dunnettreader + narrative   52

Game of Thrones, from Pixels to Parchment | The Getty Iris
We turn a Hollywood lens on medieval manuscripts, exploring parallels between illumination and TV storytelling If the GoT trailer were Getty manuscripts Death.…
Instapaper  art_history  cultural_history  narrative  narrative-visual  medieval_art  manuscripts  illustrations  illuminations  movies-sets  movies-costumes  from instapaper
may 2016 by dunnettreader
David Wootton - Narrative, Irony, and Faith in Gibbon's Decline and Fall | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 1994)
History and Theory, Vol. 33, No. 4, Theme Issue 33: Proof and Persuasion in History (Dec., 1994), pp. 77-105 -- thinks Momigliano didn't see that Gibbon was Hume's follower and their "school" was defining on a number of elements for what "history" came to be understood as - Thinks Wormersley doesn't fully appreciate Gibbon's handling of religion and the various challenges to Christianity in both antiquity and Enlightenment -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  history_of_England  Gibbon  Momigliano  Enlightenment  religious_belief  religious_history  scepticism  miracles  Middleton_Conyers  irony  narrative  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Philip Ball - Why story is used to explain symphonies and sport matches - Aeon
It’s a movie classic. The lovers are out for a walk when a villain dashes out of his house and starts fighting the man. The woman takes refuge in the house;…
neuroscience  evo_psych  narrative  complexity  causation  cognitive_bias  cognition  cognition-social  epistemology-naturalism  Instapaper  from instapaper
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - the three big stories of modernity | TextPatterns July 2015
So far there have been three widely influential stories about the rise of modernity: the Emancipatory, the Protestant, and the Neo-Thomist. (..) all these narrators of modernity see our own age as one in which the consequences of 500-year-old debates conducted by philosophers and theologians are still being played out. I think all of these narratives are wrong. They are wrong because they are the product of scholars in universities who overrate the historical importance and influence of other scholars in universities, and because they neglect ideas that connect more directly with the material world. All of these grands recits should be set aside, and they should not immediately be replaced with others, but with more particular, less sweeping, and more technologically-oriented stories. The technologies that Marshall McLuhan called "the extensions of Man" are infinitely more important for Man's story, for good and for ill, than the debates of the schoolmen and interpreters of the Bible. Instead of grand narratives of the emergence of The Modern we need something far more plural: technological histories of modernity.
Instapaper  cultural_history  cultural_capital  modernity  technology  Tech/Culture  social_theory  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  Thomism-21stC  Reformation  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  modernity-emergence  material_culture  economic_history  Great_Divergence  Industrial_Revolution  colonialism  Military_Revolution  Scientific_Revolution  consumer_revolution  technology-history  historiography  medicine  public_health  public_sphere  public_goods  media  print_culture  history_of_science  history_of_book  history-and-social_sciences  narrative  narrative-contested  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Paul Wolff - On Eric Auerbach's "Mimesis" (1 of 2) - The Philosopher's Stone: DOWN MEMORY LANE - April 2015
I launched this blog in 2007 and began posting seriously in 2009. In 2010, in a fury of activity lasting several months, I wrote and posted a Memoir that… Lovely discussion of Auerbach's contrast of Homer vs story of Abraham -- Wolff heavily influenced by Auerbach's underlying theory re the connections between how the "real world" is conceived, including man's place in it, the linguistic resources available (e.g. Song of Roland vs Decameron), and authorial choices. - both parts copied to Instapaper
literary_history  Homer  Old_Testament  Bible-as-literature  Auerbach  philology  narrative  philosophy_of_language  Instapaper  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Paul Wolff - On Eric Auerbach's "Mimesis" (2 of 2) - The Philosopher's Stone: AUERBACH -- COMPLETION - April 2015
Lovely discussion of Auerbach's contrast of Homer vs story of Abraham -- Wolff heavily influenced by Auerbach's underlying theory re the connections between how the "real world" is conceived, including man's place in it, the linguistic resources available (e.g. Song of Roland vs Decameron), and authorial choices. - both parts copied to Instapaper
literary_history  Homer  Old_Testament  Bible-as-literature  Auerbach  philology  narrative  philosophy_of_language  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright, eds. - Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre Re forming Literature 1789–1837 (2006 pbk) | Cambridge University Press
Tilottama Rajan, University of Western Ontario and Julia M. Wright, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia **--** Romanticism has often been associated with lyric poetry, or otherwise confined within mainstream genres. As a result, we have neglected the sheer diversity and generic hybridity of a literature that ranged from the Gothic novel to the national tale, from monthly periodicals to fictionalized autobiography. In this new volume some of the leading scholars of the period explore the relationship between ideology and literary genre from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The introduction offers a fresh examination of how genre was rethought by Romantic criticism. **--** Introduction Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright **--** Part I. Genre, History, and the Public Sphere: 1. Godwin and the genre reformers: on necessity and contingency in romantic narrative theory - Jon Klancher *-* 2. Radical print culture in periodical form - Kevin Gilmartin *-* 3. History, trauma, and the limits of the liberal imagination: William Godwin's historical fiction - Gary Handwerk *-* 4. Writing on the border: the national tale, female writing, and the public sphere - Ina Ferris. **--** Part II. Genre and Society: 5. Genres from life in Wordsworth's art: Lyrical Ballads 1798 - Don Bialostosky *-* 6. 'A voice in the representation': John Thelwall and the enfranchisement of literature - Judith Thompson *-* 7. 'I am ill-fitted': conflicts of genre in Elisa Fenwick's Secresy - Julia M. Wright *-* 8. Frankenstein as neo-Gothic: from the ghost of the couterfeit to the monster of abjection - Jerrold E. Hogle **--** Part III. Genre, Gender, and the Private Sphere: 9. Autonarration and genotext in Mary Hays' Memoirs of Emma Courtney - Tilottama Rajan *-* 10. 'The science of herself': scenes of female enlightenment - Mary Jacobus *-* 11. The failures of romanticism Jerome McGann -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_history  British_history  British_politics  genre  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  literary_journals  literary_history  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  narrative  narrative-contested  Hunt_Leigh  censorship  Hazlitt_William  Godwin_Wm  historical_fiction  historical_change  necessity  contingency  women-intellectuals  authors-women  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  Shelley_Mary  imagination  magazines  newspapers  gender  gender_history  Wordsworth  poetry  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Romanticism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
John D. Wilkins, review - Neil Postman, Building a Bridge to the 18th Century (1999) | Technology and Society Book Reviews
In Building a Bridge to the 18th Century, Neil Postman weaves an interesting tale on the development of a new "conversation" that Americans should commence. His book was an enjoyable read, and it re-ignites debate over policy questions and knowledge claims in the process of decision making. However, in formulating his arguments, he ran afoul, as so many do, in misconstruing the meaning of social construction and the manner in which society constructs knowledge. At the same time, Postman correctly articulates 'a crisis in narrative' (p.113). His story is best understood in the context of a manifesto that sees current narratives as inadequate for the future development of a healthy society. He sees a loss of meaning in our stories and reminds us that the 18th century is a social location that provides a foundation from which to launch a new conversation in order to restore a more meaningful social life. His manifesto does not seem to be interested in contemplation or conversation as he implies. Instead, I will argue that Postman is looking for efficiency and efficacy, and advocating his perspective from an ethnocentric foundation. I will attempt to provide the notion that there are multiple stories to be told, and that retelling one can be another form of advocating the status quo. In this review, I will focus on Postman's arguments for healthy skepticism, some of his contradictions, the notion of individualism and egoism, and the misconstruction of postmodern thought. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  kindle-available  cultural_critique  21stC  18thC  Enlightenment  philosophes  social_theory  constructivism  intellectual_history  Tocqueville  narrative  narrative-contested  conservation  postmodern  scepticism  scepticism-Academic  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  science-and-politics  science-public  individualism  self-interest  self-interest-cultural_basis  community  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Solutions Journalism - Toolkit for Reporting Internationally
Downloaded guide to iPhone -- This meaty guidebook has two objectives: (1) to highlight and dissect the solutions-oriented work of four Pulitzer Center grantees; and (2) to offer general guidance about howto report on solutions stories internationally – and how to get your story idea funded. This guidebook has been produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting, which supports international journalism across media platforms.
report  downloaded  journalism  narrative  public_sphere  public_policy  development  urbanism  family  migration  public_health  education  women-education  public_disorder  racism  civil_wars  environment  climate  poverty  access_to_services  labor  labor_standards  political_participation  gender  violence  norms 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Paskey - The Law is Made of Stories: Erasing the False Dichotomy between Stories and Legal Rules (May 30, 2014) :: SSRN
SUNY Buffalo Law School -- Legal Comm. & Rhetoric: JALWD, vol. 11 (Fall 2014, Forthcoming) - SUNY Buffalo Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2014-031 -- When lawyers think of legal analysis, they think chiefly of logic and reason. Stories are secondary. As Michael Smith explains, our legal system “is not founded on narrative reasoning” but on “a commitment to the rule of law.” The article suggests that this dichotomy between “rule-based reasoning” and “narrative reasoning” is false, and that narrative and stories are central to legal reasoning, including rule-based reasoning. In doing so, the article uses literary narrative theory to show that every governing legal rule has the structure of a “stock story”: the elements of the rule correspond to elements of a story. It follows that lawyers do not rely on stories simply because they are persuasive. They do so because a story is literally embedded in the structure of governing rules, and those rules can be satisfied only by telling a story. Thus, many analytical moves we label “rule-based reasoning” can be understood as a type of narrative reasoning, in which a client’s story is compared to and contrasted with the stock story embedded in the rule. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  narrative  legal_reasoning  logic  precedent  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael D. Murray - Visual Rhetoric and Storytelling in Five Sections of a Brief (2014) :: SSRN
Valparaiso University Law School -- The rhetoric of visualization is critical to client-centered legal practice. Visualization through storytelling connects all subject areas in the law and extends far beyond the law to disciplines as varied as cognitive studies, brain science, and rhetoric and persuasion. Visual rhetoric is a growing topic of discussion and scholarship in the legal writing academy, as scholars and practitioners explore the potential of images as cognitive, communicative, and persuasive devices. Lawyers use stories and visual images and structures as framing devices, organizational schema, and persuasive rhetorical methods to communicate the context and meaning of a client’s situation and to improve the communication, reception, and understanding of legal argument with a given audience. Most legal writing and advocacy study has focused on the facts section for narrativity and storytelling, while visual rhetoric has focused on the argument section. This presentation will examine the use of client-centered narrative reasoning and visual rhetoric in five sections of trial level and appellate legal briefs: questions presented; introduction or summary of the argument; statement of facts or statement of the case; explanation sections of the argument; and application sections of the argument. -- Keywords: visual rhetoric, narrative rhetoric, storytelling, appellate advocacy, narrative, visualization, trial advocacy, legal writing -- didn't download
paper  SSRN  legal_culture  judiciary  narrative  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-visual  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Gorman - Hayden White as analytical philosopher of mind | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue : Hayden White’s " Metahistory " 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Philosophers and historians in Cambridge did not recognise either the relevance or the importance of Metahistory when it was published in 1973. The reasons are here explained in terms of the nature of the analytical tradition: the principled distinctiveness of analytical philosophy from (1) history, (2) speculative metaphysics, and (3) political morality. Following an analysis of ‘analysis’, Metahistory is argued to be an exercise in the recovery of paradigm cases in Strawsonian descriptive metaphysics that offers the outlines of an advanced philosophy of mind and philosophy of time. -- Jonathan Gorman is Emeritus Professor of Moral Philosophy at the Queen's University of Belfast. His books in philosophy of history are The Expression of Historical Knowledge (Edinburgh 1982), Understanding History (Ottawa 1992) and Historical Judgement (Stocksfield 2007), and he has many articles and reviews in theory of history journals and collections. He continues to apply analytic pragmatic philosophy to historical thought, and writes also in other branches of philosophy and in legal theory.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  historiography  narrative  analytical_philosophy  ordinary_language_philosophy  speech-act  philosophy_of_history  mind  time  metaphysics  Strawson_PF  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Peter Burke - Metahistory: before and after | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue : Hayden White’s " Metahistory " 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
This article tries to place Hayden White's Metahistory between two trends: one before and one after 1973. The first is the trend towards studying the rhetoric of history: a trend that goes back to classical antiquity itself, was revived at the Renaissance and – following the moment of positivism – enjoyed a second revival in the age of the linguistic turn. The second trend, after 1973, is essentially the story of responses to White's book, whether negative or positive. Particular emphasis is given to attempts to extend his rhetorical analysis to more historians or to utilize his approach in other disciplines, among them anthropology, geography and international relations. -- Peter Burke is Emeritus Professor of Cultural History, University of Cambridge, and Fellow of Emmanuel College. He began his studies of the history of historiography at Oxford in 1961, under the supervision of Hugh Trevor-Roper, and is the author of studies ranging from The Renaissance Sense of the Past (1969) to The French Historical Revolution (1990).
article  paywall  intellectual_history  historiography  post-WWII  rhetoric-writing  narrative  linguistic_turn  constructivism  social_sciences-post-WWII  anthropology  geography  IR_theory  social_theory 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Gabrielle M. Spiegel - Above, about and beyond the writing of history: a retrospective view of Hayden White's "Metahistory" | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue: Hayden White’s "Metahistory" 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Since its publication 40 years ago, Hayden White's Metahistory has been recognized as a foundational work for the literary analysis of historical writing. Long thought to be primarily concerned with questions of narrative, new interpretations have recently revised our understanding of White's principal aims as a theorist and philosopher of history. What has emerged from these works is a novel view of the status and meaning of tropes in Metahistory, the underlying existentialist engagements that guided White's thinking about them, and the ways in which both served his encompassing goal not only to critique the reigning Rankean paradigm of ‘history’ but to free contemporary historians and historiography altogether from the ‘burden of history’ for the sake of a morally responsible future. The article analyses the ways in which these new interpretations of White alter our understanding of the corpus of his work, from his early article on the ‘burden of history’ to his most recent writings on ‘the practical past’, with a principal focus on the re-readings of Metahistory itself. -- Gabrielle M. Spiegel is Krieger-Eisenhower Professor of history at Johns Hopkins University and a past president of the American Historical Association. She has written extensively on historical writing in the Middle Ages in Latin and Old French and on the implications of contemporary critical theory for the practice of historiography.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  historiography  narrative  lit_crit  philosophy_of_history  constructivism  usable_past  historicism  historiography-19thC  Ranke  existentialism  White_Hayden 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
David D. Roberts - Rethinking Hayden White's treatment of Croce | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue: Hayden White’s "Metahistory" 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Hayden White began as a partisan of the earlier Italian thinker Benedetto Croce. After 1963, however, White gradually turned against Croce, finally, in Metahistory, casting Croce's position as the limiting ironic outcome of nineteenth-century historiographical realism. Croce putatively left the historian as a passive observer, cut off from using historical understanding to help shape events. Whereas most students of White say little about White's encounter with Croce, this article argues that both thinkers were seeking to establish a post-realist cultural framework. Although White had plausible reasons to dissent from Croce, he sidestepped the challenge of the Crocean alternative by forcing Croce into a limiting mold as a time-bound, bourgeois ideological spokesman. This was to restrict unnecessarily and unfortunately the terms of post-realist debate. -- David D. Roberts is Albert Berry Saye Professor of History, Emeritus, at the University of Georgia (U.S.A.). His most recent books are The Totalitarian Experiment in Twentieth-Century Europe: Understanding the Poverty of Great Politics (Routledge, 2006) and Historicism and Fascism in Modern Italy (Toronto, 2007). Among his earlier writings on Benedetto Croce are Benedetto Croce and the Uses of Historicism (California, 1987); Nothing but History: Reconstruction and Extremity after Metaphysics (California, 1995); and Una nuova interpretazione del pensiero di Croce: Lo storicismo crociano e il pensiero contemporaneo (Istituti Editoriali e Poligrafici Internazionali, 1995).
article  paywall  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  historiography  historiography-19thC  realism  narrative  philosophy_of_history  historicism  White_Hayden  Croce  postmodern  epistemology-history  historians-and-politics 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Trevor A. Harley - History lessons: what can we learn about history? | Rethinking History Vol. 18, Iss. 3, 2014 - Taylor & Francis Online
What can we learn from the past? This paper examines the nature of the past and discusses the extent to which historical outcomes are robust over different starting conditions, using primarily the example of the origin of the Great War. It reviews the mathematical and psychological literature on complexity theory, and considers the idea that history can indeed in some circumstances be robust across initial conditions. I introduce the notion of a dynamic historical attractor to account for the way in which the past unfolds over time, and relate dynamic attractors to post-modern approaches to historical interpretation. -- Keywords: complexity, chaos, dynamic historical attractors, alternative histories, causality, narrative, post-modernism -- T&F paywall
article  paywall  historiography  causation-social  causation  complexity  chaos_theory  dynamic_attractors  counterfactuals  narrative  narrative-contested  postmodern  WWI  contingency  social_theory  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
David Carr - Place and Time: On the Interplay of Historical Points of View | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Dec., 2001), pp. 153-167
A historian's account of a past action must take into account the agent's point of view, and that point of view may differ radically from that of the historian. This difference of points of view, I argue, may extend to the very place and time of the action in question. In this paper, by exploring the spatial and temporal aspects of action, agency, and the description of past action, I try to describe the interplay of points of view between historian and historical agent. Because of these differences, actions may be embedded in radically different realities for agent and historian, different conceptions of the spatially and temporally real. This is especially true of time: an action may have a very different future for the agent from the future it has in retrospect. These discrepancies, I claim, do not constitute an obstacle that can be overcome, but are structural features of the relation between description and action. This is because they are merely extensions into a particular domain of certain features of relations between persons. I try to show that these features also have implications for the concepts of narrative and of counterfactual history. -- Carr has been doing a lot on post postmodern historiography -- this piece looks useful for thinking about how to position a biographical narrative that gets at the protagonist's point of view -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  narrative  perspectivism  historicism  Bolingbroke  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview of Peter Kivy - Apologia pro vita sua: my work in philosophy » 3:AM Magazine
Peter Kivy, you are a leading figure in the philosophy of aesthetics, with particular interest in music and literature. Can you begin by telling us what made you become a philosopher and what were the philosophical puzzles that interested you?. Can you then tell us about the music problem, and in particular how emotions get into the music? After that can you say how you approach the old literature problem as to whether fiction, in particular, a novel, could be a source of knowledge? In doing so can you say why and how music and novels enthral us? -- see also his recommended books - most are recent in philosophy of literature, narrative, metaphor etc
aesthetics  lit_crit  literary_theory  music  music_history  novels  narrative  metaphor  epistemology-moral  Hutcheson  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Motifs - How to Locate Boccaccio's Sources and Imitators
This document was prepared to assist students interested in tracing the literary heritage of certain tales - both before and after the Decameron. One of the most efficient ways in which to do this is by utilizing what is known as a "motif index." A scholar named Stith Thompson (whose enormous work is cited below) is generally credited with the invention of such indices. His system of categorization, though almost Victorian in its organization, provides an excellent resource for anyone interested in locating and studying the development and elaboration of plots or plot elements (which are known as "motifs") throughout the folklore tradition. Thompson collected and classified thousands of different tales based upon general categories which he identified by a letter of the alphabet.
literary_history  Boccaccio  Italian_lit  Medieval  folklore  myth  plot  narrative 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Literature index page
(1) Medieval Attitudes toward Literature (2) Literary Relations -- ** Dante and Boccaccio, ** The Proem of the Decameron: Boccaccio between Ovid and Dante, ** Authorship, ** The Decameron and the English Romantics -- (3) Narratology and Structural Exegesis -- ** Numerology in the Decameron, ** The Novella before Boccaccio, ** Performance and Interpretation, ** Performance and Interpretation 2, ** Nightingales and Filostrato's Apologia (V.4), ** The Rubrics of the Decameron, ** Madonna Filippa (VI.7): Feminist Mouthpiece or Misogynistic Tool? -- (4) Hypertext -- ** Hypertext, Hypermedia and the History of the Text, ** Boccaccio Online: Teaching the Decameron as Hypertext at Brown University -- (5) Theoretical Perspectives -- ** Poststructuralism and a Figural Narrative Model, ** Lotman and the Problem of Artistic Space, ** Weinrich and the Grammar of the Frame, ** The Narrative Frame, ** Framing the Decameron, ** Seduction by Silence in the Frame -- (6) La novella tra Testo e Ipertesto: il Decameron come modello
website  literary_history  lit_crit  Italian_lit  English_lit  14thC  Medieval  Renaissance  humanism  Latin_lit  Boccaccio  Ovid  Dante  Romanticism  narrative  literary_theory  digital_humanities 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web
In his Western Canon Harold Bloom thus recently acknowledges the crucial position of Boccaccio's Decameron : "Ironic storytelling whose subject is storytelling is pretty much Boccaccio's invention, and the purpose of this breakthrough was to free stories from didacticism and moralism, so that the listener or reader, not the storyteller, became responsible for their use, for good or for ill." The Decameron has elicited throughout the centuries fundamental discussions on the nature of narrative art, on the tenets of medieval versus modern morality, on the social and educational value of any form of artistic and literary expression. A true encyclopedia of early modern life and a summa of late medieval culture, the Decameron is also a universal repertory of perennially human situations and dilemmas: it is the perfect subject for an experiment in a new form of scholarly and pedagogical communication aimed at renewing a living dialogue between a distant past and our present. The guiding question of our project is how contemporary informational technology can facilitate, enhance and innovate the complex cognitive and learning activities involved in reading a late medieval literary text like Boccaccio's Decameron. We fundamentally believe that the new electronic environment and its tools enable us to revive the humanistic spirit of communal and collaboratively "playful" learning of which the Decameron itself is the utmost expression.
website  Medieval  Renaissance  14thC  Italy  Italian_lit  narrative  digital_humanities  Boccaccio  cultural_history  humanism  literary_history  lit_crit 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton on Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism | Philosophy and Literature 23 (1999): 243-55. Denis Dutton
Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism (Cambridge University Press, $39.95) is notable not only for its passion, but for the way it supplies a new take on familiar problems. -- Etlin, however, is an architectural historian, and it’s refreshing to come across a cultural warrior lobbing grenades from a different academic encampment. -- Etlin’s book is excessively ambitious in trying to attack poststructuralism from dozens of angles; this, however, is part of its charm. He is bravely willing to take on anyone — Hayden White, Foucault, Nietzsche, Derrida, Bourdieu, de Man, Norman Bryson, Freud — and has no hesitation in identifying heroes and heroines, from Rembrandt to Jane Austen to Jefferson to Victor Hugo to Frank Lloyd Wright. -- Etlin says that not since Hegel have intellectuals displayed the hubris they show today, “attributing to themselves the power to arbitrate all meaning.” Their celebration of complexity and ambiguity becomes a form of “boundless egotism.” Poststructuralists are as suckered by the notion that texts are hidden repositories of obscure meanings as previous generations of intellectuals were suckered by the forces of astrology or alchemy. But their feelings of power, freedom, and discovery are illusory. "....Claims about variety, endless or even limited, can never be merely asserted; they must be demonstrated with coherent solutions.” -- Etlin’s brief but incisive treatment of Walter Benjamin’s 1935 essay “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” is quite typical of the provocations of his book, making me wonder why this essay is continuously reproduced, forced on students, and cited in articles. Benjamin’s so-called pathbreaking discourse is wrong on virtually all major counts, as Etlin shows.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  lit_crit  humanism  anti-humanism  19thC  20thC  poststructuralist  postmodern  social_theory  literary_theory  historiography-postWWII  epistemology-history  complexity  diversity  hermeneutics  deconstruction  narrative  aesthetics  mass_culture  Benjamin  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by Peter J. Steinberger - Leslie Paul Thiele, The Heart of Judgment: Practical Wisdom, Neuroscience, and Narrative | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 5, No. 2 (Jun., 2007), pp. 359-360
Ever since Aristotle, phronesis has been impossible to pin down. Steinberger - inevitable that someone would try to use new neuroscience, and if a book like this had to be written, at least Thiele makes a reasonably thoughtful stab at it. Given that faint praise, review sorts through how Thiele uses scientific evidence and speculation to date. He finds it reductionist and the production of the illusion of self via a MacIntyre type story hand wavy. -- didn't download
books  article  jstor  mind  neuroscience  moral_philosophy  emotions  reason-passions  phronesis  practical_reason  practical_knowledge  narrative  self  identity  consciousness  reflection  deliberation  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - Philosophy, Rhetoric, and Power: A Response to Critics [eScholarship] | Rethinking History (2000)
This is Bevir's response to the roundtable of articles on his book, The Logic of the History of Ideas -- Additional Info: This is an electronic version of an article published in Rethinking History© 2000 Copyright Taylor & Francis; Rethinking History is available online at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/13642529.asp -- Keywords:
hermeneutics, intentionality, philosophy, power, rationality, rhetoric
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_history  concepts  historical_change  historiography  narrative  White_Hayden  power  Foucault  intentionality  meaning  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rationality  agency  individualism-methodology  philosophy_of_language  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Francesca Polletta, Pang Ching Bobby Chen, Beth Gharrity Gardner and Alice Motes - The Sociology of Storytelling | JSTOR: Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 37 (2011), pp. 109-130
In contrast to the antistructuralist and antipositivist agenda that has animated the "narrative turn" in the social sciences since the 1980s, a more uniquely sociological approach has studied stories in the interactional, institutional, and political contexts of their telling. Scholars working in this vein have seen narrative as powerful, but as variably so, and they have focused on the ways in which narrative competence is socially organized and unevenly distributed. We show how this approach, or cluster of approaches, rooted variously in conversational analysis, symbolic interactionism, network analysis, and structuralist cultural sociologies, has both responded to problems associated with the narrative turn and shed light on enduring sociological questions such as the bases of institutional authority, how inequalities are maintained and reproduced, why political challengers are sometimes able to win support, and the cultural foundations of self-interest and instrumental rationality. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- paywall
article  jstor  social_theory  narrative  narrative-contested  social_movements  political_culture  media  social_order  socialization  identity  structure  poststructuralist  symbolic_interaction  conversation  networks-social  institutions  memory-group  self-interest-cultural_basis  opposition  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Tilly - Observations of Social Processes and Their Formal Representations | JSTOR: Sociological Theory, Vol. 22, No. 4 (Dec., 2004), pp. 595-602
Distinctions between quantitative and qualitative social science misrepresent the actual choices confronting analysts of observations concerning social processes. Analysts regularly (if not always self-consciously) choose between adopting and avoiding formal representations of social processes. Despite widespread prejudices to the contrary, formalisms are available and helpful for all sorts of social scientific evidence, including those commonly labeled as qualitative. Available formalisms vary in two important regards: (1) from direct to analogical representation of the evidence at hand; and (2) from numerical to topological correspondence between formalism and evidence. Adoption of formalisms facilitates the identification of erroneous arguments, hence the correction of analytic errors and the production of more adequate explanations. -- see bibliography on jstor information page -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  methodology  narrative  statistics  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Christopher Parker - English Historians and the Opposition to Positivism | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 22, No. 2 (May, 1983), pp. 120-145
No settled view on whether English historians were dyed-in-the-wool positivists. Looks like a useful overview of where leading 19thC historians fit in Victorian intellectual milieu. Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography-19thC  British_history  positivism  literary_history  English_lit  narrative  historians-and-politics  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Tim Büthe - Taking Temporality Seriously: Modeling History and the Use of Narratives as Evidence | JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 96, No. 3 (Sep., 2002), pp. 481-493
Social scientists interested in explaining historical processes can, indeed should, refuse the choice between modeling causal relationships and studying history. Identifying temporality as the defining characteristic of processes that can be meaningfully distinguished as "history," I show that modeling such phenomena engenders particular difficulties but is both possible and fruitful. Narratives, as a way of presenting empirical information, have distinctive strengths that make them especially suited for historical scholarship, and structuring the narratives based on the model allows us to treat them as data on which to test the model. At the same time, this use of narratives raises methodological problems not identified in recent debates. I specify these problems, analyze their implications, and suggest ways of solving or minimizing them. There is no inherent incompatibility between-but much potential gain from-modeling history and using historical narratives as data. -- over 100 references and frequently cited -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  causation-social  narrative  methodology  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Roger Chartier - History, Time, and Space | Republics of Letters - Volume 2, Issue 2 (March 2011)
Downloaded pdf to Note - looks like specifically commissioned historiography reflections after "crisis of history" in 1980s and 1990s - very useful Continental view with helpful ftnts - lead article in issue but doesn't deal with the Forum - read and annotated
article  historiography  cultural_history  microhistory  global_history  periodization  geography  circulation-people  nation-state  narrative  rhetoric  fiction  White_Hayden  Foucault  Annales  Ricoeur  human_nature  comparative_anthropology  comparative_history  historical_sociology  historical_change  evidence  verisimilitude  antiquaries  historiography-18thC  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
The Politics of Systems and Environments, Part I -- TOC | JSTOR: Cultural Critique, No. 30, Spring, 1995
(1) Introduction: The Politics of Systems and Environments (pp. 5-13) William Rasch and Cary Wolfe [downloaded pdf to Note] *-- (2) Realism/Anti-Realism: A Debate (pp. 15-32) Adam Muller and Paisley Livingston. *-- (3) In Search of Post-Humanist Theory: The Second-Order Cybernetics of Maturana and Varela (pp. 33-70) Cary Wolfe. *-- (4) Making the Cut: The Interplay of Narrative and System, or What Systems Theory Can't See (pp. 71-100) N. Katherine Hayles. *-- (5) Blinded Me with Science: Motifs of Observation and Temporality in Lacan and Luhmann (pp. 101-136) Jonathan Elmer. *-- (6) Systems Theory According to Niklas Luhmann: Its Environment and Conceptual Strategies (pp. 137-170) Dietrich Schwanitz. *-- (7) Why Does Society Describe Itself as Postmodern? (pp. 171-186) Niklas Luhmann. *-- (8) Response to Luhmann (pp. 187-192) Peter Uwe Hohendahl. *-- (9) Immanent Systems, Transcendental Temptations, and the Limits of Ethics (pp. 193-221) William Rasch. *-- (10) Rethinking the beyond within the Real (Response to Rasch) (pp. 223-234)
Drucilla Cornell
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_philosophy  metaphysics  metaethics  epistemology  ontology-social  philosophy_of_science  moral_psychology  systems_theory  posthumanism  postmodern  cybernetics  information  narrative  Luhmann  pragmatism  time  subject  objectivity  paradox  critical_realism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Gary Saul Morson - Narrativeness | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 34, No. 1 (Winter, 2003), pp. 59-73
Since Descartes trend for subjects of "knowledge" to claim more authoritative explanation if not narrative (including social sciences) -- counter claim that some things require narrative for understanding -- cites to Bakhtin, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  epistemology  humanities  social_theory  social_sciences  scientism  lit_crit  natural_religion  Darwinism  narrative  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Larry Shiner, review essay - Linda Orr, Headless History: 19thC French Historiography of the Revolution | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 32, No. 1 (Feb., 1993), pp. 90-96
Downloaded pdf to Note - development and of extension her 1976 study of Michelet, taking a Hayden White approach - 19thC "invention" of "literature" that put history outside belles lettres
books  reviews  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography  19thC  France  French_Revolution  narrative  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Laurie Nussdorfer, review essay on 2 books dealing with new cultural history - JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 32, No. 1 (Feb., 1993), pp. 74-83
The New Cultural History by Lynn Hunt; Interpretation and Cultural History by Joan H. Pittock; Andrew Wear
Review by: Laurie Nussdorfer -- didn't download paper
books  reviews  jstor  historiography  cultural_history  Foucault  narrative  art_history  gender  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Aeon Timeline - ScribbleCode
Site with support, forum, blog -- trial version (full use for 20 actual days of use) has been downloaded; user manual has been downloaded and placed in EF
Mac  apps  Scrivener  narrative  downloaded  networks 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Donald R. Kelley : What is Happening to the History of Ideas? (1990)
JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 51, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1990), pp. 3-25 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  20thC  postmodern  narrative  historicism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Larry J. Griffin: Narrative, Event-Structure Analysis, and Causal Interpretation in Historical Sociology (1993)
JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 98, No. 5 (Mar., 1993), pp. 1094-1133 -- Recent developments in historical sociology emphasize the centrality of temporality to analysis and explanation. Narrative uses temporal order to organize information about events and to foster their understanding but is insufficiently systematic to substitute for sociological explanation. This article illustrates a new interpretative heuristic for the computer- assisted analysis of qualitative narrative sequences, "event-structure analysis,"that infuses narrative with greater rigor and explicitness. Through the analysis of a lynching that took place in Mississippi in 1930, this article shows how event-structure analysis can be used to build replicable and generalizable causal interpretations of events.
article  jstor  social_theory  historical_sociology  methodology  narrative  quantitative_methods  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Wesley Phoa, Sergio M. Focardi and Frank J. Fabozzi: How Do Conflicting Theories about Financial Markets Coexist?
JSTOR: Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Vol. 29, No. 3 (Spring, 2007), pp. 363-391

There are many conflicting interpretations of security prices and price determination in financial markets. They range from academic theories based on efficient markets and rational expectations hypotheses, to more traditional methods of fundamental analysis, to theories of "value" and "growth" investing, to chart-reading and technical analysis, to notions such as "reflexivity." These interpretations are logically inconsistent with each other, but they seem to coexist, sometimes even on the same trading desk. In this paper, we seek to formulate an explanation for this strange coexistence, using some tools from critical theory to understand how financial markets operate. Structuralism is used to analyze various kinds of narratives appearing in the financial literature, which are intended to have explanatory force, and appearance of sometimes contradictory elements in such narratives; poststructuralism is used to explain the way in which contradictory interpretations coexist. We discuss some practical implications for security valuation, option valuation, trading strategies, market risk management, and volatility estimation.

Downloaded pdf to Note
article  economic_models  financial_system  capital_markets  social_theory  methodology  structuralist  postmodern  narrative  risk  profit  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Interview P Gourevitch: Telling Stories About the Stories We Tell | Boston Review
He really destroys the interviewer's silly postmodern "narrative" in history is "dangerous" tripe
Very interesting comments on post-genocide recovery, cultural memory, and functional accountability in absence of real reconciliation
historiography  narrative  human_rights  postmodern  journalism 
june 2013 by dunnettreader

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