dunnettreader + military_history   59

Blaydes
We document a divergence in the duration of rule for monarchs in Western Europe and the Islamic world beginning in the medieval period. While leadership tenures in the two regions were similar in the 8th century, Christian kings became increasingly long lived compared to Muslim sultans. We argue that forms of executive constraint that emerged under feudal institutions in Western Europe were associated with increased political stability and find empirical support for this argument. While feudal institutions served as the basis for military recruitment by European monarchs, Muslim sultans relied on mamlukism—or the use of military slaves imported from non-Muslim lands. Dependence on mamluk armies limited the bargaining strength of local notables vis-à-vis the sultan, hindering the development of a productively adversarial relationship between ruler and local elites. We argue that Muslim societies' reliance on mamluks, rather than local elites, as the basis for military leadership, may explain why the Glorious Revolution occurred in England, not Egypt. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
governance-participation  Sultans  Islamic_empires  Europe  military_history  medieval_history  political_participation  article  political_history  political_culture  feudalism  militarization-society  Mamluks  bibliography  Europe-Medieval  monarchy  Great_Divergence  governing_class  government-forms  elites-political_influence  downloaded  state-building  jstor 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Karaman
Theoretical work on taxation and state-building borrows heavily from early modern European experience. While a number of European states increased centralized tax revenues during this period, for others revenues stagnated or even declined and these variations have motivated alternative arguments for the determinants of fiscal and state capacity. This study reviews the arguments concerning the three determinants that have received most attention, namely warfare, economic structure, and political regime, and tests them by making use of a new and comprehensive tax revenue dataset. Our main finding is that these three determinants worked in interaction with each other. Specifically, when under pressure of war, it was representative regimes in more urbanized-commercial economies and authoritarian regimes in more rural-agrarian economies that tended to better aggregate domestic interests towards state-building. - Downloaded via iphone
tax_collection  taxes  state-building  nation-state  urban_politics  competition-interstate  political_culture  political_participation  agriculture-surplus  Absolutism  government_finance  fiscal-military_state  agriculture  Europe-Early_Modern  economic_history  article  bibliography  political_sociology  central_government  19thC  financial_instiutions  downloaded  18thC  15thC  urban_elites  military_history  political_economy  17thC  governing_class  constitutional_regime  local_government  fiscal_policy  16thC  government-forms  jstor  Crown_finance  financial_system 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire. (Paperback 2009) - Princeton University Press
Avoiding a standard chronological account of the Byzantine Empire's millennium--long history, she identifies the fundamental questions about Byzantium--what it was, and what special significance it holds for us today. Bringing the latest scholarship to a general audience in accessible prose, Herrin focuses each short chapter around a representative theme, event, monument, or historical figure, and examines it within the full sweep of Byzantine history--from the foundation of Constantinople, the magnificent capital city built by Constantine the Great, to its capture by the Ottoman Turks.

She argues that Byzantium's crucial role as the eastern defender of Christendom against Muslim expansion during the early Middle Ages made Europe--and the modern Western world--possible. Herrin captivates us with her discussions of all facets of Byzantine culture and society. She walks us through the complex ceremonies of the imperial court. She describes the transcendent beauty and power of the church of Hagia Sophia, as well as chariot races, monastic spirituality, diplomacy, and literature. She reveals the fascinating worlds of military usurpers and ascetics, eunuchs and courtesans, and artisans who fashioned the silks, icons, ivories, and mosaics so readily associated with Byzantine art.

An innovative history written by one of our foremost scholars, Byzantium reveals this great civilization's rise to military and cultural supremacy, its spectacular destruction by the Fourth Crusade, and its revival and final conquest in 1453. - no ebook - lots of illustrations - Introduction downloaded to Tab S2
books  downloaded  Byzantium  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  elite_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islam-expansion  architecture  architecture-churches  diplomatic_history  military_history  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Orthodox_Christianity  Crusades  Constantinople  13thC  14thC  15thC  Ottomans  court_culture  courtiers  ritual  art_history  decorative_arts  popular_culture 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Harl - The Barbarian Empires of the Steppes | The Great Courses
36 lectures - list price $320
- the video version is a must in order to follow the names of groups, locations and movements
A few bothered by mispronunciation and a lot of ahs - but most reviewers very enthusiastic - and replaying lectures to get all the info. Counters a few complaints that it's too superficial, or that it pays too much attention to the sedentary civilizations that were affected - the last complaint seems to miss the very purpose of the course.
Byzantium  Eastern_Europe  military_history  Central_Asia  empires  government-forms  medieval_history  military_tactics  Egypt  Persia  ancient_Rome  nomadic_invasions  cultural_history  Ghengis_Khan  trade  video  Eurasia  Roman_Empire  government-revenues  Ottomans  Iraq  Chinese_history  Black_Sea  Islamic_civilization  Atilla_the_Hun  ancient_history  India  Iran  China  late_antiquity  Sufis  Mamluks  cultural_exchange  military_technology  Golden_Horde  Turcic_tribes  Han_China  MENA  religious_history  Mongols  Tamerlane  Caliphate  courses  Buddhism  cultural_transmission  trade-policy  empires-tributary  barbarians  steppes 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Laurent Jalabert - La politique territoriale française sur la rive gauche du Rhin (1679-1697) : des « réunions » à la Province de la Sarre (2011) Revue Historique - Cairn.info
Les entreprises dites de réunion de la monarchie française sous Louis XIV ont concerné les frontières du grand quart nord-est du royaume (Franche-Comté, Alsace, Lorraine). Au-delà de la démonstration de la puissance du roi, l’un des principaux objectifs était de parfaire la sécurisation de ce vaste espace. De fait, les réunions ont mis à mal des terres d’empire avec entre autres la création de la province de la Sarre, peu peuplée mais importante stratégiquement. Au contraire de la province d’Alsace, celle de la Sarre ne franchit pas vraiment le palier de l’intendance militaire ; pourtant, malgré son caractère éphémère, la mise en place de cette nouvelle province a favorisé la réimplantation du catholicisme entre la Sarre et la Queich. -- paywall
17thC  HRE  confessionalization  military_history  religious_history  France  Protestant_International  Louis_XIV  Germany  paywall  Catholics-France  article  religious_wars 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
The place, the time, the artefact, the culture - Yorkshire Ranter - Nov 2015
Andrew Gordon’s The Rules of the Game: Jutland and British Naval Command is pretty special. In essence, this is a deep history of a mentalité, a way of thinking…
Instapaper  books  reviews  19thC  20thC  military_history  naval_history  WWI  strategy  British_foreign_policy  British_Empire  blue_water_strategy  from instapaper
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Sara Eigen Figal - When Brothers Are Enemies: Frederick the Great's Catechism for War (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 21-36 -- This article argues that the rhetoric of "brotherhood" in military writing of the German 18thC offers a nuanced perspective on the intertwined nature of amity and enmity during an era more often associated with calls for "perpetual peace" and a rationalized end of violence. Focusing on a little-known "catechism" for young officers written by Frederick II ("the Great") of Prussia, the essay interrogates the use of Enlightenment rhetoric of brotherhood not only to theorize peace, but also to illuminate questions about the inevitability of war and the possible channeling of hostility to mitigate its destructive force. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  military_history  cultural_history  18thC  Enlightenment  perpetual_peace  violence  civil_wars  société_des_princes  Frederick_the_Great  Germany  Prussia  international_law  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
New Books intetview - Tabetha Ewing, "Rumor, Diplomacy, and War in Enlightenment Paris" (2014)
Tabetha Ewing's Rumor, Diplomacy and War in Enlightenment Paris (Oxford University Studies in the Enlightenment, 2014) is all about the on dit, the word on the street that everyday Parisians might have picked up, and/or spread around town in the 1740s. Focused on rumor during the War of Austrian Succession that lasted from 1740-1748, Ewing's is a book that examines a range of urban voices and opinions across a pivotal decade of the Enlightenment. Taking very seriously the landscapes of gossip and fantasy, Rumor, Diplomacy, and War is intriguing in its subject matter and its methodology. Interested in the circulation of speech and ideas, Ewing tracks a variety of bruits–open and clandestine media, royal efforts to release and police information about matters of state and military conflict, and oral and written forms of communication. All this, with the aim of exploring a distinctively early-modern brand of political participation, and an "inchoate citizenship" that existed in the decades before the French Revolution. Questions of national identity, loyalty to the regime (or not), and political expression/representation were in the air during these years of war and Enlightenment. Ewing's is a book that shows us how much historians can hear if we listen carefully.
books  interview  audio  18thC  French_Enlightenment  French_politics  French_foreign_policy  military_history  political_culture  War_of_Austrian_Succession  public_opinion  diplomatic_history  publishing-clandestine  national_ID  national_interest  legitimacy  1740s  Louis_XV  political_press  political_participation  citizenship  representative_institutions  free_speech  public_sphere 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Remains of soldiers in mass grave show toll of Napoleon’s Russian campaign | The History Blog
Describes the extraordinary work done to analyze the approximately 3,000 people buried in a Vilnius mass grave site -- which armies (French and allied states) and units soldiers were from, what portion were women, how poor their nutrition and other signs of physiological stress, "oxygen" analysis!!! that permits them to locate where individuals were raised -- Italy, Iberian Peninsula, southern France, etc. -- and grain diet (wheat vs other). The post shows the remarkably informative graphic from the 1860s that displays the size of Napoleon's forces on the way to and from Moscow that's truly horrifying in the scale of the ongoing catastrophe.
Pocket  archaeology  Napoleonic_Wars  1812_invasion_of_Russia  information_graphics  French_army  Napoleonic_Empire  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  military_history  i  from pocket
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Barry Allen, "Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition" (Harvard University Press, 2015)
Barry Allen's new book carefully considers the problem of knowledge in a range of Chinese philosophical discourses, creating a stimulating cross-disciplinary dialogue that's as much of a pleasure to read as it will be to teach with. Taking on the work of Confucians, Daoists, military theorists, Chan Buddhists, Neo-Confucian philosophers, and others, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition (Harvard University Press, 2015) looks at the common threads and important differences in the ways that scholars have attempted to conceptualize and articulate what it is to be a knowing being in the world. Some of the major themes that recur throughout the work include the nature of non-action and emptiness, the relationship between knowledge and scholarship, the possibility of Chinese epistemologies and empiricisms, and the importance of artifice. Allen pays special attention to the ways that these scholars relate knowledge to a fluid conception of "things" that can be "completed" or "vanished into" by the knower, and to their understanding of things as parts of a collective economy of human and non-human relationships. The book does an excellent job of maintaining its focus on Chinese texts and contexts while making use of comparative cases from Anglophone and European-language philosophy that brings Chinese scholars into conversation with Nietzsche, Latour, Deleuze and Guattari, Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, and beyond - 1 hour interview
books  interview  audio  intellectual_history  Chinese_philosophy  China  Chinese_history  Asian_philosophy  epistemology  Buddhism  Confucianism  empiricism  epistemology-social  ontology  human_nature  human-non-human_relations  military_theory  military_history  Neo-Confucian  Nietzsche  Deleuze  Aristotle  Machiavelli  Plato  Latour  consciousness  perception 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Daniel McCarthy - Why Liberalism Means Empire | Lead essay / TAC Summer 2014
Outstanding case made for "consrrvative" realist IR position of off-shore balancing - not really "conservative" but he needs to give it that spin for his aufience buy-in -- takes on not just the militarists, neicons and librral intrrventionists but thr "non-liberal" sbtu-interventionists like Kennan and Buchanan - he leaves out the corrosive, anti-liberal democracy effects of globalized, financial capitalism that undermines the narrative of gradualist liberal democratization and achievements in OECD rconomies - as Zingales putscit "save capitalism from the capitalists" beeds to be included with the hegemon's responsibilities along with off-shore balancing - dimensions of power beyond military, which Dan does stress in his sketch of ehy Britain could meet the military challenges until WWI
Pocket  18thc  19thc  20thc  anti-imperialism  balance-of-power  british_empire  british_history  british_politics  civil_rights  cold_war  competition-interstate  cultural_transmission  democracy  empires  entre_deux_guerres  europe  foreign_policy  french_revolution  geopolitics  germany  global  governance  globalization  great_powers  hegemony  hong_kong  human_rights  ideology  imperialism  international_system  ir  ir-history  iraq  japan  liberalism  military-industrial  military_history  napoleon  napoleonic  wars  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  naval_history  neocons  neoliberalism  peace  pinboard  political_culture  politics-and-history  post-wwii  power  rule_of_law  social_science  trade  us  history  us_foreign_policy  us_military  us_politics  uses_of_history  warfare  world  wwi  wwii 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jean-Pierre Bois - Le concert des Nations au XIXe siècle sous le regard d'un historien moderniste (lecture audio) | Canal Académie (2013)
L’objectif de la guerre est de faire la paix rappelle Jean-Pierre Bois, professeur émérite d’histoire moderne. Loin d’une histoire des différents congrès diplomatiques qui ont ponctué le XIXe siècle, l’historien propose de situer ce qu’on appelle "Le concert des nations", expression passée dans le langage courant au XIXe siècle dans un champ historique plus large. -- L’Académie des sciences morales et politiques, à l’initiative de l’académicien Jean Baechler, a organisé un colloque international sur le Thème de la Guerre et de la société. Une vingtaine de participants se sont réunis autour du thème spécifique, cette année, de « la Guerre et de la politique », le premier volet d’une démarche scientifique interdisciplinaire qui durera trois ans.-- la retransmission de la communication de Jean-Pierre Bois, Professeur à l’Université de Nantes..--Jean-Pierre Bois est professeur émérite d'histoire moderne du Centre de Recherches en Histoire Internationale Atlantique (CRHIA. Il a reçu en 2012 le prix Drouyn de Lhuys pour son ouvrage La Paix, histoire politique et militaire.
audio  lecture  19thC  Concert_of_Europe  balance_of_power  IR  IR_theory  military_history  diplomatic_history  diplomacy  IR-domestic_politics  international_system  geopolitics  Great_Powers 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Hoffman, P.T.: Why Did Europe Conquer the World? (eBook and Hardcover).
Between 1492 and 1914, Europeans conquered 84% of the globe. But why did Europe rise to the top, when for centuries the Chinese, Japanese, Ottomans, and South Asians were far more advanced? Why didn’t these powers establish global dominance? ...distinguished economic historian Hoffman demonstrates that conventional explanations— eg geography, epidemic disease, and the Industrial Revolution—fail to provide answers. Arguing instead for the pivotal role of economic and political history, Hoffman shows that if variables had been at all different, Europe would not have achieved critical military innovations, and another power could have become master of the world. In vivid detail, he sheds light on the two millennia of economic, political, and historical changes that set European states on a distinctive path of development and military rivalry. Compared to their counterparts in China, Japan, South Asia, and the Middle East, European leaders—whether chiefs, lords, kings, emperors, or prime ministers—had radically different incentives, which drove them to make war. These incentives, which Hoffman explores using an economic model of political costs and financial resources, resulted in astonishingly rapid growth in Europe’s military sector from the Middle Ages on, and produced an insurmountable lead in gunpowder technology. The consequences determined which states established colonial empires or ran the slave trade, and even which economies were the first to industrialize. -- Professor of Business Economics and professor of history at CalTech. His books include Growth in a Traditional Society (PUP), Surviving Large Losses, and Priceless Markets. -- ebook and pbk not yet released --text 200 pgs, data, mideks in appendices ~35 pgs -- downloaded 1st chapter excerpt
books  kindle-available  Great_Divergence  economic_history  political_history  political_culture  military_history  technology  gunpowder  colonialism  imperialism  Europe  Europe-exceptionalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  incentives  wars-causes  war  Innovation  technology-adoption  historical_sociology  historical_change  balance_of_power  path-dependency  Tilly  Mann_Michael  state-building  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
The Legacy of the U.S. Civil War: 150 Years Later - roundtable with historians | Cambridge University Press Blog - April 2015
Participants: Kathleen M. Hilliard  is the author of Masters, Slaves, and Exchange .  She is Assistant Professor in the Department of History at Iowa State… Quite interesting, both for their insights and for how the historiography of the US in the 19thC has changed -- not simply looking at social groups (both as actors and victims) who had been ignored, but that historiographical shifts in specialties (e.g. military history, or the connections between legal and political history) have changed or broadened the focus when it comes to the Civil War. Lots of links to CUP books as well as (unlinked) other books and papers. S
US_history  19thC  US_Civil_War  historiography-postWWII  historiography  military_history  social_history  cultural_history  digital_humanities  global_history  global_system  diplomatic_history  legal_history  constitutional_law  US_constitution  Congress  Lincoln  Confederacy  slavery  abolition  African-Americans  Native_Americans  Manifest_Destiny  frontier  industrialization  books  kindle-available  US_society  US_politics  US_government  US_legal_system  bibliography  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Bogart - "There Can Be No Partnership with the King": Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England's East Indian Merchant Empire | via Brad DeLong - Equitablog
Dan Bogart, Department of Economics, UC Irvine - : “There Can Be No Partnership with the King”: Regulatory Commitment and the Tortured Rise of England’s East Indian Merchant Empire: “The English East India Company helped build Britain’s colonial empire, but the Company was not a leader in East Asian trade for nearly a century after its founding in 1600. This paper argues that its early performance was hindered by a problem of regulatory commitment. It gives a brief history of the torturous renegotiations over its monopoly trading privileges and the fiscal demands by the monarchy. It also analyzes the effects of political instability, warfare, and fiscal capacity on the Company’s investment in shipping tonnage. Regressions show the growth of shipping tonnage declined significantly when there were changes in government ministers, when Britain was at war in Europe and North America, and when shipping capacity exceeded central government tax revenues. The findings point to the significance of regulatory institutions in Britain’s development and its links with politics and war. They also provide an important case where regulatory uncertainty lowers investment.” paper dated Jan 2015 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  downloaded  economic_history  British_history  British_Empire  fiscal-military_state  state-building  UK_government-colonies  East_India_Company  trade-policy  trading_companies  trading_privileges  monopolies  British_Navy  17thC  institutional_capacity  regulation  monarchy-proprietary  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  taxes  political_culture  shipping  merchants  interlopers  military_history  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Glorious_Revolution  Nine_Years_War  War_of_Spanish_Succession  investment  uncertainty-regulation  uncertainty-political  British_politics  Restoration  colonialism  parties  faction  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Kelley Vlahos - A Blackwater World Order | The American Conservative - Feb 2015
...a recent examination by Sean McFate, a former Army paratrooper who later served in Africa working for Dyncorp International and is now an associate professor at the National Defense University, suggests that the Pentagon’s dependence on contractors to help wage its wars has unleashed a new era of warfare in which a multitude of freshly founded private military companies are meeting the demand of an exploding global market for conflict. “Now that the United States has opened the Pandora’s Box of mercenarianism,” McFate writes in The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What they Mean for World Order, “private warriors of all stripes are coming out of the shadows to engage in for-profit warfare.” It is a menacing thought. McFate said this coincides with what he and others have called a current shift from global dominance by nation-state power to a “polycentric” environment in which state authority competes with transnational corporations, global governing bodies, non-governmental organizations (NGO’s), regional and ethnic interests, and terror organizations in the chess game of international relations. New access to professional private arms, McFate further argues, has cut into the traditional states’ monopoly on force, and hastened the dawn of this new era. McFate calls it neomedievalism, the “non-state-centric and multipolar world order characterized by overlapping authorities and allegiances.” States will not disappear, “but they will matter less than they did a century ago.” - copied to Pocket
books  global_system  global_governance  IR  IR_theory  military_history  Europe-Early_Modern  nation-state  transnational_elites  privatization  MNCs  NGOs  civil_wars  international_system  international_law  mercenaries  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Pentagon  Afghanistan  warfare-irregular  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  Pocket 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Maria Fusaro - Political Economies of Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean: The Decline of Venice and the Rise of England 1450–1700 (to be released April 2015) | Cambridge University Press
Maria Fusaro presents a new perspective on the onset of Venetian decline. Examining the significant commercial relationship between England and Venice in the period 1450–1700, Fusaro demonstrates how Venice's social, political and economic circumstances shaped the English mercantile community in unique ways. By focusing on the commercial interaction between them, she also re-establishes the analysis of the maritime political economy as an essential constituent of the Venetian state political economy. This challenging interpretation of some classic issues of early modern history will be of profound interest to economic, social and legal historians and provides a stimulating addition to current debates in imperial history, especially on the economic relationship between different empires and the socio-economic interaction between 'rulers and ruled'. **--* "For the first time Maria Fusaro gives us the English among the creeks and islands of the Venetian empire, as seen by the Venetians themselves. Using archives hitherto little-known or wholly unknown, she paints a lively picture of Anglo-Venetian commerce, diplomacy and war." Nicholas Rodger, University of Oxford **--** Introduction: political economies of empire *-* 1. The medieval background *-* 2. The reversal of the balance *-* 3. The Ottoman Levant *-* 4. Genoa, Venice and Livorno (a tale of three cities) *-* 5. Trade, violence and diplomacy *-* 6. Diplomacy, trade and religion *-* 7. The Venetian peculiarities *-* 8. The English mercantile community in Venice *-* 9. The English and other mercantile communities *-* 10. The goods of the trade *-* 11. Empires and governance in the Mediterranean *-* 12. Coda and conclusions -- marketing materials not yet available for download
books  find  political_economy  economic_history  political_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Mediterranean  Venice  Italy  city_states  Genoa  Livorno  British_history  mercantilism  trade  trading_companies  empires  Ottomans  Ottoman_Empire  maritime_history  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  commerce  privileges-corporate  trading_privileges  religion-and-economics  trade_finance  trade-cultural_transmission  governance-regional  maritime_law  commercial_law  commercial_interest  foreigners-resident  wars-causes  military_history  competition-interstate  mercantilism-violence  trade-policy_enforcement  naval_history  shipping  weaponry 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Harding, review essay - History of the Royal Navy [1st 3 volumes in series] | Reviews in History - Jan 2015
(1) Duncan Redford, Philip D. Grove, The Royal Navy : A History since 1900 -- (2) Duncan Redford, A History of the Royal Navy : World War II -- (3) Martin Robson, A History of the Royal Navy : The Napoleonic War -- Reviewer:
Dr Richard Harding, University of Westminister -- ... the first titles in an ambitious new series from I.B.Tauris... in association with the National Museum of the Royal Navy (..) is to throw ‘new light on almost every aspect of Britain’s Royal Navy’ from 1660 to the present day. (1) A History since 1900 ... it is clear that the authors have got a job to do. They have to bring readers, who almost certainly have a firm idea of what they think is significant in the Royal Navy’s past, through more than 100 years of history, present those readers with relatively new research, ... and challenge some of their cherished assumptions. (..) The main point emphasised by the authors is that sea power is not generally understood by the public (and even by planners, for that matter). Its operations are usually out of the public gaze. (..) the authors’ set out to show how sea power worked across the century; how it has been a vital, flexible element in Britain’s defence as diplomatic and military challenges changed; and how it remains essential today. (3) Robson’s narrative is the story of how [British naval dominance which cost the French dearly] was achieved at a tactical and strategic level. The work is divided into two – before 1805 which is characterised as the struggle for sea control, and after the Trafalgar campaign, which Robson describes as the period of exploitation of sea domination. It is a distinction that works better than alternatives (Peace of Amiens in 1802 or the coronation of Napoleon in 1804). The emphasis is, unsurprisingly, on the first period, in which the battles and the expeditions are more dramatic and frequent. (..) [These volumes] are welcome as an important balance to military and diplomatic histories that have ignored the sea and naval power, or which have not kept up to date with the great flowering of naval history that has taken place in the last 40 years. (..) there remains the danger that unless this idea of sea power is embedded into the broader fabric of British social and diplomatic concerns, the message with the authors wish to convey (..) will be overshadowed by the Royal Navy as a tradition and an institution. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  military_history  maritime_history  diplomatic_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_Navy  British_Empire-military  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  WWI  WWII  blue_water_strategy  downloaded 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Esdaile, Napoleon Review Article | Reviews in History - Jan 2015
Books reviewed -- * (1) * Michael Broers, Napoleon: Soldier of Destiny, London, Faber & Faber, 2014, ISBN: 9780571273430; 400pp. * (2) * Philip Dwyer, Citizen Emperor: Napoleon in Power, 1799-1815, London, Bloomsbury Academic, 2013, ISBN: 9780747578086; 816pp. * (3) * Alan Forrest, Napoleon, London, Quercus, 2011, ISBN: 9781849164108; 352pp * (4) * Munro Price, Napoleon: the End of Glory, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2014, ISBN: 9780199934676; 344pp. * (5) * Michael J. Hughes, Forging Napoleon’s Grande Armée: Motivation, Military Culture and Masculinity in the French Army, 1800-1808, New York, NY, New York University Press, 2012, ISBN: 9780814737484; 296pp. -- Reviewer: Professor Charles Esdaile, University of Liverpool -- Citation: Professor Charles Esdaile, review of Napoleon Review Article, (review no. 1707), DOI: 10.14296/RiH/2014/1707 -- as of Jan 18, Hughes had said Thanks, no further response, and Dwyer has written a considerable response not re any criticism of his own work but on some historiographical issues raised by Esdaile - Dwyer response in a open-close button box, so unfortunately doesn't work in either "print" or "download as pdf" -- review downloaded as pdf to Note
books  reviews  biography  Napoleon  18thC  19thC  France  military_history  political_history  cultural_history  Napoleonic_Wars  French_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Joseph Dragovich - A Comparison Of Republican Roman and Han Chinese Barbarian Relations (2009 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2009 -- posted on History of the Ancient World website -- Abstract: Throughout the course of human history, the interaction and conflict between civilization and barbarism, whether real or perceived, has existed in historical memory. The conflict, which spans continents and centuries, can be found in the historical writings of many sedentary civilizations, who felt a need to differentiate between “Us” and “Them.” In fact, many early civilizations defined themselves in the presence of groups which they considered barbarous.The project looks at two civilizations which had such interactions. Late Republican Rome and Han China are well known for their conflicts with peripheral groups. This thesis compares how these two empires conquered and assimilated these barbarian groups, namely the Roman conquest of Gaul and the Chinese conquest of the Xiongnu, a nomadic people that inhabited modern day Mongolia. Despite these two empires separation by time and geography, their methods of conquest were very similar. Where they differed was in their assimilation of conquered peoples, a difference which stems from the way the two civilizations defined themselves.By comparing these events in history, we can gain an insight into the topic which can not be achieved by studying each civilization individually. The interface of disparate cultures is at the heart of many modern issues, from immigration to the war on terror. By studying these past events, it can be seen that this aspect of the human experience not only transcends East and West but also the centuries that separate us from the ancient world. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Han_China  Chinese_history  barbarians  center-periphery  conquest  national_ID  military_history  militarization-society  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Philippe Genet - La genèse de l'État moderne: Culture et société politique en Angleterre (2003) | Livres -- Amazon.fr
La genèse de l'État moderne est le fruit d'une lente évolution à partir de la seconde moitié du XIIIe siècle, qui a d'abord affecté les monarchies féodales d'Occident : il y a quelques années, elle a fait l'objet d'études systématiques de nombreux historiens en Europe, grâce au CNRS et à la Fondation européenne de la Science. Le présent ouvrage est une étude de cas, consacrée à l'Angleterre, à bien des égards la plus précoce et la plus cohérente des constructions politiques médiévales qui, paradoxalement, est peu étudiée par les historiens français. On y retrouve le primat de la guerre et de la fiscalité dans la dynamique de la genèse de l'État moderne, ainsi que la mise en place d'un système judiciaire garantissant la reproduction de la classe dominante dans des conditions satisfaisantes. Mais l'ouvrage permet surtout de relever et d'articuler la corrélation entre le développement et la vitalité de la société politique, dont l'existence est une condition sine qua non pour l'État moderne, et la mutation de la culture et du système de communication médiéval, tant au niveau des médias et de la langue qu'à celui des types de textes produits. Par l'analyse de plus de 2200 bio-bibliographies d'" auteurs " actifs dans les domaines de l'histoire et du politique, et au moyen d'une théorie des champs de production textuelle, se dégage ce qu'a été l'idéologie spécifique du féodalisme d'État. Alors naissent progressivement les catégories modernes du politique, ainsi que la notion d'une société politique " nationale " -- Recommended in Penguin history of England bibliographies
books  amazon.fr  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  13thC  14thC  15thC  nation-state  national_ID  political_culture  feudalism  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  judiciary  historiography  political_sociology  military_history  state-building  political_economy  elites  elite_culture  monarchy  taxes  fiscal-military_state  nobility 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack Goldstone - What is ISIS? | NewPopulationBomb - August 13, 2014
The Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) has emerged as the most terrifying and brutal of extreme jihadist groups (and that is against tough competition, such as Boko Haram in Nigeria and Al-Shabaab in Somalia). Why have such extreme Islamist groups emerged in so many places in recent years? Odd as this may sound, it is not because of the appeal of extreme Islam itself. A study of fighters in Syria by Mironova, Mrie, and Whitt found that most fighters join ISIS and similar groups because (1) they want vengeance against the Assad regime and (2) they found from experience that the Islamist groups take the best care of their fighters — caring for the wounded, supporting them in battle. In situations of social breakdown — which are generally NOT caused by the Islamist groups themselves, but by problems of finances, elite divisions, and popular unrest due to oppressive or arbitrary actions by the state – extremists tend to have major advantages. This has always been the case throughout the history of revolutions: moderates are usually outflanked and outmaneuvered and out-recruited by radicals; so much so that the triumph of radicals over moderates is a staple of academic work on the trajectory of revolutions, from Crane Brinton to my own.
historical_sociology  revolutions  radicals  Iraq  Syria  MENA  Islamist_fundamentalists  US_foreign_policy  global_governance  NATO  military  military_history  alliances  Thirty_Years_War  terrorism  GWOT 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Niccolo Machiavelli, The Historical, Political, and Diplomatic Writings of Niccolo Machiavelli, Vol. 1. (Life of Machiavelli, History of Florence), tr. from the Italian, by Christian E. Detmold (Boston, J. R. Osgood and company, 1882). - Online Library of
<http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/774> - Volume 1 of a 4 volume set of Machiavelli’s writings which contains a lengthy introduction on the life of Machiavelli, the History of Florence, The Prince, Discourses on Livy, and his letters and papers from his time as a diplomat. This volume contains his famous History of Florence. - life and historical context based especially on 19thC Italian historiography -- downloaded kindle version of html
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  downloaded  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-19thC  Machiavelli  Italy  Florence  Italian_Wars  Papacy  France  Louis_XI  nation-state  state-building  military_history  militia  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  mercenaires  diplomatic_history  IR_theory  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Encyclopedia of the Early Modern World, by the Gale Group, Inc. | Answers.com
The history of Europe from the mid-15th century until the French Revolution. Includes notable events such as wars and revolutions as well as broader processes like the Renaissance and the Enlightenment; biographical information on leading figures; individual national histories; and meaningful developments in the arts, religion, politics, exploration and warfare.
books  etexts  reference  Europe-Early_Modern  Renaissance  exploration  colonialism  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  France  Germany  Italy  Spain  Spanish_Empire  British_Empire  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  Reformation  Counter-Reformation  Netherlands  Holy_Roman_Empire  Austria  Denmark  Sweden  Russia  Poland  Ottomans  commerce  intellectual_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Absolutism  Thirty_Years_War  Wars_of_Religion  Louis_XIV  military_history  political_culture  political_history  politics-and-religion  art_history  religious_history 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Oxford Dictionary of British History, edited by John Cannon | Answers.com
A Dictionary of British History, edited by John Cannon, Oxford University Press
This reference work is the ultimate source for the history of Britain from 55 BCE to the present. There is a wealth of information on the people, events and institutions that have defined the political, economic, military, social and cultural life of Britain.
books  etexts  reference  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire-military  military_history  economic_history  social_history  cultural_history 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Oxford Companion to Military History, ed. Richard Holmes: | Answers.com
The Oxford Companion to Military History, edited by Richard Holmes, Oxford University Press -- A complete overview of military history from classical times to the present, The Oxford Companion to Military History is an essential guide to how the world has been shaped by conflict. Entries on key topics such as intelligence, propaganda, peacekeeping and women in the military, are included, with over 70 maps showing the course of famous battles and campaigns.
books  etexts  military_history  military  war  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  propaganda  maritime_history  IR 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
ANDERS INGRAM -- THE OTTOMAN SIEGE OF VIENNA, ENGLISH BALLADS, AND THE EXCLUSION CRISIS (2014).| The Historical Journal, 57, pp 53-80.- Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
ANDERS INGRAM - National University of Ireland, Galway --The second Ottoman siege of Vienna (1683) generated a higher volume of English writing than any other seventeenth-century event involving the Ottomans. This article focuses upon ballads written in the immediate aftermath of the siege and relates them to the concurrent English political context of the Tory reaction to the exclusion crisis. Situating these ballads within the publication milieu of pamphlet news and political polemic, it examines the figures who produced them and the audiences they were aimed at. Following from this, it shows how the use of commonplace images and associations with the ‘Turk’ as a recurring figure in early modern writing allowed these ballads to find, or depict, synchronicities between the events of the siege of Vienna, and the English political scene. -* I am grateful to Daniel Carey and Christine Woodhead for their help and comments at various stages.
article  paywall  find17thC  British_history  British_politics  political_culture  Exclusion_Crisis  Tories  Ottomans  Austria  Holy_Roman_Empire  military_history  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  despotism  popular_politics  popular_culture  political_press  ballads  pamphlets  newspapers  1680s  Charles_II  Whigs  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
MARK HEWITSON - ON WAR AND PEACE: GERMAN CONCEPTIONS OF CONFLICT, 1792–1815 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 447-483 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
MARK HEWITSON - University College London -- This article re-examines some of the principal portrayals of military conflict in academic treatises and works of art, arguing that the changing visions of war and peace which they presented were indicative of a wider acceptance within critical sections of the various public spheres of the German lands. The majority of recent studies, which have sought to debunk the myth of national ‘wars of liberation’, have tended to overlook the reasons for and ramifications of such shifts. This study shows how contemporary commentators, faced with an unending series of revolutionary and Napoleonic campaigns, gave up any hope of a perpetual peace and accepted, however reluctantly, the necessity of military conflict. Writers', artists', academics', and other publicists' failure to acknowledge the actual conditions of revolutionary and Napoleonic warfare, despite evidence that the nature of combat had altered, meant that conflicts could be viewed as patriotic, heroic, and defensive struggles, which served to simplify the divided loyalties and complicated diplomacy of the Napoleonic era.
article  paywall  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Germany  Napoleonic_Wars  revolutions  military_history  diplomatic_history  patriotism  nationalism  German_lit  German_Idealism  Romanticism  art_history  political_press  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Emer de Vattel, The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays on the Origin and Nature of Natural Law and on Luxury ed. Béla Kapossy and Richard Whitmore - O
Emer de Vattel, The Law of Nations, Or, Principles of the Law of Nature, Applied to the Conduct and Affairs of Nations and Sovereigns, with Three Early Essays on the Origin and Nature of Natural Law and on Luxury, edited and with an Introduction by Béla Kapossy and Richard Whitmore (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2246> -- A republication of the 1797 translation of Vattel’s work, along with new English translations of 3 early essays. -- The 1st French edition was 1758, the 2nd 1773..The 1797 translation is of the 1773 edition and posthumous notes Vattel intended for a revised edition. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  international_law  natural_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  IR_theory  political_economy  international_political_economy  mercantilism  commerce  military_history  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  sovereignty  nation-state  raison-d'-état  balance_of_power  government-forms  luxury  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Franz-Stephan Grady - Meet the Elusive Man Responsible for Today’s Middle East Mayhem | The National Interest - June 2014
In the spring of 1915, bogged down British and French forces were desperately battling the Ottoman army on the Gallipoli peninsula trying to force the Dardanelles and occupy Istanbul. Amid the fighting, a 25-year-old Turkish officer, Lieutenant Muhammad Sharif Al-Faruqi, deserted to the British side on August 20, 1915. Trying to save his own skin and apparently determined to play a role in shaping the postwar future of the Middle-East, Al-Faruqi provided British intelligence with a host of assertions about himself and the Arab tribes under Ottoman suzerainty, which later turned out to be either wild exaggerations or plain lies. British intelligence, however, took Al-Faruqi’s statements at face value, which led the British to promise a great deal to the Arabs in exchange for revolting against the Turks. This in turn directly influenced the negotiations over the notorious Sykes-Picot agreement that in many ways has been at the root of much of the political upheaval in the Middle East ever since. Thus, Lieutenant Muhammad Sharif Al-Faruqi may very well be one of the greatest imposters in the history of international relations.
20thC  IR  political_history  military_history  spying  British_history  British_Empire  France  imperialism  Great_Powers  MENA  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  diplomatic_history  ethnic_conflict  sectarianism  Ottomans  Turkey  Iraq  Islamic_civilization  Shiites  Sunnis  Saudia_Arabia  Jordan  Israel  Great_Game  British_Empire-military  British_foreign_policy 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Tiegs, review - Derek Croxton. Westphalia: The Last Christian Peace (2013) | H-Net Reviews
The work is divided into three sections covering the background, negotiations, and conclusions. The background section is the largest - its fifth chapter, “Structures,” is undoubtedly the highlight of the work. Croxton superbly places the negotiations in their baroque setting, showing how issues of precedence, prestige, gift giving, and logistics all affected the talks. The second section, covering the negotiations - In addition to attempting to resolve contentious religious issues, they also wrangled over the representation of imperial estates at the congress, territorial compensation, the independence of the United Provinces, and arrears for the Swedish soldiers. ...it was nearly impossible to settle any issue independently, and negotiations became a matter of brinksmanship. In the final section on consequences, Croxton takes aim at perceived errors in the historiography. ..he wants to place the focus back on the religious dimensions of negotiations, as the opening lines of the treaty clearly stated, “Let there be a Christian peace”. He believes that the notion of Westphalia as the foundation of modern diplomacy between independent sovereign states is erroneous. Alsace again provides a good example, as he points to the fact that the negotiations led to the curious situation where it was part of both the French crown and the empire. As this case makes clear, internal and external issues were not clear cut post-1648, thus European states were not independent and discrete sovereign units. In fact, he goes on to argue that Westphalia probably had the opposite effect, specifically “the continuation of the idea of mutual interference of states in each other’s internal affairs”.
books  reviews  17thC  diplomatic_history  military_history  religious_history  IR_theory  IR  nation-state  Westphalia  Thirty_Years_War  religious_wars  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Sweden  Spain  Germany  Austria  Habsburgs  Dutch_Revolt  Dutch  state-building  balance_of_power  Great_Powers  sovereignty  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
The story of D-Day, in five maps - Vox
Including animations of advances and other fronts
military_history  WWII  maps 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Clarissa Campbell Orr, historiographical review - New Perspectives on Hanoverian Britain | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Jun., 2009), pp. 513-529
Reviewed work: War, State and Society in Mid-Eighteenth-Century Britain and Ireland by Stephen Conway; Georgian Monarchy: Politics and Culture, 1714-1760 by Hannah Smith; Britain, Hanover and the Protestant Interest, 1688-1756 by Andrew C. Thompson; Hanover and the British Empire, 1700-1837 by Nick Harding -- paywall Cambridge journals -- quite long and looks very useful
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  paywall  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  British_foreign_policy  Britain-Continent  Hanover-Britain_relations  Hanoverian_Succession  George_I  George_II  George_III  limited_monarchy  Absolutism  monarchy  diplomatic_history  court_culture  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  political_culture  popular_politics  religious_culture  Whigs-oligarchy  Protestant_International  nationalism  national_ID  military_history  British_Empire  British_Army  British_Navy  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  Anglo-French  Anglo-Dutch  Holy_Roman_Empire  Austria  Prussia 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul E. J. Hammer - Shakespeare's Richard II, the Play of 7 February 1601, and the Essex Rising | JSTOR: Shakespeare Quarterly, Vol. 59, No. 1 (Spring, 2008), pp. 1-35
He's published books on Essex and late Elizabethan politics - not a literary histirian. Extensive bibliography on late Elizabethan politics, the difficulties in Ireland, and factions of courtiers and counselors, not only re administration, public financial difficulties, and the succession, but foreign policy, especially re Spain. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  16thC  17thC  1590s  1600s  Elizabeth  British_history  British_politics  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  military_history  courtiers  court_culture  counselors  public_finance  public_disorder  conspiracy  treason  torture  faction  Bolingbroke-family  British_foreign_policy  Anglo-Spanish  Shakespeare  political_culture  nobility  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Linch and Matthew McCormack, eds - Britain’s Soldiers: Rethinking War and Society, 1715–1815 | Liverpool University Press
The British soldier was a fascinating and complex figure in the century between the Hanoverian accession and the Battle of Waterloo. The ‘war and society’ approach has shed much light on Britain’s frequent experience of conflict in this period, but Britain’s Soldiers argues that it is time to refocus our attention on the humble redcoat himself, and rethink historical approaches to soldiers’ relationship with the society and culture of their day. Using approaches drawn from the histories of the military, gender, art, society, culture and medicine, this volume presents a more rounded picture of the men who served in the various branches of the British armed forces. This period witnessed an unprecedented level of mass mobilisation, yet this was largely achieved through novel forms of military service outside of the regular army. Taking a wide definition of soldiering, this collection examines the part-time and auxiliary forces of the period, as well as looking at the men of the British Army both during their service and once they had been discharged from the army. Chapters here explore the national identity of the soldier, his sense of his rights within systems of military discipline, and his relationships with military hierarchies and honour codes. They also explore the welfare systems available to old and wounded soldiers, and the ways in which soldiers were represented in art and literature. In so doing, this book sheds new light on the processes through which soldiers were ‘made’ during this crucial period of conflict
books  18thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_Army  British_foreign_policy  militia  military_history  fiscal-military_state  cultural_history  social_history  Seven_Years_War  American_Revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  British_Empire-military  working_class  medicine 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Hugh Dunthorne - Britain and the Dutch Revolt 1560-1700 (2013) :: Cambridge University Press
Hardback and ebook - not yet pbk -- England's response to the Revolt of the Netherlands (1568–1648) has been studied hitherto mainly in terms of government policy, yet the Dutch struggle with Habsburg Spain affected a much wider community than just the English political elite. It attracted attention across Britain and drew not just statesmen and diplomats but also soldiers, merchants, religious refugees, journalists, travellers and students into the conflict. Hugh Dunthorne draws on pamphlet literature to reveal how British contemporaries viewed the progress of their near neighbours' rebellion, and assesses the lasting impact which the Revolt and the rise of the Dutch Republic had on Britain's domestic history. The book explores affinities between the Dutch Revolt and the British civil wars of the seventeenth century - the first major challenges to royal authority in modern times - showing how much Britain's changing commercial, religious and political culture owed to the country's involvement with events across the North Sea. --

** Reveals the wide-ranging impact of the Dutch Revolt on Britain's political, religious and commercial culture
** Connects the Dutch Revolt and Britain's seventeenth-century civil wars
** Places early modern Dutch and British history in international context
books  find  kindle-available  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  British_Navy  Dutch  Spain  Dutch_Revolt  Thirty_Years_War  Protestant_International  English_Civil_War  diplomatic_history  military_history  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Restoration  economic_culture  political_culture  religious_culture  Calvinist  Absolutism  public_opinion  political_participation  political_press  politics-and-religion  William_III  Glorious_Revolution  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  exiles  pamphlets  travel  Europe-Early_Modern  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Ryan Balot - Polybius' Advice to the Imperial Republic | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 4 (August 2010), pp. 483-509
Polybius' Histories, written in the mid—second century BC, offers an authoritative account of Rome's rise to uncontested imperial supremacy. The work has been highly influential among political thinkers because of its theory of the "mixed constitution." This essay proposes to return Polybius' mixed constitution to its proper location within the narrative of the Histories. This interpretative approach enables us to appreciate Polybius' frequently neglected emphasis on the connections between republican politics and Roman imperial power. These connections shed light on recent developments in republican political theory. They also lead to an investigation of the didactic purposes of the author, who intended to educate the Roman aristocracy in the virtues necessary for exercising hegemonic power successfully in the ancient Mediterranean world. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  ancient_Greece  Roman_Republic  imperialism  Polybius  mixed_government  military_history  Mediterranean  hegemony  republicanism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Frank O'Gorman, review essay - Approaches to Hanoverian Society JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 39, No. 2 (Jun., 1996), pp. 521-534
(1) Philanthropy and Police: London Charity in the Eighteenth Century by Donna T. Andrew; *--* (2) The Language of Liberty: Political Discourse and Social Dynamics in the Anglo-American World by J. C. D. Clark; *--* (3) Stilling the Grumbling Hive. The Response to Social and Economic Problems in England, 1689-1750 by L. Davison; *--* (4) Riot, Risings and Revolution. Governance and Violence in Eighteenth- Century England by Ian Gilmour; *--* (5) A Patriot Press. National Politics and the London Press in the 1740s by Robert Harris; *--* (6) Judging New Wealth. Popular Publishing and Responses to Commerce in England, 1750-1850 by James Raven; *--* (7)The Local Origins of Modern Society. Gloucestershire 1500-1800 by David Rollison; *--* (8) An Imperial State at War: Britain from 1689 to 1815 by Lawrence Stone; *--* (9) Protest and Survival: The Historical Experience. Essays for E. P. Thompson by John Rule; Robert Malcolmson -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  bookshelf  article  jstor  political_history  cultural_history  political_culture  social_history  political_economy  17thC18thC  19thC  British_politics  British_Empire  UK_economy  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  British_foreign_policy  military_history  political_press  class_conflict  local_government  political_philosophy  charity  crime  violence  riots  lower_orders  mercantilism  luxury  status  nouveaux_riches  governing_class  governmentality  fiscal-military_state  popular_culture  popular_politics  populism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles W. J. Withers and Robert J. Mayhew - Rethinking 'Disciplinary' History: Geography in British Universities, c.1580-1887 | JSTOR: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, New Series, Vol. 27, No. 1 (2002), pp. 11-29
Downloaded pdf to Note -- Against a background of recent work in the history of geography and of geographical knowledge, the paper considers evidence for the place of geography within British universities before the formal establishment of the first departments of geography. Attention is paid to geography's discursive connections with other subjects within given university curricula, and to the values placed upon its teaching by contemporaries. The paper argues that extant historiographies for British geography should be revised in the light of such evidence. More importantly, the paper raises questions about the sites and intellectual spaces in which geography has been situated and about the content, nature and purpose of writing geography's 'disciplinary' history.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  colonialism  exploration  public_sphere  university  history_of_science  geography  sociology_of_knowledge  education  Royal_Society  military_history  maps  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Chase: Firearms: A Global History to 1700: 9780521722407: Amazon.com: Books
Kenneth Chase traces the history of firearms from their invention in China in the 1100s to the 1700s, when European firearms had become clearly superior. In Firearms, Chase asks why it was the Europeans who perfected firearms, not the Chinese, and answers this question by looking at how firearms were used throughout the world. Early firearms were restricted to infantry and siege warfare, limiting their use outside of Europe and Japan. Steppe and desert nomads imposed a different style of warfare on the Middle East, India, and China--a style incompatible with firearms. By the time that better firearms allowed these regions to turn the tables on the nomads, Japan's self-imposed isolation left Europe with no rival in firearms design, production, or use, with lasting consequences.
books  military_history  economic_history  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Asia  China  India  Ottomans  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  Great_Divergence 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
NAKED KEYNESIANISM: The Fiscal-Military State and Western Hegemony - Nov 2013
An often neglected, at least in economics, argument for the rise of the West (leaving the debate of when the Big Divergence took place, if around 1800 or before, for another post), is its fiscal advantage when compared to the Oriental Empires (Mughal, Ottoman, Safavid and Qing). Patrick O'Brien, the prominent author of the idea of Western fiscal exceptionalism, suggests that the smaller and more urbanized polities of the West found it easier to tax their populations than the Eastern empires with more extensive territories, larger populations and less urbanized economies, even if the latter were in many respects more advanced than the former. The figure below shows that to some extent the Dutch dominance, and then the English ascension, go hand in hand with and increase of tax revenue as a share of GDP.

In this respect, the work by Jan Glete on the effects of a permanent navy on State formation deserves also careful reading.

However, the reasons for the militaristic nature of the Western economies is not well developed in the Fiscal-Military State literature. Kenneth Chase's book on the history of firearms provides an interesting answer.

He argues that early firearms were not very effective when used against cavalry because of their overall lack of mobility, poor rates of fire, and limited accuracy. As a result, their effectiveness was restricted to infantry and siege warfare, and were not used in regions threatened by nomads
economic_history  historical_sociology  Great_Divergence  fiscal-military_state  military_history  Military_Revolution  links 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert Farlety » Sunday Book Review: Beneficial Bombing » Lawyers, Guns & Money Sept 2013
Review essay - Mark Clodfelter’s Beneficial Bombing: The Progressive Foundations of American Air Power, 1917-1945

Obviously, I think that Clodfelter could have used some more James Scott. I think the phenomenon he describes is better understood as a facet of high modernism than as a peculiarly American phenomenon. I don’t think it’s difficult to read Progressive politics as the American manifestation of High modernism. Quick review of Scott’s essentials of high modernism:

A strong confidence in the potential for scientific and technological progress, including a reliance on the expertise of scientists, engineers, bureaucrats and other intellectuals.
Attempts to master nature to meet human needs.
An emphasis on rendering complex environments or concepts legible, most often through spatial ordering (for example, city planning on a grid).
Disregard for historical, geographical and social context in development.
Echoing Clodfelter, I argue in the book that theories of strategic bombing represent the essence of high modernist thinking. They posit an essentially intelligible target population or organization and propose a relatively programmatic series of steps for influencing and reorganizing that population.
books  reviews  military_history  intellectual_history  20thC  WWII  US_history  US_military  High_Modernism  governmentality 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Jamel Ostwald - Operationalizing Military Operations - July 2013 | Society for Military History Blog
While working feverishly to complete an 8,000-word (ok, more like 8,600) chapter narrating the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714) – a part of West Point’s massive new e-textbook for their History of Warfare survey course – I got to talking with another author. The discussion quickly descended into that classic game of “I’ve got it worse than you.” My self-serving jeremiad was that I couldn’t pity some of the other authors who had the same amount of space to cover just a few years of a war, say 1805-1807 or a few years of WW2. Which got me thinking (famous last words) about how one could more objectively rate the amount of detail needed to adequately narrate and explain various wars. Given a set number of words to explain the conduct of two wars at the same level of detail (i.e. putting aside the editorial decision to, a priori, declare some wars worthy of more or deeper coverage than others), what makes the task more difficult for one war versus the other? This is what I’ve come up with thus far.
military_history  historiography  War_of_Spanish_Succession 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Leo F. Solt - The New Model Army in England, Ireland and Scotland, 1645-1653 by Ian Gentles (1993)
JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 98, No. 3 (Jun., 1993), pp. 868-869 -- a revision of Kishlanky's revisionist account --brings religion back in
books  reviews  17thC  British_history  British_politics  military_history  English_Civil_War  religious_history  religious_culture  Calvinist  Interregnum  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: R. M. Sunter: The British Armed Nation, 1793-1815 by J. E. Cookson (2000)
JSTOR: The Scottish Historical Review, Vol. 79, No. 208 (Oct., 2000), pp. 260-262 -- 1st thorough study of how extensive mobilization of manpower was in British Isles during French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. Lots of stuff on militias, volunteer units, yeomanry in Ireland (Protestants mostly in North East) and England, and fencibles. Throw away comment that how it hooks up with understanding of society at the time runs counter to Linda Colley and John Brewer.
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  British_history  military_history  British_Army  British_Navy  militia  Ireland  Scotland  Irish_Rebellion  Castlereagh  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  fiscal-military_state  social_history  Britain-invasion  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paul Schuurman : Determinism and Causal Feedback Loops in Montesquieu's Explanations for the MilitaryRise and Fall of Rome (2013) | T & F Online
British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 21, Issue 3, 2013, pages 507- 528, Available online: 23 May 2013, DOI: 10.1080/09608788.2013.771612 -- Montesquieu's Considérations sur les causes de la grandeur des Romains et de leur décadence (1733/1734) is a methodological exercise in causal explanation on the meso-level applied to the subject of the military rise and fall of Rome. Rome is described as a system with contingent initial conditions that have a strong path-determining effect. Contingent and plastic initial configurations become highly determining in their subsequent operation, thanks to self-reinforcing feedback loops. Montesquieu's method seems influenced by the ruthless commitment to efficient causality and the reductionism of seventeenth-century mechanicist philosophy; but in contrast to these predecessors, he is more interested in dynamic processes than in unchangeable substances, and his use of efficient causality in the context of a system approach implies a form of holism that is lacking in his predecessors. The formal and conceptual analysis in this article is in many ways complementary with Paul Rahe's recent predominantly political analysis of the Considérations. At the same time, this article points to a problem in the works on the Enlightenment by Jonathan Israel: his account stresses a one-dimensional continuum consisting of Radical, Moderate and Counter-Enlightenment. This invites Israel to place the combined religious, political and philosophical views of each thinker on one of these three points. His scheme runs into trouble when a thinker with moderate religious and political views produces radical philosophical concepts. Montesquieu's Considérations is a case in point.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Montesquieu  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  military_history  lessons-of-history  determinism  causation  social_theory  mechanism  path-dependency  historiography  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  find  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Review by: Andrea Zanini: Genoa and the Sea: Policy and Power in an Early Modern Maritime Republic, 1559-1684 by Thomas Allison Kirk
JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 67, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 813-814

Traces stages in evolution from a military fleet supported by Spanish financial links, decline of Spanish power in Mediterranean during 17thC, attempt to make Genoa an entrepôt free port, and putting paid to military aspirations by French bombardment 1684

Bibliography and recent work by historians of Genoa port are missin5, but overall scheme and conclusion look sound.
books  reviews  16thC  17thC  economic_history  political_history  IR  Spain  Mediterranean  Italy  sovereign_debt  military_history  naval_history  city_states  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

13thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  17thC18thC  18thc  19thc  20thc  21stC  1590s  1600s  1670s  1680s  1690s  1700s  1710s  1740s  1750s  1812_invasion_of_Russia  abolition  Absolutism  Afghanistan  African-Americans  agriculture  agriculture-surplus  alliances  amazon.fr  American_colonies  American_Revolution  ancient_Greece  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  Ancien_régime  Anglo-Dutch  Anglo-Dutch_wars  Anglo-French  Anglo-Norman  Anglo-Saxons  Anglo-Scot  Anglo-Spanish  anti-imperialism  applied-_science  Arab_Spring  archaeology  architecture  architecture-churches  Aristotle  article  art_history  Asia  Asian_philosophy  Atilla_the_Hun  Atlantic  audio  Austria  Austro-Hungarian_Empire  balance-of-power  balance_of_power  Balkans  ballads  barbarians  bibliography  biography  Black_Sea  blue_water_strategy  Bolingbroke-family  books  bookshelf  Britain-Continent  Britain-invasion  British_Army  british_empire  British_Empire-military  British_foreign_policy  british_history  British_Navy  british_politics  Buddhism  Bush_administration  buy  Byzantium  Caliphate  Calvinist  capitalism  Castlereagh  Catholics-France  causation  center-periphery  Central_Asia  Central_Europe  central_government  change-social  charity  Charles_I  Charles_II  chemistry  China  Chinese_history  Chinese_philosophy  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  church_history  Church_of_England  cities  citizenship  city_states  civil_liberties  civil_rights  civil_society  civil_wars  class_conflict  cold_war  colonialism  commerce  commercial_interest  commercial_law  common_law  competition-interstate  composite_monarchies  Concert_of_Europe  Confederacy  confessionalization  Confucianism  Congress  conquest  consciousness  conspiracy  Constantinople  constitutional_law  constitutional_regime  contention  counselors  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  counter-terrorism  courses  courtiers  court_culture  crime  criminal_justice  Crown_finance  Crusades  cultural_exchange  cultural_history  cultural_transmission  decorative_arts  Deleuze  democracy  Denmark  despotism  determinism  development  digital_humanities  diplomacy  diplomatic_history  Directoire  downloaded  Dutch  Dutch_Revolt  Eastern_Europe  East_India_Company  economic_culture  economic_history  economic_sociology  education  EF-add  Egypt  elections-2016  elites  elites-political_influence  elite_culture  Elizabeth  empire-and_business  empires  empires-tributary  empiricism  English_Civil_War  English_lit  Enlightenment  entre_deux_guerres  epistemology  epistemology-social  etexts  ethnic_conflict  Eurasia  europe  Europe-Early_Modern  Europe-exceptionalism  Europe-Medieval  Exclusion_Crisis  exiles  exploration  faction  feudalism  financial_instiutions  financial_system  find  find17thC  fiscal-military_state  fiscal_policy  Florence  foreigners-resident  foreign_policy  France  Franco-German_relations  Frederick_the_Great  free_speech  French_army  French_Enlightenment  French_foreign_policy  French_history  French_Navy  French_politics  french_revolution  French_Revolutionary_Wars  frontier  game_theory  Genoa  geography  geohistory  geopolitics  George_I  George_II  George_III  germany  German_Idealism  German_lit  Ghengis_Khan  gin_craze  global  globalization  global_governance  global_history  global_system  Glorious_Revolution  Golden_Horde  governance  governance-participation  governance-regional  governing_class  government-forms  government-revenues  governmentality  government_finance  Great_Divergence  Great_Game  great_powers  guerrillas  Gulf_Stares  gunpowder  GWOT  Habsburgs  Hanover-Britain_relations  Hanoverian_Succession  Han_China  hegemony  hierarchy  High_Modernism  historical_change  historical_sociology  historiography  historiography-19thC  historiography-postWWII  historiography-Renaissance  history  history_of_science  Holy_Roman_Empire  hong_kong  HRE  human-non-human_relations  human_nature  human_rights  Hundred_Years_War  i  ideology  imperialism  incentives  India  industrialization  inequality  information_graphics  Innovation  Instapaper  institution-building  institutional_capacity  institutional_change  institutions  intellectual_history  interlopers  international_law  international_organizations  international_political_economy  international_system  Internet  Interregnum  interview  investment  ir  IR-domestic_politics  ir-history  Iran  iraq  Iraq_war  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  Irish_Rebellion  IR_theory  Islam  Islam-expansion  Islamic_civilization  Islamic_empires  Islamist_fundamentalists  Israel  Italian_Wars  Italy  James_I  James_II  japan  Jordan  journal  jstor  judiciary  kindle-available  late_antiquity  Latour  lecture  legal_culture  legal_history  legal_system  legitimacy  lessons-of-history  liberalism  Liberty_Fund  libraries  Libya  limited_monarchy  Lincoln  links  Livorno  local_government  London  Louis_XI  Louis_XIV  Louis_XV  lower_orders  luxury  Machiavelli  Mamluks  Manifest_Destiny  Mann_Michael  maps  maritime_history  maritime_law  Marlborough  mechanism  medicine  medieval_history  Mediterranean  MENA  mercantilism  mercantilism-violence  mercenaires  mercenaries  merchants  militarization-society  military  military-industrial  military-industrial_complex  military_history  Military_Revolution  military_tactics  military_technology  military_theory  militia  mixed_government  MNCs  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monasticism  Mongols  monopolies  Montesquieu  moral_economy  moral_philosophy  napoleon  napoleonic  Napoleonic_Empire  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  national_interest  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  Native_Americans  NATO  natural_law  naval_history  Neo-Confucian  neocons  neoliberalism  Netherlands  networks  networks-business  networks-religious  networks-social  newspapers  NGOs  Nietzsche  Nine_Years_War  nobility  nomadic_invasions  Norman_Conquest  nouveaux_riches  NPT  nuclear_deterrence  nuclear_weapons  Obama_administration  ontology  Orthodox_Christianity  Ottomans  Ottoman_Empire  pamphlets  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  paper  Parliament  Parliamentarians  parties  path-dependency  patriotism  paywall  peace  Pentagon  perception  perpetual_peace  Persia  pinboard  Plato  Pocket  Poland  political_culture  political_economy  political_history  political_participation  political_philosophy  political_press  political_sociology  politics-and-history  politics-and-religion  Polybius  popular_culture  popular_politics  populism  ports  post-wwii  power  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  Prince_Eugene  privatization  privileges-corporate  propaganda  property-confiscations  property_rights  Protestant_International  Prussia  public_disorder  public_finance  public_opinion  public_sphere  publishing-clandestine  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  raison-d'-état  reference  Reformation  refugees  regulation  religion-and-economics  religious_culture  religious_history  religious_wars  Renaissance  representative_institutions  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Restoration  reviews  revolutions  riots  ritual  Romanticism  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Royal_Society  rule_of_law  Russia  Saudia_Arabia  Scientific_Revolution  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_history  sectarianism  serfs  Seven_Years_War  Shakespeare  Shiites  shipping  slavery  social_history  social_movements  social_order  social_science  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  société_des_princes  sovereignty  sovereign_debt  Spain  Spanish_Empire  spying  state-building  status  steppes  strategy  Sufis  Sultans  Sunnis  Sweden  Syria  Tamerlane  taxes  tax_collection  technology  technology-adoption  technology_transfer  terrorism  thesis  Thirty_Years_War  Tilly  Tories  torture  towns  trade  trade-cultural_transmission  trade-policy  trade-policy_enforcement  trade_finance  trading_companies  trading_privileges  transnational_elites  travel  treason  Trump  trust  Turcic_tribes  Turkey  UK_economy  UK_Government  UK_government-colonies  uncertainty-political  uncertainty-regulation  university  urbanization  urban_development  urban_elites  urban_politics  us  uses_of_history  US_Civil_War  US_constitution  US_economy  us_foreign_policy  US_government  US_history  US_legal_system  us_military  us_politics  US_society  Venice  video  violence  Wales  war  warfare  warfare-irregular  wars  wars-causes  Wars_of_Religion  War_of_Austrian_Succession  War_of_Spanish_Succession  War_of_the_Roses  weaponry  welfare_state  Westphalia  Whigs  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-Radicals  William_III  working_class  world  wwi  wwii 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: