago (the EU) was praised by some as a model of ingenious institutional innovation and cooperative transnational governance, while simultaneously denounced by others as an insidious instrument for subjecting ostensibly democratic states to the imperious dictates of capitalism in its latest “neoliberal” form? For 2 generations after World War II, memories of the devastating consequences of nationalism trumped economic rivalries, giving technocrats maneuvering room to devise continental strategies for economic growth that nevertheless enabled member states to maintain sufficient control over social policy to satisfy voter demands. For decades, this arrangement held.By the mid-1980s, however, enormous changes in the global economy forced the European Community to reinvent itself in order to remain competitive. The original balance between national sovereignty and technocratic government at the European level was altered, limiting the ability of member states to set their own economic policy. But today’s convergent crises raise the question of whether the European Union that replaced the European Community needs to reinvent itself yet again. And if so, is reinvention possible at a time when many Europeans, and especially those for whom World War II is a distant memory, feel that the EU is exacerbating nationalist enmities rather than calming them? -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Europe  20thC  21stC  EU  EU_governance  technocracy  nation-state  nationalism  regional_blocs  sovereignty  democracy_deficit  political_participation  opposition  globalization  competition-interstate  Eurozone  economic_policy  fiscal_policy  monetary_policy  sovereign_debt  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Martens, Rusconi and Leuze, eds. - New Arenas of Education Governance: The Impact of International Organizations and Markets on Educational Policy Making | Palgrave Macmillan - November 2007
Edited by Kerstin Martens, Alessandra Rusconi, Kathrin Leuze -- How and to what extent is education becoming a field of international and market governance? Traditionally, education policy making has been viewed as the responsibility of the nation state, falling within the realm of domestic politics. But recent years have witnessed the transformation of the state. Globalization has introduced new actors and led to the internationalization and marketization of education. This volume provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date account of these new arenas of education governance, examining the impact of international organizations and the role of the market in policymaking. It demonstrates how education policy is formulated at international levels and what the consequences for national policy making will be. -- excerpt = TOC, Introduction and index -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  public_policy  education  education-higher  education-training  education-privatization  education-finance  international_organizations  globalization  markets_in_everything  market_fundamentalism  privatization  public_goods  governance  global_governance  business-and-politics  business_influence  education-civic  values  accountability  Labor_markets  human_capital  competition  competition-interstate  development  distance_learning  IT  communication  nation-state  national_ID  knowledge_economy  OECD  World_Bank  WTO  trade-policy  trade-agreements  student_debt  democracy_deficit  political_participation  EU  EU_governance  standards-setting  testing  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Stella Ghervas (2014). “La paix par le droit, ciment de la civilisation en Europe? La perspective du siècle des Lumières” | Stella Ghervas - Academia.edu
Citation:Ghervas, Stella. 2014. “La paix par le droit, ciment de la civilisation en Europe? La perspective du siècle des Lumières,” in "Penser l’Europe au XVIIIe siècle: Commerce, Civilisation, Empire", ed. Antoine Lilti and Céline Spector (Oxford: Voltaire Foundation), pp. 47-69. -- bookmarked and downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  books  18thC  Europe  commerce  commerce-doux  empires  IR  international_law  international_system  international_political_economy  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  peace  dynasties  nation-state  national_interest  mercantilism  mercantilism-violence  competition-interstate  civil_society  civilizing_process  politeness  Enlightenment  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Vincent Descombes - Louis Dumont’s Political Thought - Books & ideas - April 2012.
Previously published in French in laviedesidees.fr, 14 February 2011. Translated by John Zvesper with the support of the Florence Gould Foundation. -- Louis Dumont is very well known for his anthropological work on India, but rather less for his political thought. Vincent Descombes emphasizes the substantial originality of that thought, which defined the political on the basis of comparative studies and in that way dispelled some of the equivocations of modern and contemporary philosophy. -- very interesting re anthropologist who developed a comparative method that would allow it to be turned back on Western modernity, and some political implications, including distinguishing French and German versions of individualism -- discussion of Rousseau's "general will" vs "will of all" makes more sense of it within this framing -- also Montesquieu, Tocqueville and especially Hegel moving back and forth, sometimes explicitly as in Montesquieu and less sharply in Hegel, with society as a (political, cultural, self-conscious? ) whole vs the political institutions -- see bibliography including list of Dumont’s works -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  intellectual_history  20thC  social_theory  political_philosophy  anthropology  comparative_anthropology  comparative_history  individualism  Rousseau  Hegel  Hegel-philosophy_of_right  Montesquieu  society  civil_society  nation-state  bibliography  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Kelley Vlahos - A Blackwater World Order | The American Conservative - Feb 2015
...a recent examination by Sean McFate, a former Army paratrooper who later served in Africa working for Dyncorp International and is now an associate professor at the National Defense University, suggests that the Pentagon’s dependence on contractors to help wage its wars has unleashed a new era of warfare in which a multitude of freshly founded private military companies are meeting the demand of an exploding global market for conflict. “Now that the United States has opened the Pandora’s Box of mercenarianism,” McFate writes in The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What they Mean for World Order, “private warriors of all stripes are coming out of the shadows to engage in for-profit warfare.” It is a menacing thought. McFate said this coincides with what he and others have called a current shift from global dominance by nation-state power to a “polycentric” environment in which state authority competes with transnational corporations, global governing bodies, non-governmental organizations (NGO’s), regional and ethnic interests, and terror organizations in the chess game of international relations. New access to professional private arms, McFate further argues, has cut into the traditional states’ monopoly on force, and hastened the dawn of this new era. McFate calls it neomedievalism, the “non-state-centric and multipolar world order characterized by overlapping authorities and allegiances.” States will not disappear, “but they will matter less than they did a century ago.” - copied to Pocket
books  global_system  global_governance  IR  IR_theory  military_history  Europe-Early_Modern  nation-state  transnational_elites  privatization  MNCs  NGOs  civil_wars  international_system  international_law  mercenaries  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Pentagon  Afghanistan  warfare-irregular  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  Pocket 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Harold Laski page - McMaster Economic History archive
Downloaded pdfs to iPhone if his 1917 study in theories of sovereignty and 1819 on evolution of authority and its locus in the modern state. Page also has hyml link to 1922 wirk on Marx and a list of biographies and studies of Laski's thought
books  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  Europe-Early_Modern  politics-and-religion  sovereignty  nation-state  bureaucracy  19thC  20thC  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  Marx  website  links 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Forrest Capie, review - Eric Helleiner, The Making of National Money: Territorial Currencies in Historical Perspective | JSTOR - The Economic History Review Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003), p. 594
Mostly a 19thC to 20thC phenomenon relying on creation of nation-state and industrial capacity. Discusses what countries did and do without national currency, challenges to establishing e.g. free banking, alternatives e.g. dollarization with or contra to government policy. Downloaded 1 page review to Note
books  reviews  jstor  economic_history  19thC  20thC  nation-state  national_ID  monetary_policy  fiscal_policy  currency  commerce  FX  dollarization  free_banking  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey A. Sheehan - The Legacy of Indonesia's Boediono - Knowledge@Wharton
Boediono served as Vice President of Indonesia from 2009 to October 20, 2014, when President Joko Widodo was elected and took office with Vice President Jusuf Kalla. In the following piece, Jeffrey A. Sheehan of Sheehan Advisory LLC — and former associate dean for international relations at Wharton — writes about Boediono, who he has known for 22 years. The material, which draws on public and private discussions, is excerpted from the manuscript of Sheehan’s forthcoming book, tentatively titled, “There Are No Foreign Lands.”
books  Indonesia  democracy  democratization  development  nation-state  state-building  emerging_markets  national_ID  globalization  global_governance  post-colonial  Dutch  20thC  21stC  bureaucracy  corruption 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc BELISSA - REPENSER L'ORDRE EUROPÉEN (1795-1802). DE LA SOCIÉTÉ DES ROIS AUX DROITS DES NATIONS | JSTOR: Annales historiques de la Révolution française, No. 343 (Janvier/Mars 2006), pp. 163-166
Brief summary of thesis defended 2005, l'Université Paris I Sorbonne - surprise, surprise, Lucien Bély on his committee with the notion of the 18thC as the last stage of the société des princes and the French Revolution forcing the end of the dynastic wars -- though focus is on the period of the Directoire and Napoleon up through Amiens, he places it in the context of the European dynastic system as structured by the Peace of Utrecht -- highlights an interdisciplinary approach -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  thesis  18thC  1790s  1800s  Europe  Europe-19thC  balance_of_power  French_Revolution  IR  IR_theory  Westphalia  sovereignty  dynasties  nation-state  diplomatic_history  political_culture  counter-revolution  Jacobins  republicanism  Europe-federalism  Peace_of_Utrecht  société_des_princes  national_interest  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  France  French_politics  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Directoire  monarchy  social_order  legal_system  international_law  international_system  natural_law  citizenship  subjects  property  elites  political_economy  economic_culture  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Hilde Eliassen Restad - Old Paradigms in History Die Hard in Political Science: US Foreign Policy and American Exceptionalism | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 1, No. 1 (Spring 2012), pp. 53-76
Most writers agree that domestic ideas about what kind of country the United States is affect its foreign policy. In the United States, this predominant idea is American exceptionalism, which in turn is used to explain US foreign policy traditions over time. This article argues that the predominant definition of American exceptionalism, and the way it is used to explain US foreign policy in political science, relies on outdated scholarship within history. It betrays a largely superficial understanding of American exceptionalism as an American identity. This article aims to clarify the definition of American exceptionalism, arguing that it should be retained as a definition of American identity. Furthermore, it couples American exceptionalism and US foreign policy differently than what is found in most political science literature. It concludes that American exceptionalism is a useful tool in understanding US foreign policy, if properly defined. -- extensive bibliography of both historians and IR theorists -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  US_history  American_Revolution  American_colonies  Puritans  American_exceptionalism  national_ID  nation-state  US_foreign_policy  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  IR  Founders  Manifest_Destiny  multilateralism  international_law  Jefferson  imperialism  republicanism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone and Bert Useem - Putting Values and Institutions Back into the Theory of Strategic Action Fields | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 30, No. 1 (MARCH 2012), pp. 37-47
Neil Fligstein and Doug McAdam have presented a new theory of how collective action creates the structure and dynamics of societies. At issue is the behavior of social movements, organizations, states, political parties, and interest groups. They argue that all of these phenomena are produced by social actors (which may be individuals or groups) involved in strategic action. This allows Fligstein and McAdam to advance a unified theory of "strategic action fields." This article takes issue with aspects of Fligstein and McAdam's important contribution. We argue that that all organizations are not essentially the same; in addition to the location and interactions of their strategic actors, their dynamics are shaped and distinguished by differing values and norms, by the autonomy of institutions embedded in strategic action fields, and by the fractal relationships that nested fields have to broader principles of justice and social organization that span societies. We also criticize the view that social change can be conceptualized solely in terms of shifting configurations of actors in strategic action fields. Rather, any theory of social action must distinguish between periods of routine contention under the current institutions and norms and exceptional challenges to the social order that aim to transform those institutions and norms. -- Sage paywall on a 3 year delay for jstor
article  jstor  paywall  social_theory  collective_action  social_movements  organizations  nation-state  parties  partisanship  institutions  strategic_action_fields  political_culture  civil_society  social_order  institutional_change  old_institutionalism  new_institutionalism  rational_choice  norms  contention  conflict  social_process  change-social  change-intellectual  levels_of_analyis  networks-political  networks-social  networks  networks-policy  networks-religious  power  action-social  action-theory  revolutions  reform-social  reform-political  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Ruben Andersson - TIME TO UNFENCE OUR VIEW OF MIGRATION | Pandaemonium
Ruben Andersson is an anthropologist at LSE’s Civil Society and Human Security Research Unit, and the author of Illegality, Inc: Clandestine migration and the business of bordering Europe. He recently published a post on the LSE politics blog which described how immigration border fences feed the very problem they supposedly address. I am delighted to be able to republish it on Pandaemonium.
Ruben Andersson -- Migration panic is upon Calais yet again. Amid desperate and determined attempts by refugees and migrants to clamber over fences or scramble to reach UK-bound ferries, the media have over the past month painted a picture of yet another impending invasion. Police have launched crackdowns; far-right extremists have massed on the city; and French politicians have lobbied hard for a stronger British involvement in controls. In response to the chaos, the UK first offered to send France the ‘ring of steel’ fences recently used at the NATO summit; now it has pledged £12m over three years, earmarked – among other things – for the building of robust security barriers around Calais port. Fencing, the UK immigration minister has made clear, is one key element in efforts to ‘send out a very clear message… [that] Britain is no soft touch when it comes to illegal immigration’. -- Ruben Andersson’s book Illegality, Inc will be launched at the LSE on 14 October with a public discussion, Secure the borders: The cost and consequences of Europe’s ‘fight against irregular migration’. He tweets at @Ruben_Andersson. -- lots of links including absurd US SBI
21stC  nation-state  geography  migration  Labor_markets  EU  EU_governance  right-wing  EU-foreign_policy  US_government  US_politics  links 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Philippe Genet - La genèse de l'État moderne: Culture et société politique en Angleterre (2003) | Livres -- Amazon.fr
La genèse de l'État moderne est le fruit d'une lente évolution à partir de la seconde moitié du XIIIe siècle, qui a d'abord affecté les monarchies féodales d'Occident : il y a quelques années, elle a fait l'objet d'études systématiques de nombreux historiens en Europe, grâce au CNRS et à la Fondation européenne de la Science. Le présent ouvrage est une étude de cas, consacrée à l'Angleterre, à bien des égards la plus précoce et la plus cohérente des constructions politiques médiévales qui, paradoxalement, est peu étudiée par les historiens français. On y retrouve le primat de la guerre et de la fiscalité dans la dynamique de la genèse de l'État moderne, ainsi que la mise en place d'un système judiciaire garantissant la reproduction de la classe dominante dans des conditions satisfaisantes. Mais l'ouvrage permet surtout de relever et d'articuler la corrélation entre le développement et la vitalité de la société politique, dont l'existence est une condition sine qua non pour l'État moderne, et la mutation de la culture et du système de communication médiéval, tant au niveau des médias et de la langue qu'à celui des types de textes produits. Par l'analyse de plus de 2200 bio-bibliographies d'" auteurs " actifs dans les domaines de l'histoire et du politique, et au moyen d'une théorie des champs de production textuelle, se dégage ce qu'a été l'idéologie spécifique du féodalisme d'État. Alors naissent progressivement les catégories modernes du politique, ainsi que la notion d'une société politique " nationale " -- Recommended in Penguin history of England bibliographies
books  amazon.fr  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  13thC  14thC  15thC  nation-state  national_ID  political_culture  feudalism  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  judiciary  historiography  political_sociology  military_history  state-building  political_economy  elites  elite_culture  monarchy  taxes  fiscal-military_state  nobility 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - THE RESILIENCY OF THE NATION-STATE IN SCHOLARSHIP AND IN FACT | JSTOR: Review (Fernand Braudel Center), Vol. 34, No. 3, 2011
Introduction: "Globalization" and the Nation-State in the Modern World-System (pp. 253-258) - Denis O'Hearn and Thomas M. Wilson. *--* Nationalism in a Post-Hegemonic Era (pp. 259-283) - Richard Lachmann. *--* The State of States in International Organizations: From the WHO to the Global Fund (pp. 285-310) - Nitsan Chorev, Tatiana Andia Rey and David Ciplet. *--* On the Study of Social Optics: Foucault, Counter-Surveillance, and the Political Underground in Northern Peru (pp. 311-331) - David Nugent -- lots of interesting bibliography
article  journal  jstor  20thC  21stC  economic_history  political_history  political_economy  international_political_economy  cultural_history  globalization  global_governance  global_economy  global_system  global_history  social_theory  political_sociology  political_culture  political_nation  nation-state  national_ID  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  international_finance  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  hegemony  Foucault  IFIs  world_systems  bibliography  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jan-Hendrik Passoth and Nicholas J. Rowland -- Actor-Network State: Integrating Actor-Network Theory and State Theory | Nicholas Rowland - Academia.edu
Jan-Hendrik Passoth, University of Bielefeld - Nicholas J. Rowland, Pennsylvania State University -- doi: 10.1177/0268580909351325 International Sociology November 2010 vol. 25 no. 6 818-841 -- This conceptual article draws on literature in the sociology of science on modelling. The authors suggest that if state theory can be conceptualized as an ‘engine’ rather than merely a ‘camera’, in that policy is mobilized to make the world fit the theory, then this has implications for conceptualizing states. To examine this possibility the authors look through the lens of actor-network theory (ANT) and in doing so articulate a relationship between two models of the state in the literature. They find that an ‘actor model’ of the state is accepted by many scholars, few of whom develop ‘network models’ of the state. In response, this study introduces an actor-network model and proposes that its contribution to state theory is in rethinking the character of modern states to be the outcome of actually performed assemblages of all those practices of building it, protecting it, governing it and theorizing about it. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  academia  Actor_Network_Theory  social_theory  political_sociology  political_science  nation-state  IR_theory  modelling  networks-policy  networks-political  sovereignty  unit_of_analysis  agency-structure  organizations  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Esty - Bottom-Up Climate Fix - NYTimes.com - September 2014
Smart people in the 20th century thought we could tackle climate change with a treaty in which the world’s nations agreed to “targets and timetables” for reducing emissions. These reductions would be implemented by top-down, national mandates and government support for clean energy technologies. But 22 years after the original climate agreement, emissions continue to rise and threats of significant harm loom larger. As one of those who, as an official at the Environmental Protection Agency, negotiated that first United Nations treaty in 1992, I believe we need to shift gears and try something new. Relying on national governments alone to deliver results is not enough, as the last two decades have shown. The real action on climate change around the world is coming from governors, mayors, corporate chief executives and community leaders. They are the ones best positioned to make change happen on the ground. Accordingly, we need to move from a top-down strategy to a bottom-up approach.
global_governance  climate  energy  local_government  nation-state  collective_action  public-private_partnerships  green_economy  green_finance  Innovation  UN  UNEP  World_Bank  treaties  international_political_economy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Henning Grosse Ruse-Khan - Litigating Intellectual Property Rights in Investor-State Arbitration: From Plain Packaging to Patent Revocation :: SSRN August 14, 2014
University of Cambridge - Faculty of Law; Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014-21 - Max Planck Institute for Innovation & Competition Research Paper No. 14-13. **--** Enforcing intellectual property rights abroad is difficult. International treaties have generally not created directly enforceable IP rights. Usually, the protection they confer cannot be directly invoked in national courts. Because of the territorial nature of IP protection, right holders must proceed in local courts based on local laws. Litigating IP rights abroad hence faces several hurdles. International investment law offers some options to overcome these hurdles: -- This article focusses on the investment interface aspect of IP: Compared to domestic proceedings (where international standards usually cannot be invoked), WTO dispute settlement (where right holders have no legal standing), and the protection of property under human rights instruments (where protection is limited to specific human rights standards), investor-state arbitration may be the only forum where right holders can litigate international IP norms such as the TRIPS Agreement. This may have significant effects on the autonomy of host states in responding to public interest concerns (such as access to medicines or reducing smoking) once measures affect IP rights of foreign investors. Reviewing the options for litigating international IP norms in investment disputes, I conclude that most routes pursued by right holders are unlikely to be successful. Ironically, it is only clauses in investment treaties which aim to safeguard flexibilities in the international IP system that are likely to open a door for challenging compliance with international IP obligations in investor-state arbitration. - Number of Pages: 44 - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  global_governance  IP  patents  litigation  property_rights  property-confiscations  investors  FDI  dispute_resolution  arbitration  investor-State_disputes  trade-agreements  investment-bilateral_treaties  public_health  public_goods  nation-state  national_interest  sovereignty  WTO  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Junianto James Losari, Michael Ewing-Chow - A Clash of Treaties: The Legality of Countermeasures in International Trade Law and International Investment Law :: SSRN June 20, 2014
Junianto James Losari - National University of Singapore (NUS) - Centre for International Law -- Michael Ewing-Chow - National University of Singapore (NUS) - Faculty of Law -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/18. *--* Countermeasures are well recognized under Customary International Law and have been incorporated into the WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding as a mechanism to facilitate compliance, subject to an authorization by the WTO Dispute Settlement Body. However, such a countermeasure — increased tariffs, quantitative restrictions and permission to breach intellectual property rights — may also affect private investors. When there is an investment treaty between two WTO Members and one of the Members is subject to WTO countermeasures by the other Member, a clash of treaties may arise. This happened in the Sugar Dispute between Mexico and the United States. Mexico claimed that their measures on High Fructose Corn Syrup were trade countermeasures under the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in retaliation for a US breach of NAFTA. US investors affected by these measures brought claims against Mexico for breach of NAFTA Chapter 11 — the Investment Chapter. All three International Centre for the Settlement of Investment Disputes tribunals held for different reasons, that a countermeasure that affects the rights of investors would not be valid. In contrary, this paper argues that a legitimate trade countermeasure should also be legitimate in the investment regime. A failure to consider the need for such coherence between the regimes could lead to a clash between the regimes and limit states’ ability to enforce its legitimate trade interests. - Number of Pages: 37 -- didn't download
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  free_trade  trade-agreements  FDI  investment-bilateral_treaties  arbitration  WTO  global_governance  conflict_of_laws  IP  property_rights  dispute_resolution  US_foreign_policy  Mexico  nation-state  national_interest  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Fola Adeleke - Investor-State Arbitration and the Public Interest Regulation Theory :: SSRN June 16, 2014
University of the Witwatersrand - School of Law -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/12. *--* When South Africa decided late last year to terminate a number of bilateral investment agreements with European Union countries, it did so at a time when global regulatory governance has come under scrutiny for their disposition to the domestic economic policies of states and the idea of state sovereignty in the regulation of its own economic affairs is fast declining. The prevailing global regulatory governance regime institutionalizes neo-liberalism which has given birth to various economic institutions and rules including bilateral investment treaties (BITs). The policy interest behind BITs is to some extent the suspension of domestic regulation in the governance of foreign investment. With this suspension in place, the regulatory sphere is filled by a supra-national regime that is rigid and restrains state conduct. In this paper, I intend to apply the emerging legal framework of global administrative law (GAL) to investor state arbitration in order to dispel the resistance towards this dispute settlement mechanism found in BITs for its perceived inability to adequately handle disputes that deal with public interest issues that fall outside standard investment protection but are relevant to the resolution of the investment dispute. I propose the application of domestic law concepts in an international sphere and make the argument that a statutory interpretation based on administrative law principles anchors the BIT regime to the domestic policy space of states and builds up the much needed legitimacy for investor state arbitration. The focus of GAL on the procedural elements of administrative law enables the implementation of substantive norms of liberalized trade which also promotes the rule of law, encourage a broader range of social and economic actors to scrutinize decision making and promote a democratic element in global regulatory governance. This democratic element includes public participation, greater transparency as well as an interpretive approach founded on GAL principles. - Pages in PDF File: 52 -- Keywords: Bilateral Investment Treaties (BITs), Global Administrative Law (GAL), Deference, Public Interest, Investment Arbitration - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  South_Africa  EU  global_governance  global_economy  international_political_economy  international_finance  administrative_law  dispute_resolution  arbitration  neoliberalism  treaties  FDI  common_good  investment-bilateral_treaties  democracy  nation-state  national_interest  political_participation  business-and-politics  emerging_markets  investor-State_disputes  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Historical, Political, and Diplomatic Writings of Niccolo Machiavelli, Vol. 1. (Life of Machiavelli, History of Florence), tr. from the Italian, by Christian E. Detmold (Boston, J. R. Osgood and company, 1882). - Online Library of
<http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/774> - Volume 1 of a 4 volume set of Machiavelli’s writings which contains a lengthy introduction on the life of Machiavelli, the History of Florence, The Prince, Discourses on Livy, and his letters and papers from his time as a diplomat. This volume contains his famous History of Florence. - life and historical context based especially on 19thC Italian historiography -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Machiavelli  Italy  Florence  Italian_Wars  Papacy  France  Louis_XI  nation-state  state-building  military_history  militia  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercenaires  diplomatic_history  IR_theory  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Emerich Edward Dalberg, Lord Acton, Lectures on Modern History, ed. John Neville Figgis and Reginald Vere Laurence (London: Macmillan, 1906) - Online Library of Liberty
These are the lectures given by the great English classical liberal historian, Lord Acton, in the academic years 1899-1901 at Cambridge University. It is a survey of modern history from the rise of the modern nation state to the American Revolution. The book also contains his “Inaugural Lecture” of 1895. *---* INTRODUCTION LORD ACTON AS PROFESSOR *-* INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY *-* I: BEGINNING OF THE MODERN STATE. *-* II: THE NEW WORLD. *-* III: THE RENAISSANCE *-* IV: LUTHER. *-& V: THE COUNTER–REFORMATION. *-* VI: CALVIN AND HENRY VIII. *-* VII: PHILIP II., MARY STUART, AND ELIZABETH. *-* VIII: THE HUGUENOTS AND THE LEAGUE. *-* IX: HENRY THE FOURTH AND RICHELIEU. *-* X: THE THIRTY YEARS’ WAR. *-* XI: THE PURITAN REVOLUTION. *-* XII: THE RISE OF THE WHIGS. *-* XIII: THE ENGLISH REVOLUTION. *-* XIV: LEWIS THE FOURTEENTH. *-* XV: THE WAR OF THE SPANISH SUCCESSION. *-* XVI: THE HANOVERIAN SETTLEMENT. *-* XVII: PETER THE GREAT AND THE RISE OF PRUSSIA. *-* XVIII: FREDERIC THE GREAT. *-* XIX: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION. *-* APPENDIX I. *-* APPENDIX II - NOTES TO THE INAUGURAL LECTURE ON THE STUDY OF HISTORY -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  historiography-19thC  British_history  British_politics  Europe-Early_Modern  Renaissance  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  nation-state  France  Wars_of_Religion  Henri_IV  Richelieu  Louis_XIV  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Peter_the_Great  Frederick_the_Great  Hanoverian_Succession  James_II  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Tudor  Elizabeth  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  Thirty_Years_War  English_Civil_War  Puritans  Calvin  Henry_VIII  usable_past  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard J. Ross, Philip J. Stern - Reconstructing Early Modern Notions of Legal Pluralism in "Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500-1850", ed. Lauren Benton and Richard J. Ross (2013) :: SSRN
Richard J. Ross, U. of Illinois College of Law; U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept of History - Philip J. Stern, Duke History Dept -- Legal pluralism occurs when two or more legal orders exert control within a given territory or over a particular social group and yet are not part of a single hierarchical “system” under a coordinating authority. Most historical scholarship on legal pluralism concentrates on its shifting structures in local contexts and on its political and economic implications. By contrast, our essay probes historical actors’ uses of political and religious thought to justify or undermine plural legal regimes in the late 16thC through early 18thC. Historians of early modern political thought preoccupied with the rise of the modern state have lavished attention on ‘centralizing’ discourses, particularly theorists such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Pufendorf represented as champions of sovereignty. Against this tendency, we emphasize how ideological support for plural legal orders could be found in a wide range of intellectual projects. These ranged from debates over the right of resistance and the divine right of rulers, through historical work on the ancient Jewish commonwealth and theological disputes over which precepts “bound conscience,” and finally to writings on political economy and the place of family. -- The central ambition of our article is to provide an alternative historical genealogy for legal scholars of pluralism. Workaday legal pluralism did not struggle against a predominantly hostile intellectual climate. Many discourses supported pluralism. And the most emphatic theorists of a powerful singular sovereign were often responding to intellectual projects that valorized pluralism.
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history-distorted  legal_history  legal_system  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  nation-state  centralization  central_government  sovereignty  territory  pluralism-legal  pluralism  custom  customary_law  family  state-building  political_economy  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  law-and-religion  canon_law  church_history  church_courts  Bodin  Hobbes  Pufendorf  natural_law  colonialism  empires  commonwealth  Hebrew_commonwealth  resistance_theory  divine_right  monarchy  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  casuistry  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - A Religious View of the Foundations of International Law (2011) :: SSRN - Charles E. Test Lectures in the James Madison Program at Princeton University
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-29 -- Lecture 1 begins from a specifically Christian point of view, though it also addresses the difficulties of sustaining a viewpoint of this kind in a multi-faith and indeed increasingly secular world. Lecture 2 considers nationhood, sovereignty, and the basis for the division of the world into separate political communities. A religious approach to international order will endorse the position of most modern international jurists that sovereign independence is not to be made into an idol or a fetish, and that the tasks of order and peace in the world are not to be conceived as optional for sovereigns. But sovereigns also have their own mission, ordering particular communities of men and women. Lecture 3 considers the rival claims of natural law and positivism regarding sources of international law. The most telling part of natural law jurisprudence from Aquinas to Finnis has always been its insistence on the specific human need for positive law. This holds true in the international realm as much as in any realm of human order - perhaps more so, because law has to do its work unsupported by the overwhelming power of a particular state. Lecture 3 addresses, from a religious point of view, the sources of law in the international realm: treaty, convention, custom, precedent, and jurisprudence. It will focus particularly on the sanctification of treaties. -- No of Pages : 73 -- Keywords: customary international law, international law, ius cogens, nationalism, natural law, positivism, public reason, religion, self-determination, sovereignty, treaties -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  international_law  natural_law  positivism-legal  IR  IR_theory  diplomacy  international_organizations  legal_system  international_system  sovereignty  nation-state  nationalism  public_sphere  liberalism-public_reason  deliberation-public  decision_theory  customary_law  self-determination  national_interest  national_security  responsibility_to_protect  treaties  universalism  precedent  conflict_of_laws  dispute_resolution  human_rights  community  trust  alliances  politics-and-religion  jurisprudence  jurisdiction  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Principle of Proximity (2011) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-08 -- How should we think about, how should we model the basis of political community. To the extent that it is a matter of choice, what should be the basis on which the people of the world divide themselves up into distinct political communities. This paper seeks to cast doubt on the proposition that it is a good idea for people to form a political community exclusively with those who share with them some affinity or trust based on culture, language, religion, or ethnicity. I want to cast doubt on that proposition by articulating an alternative approach to the formation of political communities, which I shall call the principle of proximity. People should form political communities with those who are close to them in physical space, particularly those close to them whom they are otherwise like to fight or to be at odds with. This principle is rooted in the political philosophies of Hobbes and Kant. The suggestion is that we are likely to have our most frequent and most densely variegated conflicts with those with whom we are (in Kant’s words) “unavoidably side by side”, and the management of those conflicts requires not just law (which in principle can regulate even distant conflicts) but law organized densely and with great complexity under the auspices of a state. The paper outlines and discusses the proximity principle, and the conception of law and state that it involves, and defends it against the criticism that it underestimates the importance of pre-existing trust in the formation of political communities. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 27 -- Keywords: community, conflict, ethnicity, Hobbes, identity, Kant, law, nationalism, proximity, state, state-building
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  community  community-virtual  conflict  political_culture  state-building  rule_of_law  trust  ethnic_ID  national_ID  nation-state  nationalism  Kant  Kant-politics  Kant-ethics  Hobbes  sociability  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Human Rights: A Critique of the Raz/Rawls Approach (2013) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 13-32 -- This paper examines and criticizes the suggestion that we should interpret the “human” in “human rights” as (i) referring to the appropriate sort of action when certain rights are violated rather than (ii) the (human) universality of certain rights. It considers first a crude version of (i) — the view that human rights are rights in response to whose violation we are prepared to countenance humanitarian intervention; then it considers more cautious and sophisticated versions of (i). It is argued that all versions of (i) distract us with side issues in our thinking about human rights, and sell short both the individualism of rights and the continuity that there is supposed to be between human rights and rights in national law. The paper does not deny that there are difficulties with views of type (ii). But it denies that the positing of views of type (i) gives us reason to abandon the enterprise of trying to sort these difficulties out. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 22 -- Keywords: Charles Beitz, John Rawls, Joseph Raz, human rights, humanitarian intervention, rights, sovereignty, universalism
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  international_system  international_law  human_rights  humanitarian  interventionism  sovereignty  universalism  civil_liberties  nation-state  Rawls  Raz 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages 1881] trans. and ed. Frederic William Maitland ( 1900) - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> -- image scan -' translation by F.W. Maitland of part of vol. 3 of Das deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (1881) entitled “Die publicistischen Lehren des Mittelalters.” It is a short history of the evolution of modern political thought which emerged during the Middle Ages -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Europe-Early_Modern  historiography-19thC  Germany  historicism  legal_history  legal_theory  nation-state  authority  government-forms 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Emer de Vattel, The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays on the Origin and Nature of Natural Law and on Luxury ed. Béla Kapossy and Richard Whitmore - O
Emer de Vattel, The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays on the Origin and Nature of Natural Law and on Luxury, edited and with an Introduction by Béla Kapossy and Richard Whitmore (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2246> -- A republication of the 1797 translation of Vattel’s work, along with new English translations of 3 early essays. -- The 1st French edition was 1758, the 2nd 1773..The 1797 translation is of the 1773 edition and posthumous notes Vattel intended for a revised edition. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  international_law  natural_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  IR_theory  political_economy  international_political_economy  mercantilism  commerce  military_history  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  sovereignty  nation-state  raison-d'-état  balance_of_power  government-forms  luxury  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Lord Kames, Sketches of the History of Man, 3 vols., ed. James A. Harris - Online Library of Liberty
Henry Home, Lord Kames, Sketches of the History of Man Considerably enlarged by the last additions and corrections of the author, edited and with an Introduction by James A. Harris (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2007). 3 Vols. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2031> -- Written late in his life, this 3 volume work deals with the idea of human progress. Vol. 1 deals with progress in property law, commerce, the treatment of women, and luxury. Vol. 2 deals with the development of states, government, and taxation. Vol. 3 deals with the progress of science.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kames  historiography-18thC  stadial_theories  progress  civil_society  political_philosophy  human_nature  luxury  property  property_rights  legal_history  legal_culture  commerce  taxes  nation-state  state-building  Scientific_Revolution  Newtonian  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton, Lord Acton - Lectures on Modern History (1921 reprint 1907) - Google Books
Editors - with Introduction, John Neville Figgis, Reginald Vere Laurence -- Contents -- Inaugural Lecture on the Study of History *--* LECTURES ON MODERN HISTORY *--* Beginning of the Modern State *--* The New World *--* The Renaissance *--* Luther *--* The CounterReformation *--* Calvin and Henry VIII *--* The Puritan Revolution *--* The Rise of the Whigs *--* The English Revolution *--* Lewis XIV *--* The War of the Spanish Succession *--* The Hanoverian Settlement *--* Peter the Great and the Rise of Prussia *--* Frederic the Great *--* Philip II Mary Stuart and Elizabeth *--* The Huguenots and the League *--* Henry the Fourth and Richelieu *--* The Thirty Years War *--* The American Revolution *--* Letter to Contributors to the Cambridge Modern History *--* Notes to Inaugural Lecture -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  religious_history  politics-and-religion  political_history  nation-state  modernity-emergence  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Wars_of_Religion  Thirty_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  Hanoverian_Succession  colonialism  American_Revolution  Louis_XIV  Henry_VIII  Lutherans  Calvinist  Peter_the_Great  Frederick_the_Great  Elizabeth  Mary_Queen_of_Scots  Spanish_Empire  Huguenots  Renaissance  Puritans  Whigs  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Grumley - Theorizing Modernity: Unit of Study Guide 2014 - Sydney, Australia
Lecture notes on each class plus extensive reading lists, - see especially the post on alternative paper questions, each with a reading list -- PHIL 2633 Theorising Modernity -- The popular image of 19th century modernity was of a speeding locomotive clear of form, direction and ultimate destination. In reality, however, and despite unbounded optimism, the great thinkers of the 19th century were at least aware of deep contradictions and these tempered their assessments of modernity. This course will survey the best of these classical theories to discover to what extent they were able to capture the contradictions and problems we know only too well. The work of Hegel, de Tocqueville, Marx and Nietzsche will serve as paradigmatic attempts to discover the essence of modernity. Recurring themes and features will be examined through the prism of these thinkers: these include questions of meaning after the collapse of tradition, and problems arising from capitalism, industrialisation, the nation-state, democracy, bureaucratisation, individualism and the rise of secularism-- their main tendencies, antinomies and problems. The course will demonstrate how much we owe these thinkers for our understanding of modernity, as well as, considering their respective shortcomings from a contemporary perspective.
intellectual_history  19thC  Hegel  Tocqueville  Marx  Nietzsche  modernity  Industrial_Revolution  individualism  secularization  nation-state  nationalism  democracy  mass_culture  elite_culture  class_conflict  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  social_process  historicism  bibliography  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Christian Nadeau, review essay - Blaise Bachofen (dir.), Le libéralisme au miroir du droit. L’État, la personne, la propriété - Philosophiques v36 n1 2009, p. 249-253 | Érudit 
Christian Nadeau - Université de Montréal -- Ces auteurs, pour la plupart spécialistes de philosophie politique moderne, se sont penchés sur des notions fondamentales du libéralisme en les situant dans leur contexte théorique d’émergence. Sont ainsi passés au crible de l’analyse philosophique les oeuvres de Locke, Hume, Montesquieu, Bentham, Constant et Tocqueville, mais aussi, celles des auteurs associés au conservatisme, comme Burke ou Bonald. Dans son introduction, Blaise Bachofen explique les raisons pour lesquelles les textes rassemblés dans ce recueil se recoupent sur la notion de libéralisme normatif, et plus précisément de libéralisme juridique. La norme de droit propre au libéralisme permet en effet de rendre compte à la fois de sa dimension politique et de sa dimension économique. L’égal traitement de droit contient en lui-même les motivations morales des principes fondamentaux du libéralisme. -- Trois grandes notions ont été retenues pour expliciter le paradigme du libéralisme juridique : L’État, comme lieu des échanges et des protections individuelles ; la personne, comme sujet du droit et de la liberté ; la propriété, comme notion canonique du rapport de l’individu à lui-même et aux objets qu’il peut légitimement faire siens. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  Locke-2_Treatises  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  Montesquieu  Bentham  Burke  Constant  Tocqueville  liberalism  property  property_rights  equality  civil_liberties  nation-state  utilitarianism  legal_system  counter-revolution  social_contract  legitimacy  public_opinion  political_culture  natural_law  natural_rights  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. Prior, review - Bernard Capp. England's Culture Wars: Puritan Reformation and Its Enemies in the Interregnum, 1649-1660 | H-Net Reviews May 2013
Capp’s new book adds significant depth and nuance to our view of this period, ... Broadly speaking, the reformers were motivated by godly zeal and the desire to establish a civic commonwealth that was animated by humanist values, such as civility and good order. In this sense, the aims of the reformers agreed with the social values of the nobility, magistrates, and city corporations... However, ..a spectrum, along which positions were defined by the relative proportion of godliness to civility. The book is divided into three parts. The first concentrates on the various loci of political power, ...legislative reform carried on by the interregnum parliaments, by the government and the church at the county and local levels, and in an excellent chapter by propaganda and the press. The second part consists of six detailed chapters that take up the puritan “reformation of manners.” The third part of the book looks in some detail at local contexts, illustrating that reform proceeded very much according to the whims and will of local magistrates. Reformers had to contend with a series of structural and practical obstacles. ?..interregnum politics was fragmented. Parliament never really recovered from Pride’s Purge ... In spite of the desire to limit religious expression, a fervent climate of sectarianism remained. The Cromwellian state was obliged to settle for ad hoc compromises on a range of issues. ?...surely all of this detail adds up to something larger. ?...goes some way toward challenging the view that one major effect of the civil war was that the “state” emerged in its modern form. That is, politics transcended confessionalism and embraced legal values, secularism, and the rigid control of religion by the state. By contrast, Capp’s work suggests that religious dispute continued to destabilize politics at all levels, and that the state, if it existed at all, was obliged to defer to local custom.
books  reviews  historiography  17thC  British_history  British_politics  religious_history  Interregnum  Protectorate  Puritans  godly_persons  Parliamentarians  republicanism  Cromwell  sectarianism  state-building  nation-state  local_government  local_politics  reformation_of_manners  authority  authoritarian  church_history  commonwealth  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Tiegs, review - Derek Croxton. Westphalia: The Last Christian Peace (2013) | H-Net Reviews
The work is divided into three sections covering the background, negotiations, and conclusions. The background section is the largest - its fifth chapter, “Structures,” is undoubtedly the highlight of the work. Croxton superbly places the negotiations in their baroque setting, showing how issues of precedence, prestige, gift giving, and logistics all affected the talks. The second section, covering the negotiations - In addition to attempting to resolve contentious religious issues, they also wrangled over the representation of imperial estates at the congress, territorial compensation, the independence of the United Provinces, and arrears for the Swedish soldiers. ...it was nearly impossible to settle any issue independently, and negotiations became a matter of brinksmanship. In the final section on consequences, Croxton takes aim at perceived errors in the historiography. ..he wants to place the focus back on the religious dimensions of negotiations, as the opening lines of the treaty clearly stated, “Let there be a Christian peace”. He believes that the notion of Westphalia as the foundation of modern diplomacy between independent sovereign states is erroneous. Alsace again provides a good example, as he points to the fact that the negotiations led to the curious situation where it was part of both the French crown and the empire. As this case makes clear, internal and external issues were not clear cut post-1648, thus European states were not independent and discrete sovereign units. In fact, he goes on to argue that Westphalia probably had the opposite effect, specifically “the continuation of the idea of mutual interference of states in each other’s internal affairs”.
books  reviews  17thC  diplomatic_history  military_history  religious_history  IR_theory  IR  nation-state  Westphalia  Thirty_Years_War  religious_wars  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Sweden  Spain  Germany  Austria  Habsburgs  Dutch_Revolt  Dutch  state-building  balance_of_power  Great_Powers  sovereignty  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Milliner, review essay - Lenten Reading - Ephraim Radner, A Brutal Unity: The Spiritual Politics of the Christian Church | Books and Culture 2013
Radner, a Protestant, [argues] that something in our modern world has gone wrong. However, he places the blame less on an elusive pattern of secularization (Taylor) or on Protestant fragmentation (Gregory) than on the much wider phenomenon of Christian disunity... Christian disunity is what gave birth to—or rather, miscarried—the liberal democratic state. These are massive claims, and Radner marshals the erudition... A Brutal Unity is ..an "eristology," which Radner defines as "the study of hostility in its disordering forms and forces." -- Radner [opens with a] polemic against Wm Cavanaugh's The Myth of Religious Violence, [which] unjustifiably absolves Christians from their share in the violence of the liberal state. ...the nations as we know them arose from the inability of Christians to refrain from mutual murder. Radner marches his readers deep into the Rwandan genocide and the Holocaust.... "[Nazi death squads] were Protestants and Catholics both." To suggest otherwise—whether to exonerate Pope Pius XII or to overemphasize the role of Bonhoeffer—is to succumb to "hallucinogenic fantasy." "The dead bodies, as it were, are already gathered by the time churches admit to complicity in their murder." Radner explores Catholic and Protestant .. attempts to deny the reality of Christian disunity by carving out an inviolable space of "the Church as such"... The saving of the church from her own sins by concocting an invisible or elusive sanctity is, admittedly, a traditional theological move, but... were this approach employed Christologically, it would be plainly Gnostic. - Radner [makes] the villain of his story Ephiphanius of Salamis (d. 403), who listed heresies and distanced the church from her enemies, especially the Jews. ?..inaugurated the "Epiphanian paradigm" and its program of exclusionary violence...the church's "brutal unity." Providentialism and proceduralism are the [church's] blinders... The former is the notion that God was somehow at work in church councils, however violent; the latter is the idea that somehow bureaucratic decisions and parliamentary process betray the hand of God. We should, Radner believes, trust neither.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  church_history  Christianity  theology  intellectual_history  Early_Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Christendom  Church_Fathers  church_councils  Reformation  Papacy  violence  genocide  Holocaust  Protestants  Catholics  modernity  religious_wars  nation-state  liberalism  ecclesiology  Augustine  Providence  heterodoxy  Judaism  gnostic  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Ryan Patrick Hanley - Enlightened Nation Building: The "Science of the Legislator" in Adam Smith and Rousseau | JSTOR: American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Apr., 2008), pp. 219-234
Rousseau is famous as an advocate of the politics of "denaturing." But attention to his conception of the "science of the legislator," as developed in the Geneva Manuscript and his writings on Poland and Corsica, reveals a more moderate approach to statecraft. Here Rousseau claims that legislative science requires tempering commitment to principles of political right with sensitivity to actual political conditions-a claim that importantly and unexpectedly parallels the better known account of the science of the legislator developed by Adam Smith. In comparing these conceptions, this article draws three conclusions: first, Smith's and Rousseau's shared moderation reveals their common commitment to accommodating the passions and prejudices of modernity; second, their fundamental difference concerns not practical legislative methods but rather differing conceptions of natural justice and political right; and finally, their prudential approach to legislation helps clarify the specific types of "moderation" and "intelligence" required of contemporary nation builders. -- see bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Smith  Rousseau  nation-state  institution-building  political_culture  political_science  political_economy  modernity  natural_law  natural_rights  liberty  justice  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert J. Antonio - After Postmodernism: Reactionary Tribalism | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 106, No. 1 (July 2000), pp. 40-87
Revived Weimar‐era “radical conservatism” and fresh “New Right” and “paleoconservative” theories offer a radical cultural critique of global capitalism and liberal democracy. Expressing a broader retribalization and perceived failure of modernization, their defense of communal particularity attacks the multicultural nation‐state, liberal rights, and universal citizenship. This essay links reactionary tribalism to a recurrent 20th‐century theoretical tendency, the “total critique of modernity”—a fusion of oversimplified Nietzschean and Weberian ideas. Historically, total critique has promoted convergence between right and left, such as the current overlapping facets of “radical conservatism” and “strong‐program postmodernism.” Total critique counters the “historicist” method of “internal critique” and the “communication model” characteristic of reflexive social theory. The discussion uncovers the mediating role of social theory in the problematic relationship of science and partially disenchanted public spheres in plural, democratic cultures. -- 200+ references! -- in postmodernism includes range of "end of" thinkers from left and right, and the overlaps between far right and some of the postmodern cultural left -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  cultural_history  modernity  irrational  Germany  Weimar  Nazis  Heidegger  Nietzsche  Schmitt  Strauss  neo-Hegelian  right-wing  cultural_pessimism  Leftist  Marxist  historicism  cultural_critique  Habermas  Dewey  pragmatism  liberalism  democracy  patriarchy  nationalism  ethnic_ID  universalism  citizenship  nation-state  multiculturalism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Common-place: Kathleen DuVal - A Revolutionary Future
Presentation from conference - Historians' second goal in changing the terms of debate is to write new synthetic narratives, to tell the whole story differently. -- I would start with the question of how North Americans on the eve of the Revolution expected the future to look. I think we would find startling agreement across North America, if we maintain a sufficiently broad focus. People expected multiple sovereignties to rule the continent, as had been the case long before Europeans and Africans arrived. -- Slavery would continue, as most people believed it had throughout the world since the beginning of time, but few would have imagined either the huge scale of antebellum plantation slavery or the movement to abolish slavery altogether. -- From that starting place, we might explore various paths through the Revolutionary War and beyond, keeping an eye on different people's visions of what the world should be like (a question inherently both self-interested and ideological) through the vagaries of a war that might change those visions and ambitions along the way. The punchline would be that almost all of these visions were wrong. The republican empire that came out of the American Revolution and early republic developed both a power over the continent that no one predicted and the kind of rhetoric and promise that attracted immigration from around the world. In some ways, I would argue, the most important story of the American Revolution is how the more likely nineteenth century failed to come about.
historiography  US_history  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  18thC  19thC  nation-state  institution-building  Native_Americans  Manifest_Destiny  slavery  abolition 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Rogers Brubaker - Charles Tilly as a Theorist of Nationalism | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 375-381
This paper considers Charles Tilly as an important but underappreciated theorist of nationalism. Tilly's theory of nationalism emerged from the "bellicist" strand of his earlier work on state-formation and later incorporated a concern with performance, stories, and cultural modeling. Yet despite the turn to culture in Tilly's later work, his theory of nationalism remained state-centered, materialist, and instrumentalist— a source of both its power and its limitations. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  change-social  nation-state  nationalism  conflict  Tilly  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack A. Goldstone - From Structure to Agency to Process: The Evolution of Charles Tilly's Theories of Social Action | JSTOR: The American Sociologist, Vol. 41, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 358-367
"From Structure to Agency to Process: The Evolution of Charles Tilly's Theories of Social Action as Reflected in His Analyses of Contentious Politics" in special issue - Remembering Charles Tilly -- Charles Tilly's social theories shifted over the course of his career from an early focus on quantitative and macro-sociological approaches to a later focus on relations and agency. His studies of state-making also shifted, from a focus on conflict and capitalism to explorations of democracy. This paper details these shifts and places them in the context of broader trends in comparative-historical and political sociology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  change-social  conflict  structure  agency  agency-structure  social_process  relations-social  causation-social  democracy  nation-state  nationalism  economic_sociology  power  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Louise Arbour - Are Freedom, Peace and Justice incompatible agendas? - International Crisis Group - Feb 2014
Address by the Honorable Louise Arbour, President & CEO of the International Crisis Group, on the occasion of the Inaugural Roland Berger Lecture on Human Rights and Human Dignity, 17 February 2014, Oxford. -- The UDHR, in other words, remains largely aspirational. Its commitments are ultimately hostage to the competing principle of state sovereignty which places on states, almost exclusively, the responsibility for the wellbeing of their citizens, and to the weak institutional structures designed to promote and protect human rights at regional and international levels. -- I would like to examine today how modern doctrines – in particular international criminal justice, the responsibility to protect and the rule of law – have contributed to the advancement of lasting peace, and how to make it more likely that they might do so in the future.
21stC  human_rights  international_law  international_system  international_organizations  sovereignty  nation-state  IR  rule_of_law  responsibility_to_protect  IR_theory  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Pascal Emmanuel Gobry - What Is Citizenship? | Cato Unbound Sept 2013
National service debate - In his essay, Mr. Kuznicki is right to take me to task for being guilty of a bit of a sleight-of-hand, which is blurring the distinction between the Ancients’ view of liberty and the Moderns’. I confess to the blurring. First, because I think they are blurred – as much as we try to get rid of them, we can’t seem to be able to; less “great-grandfathers,” the Ancients are more older brothers, or perhaps Jiminy Crickets, to the Moderns.

And second, I think the distinction should be blurred. Mr. Kuznicki writes that “when the ancients wrote of liberty, they meant something like an obligation to participate actively in government.” I certainly agree that they thought it was part of it, but it is not reducible to that. It is perhaps more accurate to say that the Ancients thought of liberty as something like participation in a just moral order.
political_philosophy  political_culture  nation-state  national_ID  social_contract  liberalism  libertarianism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  citizens  political_participation  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
RANDALL GERMAIN - Financial governance and transnational deliberative democracy | JSTOR: Review of International Studies, Vol. 36, No. 2 (April 2010), pp. 493-509
Recent concern with the institutional underpinning of the international financial architecture has intersected with broader debates concerning the possibility of achieving an adequate deliberative context for decisions involving transnational economic governance. Scholars working within traditions associated with international political economy, deliberative democracy, cosmopolitanism and critical theory have informed this broader debate. This article uses this debate to ask whether the structure of financial governance at the global level exhibits the necessary conditions to support deliberative democracy. In particular, it considers the extent to which publicness and a public sphere have become part of the broader structure of financial governance. Although in some ways financial governance is a hard case for this debate, an argument can be made that a public sphere has emerged as an important element of the international financial architecture. At the same time, the analysis of the role of the public sphere in financial governance reveals important lessons which public sphere theorists and deliberative democracy advocates need to consider in order to extend their analysis into the realm of global political economy. -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  IR_theory  finance_capital  global_governance  international_political_economy  international_finance  financial_regulation  democracy  deliberation-public  political_participation  public_sphere  international_system  international_law  international_organizations  nation-state  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Johan van der Zande - Statistik and History in the German Enlightenment | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 71, No. 3 (July 2010), pp. 411-432
Not statistics but the collection and study of information about the states of Europe - connected to cameralism and focus on political economy rather than military -though clearly how to survive and thrive as an independent state in the European system a major impetus. Van der Zande uses analogy of Venetian ambassadors. Gets launched in a big way in 1750s and has ceased to be a separate important discipline by the early 19thC, the apparent victim of Germany's historical age. Interesting view of motives, academic and bureaucratic resources German states within and without the HRE, the European system, alternative philosophies of human nature, happiness, commerce and the roles of the state. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  Germany  Enlightenment  Austria  historiography-18thC  political_arithmetick  governance  enlightened_absolutism  cameralism  commerce  agriculture  trade  manufacturing  trading_companies  taxes  social_sciences  nation-state  bureaucracy  public_health  demography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Marianne Constable - Foucault & Walzer: Sovereignty, Strategy & the State | JSTOR: Polity, Vol. 24, No. 2 (Winter, 1991), pp. 269-293
Uses Walzer attack on Foucault as anarchist, nihilist etc to flesh out what about liberal political theory Foucault rejects or places in a different social position than liberals do. -- Michael Walzer faults the political theory of Michel Foucault for failing to provide an account of the liberal state and the rule of law or to provide the kind of knowledge that regulates disciplinary arrangements in society. This article assesses Walzer's criticism in light of Foucault's analysis of liberal political theory. It concludes that Walzer's theory, couched in the discourse of sovereignty, employs disciplinary strategies of power, akin to those Foucault describes, to combat the tyrannical state. -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  power  social_theory  mass_culture  liberalism  rule_of_law  nation-state  sovereignty  tyranny  resistance_theory  judiciary  legitimacy  democracy  Foucault  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Herman Siemens and Gary Shapiro - Special Section Introduction: What Does Nietzsche Mean for Contemporary Politics and Political Thought? | JSTOR: Journal of Nietzsche Studies, No. 35/36 (SPRING-AUTUMN 2008), pp. 3-8
Guest Editors' Introduction: What Does Nietzsche Mean for Contemporary Politics and Political Thought?(pp. 3-8) Herman Siemens and Gary Shapiro. *--* (1) Beyond Peoples and Fatherlands: Nietzsche's Geophilosophy and the Direction of the Earth (pp. 9-27) Gary Shapiro. *--* (2) Nietzsche and the Neoconservatives: Fukuyama's Reply to the Last Man (pp. 28-47) Haroon Sheikh. *--* (3) (downloaded) Nietzsche and the Political: Tyranny, Tragedy, Cultural Revolution, and Democracy (pp. 48-66) Tracy B. Strong. *--* (4) The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the "Innocence of Becoming": Nietzsche, 9/11, and the "Falling Man" (pp. 67-85) Joanne Faulkner *--* (book review) Nietzsche's Political Skepticism by Tamsin Shaw (pp. 177-179) - Review by: Saul Tobias. *--* (long book review) Nietzsche and the Political. Thinking the Political series by Daniel W. Conway (pp. 207-216) - Review by: Herman Siemens [both Conway and Siemens are contributors to the special section]
journal  article  books  reviews  jstor  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  Nietzsche  globalization  political_economy  political_culture  Strauss  mass_culture  nationalism  nation-state  territory  Europe  Eurocentrism  post-colonial  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative [eScholarship] (2007)
"National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative", Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2007), 293-317. -- Keywords: Nation, National Histories, Postnational, State, Transnationalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  political_culture  nation-state  national_ID  nationalism  territory  globalization  history_of_England  historiography-Whig  historians-and-politics  groups-identity  memory-group  memory_studies  narrative-contested  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
A. Claire Cutler - Critical Reflections on the Westphalian Assumptions of International Law and Organization: A Crisis of Legitimacy | JSTOR: Review of International Studies, Vol. 27, No. 2 (Apr., 2001), pp. 133-150
This article argues that the fields of international law and organization are experiencing a legitimacy crisis relating to fundamental reconfigurations of global power and authority. Traditional Westphalian-inspired assumptions about power and authority are incapable of providing contemporary understanding, producing a growing disjunction between the theory and the practice of the global system. The actors, structures, and processes identified and theorized as determinative by the dominant approaches to the study of international law and organization have ceased to be of singular importance. Westphalian-inspired notions of state-centricity, positivist international law, and 'public' definitions of authority are incapable of capturing the significance of non-state actors, informal normative structures, and private, economic power in the global political economy. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- didn't download
article  jstor  IR_theory  global_system  global_governance  international_political_economy  nation-state  Westphalia  international_organizations  international_law  legitimacy  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Dirk Matten and Andrew Crane - Corporate Citizenship: Toward an Extended Theoretical Conceptualization | JSTOR: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 30, No. 1 (Jan., 2005), pp. 166-179
We critically examine the content of contemporary understandings of corporate citizenship and locate them within the extant body of research dealing with business-society relations. Our main purpose is to realize a theoretically informed definition of corporate citizenship that is descriptively robust and conceptually distinct from existing concepts in the literature. Specifically, our extended perspective exposes the element of "citizenship" and conceptualizes corporate citizenship as the administration of a bundle of individual citizenship rights--social, civil, and political--conventionally granted and protected by governments. -- cited by more than 35 in jstor -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_economy  liberalism  markets  nation-state  civil_society  business  business-and-politics  corporate_citizenship  CSR  civil_liberties  privatization  legal_system  international_political_economy  globalization  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Crane and Dirk Matten - Corporate Citizenship: Missing the Point or Missing the Boat? A Reply to van Oosterhout | JSTOR: The Academy of Management Review, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Oct., 2005), pp. 681-684
Short follow up to earlier article challenging mushy use of CC relative to CSR. This piece clarifies what they were tackling in the article and areas where the concept needs to be expanded to deal with what's happening. A decade later after Citizens United etc their distinction from CSR and expansion to deal with blurred boundaries between state, civil society, business, politics, citizen rights and responsibilities is even more appropriate. -- didn't download
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_economy  nation-state  civil_society  business  business-and-politics  corporate_citizenship  CSR  civil_liberties  privatization  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ulf Henning Richter - Liberal Thought in Reasoning on CSR | JSTOR: Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 97, No. 4 (December 2010), pp. 625-649
In this article, I argue that conventional reasoning on corporate social responsibility (CSR) is based on the assumption of a liberal market economy in the context of a nation state. I build on the study of Scherer and Palazzo (Acad Manage Rev 32(4):1096-1120, 2007), developing a number of criteria to identify elements of liberal philosophy in the ongoing CSR debate. I discuss their occurrence in the CSR literature in detail and reflect on the implications, taking into account the emerging political reading of the firm. I conclude that the apolitical framework in the mainstream CSR literature has to be overcome since it does not reflect recent changes in the socio-economic conditions for economic actors in a globalizing world. -- over 200 references -- didn't download
article  jstor  international_political_economy  globalization  global_system  corporations  corporate_governance  CSR  nation-state  corporate_citizenship  firms-theory  regulation  accountability  business-and-politics  externalities  capitalism  political_economy  economic_sociology  management  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
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