dunnettreader + metaphysics   160

Adrian Moore interview with Richard Marshall - Modern Metaphysics - the Analytic/Continental Mix - 3AM - June 2017
Interview by Richard Marshall. ‘ Many contemporary scientists would still need persuading that it was anything other than a pointless exercise—perhaps because…
Evernote  metaphysics  Deleuze  Husserl  Heidegger  Derrida  Spinoza  Hegel  Nietzsche  Bergson  continental_philosophy  from instapaper
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Amie L. Thomasson, Ontology Made Easy - Reviewed by Matti Eklund | NDOR - March 2017
Amie L. Thomasson, Ontology Made Easy, Oxford University Press, 2015, 345pp., $53.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199385119.
Reviewed by Matti Eklund, Uppsala University
Carnap  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  reviews  ontology  epistemology  kindle-available  books 
march 2017 by dunnettreader
Spinoza Research Network - Home
The Spinoza Research Network was set up in 2008 and funded by an AHRC Networks Grant between 2008 and 2010 at the University of Dundee. The funded project focused on contemporary interdisciplinary connections to seventeenth-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza and built up a membership of over 200 members in Philosophy, Politics, Law, Literature, Music, Psychology, History, Medicine, Gender Studies, Education, and many other academic and non-academic disciplines.

The grant has now expired, but the Network continues as an interdisciplinary group of academics, students, and others interested in Spinoza around the world. Working together, sharing research and developing new projects, we investigate how Spinoza is used both within philosophy and beyond it, both inside and outside of academia.

As of 2013 the Network is based at the University of Aberdeen.
moral_philosophy  politics-and-religion  Hobbes  website  philosophy_of_religion  monism  immanence  logic  Spinoza  religious_belief  epistemology  metaphysics  bibliography  political_philosophy  Judaism  Descartes  17thC  religion-established  tolerance  history_of_science  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  scepticism  transcendence  intellectual_history 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Stephen Turner - Markus Gabriel, Why the World Does not Exist. A Review | Weber Studies - Academia.edu
Fairly lengthy attempt to get to grips with what Gabriel is proposing especially vis a vis neo-Kantianism post Heidegger's cul de sac.
books  reviews  metaphysics  epistemology  idealism  realism  relativism  constructivism  postmodern  neo-Kantian 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R Westphal - Empiricism, Pragmatic Realism & the A Priori in "Mind and the World Orde" (draft - forthcoming 2017 | Academia.edu
Forthcoming in: Carl SACHS & Peter OLEN eds., Contemporary Perspectives on C. I. Lewis: Pragmatism in Transition (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) --This paper re-examines how C.I. Lewis’s pragmatic realism in Mind and the World Order (1929, ‘MWO’) contrasts to logical empiricism, and to Lewis’s later An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation (1946, ‘AKV’), to highlight several important philosophical points Lewis clearly understood and argued for in MWO, which we need to recover today. MWO is expressly an ‘Outline of a Theory of Knowledge’; nevertheless, it provides several important lessons about human knowledge, action and our worldly context. These are highlighted by contrast to some key points in Carnap’s empiricist semantics (§2) and by considering a point important to scientific realism, not properly accommodated by Carnap’s semantics: Reichenbach’s (1920, 1922) ‘coördination’ (Zuordnung) principles – a very important point about scientific measurement procedures, central both to Peirce and to MWO (§3). These coördinating principles for exact scientific measurements highlight the contrast between the meta-linguistic ‘relative a priori’ admissible by empiricist semantics (Friedman 1999, 2001), and Lewis’ robustly realist ‘pragmatic a priori’ in MWO. I re-examine key features of MWO (§4), including Lewis’s rejection of mythical givenness and of a series of false dichotomies which still plague current discussions of epistemology, pragmatism and history and philosophy of science. -- Research Interests: Epistemology, Semantic Externalism, Pragmatism (Philosophy), Explication (Philosophy), Clarence Irving Lewis,
paper  downloaded  intellectual_history  20thC  pragmatism  Logical_Positivism  empiricism  Lewis_CI  Carnap  metaphysics  epistemology  apriori  philosophy_of_science  logic  semantics  Peirce  realism-scientific  scientific_method  myth_of_the_given 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Rationally Speaking | 166 - Eric Schwitzgebel on "Why you should expect the truth to be crazy"
Some theories violate common sense so wildly that you want to just reject them out of hand. For example, "The United States is conscious," or "The most moral act would be to replace all living beings with an orgasmic blob." On the other hand, many theories in physics that sounded similarly crazy turned out to be very well-supported (think of quantum theory, or relativity). So what role should "common sense" play in evaluating new theories? This episode features a discussion with philosopher Eric Schwitzgebel on his theory of "Crazyism," that we should expect the truth to be at least a little bit crazy.

Eric's Blog: The Splintered Mind

Eric's Paper: "The Crazyist Metaphysics of Mind"

Gustaf Arrhenius's Paper: "An impossibility theorem for welfarist axiologies"

Eric's Pick: "Labyrinths" by Jorge Luis Borges
audio  interview  metaphysics  mind  consciousness  epistemology  materialism  naturalism  folk_psychology  idealism  dualism 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Eric Schwitzgebel - Crazyist Metaphysics of Mind (2014) Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol 92, No 4
Crazyism about X is the view that something it would be crazy to believe must be among the core truths about X. In this essay, I argue that crazyism is true of the metaphysics of mind. A position is ‘crazy’ in the intended sense if it is contrary to common sense and we are not epistemically compelled to believe it. Crazyism can be treated as the conjunction of two sub-theses: (1) that something contrary to common sense must be true and (2) that whatever that true thing is, we are not epistemically compelled to believe it. I defend the first thesis on grounds of the probable incoherence of folk metaphysics, from which it follows that any fully fleshed-out metaphysics will inevitably conflict with some piece of that incoherent story. I defend the second thesis on three grounds: peer disagreement, lack of a compelling method for resolving metaphysical disputes about the mind, and the dubiousness of the general cosmological claims with which metaphysical claims about the mind are entangled. -- Keywords: common sense, consciousness, dualism, idealism, materialism, metaphilosophy, metaphysics, -- downloaded to Tab S2
article  metaphysics  mind  epistemology  folk_psychology  cosmology  dualism  idealism  materialism  consciousness  reductionism  naturalism  downloaded 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Ricardo Salles, ed - Metaphysics, Soul, and Ethics in Ancient Thought (2005) - Oxford University Press
Richard Sorabji Bibliography
1. Intellectual autobiography, Richard Sorabji
Metaphysics
2. Intrinsic and relational properties of Atoms in the Democritean ontology, Alexander P. D. Mourelatos
3. Necessitation and Explanation in Philoponus' Aristotelain Physics, Sylvia Berryman
4. A Contemporary Look at Aristotle's Changing Now, Sarah Broadie
5. On the individuation of times and events in orthodox Stoicism, Ricardo Salles
6. Stoic metaphysics at Rome, David Sedley
7. Platonism in the Bible: Numenius of Apamea on Exodus and eternity, Myles Burnyeat
The Senses and the Nature of the Soul
8. Platonic Souls as Persons, A. A. Long
9. Aristotle versus Descartes on the concept of the mental, Charles H. Kahn
10. Perception Naturalized in Aristotle's de Anima, Robert Bolton
11. The Spirit and the letter: Aristotle on perception, V. Caston
12. The discriminating capacity of the soul in Aristotle's theory of learning, Frans A. J. de Haas
13. Alexander of Aphrodisias on the nature and location of vision, Bob Sharples
Ethics
14. Plato's Stoic View of Motivation, Gabriela Roxana Carone
15. The Presence of Socrates and Aristotle in the Stoic Account of Akrasia, Marcelo D. Boeri
16. Extend or identify: Two Stoic Accounts of Altruism, Mary Margaret McCabe
17. Competing Readings of Stoic Emotions, Christopher Gill
18. Were Zeno and Chysippus at odds in analysing emotion?, A. W. Price
19. Seneca on Freedom and Autonomy, Brad Inwood
books  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Stoicism  soul  moral_philosophy  metaphysics  Seneca  Democritus  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  mind  Descartes  emotions 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Ludovic Duhem - L’idée d’« individu pur » dans la pensée de Simondon | Appareil 2009
Le projet ontologique de Gilbert Simondon est de penser l’individu à travers l’individuation dans tous les domaines de réalité : physique, biologique, et psycho-social ou « transindividuel ». Il s’agit précisément pour lui de renverser le privilège ontologique accordé par la métaphysique à l’être sur le devenir, au résultat sur l’opération, à l’individu sur l’individuation, et d’en faire la condition de toute connaissance complète de la réalité. Or, l’idée d’individu pur, telle qu’elle est développée dans deux textes de L’individuation à la lumière des notions de forme et d’information, dans le domaine biologique et psycho-technique, semble contrarier le maintien de ce renversement en réintroduisant une forme de substantialisme. Cette difficulté portant Simondon à sa propre limite sera l’occasion d’examiner deux cas d’individuation et, à travers eux, la cohérence et la portée de sa pensée.
individuation  essence  hylomorphism  epistemology  French_intellectuals  social_process  techne  20thC  Aristotle  modernity  technology  metaphysics  downloaded  substance  Simondon  article  ontology  continental_philosophy 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Alfred North Whitehead (Open Library) - Enquiry..natural knowledge and The Concept of Nature
Page of Whitehead works with links to a page for each work - with further links to reading options - from Internet Archive open for download to Internet Archive Borrowing program - with an Open Library card can "check out" book for 2 weeks to read in browser), links to WorldCat for borrowing physical copy, and for some, links to booksellers for new or used purchase
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX his complementary pair from 1919 - "Enquiry concerning the principles of natural knowledge" and the inaugural Tanner lectures "The Concept of Nature " (published 1920)
Open_Library  Whitehead  books  Internet_Archive  downloaded  metaphysics  etexts  philosophy_of_science  epistemology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Ian Hacking - A Tradition of Natural Kinds | JSTOR - Philosophical Studies (1991)
Philosophical Studies: An International Journal for Philosophy in the Analytic Tradition, Vol. 61, No. 1/2, The Twenty-Ninth Oberlin Colloquium in Philosophy (Feb., 1991), pp. 109-126 -- the colloquium was Realism and Relativism -- Hacking was commented on by Richard Boyd and Hacking responded in writing -- both are also downloaded to Note
article  jstor  metaphysics  ontology  natural_kinds  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  epistemology-social  constructivism  nominalism  Mill  Locke-Essay  Quine  Peirce  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Gyula Klima - Quine, Wyman, and Buridan: Three approaches to ontological commitment (2005) - PhilPapers
Quine, Wyman, and Buridan: Three approaches to ontological commitment, Korean Journal of Logic 8:1-22 (2005) -- This paper provides a comparison of three fundamentally different approaches to the issue of ontological commitment. It argues that despite superficial similarities on either side, Buridan’s approach provides an intriguing third alternative to the two commonly recognized modern approaches. Keywords: ontological commitment, existence, meaning, reference.. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  metaphysics  medieval_philosophy  ontology  meaning  reference  Quine  downloaded 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Entretien avec André Comte-Sponville (2013) - Cairn.info
ndré Comte-Sponville, philosophe matérialiste, rationaliste et humaniste, est né à Paris, en 1952. Longtemps maître de conférences à l’Université Paris I (Panthéon-Sorbonne), il démissionne de sa chaire en 2003 pour consacrer davantage de temps à l’écriture et aux conférences qu’il donne en dehors de l’Université. Il est membre du Comité Consultatif National d’Éthique. Parmi les nombreux ouvrages qu’il a publiés (traduits en 24 langues), on peut citer le Traité du désespoir et de la béatitude (P.U.F, 1984 et 1988), Une éducation philosophique (P.U.F, 1989), Valeur et vérité (P.U.F, 1994), Petit traité des grandes vertus (P.U.F, 1995), La sagesse des Modernes (avec Luc Ferry, Robert Laffont, 1999), L’être-temps (P.U.F, 1999), L’esprit de l’athéisme (Albin Michel, 2006), Le goût de vivre et cent autres propos (Albin Michel, 2010), Le sexe ni la mort (Albin Michel, 2012), et le Dictionnaire philosophique (P.U.F, 2001 – nouvelle édition, revue et augmentée, en 2013). -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
metaphysics  materialism  interview  political_philosophy  downloaded  French_intellectuals 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Jean-Louis Vieillard-Baron, review essay - L'HÉRITAGE HÉGÉLIEN AUJOURD'HUI (2010) | JSTOR - Revue philosophique de la France et de l'ÉTranger
L'HÉRITAGE HÉGÉLIEN AUJOURD'HUI
Jean-Louis Vieillard-Baron
Revue Philosophique de la France et de l'Étranger
T. 200, No. 2, PEIRCE LAVELLE HEGEL (AVRIL-JUIN 2010), pp. 223-234
Review essay re 4 recent collections, with special focus on recognition, beauty, metaethics
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
metaphysics  moral_philosophy  reviews  French_language  books  downloaded  Hegel  jstor  aesthetics 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme) (2005) - Cairn.info
I - Considérations introductives sur l’essence de la modernité
- L’esprit de la modernité : la liberté, l’universalisme et l’individualisme
- Réflexivité, autonomie et indépendance
- Conséquences : les idées d’égalité et de progrès
II - Les origines antiques de la modernité
- Universalisme et individualisme en Grèce antique
- Le stoïcisme : entre hellénisme et christianisme
- Universalisme, égalitarisme et individualisme chrétien
- L’individualisme du droit romain
III - L’avènement de la modernité et la périodisation de l’ère moderne
- Le monde Ancien et le monde Moderne
- La périodisation de la modernité:
1 - La première modernité : de la Renaissance aux Lumières
2 - La seconde modernité : de la fin du XVIIIème siècle aux années 1960
3 - La troisième modernité : entre postmodernité et hypermodernité
Citot Vincent, « Le processus historique de la Modernité et la possibilité de la liberté (universalisme et individualisme). », Le Philosophoire 2/2005 (n° 25) , p. 35-76
individualism  moral_philosophy  Counter-Enlightenment  16thC  Romanticism  history_of_science  politico-theology  autonomy  scholastics  Renaissance  change-social  democracy  republicanism  modernity-emergence  political_philosophy  democracy_deficit  Stoicism  Reformation  Early_Christian  French_Enlightenment  18thC  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  French_Revolution  periodization  Europe-Early_Modern  universalism  downloaded  subjectivity  political_culture  religious_history  article  Ancients-and-Moderns  community  self  German_Idealism  Counter-Reformation  authority  Enlightenment  metaphysics  ancient_Rome  17thC  Cartesians  cosmology  Descartes  ancient_Greece  Locke  modernity  liberty  Hobbes  intellectual_history  bibliography 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Poirier - Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet (2003) - Cairn.info
Entretien préparé et réalisé par Fouré Lionel, Entretien préparé et réalisé par Poirier Nicolas, « Entretien avec Marcel Gauchet. », Le Philosophoire 1/2003 (n° 19) , p. 23-37
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2003-1-page-23.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.019.0023.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
representative_institutions  metaphysics  democracy  Gauchet  change-social  Freud  phenomenology  France  social_theory  cultural_critique  psychology  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_social_science  poststructuralist  French_intellectuals  19thC  governance  social_sciences-post-WWII  subjectivity  common_good  nation-state  republicanism  Lacan  social_history  philosophy_of_history  modernity  German_Idealism  structuralism  civil_liberties  human_nature  downloaded  epistemology  interview  Foucault  intellectual_history  Lefort  political_participation  epistemology-social  citizenship  community 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Étienne Bimbenet, review - Claude Romano, Au cœur de la raison, la phénoménologie - La Vie des idées - 17 décembre 2010
Recensé : Claude Romano, Au cœur de la raison, la phénoménologie. Gallimard (Folio Essais), 2010 ; 1141 p., 13, 50 €. -- Repenser la phénoménologie dans ses présupposés les plus forts, et la transformer de l’intérieur : tel est le geste théorique de Claude Romano qui, à partir des objections formulées par la philosophie analytique et l’empirisme logique, défend une phénoménologie redonnant toute sa place à la sensibilité dans l’analyse de l’expérience et la saisie des essences. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  21stC  continental_philosophy  phenomenology  Heidegger  Merleau-Ponty  Levinas  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  empiricism  metaphysics  experience  sensation  reason  rationality  epistemology  downloaded 
december 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - An Ethics of the Event: Deleuze’s Stoicism (2006) | Academia.edu
Angelaki, Journal of the Theoretical Humanities, Vol 11, No. 3, (Dec 2006) -- I may finally start to figure out what Deluze's project was from how Sellars positions him! -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  France  French_intellectuals  Deleuze  Stoicism  empiricism  James_William  Whitehead  Spinoza  Nietzsche  Kierkegaard  style-philosophy  metaphysics  ontology  ethics  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Stoic Ontology and Plato's "Sophist" (2010) | Academia.edu
in V. Harte, M.M. McCabe, R.W. Sharples, A. Sheppard, eds, Aristotle and the Stoics Reading Plato, Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies, Suppl. 107 (2010), 185-203 -- Keywords: Metaphysics, Plato, and Stoicism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Stoicism  metaphysics  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ontology  Being  nothing  ideas-theories  concepts  universals  categories  Plato  Platonism  Seneca  Zenon_of_Citium  commentaries  late_antiquity  ancient_Rome  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
philosophy bites: Galen Strawson on Panpsychism
Is there something that it is like to be an electron? That sounds implausible. Yet Galen Strawson believes this is the best explanation of how things are. Find out why.

Listen to Galen Strawson on Panpsychism

Listen to an earlier interview with Galen Strawson on the Sense of Self
metaphysics  naturalism  audio  ontology  panpsychic_monism  Strawson_Galen  physicalism 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Neil Sinhababu, review - Maudemarie Clark, Nietzsche on Ethics and Politics (OUP 2015) | Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - September 09, 2015
Nietzsche scholarship has made impressive progress over the last thirty years, with lots of excellent work now available to help puzzled readers understand Nietzsche's provocative and often beautiful writing. Maudemarie Clark's Nietzsche on Truth and Philosophy was a big step forward in our understanding of his metaphysics and epistemology. Her Nietzsche on Ethics and Politics is a collection of fourteen essays mostly on Nietzsche's practical philosophy, ending with four on metaphysical issues that are related to the normative issues discussed earlier in the book. Most were published previously -- the oldest in 1987 and the newest in 2014 -- though two are revised versions of unpublished lectures and one is a remix of material from her recent book. Some appeared in obscure venues, so this volume helps readers access all of them. -- Highly recommends the introduction discussing each essay and broader framework for placing her discussion
Instapaper  books  reviews  intellectual_history  19thC  Nietzsche  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  metaphysics  political_philosophy  free_will  responsibility  from instapaper
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Entretien avec Luc Foisneau - Qu’est-ce qu’un [17thC] philosophe français ? - La Vie des idées - September 2015
Entretien avec Luc Foisneaupar Florent Guénard , le 9 septembre -- Le Dictionnaire des philosophes français du XVIIe siècle paraît sept ans après une première édition anglaise remarquée. L’occasion de s’interroger sur le savoir du Grand Siècle, réputé classique mais au fond assez baroque. Et l’occasion de se demander ce que peut bien être un philosophe français au XVIIe siècle. -- Publisher Continuum, now Bloomsbury -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  intellectual_history  17thC  philosophy  Scientific_Revolution  French_intellectuals  French_language  metaphysics  epistemology  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  downloaded 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Hartshorne: Biography and Psychology of Sensation | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
(..) he insisted that metaphysics and empirical science have different aims and methods, each ensuring in its own way a disciplined objectivity. His “neoclassical” or “process” metaphysics is in the same family of speculative philosophy that one finds in the works of CS Peirce and the later writings of AN Whitehead. Although he did not style himself a disciple of either, he made significant contributions to the study of these philosophers even as he developed his own views. Like them, he endeavored in his own metaphysical thinking to give full weight to the dynamic, relational, temporal, and affective dimensions of the universe. He emphasized, as few before him had, in logic and in the processes of nature, the foundational nature of asymmetrical relations. He was also a theist (...) the revival of the ontological or modal argument for God’s existence...He insisted, however, that it was unavailing to appeal to ...any theistic argument) as support for theism without first rethinking the concept of deity. He argued that thinking about God had been handicapped by lack of attention to the logically possible forms of theism, and in place of the unmoved mover of classical theology, he proposed “the most, and best, moved mover.” He endorsed a “dipolar” version of theism according to which God is both necessary and contingent, but in different respects. He sought a “panentheism” in which God includes the creatures without negating their distinctiveness. -- entry also covers his 1st book on perception -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  20thC  metaphysics  philosophy_of_religion  Peirce  Whitehead  theism  Hartshorne  natural_religion  rational_religion  God-attributes  God-existence  analytical_philosophy  logic  logic-Peirce  process_theology  panentheism  ontological_argument  cosmology  Aristotelian  sensation  perception  empiricism  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Hartshorne, Charles : Dipolar Theism | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Hartshorne’s views on the existence of a divine reality are treated separately in another article, “Charles Hartshorne: Theistic and Anti-Theistic Arguments.” -- Hartshorne spent much of his career in a philosophical atmosphere in which the question was not so much “Does God exist?” as it was “Does ‘God’ name a coherent idea?” Philosophers from very diverse schools of thought—from Sartre to the Logical Positivists—rejected theism on the basis of alleged inconsistencies in the very idea of deity. Hartshorne himself remarked that there would be fewer atheists if theists had done a better job of making sense of the concept of God. Hartshorne’s response to this situation was to develop his dipolar or neoclassical concept of God. It can plausibly be claimed that Hartshorne accomplished at least two tasks: first, he introduced a sophisticated and religiously important form of theism heretofore unheard of or at least very poorly developed through philosophical argument and, second, he shifted the burden of proof onto those who claim that the concept of God is hopelessly muddled. -- downloaded pdf to Note
philosophy_of_religion  metaphysics  20thC  rational_religion  Whitehead  Hartshorne  God-attributes  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  existentialism  panentheism  theism  atheism  process_theology  modal_logic  ontological_argument  empiricism  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Newall interview with John Wilkins: Biology and Philosophy (2008) - The Galilean Library
John S. Wilkins is a sessional lecturer at the University of Queensland in philosophy. He runs a philosophy of biology blog, Evolving Thoughts, which is part of the Seed Magazine stable of science blogs. John worked in publishing and printing for 25 years while he eventually finished his philosophy studies with a PhD from the University of Melbourne. He used to boast that he had never learned anything of direct practical use, which is a bit of a stretch as he also has a computing diploma. -- author of my Kindle book, Species. -- converted page for downloaded pdf to Note
interview  history_of_science  intellectual_history  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  biology  evolutionary_biology  species  metaphysics  epistemology  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Newall interview of Stephen D. Snobelen: Newton Reconsidered - Theology and Alchemy | The Galilean Library
Stephen David Snobelen is Assistant Professor in the History of Science and Technology at University of King's College, Halifax, Nova Scotia. He is a founder member of the Newton project and author of many fascinating papers on Newton's alchemy and religious thinking. I was privileged to be able to ask him some questions about his work on Newton. -- helpful re the process by which Newton's papers were hidden, then sold at auction in 1936 and beginning in 1991 being made available for researchers as the dispersed manuscripts have been re-collected - who is working on what issues, as of 2005 -- Snobelen got his degrees in History of Philosophy of Science at Cambridge with Schaffer -- converted page and downloaded pdf to Note
interview  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  religious_history  religious_belief  17thC  18thC  Newton  Socinians  Arian  anti-Trinitarian  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  Bible-as-history  Neoplatonism  immortality  soul  metaphysics  essence  substance  theology  Early_Christian  alchemy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuel Bezy, review - Pascale Gillot, L’esprit, figures classiques et contemporaines - Histoire du mind-body problem - La Vie des idées - 10 janvier 2008
Pascale Gillot, L’esprit, figures classiques et contemporaines, Paris, CNRS Editions, 2007, 315 p., 30 euros. -- Si l’esprit et le corps sont des substances séparées et distinctes, comment peuvent-ils agir l’un sur l’autre ? P. Gillot montre dans son ouvrage les différentes réponses que la philosophie de l’esprit a apportées au problème ainsi formulé par Descartes. Mais ces réponses parviennent difficilement, selon elle, à s’affranchir totalement du cartésianisme. -- L’ouvrage de Pascale Gillot peut se lire de deux manières, qui ne sont pas exclusives l’une de l’autre : il constitue à la fois une introduction à la philosophie de l’esprit et une mise en perspective de la philosophie de l’esprit contemporaine, telle qu’elle s’est développée aux Etats-Unis depuis le tournant cognitiviste. Pascale Gillot expose la construction du problème du corps et de l’esprit, puis elle met en évidence les rémanences de cette problématique de William James à Jaegwon Kim. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  20thC  21stC  mind  mind-body  cogito  Cartesian  Descartes  James_William  dualism  cognition  neuroscience  psychology  metaphysics  essence  substance  human_nature  analytical_philosophy  naturalism  reductionism  thinking_matter  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuel Bezy, review - Jean-Marie Schaeffer, La fin de l’exception humaine (2007) -- Pour une histoire naturelle de l’homme - La Vie des idées - 21 janvier 2008
Gallimard, 2007, 446 p., 21,50 euros. -- Dans son dernier essai, Jean-Marie Schaeffer s’éloigne de ses thèmes habituels de recherche (le langage, la littérature, la fiction, l’esthétique) et propose une réflexion générale sur l’humanité. Il s’agit de dessiner une perspective qui inscrirait cette dernière en continuité avec le vivant. Il présente ce travail comme l’explicitation de l’arrière-plan de ces précédents travaux. L’ambition est de prendre le contre-pied de ce que l’auteur appelle la « Thèse » selon laquelle l’humanité constituerait une exception parmi les vivants. (...) qu’il pense a conduit à une survalorisation des savoirs spéculatifs au détriment des savoirs empiriques. C’est à critiquer cette vision du monde, véritable obstacle au progrès scientifique, et à redonner toute sa légitimité au naturalisme que son ouvrage est consacré. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_intellectuals  French_language  philosophy  human_nature  metaphysics  imago_dei  animals  reason  speculative_philosoohy  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_language  epistemology-naturalism  lit_crit  aesthetics  philosophy_of_science  mind  cogito  natural_kinds  essence  naturalism  empiricism  biology  evolution  evolutionary_biology  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Hartshorne, Charles: Neoclassical Metaphysics | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy - July 2015
Hartshorne (1897-2000) was an intrepid defender of the claims of metaphysics ...While many influential voices were explaining what speculative philosophy could not accomplish or even proclaiming an end to it, Hartshorne was trying to show what speculative philosophy could accomplish. Metaphysics, he said, has a future as well as a past. He believed that the history of philosophy exhibits genuine, albeit halting and uneven, progress towards a comprehensive understanding of the nature of existence. Philosophy was, for him, a dialogue that spans centuries, with partners whose wisdom has a perennial relevance. The 2 philosophers who most influenced him, and in whose work he found the greatest parallels with his own thinking, were Charles Sanders Peirce and Alfred North Whitehead. Hartshorne was co-editor with Paul Weiss of the first comprehensive edition of Peirce’s philosophical papers, and he served as Whitehead’s assistant during the most metaphysically creative period of the Englishman’s career. (...) there remained important differences between the two philosophers [i.e. H & W]. (..) theism was always a central element of Hartshorne’s metaphysics (addressed briefly here, but see “Charles Hartshorne: Dipolar Theism” and “Charles Hartshorne: Theistic and Anti-theistic Arguments”) whereas Whitehead was preoccupied for much of his career with a philosophy of nature and did not introduce God until he developed the speculative philosophy of his later works. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  20thC  metaphysics  philosophy_of_religion  Peirce  Whitehead  theism  Hartshorne  natural_religion  rational_religion  God-attributes  God-existence  analytical_philosophy  logic-Peirce  ontological_argument  modal_logic  Quine  process_theology  panentheism  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Gordon Graham, Wittgenstein and Natural Religion // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - July 2015
In this book, Gordon Graham attempts to breathe new life into an old idea, namely, a naturalized conception of religion; with this goal, he succeeds admirably.…
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july 2015 by dunnettreader
Dan Priel - Toward Classical Legal Positivism (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 987 (2015)
I have two major aims: (1) set the historical record straight(...) Hobbes’s and Bentham’s work that seeks to understand their views on law not by isolating it from the rest of their wide-ranging body of work, but by understanding their jurisprudential work as part of a broader project. (2) My main aim is to contribute to contemporary jurisprudential debates and to suggest that the largely neglected approach of earlier positivists is superior to the view held by most contemporary legal positivists. (...) to what extent it is useful for us to call Hobbes and Bentham “legal positivists.” My answer to this question consists of three interrelated points. The first is that we draw an explicit link between their ideas and the view that (some time later) would come to be known as “positivism,” roughly the view that the methods of the “human sciences” are essentially the same as those of the natural sciences. The second point is that the classical legal positivists’ decisive break with natural law ideas prevalent in their day is to be found exactly here, in their views about metaphysics and nature. The third point is that this aspect of their work has been, in my view regrettably, abandoned by contemporary legal positivists. Though all three points are related, in this Article I will say relatively little about the first point, as I discussed it in greater detail elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  Hobbes  Bentham  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  analytical_philosophy  metaphysics  natural_philosophy  nature  human_nature  scientific_method  social_theory  social_sciences  positivism  positive_law  Methodenstreit  methodology-quantitative  epistemology  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey A. Pojanowski - Positivism(s): A Commentary on Priel's "Toward Classical Legal Positivism" | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 1023 (2015)
Anglo-American jurisprudence, before it insulated itself in conceptual analysis and defined itself in opposition to broader questions, was properly a “sociable science,” to use Professor Postema’s phrase from his symposium article. And, in part due to the exemplars of history, so it may become again. By drawing on Bentham and Hobbes, Professor Dan Priel’s Toward Classical Positivism points forward toward more fruitful methods of jurisprudence while illuminating the recent history and current state of inquiry. His article demonstrates the virtues and promise of a more catholic approach to jurisprudence. It also raises challenging questions about the direction to take this rediscovered path, and I am not sure I always agree with his suggested answers. Any misgivings I have about Priel’s particular approach, however, do not diminish my appreciation; I find even the points of disagreement to be live and meaningful, and that itself is refreshing. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2015 by dunnettreader
W. J. Mander - British Idealism: A History (2011, pbk 2014) | Oxford University Press
Mander presents the first ever synoptic history of British Idealism, the philosophical school which dominated English-language philosophy from the 1860s through to the early years of the following century. Offering detailed examination of the origins, growth, development, and decline of this mode of thinking, British Idealism: A History restores to its proper place this now almost wholly forgotten period of philosophical history. Through clear explanation of its characteristic concepts and doctrines, and paying close attention to the published works of its philosophers, the volume provides a full-length history of this vital school for those wishing to fill a gap in their knowledge of the history of British Philosophy, while its detailed notes and bibliography will guide the more dedicated scholar who wishes to examine further their distinctive brand of philosophy. By covering all major philosophers involved in the movement (not merely the most famous ones like Bradley, Green, McTaggart, and Bosanquet but the lesser known figures like the Caird brothers, Henry Jones, A.S.Pringle-Pattison, and R.B.Haldane) and by looking at all branches of philosophy (not just the familiar topics of ethics, political thought, and metaphysics but also the less well documented work on logic, religion, aesthetics, and the history of philosophy), British Idealism: A History brings out the movement's complex living pattern of unity and difference; something which other more superficial accounts have tended to obscure.
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june 2015 by dunnettreader
Caroline Jacot Grapa - Dans le vif du sujet - Diderot, corps et âme ( 2009) | Classiques Garnier - collection L'Europe des Lumières
Ce livre est un essai sur le style du matérialisme de Diderot, sa psychologie, sa métaphysique et sur les figures de l'intériorité des Lumières. La langue de l'intériorité, apanage de la spiritualité, se retrempe au contact sensible des métaphores de l'époque. Elles donnent accès à un savoir nouveau de la vie corporelle. L'actualité de cet essai tient au dialogue qu'il engage avec la phénoménologie et les neurosciences. -- This work is an essay on the style of Diderot's materialism, his psychology and his metaphysics. Its modern pertinence stems from the dialogue established with phenomenology and neurosciences. -- ISBN 978-2-8124-0046-9 -- 504 pages -- looks extremely interesting -- tracking reception of British empiricism, debates over various Cartesian proposals for dealing with animals, and the new directions taken both in life sciences and psychology and the metaphysics of materialism -- downloaded TOC as pdf to Note
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may 2015 by dunnettreader
Markus Gabriel interview with Richard Marshall - Why The World Does Not Exist But Unicorns Do | 3AM - May 2015
Markus Gabriel broods on why the world doesn’t exist and never stops wondering about Kant, existence, pluralism, fields of sense, Huw Price, about why he isn’t po-mo, nor a Meinongian, about why unicorns exist, about why he’s a realist, about dissolving the hard problem, about why naturalism and physicalism are wrong, about Schelling and post-Kantian idealism, about Badiou and Meillassouz, Heidegger, about resisting skepticism, about negative philosophy, mythology, madness, laughter and the need for illusions in metaphysics, and about the insult that is the continental/analytic divide . Gird up for an amazing story… -- humongous interview divided into 2 pages - each about twice as long as one of Marshall's regular interviews -- only page 1 picked up by Instapaper, and no single page option -- saved as 2 pdfs to Note
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may 2015 by dunnettreader
‘First Philosophy and its Metacritique: The Case of Karl-Otto Apel’ ( 1982) | Piet Strydom - Academia.edu
‘First Philosophy and its Metacritique: The Case of Karl-Otto Apel’, unpublished paper presented to the philosophical society Cogito, University College Cork, 10 December 1982 -- [after noting the recurring battle between metaphysics and anti metaphysics, most recently the strange bedfellows of conservative, liberal and radical from Heidegger to Rorty to Derrida proposes a 4-fold rather than binary model] This quadruple constellation has been in evidence ever since the classical Greek period and can be traced back to the existence side by side of everyday language embodying common sense, the paradigmatically regulated language of science which tends to monopolise rationality as such, philosophical language which claims to embody noetic rationality, and finally the claim of metacritical enlighteners to be able to expose the presuppositions of philosophy and thus to clarify the concept of rationality in its broadest conceivable sense. Accordingly, the following four poles can be seen most basically to determine the dispute between the representative of first philosophy and their metacritics: -- (1) "dogmatic first philosophy", including every form of philosophy of common-sense which elevates conventional forms of language use, cognition and action to the status of criterion of argumentation; (2) "self-critical first philosophy" in the sense of all forms of transcendental philosophy which regard common sense as well as science as explicandum and deduce general conditions for them from an irreducible, final and immutable criterion; -- (3) "dogmatic metacitique" in the sense of the scientistic critique of philosophy which on the basis of a determinate concept of science as final criterion implicitly or explicitly seeks the dissolution of both dogmatic and self-critical forms of first philosophy; -- and, finally, (4) "dialectical metacritique" as that form of critique of philosophy which takes in its stride all the above-mentioned types of philosophy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  metaphysics  scepticism  rationality  foundationalism  anti-foundationalism  Heidegger  Wittgenstein  Rorty  Derrida  Foucault  deconstruction  postmodern  critical_theory  certainty  epistemology  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
EFRAIM PODOKSIK. NEO-KANTIANISM AND GEORG SIMMEL'S INTERPRETATION OF KANT. Modern Intellectual History
available on CJO2014. - Hebrew University of Jerusalem -- This essay explores the development of Georg Simmel's interpretation of Immanuel Kant's philosophy in the context of neo-Kantianism and its preoccupation with the question of unity in modern diversity. It argues that the neo-Kantian movement can be divided into two periods: in the first, unity was addressed with regard to Kant's epistemology; in the second period, the main issue was the overall coherence of Kantian teaching. Simmel, who belonged to the younger generation of neo-Kantians, absorbed the conclusions of the previous generation that purged Kantian epistemology from its metaphysical foundations related to the noumenal world. Yet he did not share the views of his peers who considered Kant to be the philosopher of cultural plurality. On the contrary, he argued that Kant's system is thoroughly intellectualistic, and that ethics, aesthetics and religion within it are subordinated to logic. At the same time, his own philosophy presupposed cultural plurality akin to that of other neo-Kantians. In other words, Simmel abandoned Kant in order to develop his own version of neo-Kantianism.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  social_theory  German_Idealism  German_scholars  Simmel  metaphysics  sociology  neo-Kantian  19thC  20thC  culture  diversity  modernity  pluralism 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Kevin Slack - Benjamin Franklin’s Metaphysical Essays and the Virtue of Humility | JSTOR: American Political Thought, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Spring 2013), pp. 31-61
Historians have long rejected Max Weber and D. H. Lawrence’s portrayal of Benjamin Franklin as the stuffy architect of a new kind of prudish bourgeois virtue. Recent scholarly work has challenged this notion and has added something more: the idea that Franklin is a serious thinker, even an ironic thinker, in the Western philosophic tradition. Certainly Franklin participated in a vigorous intellectual debate with the greatest minds of his time over the meaning of religion, moral duty, and virtue. In this article I return to Franklin’s own writings to provide what I think is a new and hopefully provocative interpretation of Franklin as a philosophic thinker. After briefly recounting the traditional interpretation of Franklin’s Autobiography, I present new interpretations of Franklin’s metaphysical essays in the context of his orientation to the philosophical schools of his day and argue that Franklin, upon this foundation, constructs his own theory of the philosophical temper. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  American_colonies  American_Revolution  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  Deism  metaphysics  determinism  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  Franklin_Ben  virtue  civic_virtue  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Dunham, review - W. J. Mander (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 22, 2014
This volume is a hugely important contribution to scholarship on 19thC philosophy. ...for many important aspects of British philosophy in the 19thC the scholarship is almost non-existent. As Mander notes in the introduction, when we hear "19thC philosophy", we are more likely to think of 'the great systems of continental thought'. This volume shows that the British tradition boasts a remarkably rich and varied range of philosophical resources, and that it deserves the level of scholarship that the British traditions of the 17thC and 18thC are beginning to enjoy. In a review of another recent volume on 19thC philosophy Frederick Beiser argued that 'No period ... stands in more need of an original historian than 19thC philosophy. The standard tropes and figures do no justice to its depths, riches, and powers'. One of this present volume's greatest virtues is that it answers Beiser's plea as well as offering an impressive number of very original contributions.... It does an outstanding job of introducing a wide range of philosophical figures and ideas that will be unknown... It also includes excellent contributions on well-known philosophers and orientates the reader to the secondary literature.... The... volume provides a clear and comprehensive picture of how 19thC philosophy was practised and understood during the period. -- The Handbook has 6 parts: (1) Logic and Scientific Method; (2) Metaphysics; (3) Science and Philosophy; (4) Ethical, Social, and Political Thought; (5) Religious Philosophy; and, (6) The Practice of Philosophy. As Mander states, these classifications come from our contemporary perspective, and we should not expect the work of 19thC philosophers to neatly fit within them. Nonetheless, the individual authors [present] the aspects of a philosopher or school.. that fits within these categories while ... making clear how these aspects fit within a larger philosophical perspective ....
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october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jason M. Wirth, Seattle University, review - Dalia Nassar (ed.), The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy (OUP 2014) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 23, 2014
Dalia Nassar's assemblage of engaging and significant essays on some of the resurgent philosophers of early German romanticism emphasizes their contemporary philosophical relevance. "For it is a specifically philosophical revival, motivated by philosophical questions". Nassar demarcates this relevance into four general kinds. In the first part of the book, consisting of a fascinating debate between two of the heaviest hitters in this revival, Manfred Frank and Frederick Beiser, the question revolves around the very identity of early German philosophical romanticism. What counts as a work of this kind? What makes these works significantly different from works by practitioners of German idealism? Or can the two areas be so clearly distinguished? The next three sections are less global in their ambitions, but all of them touch on important facets of this period's enduring philosophical provocation. The second section features essays on the question of culture, language, sociability, and education, while the third turns to matters aesthetic, and the fourth and concluding section takes up the question of science.
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september 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Della Rocca, review - Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide (2013) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 2014
Karen Detlefsen (ed.), Descartes' Meditations: A Critical Guide, Cambridge University Press, 2013, 264pp., $95.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780521111607. -- Reviewed by Michael Della Rocca, Yale University -- What explains the continuing power the Meditations has over us, its ability to shape our ways of philosophical thinking even today? As influential as Descartes' arguments have been, it is certainly not the rational compellingness of those arguments that gives the book its exalted place in philosophy. And while Descartes' departures from Aristotelian philosophy (to the extent that he broke with it) are historically and philosophically important, they do little to explain the lasting and powerful attraction of the Meditations. I will return to this mysterious power at the end of this review. But first I want to show how the many fine and well-selected essays in Karen Detlefsen's volume collectively confirm the widespread conviction that engagement with Descartes remains vital to philosophy. -- first rate group of authors, including Garber on Descartes's response to Hobbes's objections re substance
books  reviews  17thC  intellectual_history  Descartes  Hobbes  Locke  metaphysics  epistemology  substance  scepticism  cogito  perception  qualia  natural_philosophy  self  self-knowledge  self-examination  theology  scholastics  Aristotelian  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Charlie Huenemann, review - Matthew J. Kisner and Andrew Youpa (eds.), Essays on Spinoza's Ethical Theory (OUP) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 09, 2014
This volume presents a cohesive and engaging set of essays, converging on the question: was Spinoza frowning or smiling? ...as he surveyed the wide range of human moral phenomena, did he merely bemoan our superstitious beliefs and ignorant behaviors? Or did he see some of it as truly virtuous? But how can anything be virtuous, if all human actions are completely determined by an infinite substance that doesn't give a damn what happens? --...Charles Jarrett's essay forcefully presents the challenges of finding genuine morality in Spinoza's philosophy. As Jarrett reads him, Spinoza left himself no room to construct a meaningful "ideal" of human behavior. Indeed, "good" itself is misleading, as Spinoza "advocates or recommends that we take a perspective from which good and evil cannot be conceived. He thus seems... to advocate, a transcendence of ethics". -- Several essays take up Jarrett's challenge. -- Some of the essays are concerned with saving the possibility of Spinoza's morality from other doctrines he espoused. Michael LeBuffe ("Necessity and the Commands of Reason in the Ethics") -- Karolina Hübner rescues meaningful discourse about humanity as a whole in the face of Spinoza's disdain for universals. Eugene Marshall ("Man is a God to Man: How Humans can be Adequate Causes") defends the intelligibility, within Spinoza's determinism, that some actions can be autonomous and hence "free". -- Some of the essays provide broad and masterful perspective... meditations on the nature and significance of Spinoza's ethical project. -- A final trio of essays connects Spinoza's morality with the claims regarding "eternity" in Part V of the Ethics. These are especially welcome, as Spinoza's mystical claims are sometimes treated as an embarrassment or as a separate island of befuddlement. -- there is not a single clunker in the lot. The introduction is a thoughtful overview of the terrain that also provides a useful integration of the chapters that follow. If you are studying Spinoza's ethical theory, you need this book.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  determinism  free_will  causation  good  evil  infinity  virtue 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Christopher Bartley, review - Matthew R. Dasti and Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 16, 2014
Reviewed by Christopher Bartley, University of Liverpool -- This is a fine collection of learned essays replete with translations from primary sources, but a sense of frustration may be induced in the reader attracted by the book's title. Most of the contributors admit that the topics of free will, agency and selfhood as understood in the West today don't really have equivalents in the Indian traditions of thought and practice under consideration.
books  reviews  Indian_religion  Indian_philosophy  Hinduism  Buddhism  Sanskrit  free_will  self  ontology  metaphysics  reincarnation  metempsychosis  emotions  desire  agency 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
David Shoemaker, Tulane University, review - Derk Pereboom, Free Will, Agency, and Meaning in Life // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // September 14, 2014
This is basically a new and improved version of Derk Pereboom's important Living Without Free Will (2001). In the thirteen-year interval, his skepticism about free will has been the subject of lots of critical scrutiny (with over 600 citations). Pereboom has taken this scrutiny seriously, and in this book he lays out a refined version of his view designed to beat his critics back and expand the view in several ways. Pereboom's version of skepticism is called hard incompatibilism, according to which the type of free will necessary for moral responsibility of the basic desert-entailing kind is incompatible with determinism, and we lack any good reason to believe that its indeterministic conditions obtain. Consequently, many of our responsibility responses... are unjustified, and so ought rationally to be altered. Nevertheless, ... there are other attitudes and practices compatible with his skeptical conclusions that may take their place, and substituting them will contribute to our living in a better world and finding meaning in life. -- Pereboom is advocating a massive rewriting of human sensibility based on theoretical arguments that are, as he allows, not decisive. Now when it comes to harsh treatment of others, he may be right that the strength of his metaphysical arguments "provide[s] a sound moral reason to treat wrongdoers as if the skeptical position were true". But a "better safe than sorry" argument like this feels less gripping when applied to the sorts of positive treatment -- often flowing from loving relationships -- that are also ruled out to the extent they presuppose basic desert. Indeed, now it looks as if the argument may have more power in the other direction: to the extent these relationships are exceedingly valuable, render us vulnerable to a wide range of attitudes, and would take significant work to revise, "better safe than sorry" may counsel revisiting and rewriting the skeptical theoretical arguments, or at least their practical implications. There may thus be an asymmetrical payoff to revisionary metaphysics like Pereboom's, giving us reason to revise our practices only in the negative cases.
books  reviews  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  action-theory  free_will  accountability 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey K. McDonough, review - Justin E. H. Smith, Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // April 17, 2012
Justin E. H. Smith, Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life, Princeton University Press, 2011, 392pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691141787.
Reviewed by Jeffrey K. McDonough, Harvard University -- It is widely recognized that Leibniz's philosophical thought is deeply influenced by the mathematics, physics and philosophical theology of his era. Justin E. H. Smith's Divine Machines argues that many of Leibniz's most central philosophical doctrines are similarly bound up with the life sciences of his time, where the "life sciences" are understood very broadly to include fields as diverse as alchemy, medicine, taxonomy, and paleontology. Smith's groundbreaking exploration represents an important contribution to our understanding of both Leibniz's philosophy and the study of life in the early modern era. It is to be recommended to historians, philosophers, and historians of philosophy alike. Below I highlight four central topics in Smith's book, raising some reservations along the way.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  Leibniz  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  monads  causation  species  teleology  anatomy  biology  medicine  microscope  fossils  reproduction  theodicy  creation  mechanism  organism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeff McDonough's CV - Harvard University - Philosophy Department
Areas of Specialization: Early Modern Philosophy, History and Philosophy of Science. -- Areas of Competence:Medieval Philosophy, Metaphysics, Philosophy of Religion -- papers, conference presentations focus on Leibniz with some Berkeley, Hume
academia  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  philosophy_of_religion  17thC  18thC  Leibniz  Berkeley  causation  teleology  theodicy  Descartes  Spinoza  Hume  Malebranche  bibliography 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview - Jeffrey K. McDonough -Leibniz, Berkeley, Kant, Frege; bees, toasters and Julius Caesar » 3:AM Magazine - September 2014
Good overview of different approaches to Leibniz. Causation and relation of divine and creaturely activity - Scholastics, Berkeley, Malebranche, Leibniz. Difference between Malebranche and Berkeley’s idealism. Kant on refutation of idealism re Cartesian scepticism of external world.
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Leibniz  Berkeley  Malebranche  Kant  substance  metaphysics  causation  teleology  theodicy  creation  mind-body  volition  mechanism  physics  philosophy_of_science  history_of_science  optics  idealism  scepticism  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Matteo Residori - Néoplatonisme et scepticisme dans le Malpiglio secondo du Tasse | Italique, V, 2002, p. 93-108.
« «Del fuggir la moltitudine ». Néoplatonisme et scepticisme dans le Malpiglio secondo du Tasse », Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.150 **--** La composition, en 1584-1585, du dyptique de dialogues consacré à Vincenzo et à Giovanlorenzo Malpiglio semble destinée à illustrer la double vocation de l’œuvre dialogique du Tasse, telle que l’auteur la définit à la même époque dans son discours sur le dialogue.1Le malpiglio overo de la corte, qui a pour protagoniste le gentilhomme lucquois Vincenzo Malpiglio, trésorier du duc de Ferrare, est un exemple parfait de dialogue « civil ou moral », portant sur les problèmes éthiques et politiques de la vie de cour. Le malpiglio secondo overo del fuggir la moltitudine semble pencher plutôt du côté du genre « spéculatif », qui a pour objet les questions concernant « la science et la vérité ». Mais cette définition n’est pas assez précise. En mettant en scène le fils de Vincenzo, Giovanlorenzo, jeune homme brillant qui aspire à l’otium littéraire et philosophique, le Tasse propose dans le malpiglio secondo une réflexion sur les fondements mêmes de l’activité spéculative, et, de ce fait, sur la légitimité de sa propre entreprise littéraire. Dans la lecture du dialogue il faudra tenir compte de cette dimension réflexive, tout en essayant d’en préciser les circonstances et la portée réelle. D’autre part, la complexité du parcours que le Tasse dessine dans le texte, qui compte parmi les plus ambigus des dialogues, demande au lecteur de porter une attention particulière aux modèles qui en organisent la texture composite. C’est dans cette direction que nous avons orienté notre lecture, pour essayer de démonter la machine complexe du malpiglio secondo et d’éclairer ainsi quelques uns de ses enjeux essentiels. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  16thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Italy  Renaissance  Tasso  dialogue  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  metaphysics  epistemology  Neoplatonism  scepticism  otium  natural_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
John Horgan - Physicist George Ellis Knocks Physicists for Knocking Philosophy, Falsification, Free Will | Cross-Check, Scientific American Blog Network - July 2014
A native of South Africa, Ellis is professor emeritus at the U of Cape Town, where he taught for decades, and has also held positions at Cambridge, the U of Texas, the Fermi Institute and ...around the globe. He was an early critic of apartheid, and Mandela awarded him the Order of the Star of S.Africa. -- Horgan: At the conference where we met you were in a session called “The end of experiment.” What was that about? - Ellis: - many of the possible high-energy physics experiments and astronomy observations relevant to cosmology are now in essence nearly complete. Physics experiments are approaching the highest energies it will ever be possible to test by any collider experiment... We can’t build a collider bigger than the surface of the Earth. Thus our ability to test high energy physics – and hence structures on the smallest physical scales – is approaching its limits. Astronomical observations at all wavelengths are now probing the most distant cosmological events that will ever be “seeable” by any kinds of radiation whatever, because of visual horizons for each form of radiation. -- So what we can see at the largest and smallest scales is approaching what will ever be possible, except for refining the details. But I emphasize that this comment does not apply to complex systems. Complexity is almost unbounded – microbiology, biology, the brain will give us work to do for many centuries more, what we may find may be very unexpected. That might also apply to the foundations of quantum physics, and its relation to complexity. -- I concede that observations relevant to structure formation in the universe – galaxies, stars, planets – have a good while to go, they are in essence verging to the side of studying complexity, and still have life in them yet, they are very interesting studies.
physics  cosmology  astronomy  scientism  reductionism  complexity  metaphysics  creation  big_bang  free_will  philosophy_of_science  neuroscience  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Reviewed by Tom Donaldson - David J. Chalmers, Constructing the World (OUP 2014) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // August 2014
Stanford University -- This is a monumental book, in several respects. Most obviously, it’s very long: longer, by my estimate, than the Critique of Pure Reason b y a margin of about three and a half Tractatus. It is also vast in scope: Chalmers discusses a huge range of topics in formal and informal epistemology, metaphysics, the philosophy of language, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of science. There is even some history: Carnap is the ‘hero’ of Constructing the World (p. xvii), and one of Chalmers’ goals is to reassess Carnap’s work — especially the Aufbau. Paper copies of the book contain eight chapters and seventeen short supplemental ‘excursuses’. Chalmers has also made one extra chapter and four additional excursuses available online. The book is based on Chalmers’ 2010 John Locke lectures, which the Oxford University philosophy department has to its great credit put online in mp3 format. Chalmers has made no major changes to his position or terminology between delivering the lectures and completing the book, so those who like to take their philosophy aurally can start with the online lectures before turning to the written text for more detail. -- In section one I discuss Chalmers’ use of the vexed term ‘a priori’. In section two I discuss Chalmers’ defence of the claim that there are a priori truths (including synthetic a priori truths) from empiricist doubters. In section three I explain how Chalmers defends his ‘scrutability theses’. In section four I outline the Fregean theory of sense.
books  reviews  kindle-available  logic  Carnap  Frege  Quine  metaphysics  epistemology  philosophy_of_language  mind  consciousness  subjectivity  apriori  philosophy_of_science 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Gorman - Hayden White as analytical philosopher of mind | Rethinking History Vol. 17, Iss. 4, 2013 - Special Issue : Hayden White’s " Metahistory " 40 Years On - Taylor & Francis Online
Philosophers and historians in Cambridge did not recognise either the relevance or the importance of Metahistory when it was published in 1973. The reasons are here explained in terms of the nature of the analytical tradition: the principled distinctiveness of analytical philosophy from (1) history, (2) speculative metaphysics, and (3) political morality. Following an analysis of ‘analysis’, Metahistory is argued to be an exercise in the recovery of paradigm cases in Strawsonian descriptive metaphysics that offers the outlines of an advanced philosophy of mind and philosophy of time. -- Jonathan Gorman is Emeritus Professor of Moral Philosophy at the Queen's University of Belfast. His books in philosophy of history are The Expression of Historical Knowledge (Edinburgh 1982), Understanding History (Ottawa 1992) and Historical Judgement (Stocksfield 2007), and he has many articles and reviews in theory of history journals and collections. He continues to apply analytic pragmatic philosophy to historical thought, and writes also in other branches of philosophy and in legal theory.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  historiography  narrative  analytical_philosophy  ordinary_language_philosophy  speech-act  philosophy_of_history  mind  time  metaphysics  Strawson_PF  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, by Simon Blackburn | Answers.com
The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, by Simon Blackburn, Oxford University Press
This dictionary covers every aspect of philosophy from Aristotle to Zen. Entries include biographies of famous and influential philosophers, in-depth analysis of philosophical terms and concepts, a chronology of philosophical events from antiquity to the present day, and coverage of themes from Chinese, Indian, Islamic and Jewish philosophy.
books  etexts  reference  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_religion  metaphysics  metaethics  epistemology  ontology  logic  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  political_philosophy 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Rex Gilliland - What Becomes of the Human after Humanism? Heidegger and Derrida | Dartmouth College
We will consider Heidegger’s concept of the human being in the “Letter on ‘Humanism’” and Derrida’s reading of it in “The Ends of Man.” The “Letter on ‘Humanism’” is the first publication in which Heidegger extensively discusses the central themes of his later thought and is also the text that framed Heidegger’s reception in postwar France. In it, Heidegger critically examines the metaphysical foundation of humanism and develops a conception of the human being that attempts to think human decision in terms of its fundamental orientation toward being. Against humanists such as Sartre, Heidegger argues that being, not the human being, is of primary importance. At the same time, he maintains that the human being cannot be reduced to an epiphenomenon of being because being needs the human being to preserve its truth. We will consider Derrida’s response and his own views about the human being. In “The Ends of Man,” a nuanced reading of this text and the debate about humanism it helped to inspire, Derrida highlights the inadequacies of the interpretations of Heidegger found on both sides of the debate. However, Derrida also argues that there is a certain justification for these readings: Due to the fact that he privileges the human being and defines its essence via the proximity and presence of being, Heidegger fails to escape metaphysics. Does Derrida provide an alternate conception that avoids these difficulties? We will explore these questions by examining Derrida’s notions of undecidability and the relationship to an impossible presence: Is the extreme minimalism of Derrida’s position needed to disrupt the metaphysics of presence, or does it lead to a conception of the human being that is unnecessarily meager?
paper  20thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  continental_philosophy  Heidegger  Derrida  humanism  anti-humanism  post-WWII  human_nature  metaphysics  Being  determinism  free_will  responsibility  Sartre  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Philosophy at 3:AM: Questions and Answers with 25 Top Philosophers : Richard Marshall : 9780199969531
Contents -- i. Introduction. ; Chapter 1. Brian Leiter: 'Leiter Reports' ; Chapter 2. Jason Stanley : 'Philosophy As The Great Naivete' ; Chapter 3. Eric Schwitzgebel: 'The Splintered Skeptic' ; Chapter 4. Mark Rowlands: 'Hour Of The Wolf' ; Chapter 5. Eric T Olson: 'The Philosopher With No Hands' ; Chapter 6. Craig Callender: ' Time Lord' ; Chapter 7. Kieran Setiya: ' What Anscombe Intended and Other Puzzles' ; Chapter 8. Kit Fine: 'Metaphysical Kit' ; Chapter 9. Patricia Churchland: 'Causal Machines' ; Chapter 10. Valerie Tiberius: 'Mostly Elephant, ErgoEL' ; Chapter 11. Peter Carruthers: 'Mind Reader' ; Chapter 12. Josh Knobe: 'Indie Rock Virtues' ; Chapter 13. Al Mele: 'The Four Million Dollar Philosopher ; Chapter 14.Graham Priest: 'Logically Speaking' ; Chapter 15. Ursula Renz: 'After Spinoza: Wiser, Freer, Happier' ; Chapter 16. Cecile Fabre: ' On The Intrinsic Value Of Each Of Us' ; Chapter 17. Hilde Linderman: ' No Ethics Without Feminism' ; Chapter 18. Elizabeth S. Anderson: 'The New Leveller' ; Chapter 19. Christine Korsgaard: 'Treating People As End In Themselves' ; Chapter 20. Michael Lynch: 'Truth, Reason and Democracy' ; Chapter 21. Timothy Williamson : 'Classical Investigations' ; Chapter 22. Ernie Lapore: 'Meaning, Truth, Language, Reality' ; Chapter 23. Jerry Fodor: 'Meaningful Words Without Sense, And Other Revolutions.' ; Chapter 24. Huw Price: 'Without Mirrors' ; Chapter 25. Gary Gutting: 'What Philosophers Know'
books  buy  philosophy  intellectual_history  metaphysics  metaethics  ontology  scepticism  analytical_philosophy  political_philosophy  epistemology  feminism  philosophy_of_language  mind  mind-body  consciousness  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_law  pragmatism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - God's Estate [Locke's theory of God's ownership of the cosmos] | JSTOR: The Journal of Religious Ethics, Vol. 20, No. 1 (Spring, 1992), pp. 69-92
This article defends John Locke's notion that the cosmos is owned by God and explores the ethical implications of such divine ownership. Locke's theory, recently revived by Baruch Brody, is modified and defended against criticisms leveled against it by Joseph Lombardi and Robert Young. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  theology  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  creation  theism  Plato-religion  soul  immortality  property  property_rights  God-attributes  obligation  morality-divine_command  morality-Christian  Locke-religion  Locke-2_Treatises  cosmology  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - Dualism and the Problem of Individuation | JSTOR: Religious Studies, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Jun., 1986), pp. 263-276
Quite helpful review of various metaphysical debates from Descartes onwards, how the "substance" debates have evolved, including the old identity of indiscernables claim that's been thoroughly challenged in post WWII analytical_philosophy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  20thC  Descartes  Locke  Butler  Reid  metaphysics  ontology  substance  soul  dualism  physicalism  mind-body  consciousness  immortality  universals  particulars  identity  self  analytical_philosophy  logic  Leibniz  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Anthony Chemero and Michael Silberstein - After the Philosophy of Mind: Replacing Scholasticism with Science | JSTOR: Philosophy of Science, Vol. 75, No. 1 (January 2008), pp. 1-27
We provide a taxonomy of the two most important debates in the philosophy of the cognitive and neural sciences. The first debate is over methodological individualism: is the object of the cognitive and neural sciences the brain, the whole animal, or the animal—environment system? The second is over explanatory style: should explanation in cognitive and neural science be reductionist‐mechanistic, interlevel mechanistic, or dynamical? After setting out the debates, we discuss the ways in which they are interconnected. Finally, we make some recommendations that we hope will help philosophers interested in the cognitive and neural sciences to avoid dead ends. -- partially a lit survey so good bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  mind  mind-body  neuroscience  reductionism  mechanism  cognition  ontology  methodology  levels_of_analyis  critical_realism  emergence  individualism-methodology  unit_of_analysis  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Jose Luis Bermudez - Jonathan Lowe, Subjects of Experience | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 195 (Apr., 1999), pp. 272-275
Lowe develops his anti-physicalist approach to self, mind-body etc - Cartesian that self is substantial, Locke that it's primarily psychological, Aristotle that it's not immaterial -- implications for other areas beyond philosophy of mind, such as language -- an earlier version of his publications in the 2000s before his death? -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  metaphysics  ontology  philosophy_of_language  mind  mind-body  Descartes  Locke  physicalism  dualism  nominalism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael P. Lynch, review essay - Beyond the Walls of Reason: The Last Word by Thomas Nagel | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 197 (Oct., 1999), pp. 529-536
Nagel attacks primarily perspectivism, lumping naturalists (e.g. Quine, Dennett) and contextualists (e.g. Rorty, Putnam) with (certain forms of? ) relativism -- Lynch teasing apart threads in Nagel's argument looks interesting -- Nagel accuses perspectivism of having to adopt a "view from nowhere" whereas one of the motivations for perspectivism is that absolute reason, truth etc requires the "view from nowhere" or God's eye view -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  metaphysics  epistemology  perspectivism  relativism  logic  Nagel  Quine  Dennett  Rorty  Putnam  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
A. W. Moore and Peter Sullivan - Ineffability and Nonsense (debate) | JSTOR: Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes, Vol. 77 (2003), pp. 169-193+195-223
[A. W. Moore] There are criteria of ineffability whereby, even if the concept of ineffability can never serve to modify truth, it can sometimes (non-trivially) serve to modify other things, specifically understanding. This allows for a reappraisal of the dispute between those who adopt a traditional reading of Wittgenstein's Tractatus and those who adopt the new reading recently championed by Diamond, Conant, and others. By maintaining that what the nonsense in the Tractatus is supposed to convey is ineffable understanding, rather than ineffable truth, we can do considerable justice to each of these readings. We can also do considerable justice to the Tractatus. /// [Peter Sullivan] Moore proposes to cut between 'traditional' and 'new' approaches to the Tractatus, suggesting that Wittgenstein's intention is to convey, through the knowing use of nonsense, ineffable understanding. I argue, first, that there is indeed room for a proposal of Moore's general kind. Secondly, though, I question whether Moore's actual proposal is not more in tune with Wittgenstein's later thought than with the attitude of the Tractatus. -- nearly 200 references -- should provide an overview of the Old vs New Wittgenstein positions, who's who and background for Moore's modern metaphysics book (kindle) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  metaphysics  philosophy_of_science  Logical_Positivism  philosophy_of_language  Wittgenstein  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Abraham D. Stone - On Husserl and Cavellian Scepticism | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 50, No. 198 (Jan., 2000), pp. 1-21
Yikes! Cavell sets up both metaphysics and (external world) scepticism as dogmatic, and asks whether Husserl was a sceptic. Stone starts from position that both Kant and Husserl would agree with Cavell re dogmatism. Works his way 1st through Kant’s shift from metaphysics (unanswerable) to epistemology (bounds on the answerable) and then how Husserl, who is post Kantian in rejecting the noumenal, uses some of Kant and Thomism to deal with knowable. As soon as he starts framing the structural concepts Husserl uses I'm lost. He winds up putting his explication of Husserl in comparison with Wittgenstein (Cavell's version of W?) -- if I get into phenomenology, Husserl and where Wittgenstein fits, probably worth returning to -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  20thC  metaphysics  epistemology  idealism-transcendental  Kant  Husserl  phenomenology  scepticism  Wittgenstein  Cavell  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Graham Bird - Rae Langton, Kantian Humility: Our Ignorance of Things in Themselves | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 50, No. 198 (Jan., 2000), pp. 105-108
Another detailed critique re range of interpretations of Kant's thing-in-itself and transcendental idealism framed between traditionalist (e, g. P Strawson) and revolutionary (quasi deflationary, e.g. Alyson) -- didn't download
books  reviews  jstor  articles  intellectual_history  18thC  Kant  metaphysics  epistemology  idealism-transcendental  noumena  phenomena  properties  relations  essence  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lucy Allais - Intrinsic Natures: A Critique of Langton on Kant | JSTOR: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 73, No. 1 (Jul., 2006), pp. 143-169
This paper argues that there is an important respect in which Rae Langton's recent interpretation of Kant is correct: Kant's claim that we cannot know things in themselves should be understood as the claim that we cannot know the intrinsic nature of things. However, I dispute Langton's account of intrinsic properties, and therefore her version of what this claim amounts to. Langton's distinction between intrinsic, causally inert properties and causal powers is problematic, both as an interpretation of Kant, and as an independent metaphysical position. I propose a different reading of the claim that we cannot know things intrinsically. I distinguish between two ways of knowing things: in terms of their effects on other things, and as they are apart from these. I argue that knowing things' powers is knowing things in terms of effects on other things, and therefore is not knowing them as they are in themselves, and that there are textual grounds for attributing this position to Kant. -- useful bibliography of past few decades of both Kant debate and powers, properties etc metaphysics -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  books  intellectual_history  18thC  Kant  metaphysics  epistemology  causation  Hume-causation  Locke  Leibniz  noumena  phenomena  properties  essence  substance  relations  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Galen Strawson - The Identity of the Categorical and the Dispositional | JSTOR: Analysis, Vol. 68, No. 4 (Oct., 2008), pp. 271-282
Attacks the bad metaphysics that results from projecting our ability to conceptualize different aspects of objects etc separately, project them onto reality where those concepts can't exist independently, and then draw elaborate metaphysical non puzzles from the mess -- quotes Ramsey and Nietzsche, not Wittgenstein -- ftbt Ramsey 1925: 60.
He agrees with Nietzsche, who writes that 'language is built in terms of the most naive prejudices ... we read disharmonies and problems into things because we think only in the form of language - thus believing in the "eternal truth" of "reason" (e.g. subject, predicate, etc.). ... That we have a right to distinguish between subject and predicate - ... that is our strongest belief; in fact, at bottom, even the belief in cause and effect itself, in conditio and conditionatum, is merely an individual case of the first and general belief, our primeval belief in subject and predicate. ... Might not this belief in the concept of subject and predicate be a great stupidity?'" -- claims but without developing that Locke's consistent with his approach read but didn't download
article  jstor  metaphysics  analytical_philosophy  concepts  realism  properties  modal_logic  possible_worlds  Locke  language-bad_metaphysics  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Galen Strawson - Realism and Causation | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 37, No. 148 (Jul., 1987), pp. 253-277
This looks like early work towards his "necessary connexion" book on Hume that challenges the standard regularity interpretation of Hume on causality. Bibliography looks useful -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  metaphysics  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_science  18thC  Hume-causation  causation  realism  scepticism  positivism  properties  laws_of_nature  powers  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lennon, Thomas M., Stainton, Robert J. (Eds.) 2008 The Achilles of Rationalist Psychology
Downloaded Introduction pdf to Note -- Series: Studies in the History of Philosophy of Mind, Vol. 7 -- newly written papers addressing each of the main contributors to the discussion of the Achilles. Despite the historical importance and intrinsic interest of the argument, very little has been written about it. *--* Contents. *--* Did Plato Articulate the Achilles Argument?. *-- Aristotle on the Unity of Consciousness. *-- The Neoplatonic Achilles. *-- The Unity of the Soul and Contrary Appetites in Medieval Philosophy. *-- Hume, Spinoza and the Achilles Inference. *-- Locke and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Reverse Achilles in Locke. *-- Cudworth and Bayle: An Odd Couple?. *-- The Achilles Argument and the Nature of Matter in the Clarke Collins Correspondence. *-- Leibniz’s ‘Achilles’. *-- Hume’s Reply to the Achilles Argument. *-- Kant and Mendelssohn on the Implications of the ‘I Think’. *-- Kant on the Achilles Argument. *-- William James and the Achilles Argument. *-- The Binding Problem: Achilles in the 21st Century.
books  intellectual_history  mind  mind-body  consciousness  perception  thinking_matter  materialism  soul  immortality  substance  Plato  Neoplatonism  Aristotle  Aquinas  Duns_Scotus  Ockham  Augustine  Descartes  Spinoza  Malebranche  Cartesian  Bayle  Locke  Clarke  Collins_Anthony  Leibniz  Hume  Kant  Mendelssohn  Fichte  cognition  neuroscience  psychology  natural_philosophy  metaphysics  rationalist  James_William  history_of_science  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"THE INTELLIGIBLE CREATOR-GOD AND THE INTELLIGENT SOUL OF THE COSMOS IN" by Jason G. Rheins | Penn Dissertations
Advisors - Charles H. Kahn and Susan Sauvé Meyer, Paul Guyer -- When Plato discusses the World-soul, cosmic intellect (nous), and the Demiurge, he approaches them theologically, i.e. as being the subjects of an account of the nature of the gods, but few works in the last half-century or more have addressed the ‘players’ in Plato’s theology as such. -- I analyze Plato’s various accounts of those divine things that are immanent in the world of change (e.g. the World-soul) and those that are said to be transcendent intelligibles (e.g. the Forms and the Demiurge) in order to determine what Plato’s gods are, and what roles they play in his system. -- The invention of the World-soul is revealed to be Plato’s way of instantiating intellect in the cosmos in order to suit the demands of his natural and moral philosophy, while his esoteric account of the Demiurge resolves any tensions between his immanent theology and his metaphysics, and suggests, semi-literally, the role that timeless, intelligible goodness plays in organizing the sensible world of change. -- Rheins, Jason G., "THE INTELLIGIBLE CREATOR-GOD AND THE INTELLIGENT SOUL OF THE COSMOS IN PLATO’S THEOLOGY AND METAPHYSICS" (2010). Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations. Paper 184. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  religious_history  theology  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  creation  gods-antiquity  God-attributes  God-existence  immanence  transcendence  forms  ideas-theories  Plato  change-metaphysics  cosmology  good  time  timeless  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
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