dunnettreader + metaphor   13

O. Bradley Bassler, The Pace of Modernity: Reading With Blumenberg (2012) | re-press publishers
Wittgenstein said that philosophers should greet each other, not by saying “hello,” but rather “take your time.”  But what is time?  Time is money, but this points to an even better answer to this basic question for our modern epoch: time is acceleration.  In a cultural system which stresses economic efficiency, the quicker route is always the more prized, if not always the better one.  Wittgenstein’s dictum thus constitutes an act of rebellion against the dominant vector of our culture, but as such it threatens to become (quickly) anti-modern.  We need an approach to “reading” our information-rich culture which is not reactionary but rather meets its accelerated condition.  In this book, O. Bradley Bassler develops a toolkit for acute reading of our modern pace, not through withdrawal but rather through active engagement with a broad range of disciplines.  The main characters in this drama comprise a cast of master readers: Hannah Arendt, Jean Starobinski, Harold Bloom, Angus Fletcher, Hans Blumenberg and John Ashbery, with secondary figures drawn from the readers and critics whom this central group suggests.  We must develop a vocabulary of pacing, reflecting our modern distance from classical sources and the concomitant acceleration of our contemporary condition.  Only in this way can we begin to situate the phenomenon of modernity within the larger scales of human culture and history.

About the Author
O. Bradley Bassler studied in the Committee on Social Thought at the University of Chicago and took a second Ph.D. in Mathematics at Wesleyan University.  He has published in areas ranging from philosophy and history of philosophy to literary studies and the foundations of mathematics, with essays appearing in New German Critique, Heidegger Studies, Review of Metaphysics and other journals.  He is also a published poet.  He currently is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Georgia, Athens, USA.
biocultural_evolution  etexts  change-social  technology  open_access  Arendt  dualism  lit_crit  phenomenology  metaphor  Montaigne  Husserl  individualism  books  poetics  modernity  social_theory  Blumenberg  rhetoric  human_nature  Heidegger  Scribd  philosophical_anthropology 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
G. A. Wells - Herder's Two Philosophies of History (1960) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas - Vol. 21, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1960), pp. 527-537 - reviews reception of Herder's 2 stages of writing about history, how they have been characterized and debated since the late 18thC, and which he thinks says as much re German intellectual currents and historicism than Herder's own thought -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  18thC  19thC  20thC  Herder  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historicism  philosophy_of_history  German_scholarship  declinism  cycles  metaphor  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Caroline Jacot Grapa - Dans le vif du sujet - Diderot, corps et âme ( 2009) | Classiques Garnier - collection L'Europe des Lumières
Ce livre est un essai sur le style du matérialisme de Diderot, sa psychologie, sa métaphysique et sur les figures de l'intériorité des Lumières. La langue de l'intériorité, apanage de la spiritualité, se retrempe au contact sensible des métaphores de l'époque. Elles donnent accès à un savoir nouveau de la vie corporelle. L'actualité de cet essai tient au dialogue qu'il engage avec la phénoménologie et les neurosciences. -- This work is an essay on the style of Diderot's materialism, his psychology and his metaphysics. Its modern pertinence stems from the dialogue established with phenomenology and neurosciences. -- ISBN 978-2-8124-0046-9 -- 504 pages -- looks extremely interesting -- tracking reception of British empiricism, debates over various Cartesian proposals for dealing with animals, and the new directions taken both in life sciences and psychology and the metaphysics of materialism -- downloaded TOC as pdf to Note
books  find  amazon.fr  libraries  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  natural_philosophy  18thC  France  Diderot  d'Alembert  d'Holbach  Cartesian  Locke  Newton  Newtonian  Encyclopédie  Republic_of_Letters  philosophes  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Vitalism  psychology  thinking_matter  anatomy  physiology  scientific_method  organism  subject  subjectivity  phenomenology  neuroscience  materialism  metaphysics  mind  mind-body  soul  human_nature  metaphor  French_language  French_lit  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview of Peter Kivy - Apologia pro vita sua: my work in philosophy » 3:AM Magazine
Peter Kivy, you are a leading figure in the philosophy of aesthetics, with particular interest in music and literature. Can you begin by telling us what made you become a philosopher and what were the philosophical puzzles that interested you?. Can you then tell us about the music problem, and in particular how emotions get into the music? After that can you say how you approach the old literature problem as to whether fiction, in particular, a novel, could be a source of knowledge? In doing so can you say why and how music and novels enthral us? -- see also his recommended books - most are recent in philosophy of literature, narrative, metaphor etc
aesthetics  lit_crit  literary_theory  music  music_history  novels  narrative  metaphor  epistemology-moral  Hutcheson  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Georg G. Iggers - Comments on F. R. Ankersmit's Paper, "Historicism: An Attempt at Synthesis" | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 34, No. 3 (Oct., 1995), pp. 162-167
"Forum: The Meaning of Historicism and Its Relevance for Contemporary Theory" -- My differences with F. R. Ankersmit's essay are historiographical and theoretical. On the historiographical plane I disagree with the sharp distinction he draws between the "ontological realism" of Enlightenment historiography and the historical outlook of classical historicism. An examination of Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire shows that Gibbon indeed takes into account internal changes in the Roman Empire. Ranke and Droysen on the other hand assume that the subjects of their study, whether the Papacy or the Prussian state, preserve their identity through time. And in their attempt to "raise history to the rank of a science" (Droysen), historicists in seeking to show wie es eigentlich gewesen (Ranke), go farther in the direction of realism than do Enlightenment historians who are keenly aware of the role of perspective and of the literary and aesthetic aspects of historical writing. On the theoretical plane, although I agree with Ankersmit that metaphor occupies a central role in historical discourse, I disagree when he writes that "coherence has its source either in reality or in the language we use for speaking about it. There is no third possibility." I argue that while reality can be approached only through the mediation of language and metaphor, these presuppose a reality which can be known, no matter how complex and mediated the process of cognitive approximation may be. Rejecting historical realism, Ankersmit nevertheless wants to "encounter the past with the same directness with which anthropologists encounter the alien culture," and thus to escape "all the ideological and emancipatory pretensions of its historiographical predecessor." Yet the very "new cultural history" he takes as an example shows that this cannot be done. -- see both Ankersmit's original article and Ankersmit's response essay downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Gibbon  Germany  historicism  historical_change  style-history  metaphor  Ranke  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Cécile Alduy, Roland Greene - Forum Introduction - Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads | Republics of Letters - Volume 1, Issue 2 ( February 2010)
Nice overview of the entangling and untangling of our notions of experience and experiment from Petrarch to Montaigne -- downloaded pdf to Note -- TOC of Forum -- Between Experience and Experiment: Five Articles at an Early Modern Crossroads by Cécile Alduy, by Roland Greene. (1) Artificial Men: Alchemy, Transubstantiation, and the Homunculus by Mary Baine Campbell. (2) Machines in the Garden by Jessica Riskin. (3) Atheism as a Devotional Category by George Hoffmann. (4) Montaigne: The Eclectic Pragmatist by Anthony Long. (5) Putting Experience First by Timothy Hampton
article  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  epistemology  empiricism  self  metaphor  cultural_history  literary_history  Seneca  Montaigne  scepticism  atheism_panic  pragmatism  alchemy  experimental_philosophy  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
EARLY MODERN RESEARCH GROUP - COMMONWEALTH: THE SOCIAL, CULTURAL, AND CONCEPTUAL CONTEXTS OF AN EARLY MODERN KEYWORD | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 54, No. 3 (SEPTEMBER 2011), pp. 659-687
Group includes Mark Knights? -- The article explores 'commonwealth' both as a term and a conceptual field across the early modern period, with a particular focus on the Anglophone world. The shifts of usage of 'commonwealth' are explored, from a term used to describe the polity, to one used to describe a particular, republican form of polity, through to its eclipse in the eighteenth century by other terms such as 'nation' and 'state'. But the article also investigates the variety of usages during any one time, especially at moments of crisis, and the network of related terms that constituted 'commonwealth'. That investigation requires, it is argued, not just a textual approach but one that embraces social custom and practice, as well as the study of literary and visual forms through which the keyword 'commonwealth' was constructed. The article emphasizes the importance of social context to language; the forms, metaphors and images used to describe and depict the polity; and to show how linguistic change could occur through the transmutation of elements of the conceptual field that endowed the keyword with its meaning. -- lots of references -- looks immensely useful, of course cites original version of Skinner on Bolingbroke -- paywall Cambridge journals
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_politics  commonwealth  body_politic  common_good  republicanism  Whigs-Radicals  macro-microcosm  keywords  political_press  images-political  English_lit  metaphor  concepts  metaphor-political  political-theology  Bolingbroke  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Torrey Shanks - Feminine Figures and the "Fatherhood": Rhetoric and Reason in Locke's "First Treatise of Government" | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 39, No. 1 (February 2011), pp. 31-57
Traditionally neglected, Locke's First Treatise of Government has taken on new significance with feminist interpretations that recognize the importance of its sustained engagement with patriarchal power. Yet feminist interpreters, both critics and admirers alike, read Locke as a champion of the "man of reason," a figure seemingly immune to the influences of passions, imagination, and rhetoric. These interpreters wrongly overlook Locke's extended engagement with the power of rhetoric in the First Treatise, an engagement that troubles the clear opposition of masculine reason and its feminine exclusions. Taking Locke's rhetoric seriously, I argue, makes the First Treatise newly important for what it shows us about Locke's practice of political critique. In following the varied and novel effects of Locke's feminine figures, we find a practice of political critique that depends on a mutually constitutive relation between rhetoric and reason. -- paywall Sage -- see bibliography on jstor information page
article  jstor  paywall  find  libraries  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  literary_history  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  17thC  Locke-1st_Treatise  women-rights  women-property  patriarchy  authority  metaphor  Popish_Plot  Exclusion_Crisis  Filmer  Dryden  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Charles_II  masculinity  femininity  reason  philosophy_of_language  emotions  practical_reason  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Ashcraft: Economic Metaphors, Behavioralism, and Political Theory: Some Observations on the Ideological Uses of Language | JSTOR: The Western Political Quarterly, Vol. 30, No. 3 (Sep., 1977), pp. 313-328
Downloaded pdf to Note -- In accordance with certain general principles relating to the study of ideology advanced by Marx and Mannheim, it is argued that a significant group of behavioral political scientists employee the terminology and concepts of neo-classical economics metaphorically as a means of establishing the nature and limits of political theory within the discipline of political science. The postwar development of behavioral political theory, the political reality to which it refers, and the purposes of theorizing are all described, metaphorically, in the language of economics. It is especially in their reliance upon "technical reason," which serves both as a characterization of the dynamics of capitalism as a socioeconomic system and as the framework for political theorizing, that behavioral political scientists have demonstrated the ideological limits of their metaphorical language. To paraphrase Marx, behavioral political science has sought, through its usage of economic metaphors, to transform the problematic features of the social order into "natural, self-understood forms of social life."
article  jstor  20thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_science  rationality-economics  rational_choice  public_choice  public_policy  metaphor  social_sciences-post-WWII  behavioralism  ideology  neoclassical_economics  capitalism  political_economy  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Robert B. Ekelund, Jr., review - Germano Maifreda: From Oikonomia to Political Economy: Constructing Economic Knowledge from the Renaissance to the Scientific Revolution | EH.net
Ashgate, 2012. vii + 304 pp. $135 (hardcover), ISBN: 978-1-4094-3301-9.

The transition from the culturally and religiously oriented era of Oikonomia to the political economy of, say, Smith and Hume, was not linear.? Culture, science and religion evolved and helped shape conceptions of economic functioning. (It would appear that medieval Christianity was not productive of ?economy.?)? Secularism also evolved and searches for constancy in value, in exchange and in entrepreneurship were shaped by culture and psychology.? Epistemology affected the scaffolding and functioning of the economic superstructure at any point in time.?

[H]e raises intriguing links between culture, psychology, medicine, biology and economic categories. In Chapters 5 through7 (plus an epilogue), Maifreda weaves together exceptionally interesting material on the manner in which the principles of other sciences and studies used what we now call economic reasoning and motivations.? The whole question of how the idea that labor ?caused? or ?represented? or ?was involved with? value is the subject of Chapters 5 and 6.? Maifreda highlights (properly) how Locke?s analysis of private property is the ?essential element? in productive economy (p. 167).? Also examined is how labor and the concept of equilibrium are related to both theological and physiological reasoning, the concept of equilibrium prominent in the writings of Hales and Boisguilbert He concludes that ?powerful metaphors formed within diverse fields of knowledge … lent their assistance to ways of thinking about phenomena and drawing up models and generalizations? (p. 253) that, later, became an independent science of economics and economic reasoning.? One small complaint is that he does not extend his discussion into exactly how and through whom the transition was finally made (e.g., possibly Cantillon and others).? But that may be the subject for another study.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  economic_history  Renaissance  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  16thC  17thC  18thC  political_economy  economic_theory  economic_culture  commerce  values  labor  Locke  property  currency  prices  cultural_history  theology  Providence  moral_philosophy  moral_economy  Foucault  Physiocrats  Linnaeus  biology  physiology  equilibrium  metaphor  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Patricia Meyer Spacks: Imagery and Method in "An Essay on Criticism" (1970)
JSTOR: PMLA, Vol. 85, No. 1 (Jan., 1970), pp. 97-106 -- downloaded pdf to Note-- The poetic method of Pope's "An Essay on Criticism" is to demonstrate how wit can operate, through imagery, as both controlling and creative power. The poem's imagery suggests the relatedness of all human endeavor, defines the special place of criticism, indicates standards of value. Images modify one another to achieve subtle effects, communicate complex and delicate judgments. The multiplicity of imagery is never random; it works by purposeful reinforcement. Even individual images supply poetic and philosophic density. Particularly important is the figure of the "good man" which emerges gradually through the poem, exemplifying a technique characteristic of much of Pope's poetry: the heightening of significant figures to emblematic proportions to exemplify the reality of key abstractions. The form as well as the content of Pope's imagery is important, with metaphors in general indicating more crucial connections than similes reveal. Pope, unlike such predecessors as Cowley, uses both metaphor and simile to convey a set of complicated paraphrasable ideas. He attempts to promulgate doctrine and to enjoin the proper feelings and beliefs about it. The "Essay on Criticism" indicates that metaphor can provide organization without comprising the sole substance of a poem.
article  jstor  lit_crit  18thC  English_lit  Pope  metaphor  rhetoric  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  aesthetics  alchemy  amazon.fr  anatomy  Arendt  article  atheism_panic  authority  behavioralism  bibliography  biocultural_evolution  biology  Blumenberg  body_politic  Bolingbroke  books  British_politics  capitalism  Cartesian  change-social  Charles_II  commerce  commonwealth  common_good  concepts  conscience  cultural_history  currency  cycles  d'Alembert  d'Holbach  declinism  Diderot  downloaded  Dryden  dualism  economic_culture  economic_history  economic_theory  EF-add  emotions  empiricism  Encyclopédie  English_lit  Enlightenment  epistemology  epistemology-moral  equilibrium  etexts  Europe-Early_Modern  Exclusion_Crisis  experimental_philosophy  femininity  Filmer  find  Foucault  France  French_Enlightenment  French_language  French_lit  Germany  German_scholarship  Gibbon  Heidegger  Herder  historical_change  historicism  historiography  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  history_of_science  Hobbes  human_nature  Husserl  Hutcheson  ideology  images-political  individualism  intellectual_history  jstor  keywords  labor  libraries  Linnaeus  literary_history  literary_theory  lit_crit  Locke  Locke-1st_Treatise  macro-microcosm  masculinity  materialism  metaphor  metaphor-political  metaphysics  mind  mind-body  modernity  Montaigne  moral_economy  moral_philosophy  music  music_history  narrative  natural_philosophy  neoclassical_economics  neuroscience  Newton  Newtonian  novels  open_access  organism  patriarchy  paywall  phenomenology  philosophes  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_science  Physiocrats  physiology  poetics  political-theology  political_culture  political_economy  political_philosophy  political_press  political_science  Pope  Popish_Plot  practical_reason  pragmatism  prices  property  Providence  psychology  public_choice  public_policy  Ranke  rationality-economics  rational_choice  reason  religious_belief  Renaissance  republicanism  Republic_of_Letters  reviews  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  scepticism  scientific_method  Scientific_Revolution  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scribd  self  Seneca  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  social_sciences-post-WWII  social_theory  soul  style-history  subject  subjectivity  technology  theology  thinking_matter  values  Vitalism  Whigs-Radicals  women-property  women-rights 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: