dunnettreader + medieval_history   93

BBC Radio 4 - Germany: Memories of a Nation, Reichstag
Neil MacGregor, director of the British Museum, explores 600 years of Germany's complex and often challenging history using objects, art, landmarks and literature.
audio  entre_deux_guerres  15thC  German_unification  design  Reformation  20thC  18thC  19thC  Holy_Roman_Empire  Nazis  art_history  Modernism  Weimar  16thC  Bismarck  Europe-Early_Modern  social_history  medieval_history  cultural_history  Germany  post-WWII  17thC 
december 2017 by dunnettreader
Bruce Campbell: The Great Transition, Lecture 1 of 4 - Ellen McArthur Lectures 2013, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
See his 2016 book with CUP - The Great Transition: Climate, Disease and Society in the Medieval World - kindle-available
Lecture schedule
Lecture 1 - The 14th century as tipping point: From one socio-ecological status quo to another
Lecture 2 - The enabling environment: The Medieval Solar Maximum and Latin Christendom's high-medieval efflorescence
Lecture 3 - A precarious balance: Mounting economic vulnerability in an era of increasing climatic instability
Lecture 4 - Disease intervenes: The Black Death and the 'Great Transition' to an alternative socio-ecological equilibrium
video  lecture  economic_history  social_history  environmental_history  disease  Black_Death  medieval_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  Italy  urbanization  foreign_trade  Mongols  Mamluks  spice_trade  Central_Asia  genetics  weather  agriculture  demography  economic_growth  climate-history  climate_change  Little_Ice_Age  Italy-cities  international_finance 
november 2017 by dunnettreader
Gierke (Maitland trans) - Political Theories of the Middle Ages - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 9/14/2017. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> -- downloaded via Air to Dbox - in "ebooks to file"
downloaded  books  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  political_philosophy  Germany  Holy_Roman_Empire 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Blaydes
We document a divergence in the duration of rule for monarchs in Western Europe and the Islamic world beginning in the medieval period. While leadership tenures in the two regions were similar in the 8th century, Christian kings became increasingly long lived compared to Muslim sultans. We argue that forms of executive constraint that emerged under feudal institutions in Western Europe were associated with increased political stability and find empirical support for this argument. While feudal institutions served as the basis for military recruitment by European monarchs, Muslim sultans relied on mamlukism—or the use of military slaves imported from non-Muslim lands. Dependence on mamluk armies limited the bargaining strength of local notables vis-à-vis the sultan, hindering the development of a productively adversarial relationship between ruler and local elites. We argue that Muslim societies' reliance on mamluks, rather than local elites, as the basis for military leadership, may explain why the Glorious Revolution occurred in England, not Egypt. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
governance-participation  Sultans  Islamic_empires  Europe  military_history  medieval_history  political_participation  article  political_history  political_culture  feudalism  militarization-society  Mamluks  bibliography  Europe-Medieval  monarchy  Great_Divergence  governing_class  government-forms  elites-political_influence  downloaded  state-building  jstor 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
(URL is a pff) Greg Clark & Neil Cummins - Surnames and Social Mobility, Human Nature (2015)
Surnames and Social Mobility
Gregory Clark1 Neil Cummins2
To what extent do parental characteristics explain child social outcomes? Typically, parent-child correlations in socioeconomic measures are in the range 0.2-0.6. Surname evidence suggests, however, that the intergenerational correlation of overall status is much higher. This paper shows, using educational status in England 1170-2012 as an example, that the true underlying correlation of social status is in the range 0.75-0.85. Social status is more strongly inherited even than height. This correlation is constant over centuries, suggesting an underlying social physics surprisingly immune to government intervention. Social mobility in England in 2012 is little greater than in pre-industrial times. Surname evidence in other countries suggests similarly slow underlying mobility rates.
KEYWORDS: Social Mobility, intergenerational correlation, status inheritance
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
status  Europe-Early_Modern  article  downloaded  surnames  statistics  17thC  British_history  16thC  mobility  Industrial_Revolution  19thC  inheritance  demography  21stC  20thC  18thC  medieval_history 
february 2017 by dunnettreader
Neil Cummins - Longevity and the Rise of the West: Lifespans of the European Elite, 800-1800 (2014)
Longevity and the Rise of the West: Lifespans of the European Elite, 800-1800
I analyze the age at death of 121,524 European nobles from 800 to 1800. Longevity began increasing long before 1800 and the Industrial Revolution, with marked increases around 1400 and again around 1650. Declines in violence contributed to some of this increase, but the majority must reflect other changes in individual behavior. The areas of North-West Europe which later witnessed the Industrial Revolution achieved greater longevity than the rest of Europe even by 1000 AD. The data suggest that the `Rise of the West' originates before the Black Death.
Downloaded WP version via iPhone to DBOX
lifestyle  16thC  10thC  13thC  14thC  17thC  11thC  paper  medieval_history  economic_history  life_expectancy  social_history  downloaded  12thC  elites  warrior_class  feudalism  18thC  British_history  nobles  wealth  Western_Europe  15thC  demography  9thC  landowners 
january 2017 by dunnettreader
Robert A. Markus - Gregory the Great and his World (1997) | Cambridge University Press
The book is a study of Gregory the Great, the pope who sent Augustine (of Canterbury) and his fellow missionaries to convert the heathen English to Christianity (597). Markus gives a full account of Gregory's life and work, his thought and spirituality, within the setting of the world at the end of the sixth century. At a time of catastrophic change in Europe, Gregory's work as pope stands on the threshold of medieval Western Europe. The book deals with every aspect of his pontificate, providing a major contribution to the study of late antique society. -- No modern equivalent in any language -- Takes into account advance in historical scholarship over the 90 years since Dudden, and modern perspectives in the study of Late Antiquity -- Downloaded frontmatter (incl maps), excerpt, index via Air to DBOX -- added to Evernote
books  biography  6thC  intellectual_history  religious_history  medieval_history  Gregory_the_Great  theology  Papacy  Christianity  Christendom  Byzantine_Empire  Roman_Empire  Lombards  Italy  Church_history  missionaries  religious_culture  religious_lit  barbarians  Visigoths  North_Africa  heresy 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages - European Review of Economic History
When did England overtake Italy? Medieval and early modern divergence in prices and wages PAOLO MALANIMA Institute of Studies on Mediterranean Societies (National Research Council), ISSM-CNR, malanima@issm.cnr.it According to Allen, between 1500 and 1750, a “great divergence” among countries in the level of wages occurred in Europe. Italian real wages were already among the lowest in the late medieval and early modern age. Their relative level diminished even more from the seventeenth century. An analysis of prices and wages in Italy and England does not support this view. Actually, until the beginning of the eighteenth century, Italian real wages were either higher than in England (fourteenth and fifteenth centuries) or more or less equal (sixteenth and seventeenth). It was not until the eighteenth century that England began to overtake Italy. However, the disparity in wages before 1800 was modest. It increased fast from then onwards. Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
labor_history  Italy  15thC  medieval_history  labor_force_structure  competiveness-labor  wages  economic_history  British_history  14thC  economic_growth  downloaded  Renaissance  16thC  Labor_markets  17thC  article  prices  18thC  England 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - Serfdom in Eastern Europe after the Revisions (2013), in S. Cavaciocchi (ed.), Serfdom and Slavery in the European Economy 11th-18th Centuries
Serfdom in Eastern Europe after the Revisions, in S. Cavaciocchi (ed.), Serfdom and Slavery in the European Economy 11th- 18th Centuries, Firenze, Firenze University Press, 2014, II, pp. 677-88. - Multi-day conference - pdf of the paper contains schedule and Table of Contents - Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
wages  social_order  legal_system  agriculture-surplus  downloaded  Eastern_Europe  labor  jurisdiction  elite_culture  prices  agriculture  nobility  Black_Death  agriculture-productivity  landowners  medieval_history  property_rights  peasants  Europe-Early_Modern  Western_Europe  conference  serfs  agriculture-markets  dispute_resolution  rural  economic_history  access_to_courts  feudalism  contract_law  Labor_markets  tenants  social_history  improvement  food  chapter  political_economy 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Unrivalled Influence: Women and Empire in Byzantium. (eBook, Paperback 2015 and Hardcover 2013)
2nd volume of 2 collecting her work across her career - Unrivalled Influence explores the exceptional roles that women played in the vibrant cultural and political life of medieval Byzantium. Written by one of the world's foremost historians of the Byzantine millennium, this landmark book evokes the complex and exotic world of Byzantium's women, from empresses and saints to uneducated rural widows. Drawing on a diverse range of sources, Herrin sheds light on the importance of marriage in imperial statecraft, the tense coexistence of empresses in the imperial court, and the critical relationships of mothers and daughters. She looks at women's interactions with eunuchs, the in-between gender in Byzantine society, and shows how women defended their rights to hold land. Herrin describes how they controlled their inheritances, participated in urban crowds demanding the dismissal of corrupt officials, followed the processions of holy icons and relics, and marked religious feasts with liturgical celebrations, market activity, and holiday pleasures. The vivid portraits that emerge here reveal how women exerted an unrivalled influence on the patriarchal society of Byzantium, and remained active participants in the many changes that occurred throughout the empire's millennial history. Unrivalled Influence brings together Herrin's finest essays on women and gender written throughout the long span of her esteemed career. This volume includes three new essays published here for the very first time and a new general introduction - Herrin. She also provides a concise introduction to each essay that describes how it came to be written and how it fits into her broader views about women and Byzantium. -- Intro downloaded to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  Byzantium  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  elite_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  women-intellectuals  women-in-politics  empires-governance  property_rights  women-property  court_culture  eunuchs  inheritance  gender_history  gender-and-religion  marriage  diplomatic_history  elites-political_influence  political_culture  popular_culture  popular_politics  ritual  Early_Christian  church_history  religious_imagery  religious_practices  religious_art  women-education  education-women  education-elites  Orthodox_Christianity  women-rulers 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire. (Paperback 2009) - Princeton University Press
Avoiding a standard chronological account of the Byzantine Empire's millennium--long history, she identifies the fundamental questions about Byzantium--what it was, and what special significance it holds for us today. Bringing the latest scholarship to a general audience in accessible prose, Herrin focuses each short chapter around a representative theme, event, monument, or historical figure, and examines it within the full sweep of Byzantine history--from the foundation of Constantinople, the magnificent capital city built by Constantine the Great, to its capture by the Ottoman Turks.

She argues that Byzantium's crucial role as the eastern defender of Christendom against Muslim expansion during the early Middle Ages made Europe--and the modern Western world--possible. Herrin captivates us with her discussions of all facets of Byzantine culture and society. She walks us through the complex ceremonies of the imperial court. She describes the transcendent beauty and power of the church of Hagia Sophia, as well as chariot races, monastic spirituality, diplomacy, and literature. She reveals the fascinating worlds of military usurpers and ascetics, eunuchs and courtesans, and artisans who fashioned the silks, icons, ivories, and mosaics so readily associated with Byzantine art.

An innovative history written by one of our foremost scholars, Byzantium reveals this great civilization's rise to military and cultural supremacy, its spectacular destruction by the Fourth Crusade, and its revival and final conquest in 1453. - no ebook - lots of illustrations - Introduction downloaded to Tab S2
books  downloaded  Byzantium  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  elite_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islam-expansion  architecture  architecture-churches  diplomatic_history  military_history  Christendom  Christianity-Islam_conflict  Orthodox_Christianity  Crusades  Constantinople  13thC  14thC  15thC  Ottomans  court_culture  courtiers  ritual  art_history  decorative_arts  popular_culture 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Judith Herrin - Margins and Metropolis: Authority across the Byzantine Empire. (eBook, Paperback and Hardcover 2016) - Princeton University Press
1st volume of 2 covering her 40 year career - This volume explores the political, cultural, and ecclesiastical forces that linked the metropolis of Byzantium to the margins of its far-flung empire. Focusing on the provincial region of Hellas and Peloponnesos in central and southern Greece, Judith Herrin shows how the prestige of Constantinople was reflected in the military, civilian, and ecclesiastical officials sent out to govern the provinces. She evokes the ideology and culture of the center by examining different aspects of the imperial court, including diplomacy, ceremony, intellectual life, and relations with the church. Particular topics treat the transmission of mathematical manuscripts, the burning of offensive material, and the church's role in distributing philanthropy.

Herrin contrasts life in the capital with provincial life, tracing the adaptation of a largely rural population to rule by Constantinople from the early medieval period onward. The letters of Michael Choniates, archbishop of Athens from 1182 to 1205, offer a detailed account of how this highly educated cleric coped with life in an imperial backwater, and demonstrate a synthesis of ancient Greek culture and medieval Christianity that was characteristic of the Byzantine elite.

This collection of essays spans the entirety of Herrin's influential career and draws together a significant body of scholarship on problems of empire. It features a general introduction, two previously unpublished essays, and a concise introduction to each essay that describes how it came to be written and how it fits into her broader analysis of the unusual brilliance and longevity of Byzantium.

Judith Herrin is the Constantine Leventis Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s College London. She is the author of Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire, Women in Purple: Rulers of Medieval Byzantium, and The Formation of Christendom (all Princeton). -- downloaded Introduction to Tab S2
books  kindle-available  downloaded  Byzantium  medieval_history  empires  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_culture  empires-governance  Islam  Islamic_civilization  ancient_Greece  Christianity  Christendom  elite_culture  urban_elites  rural  center-periphery  Orthodox_Christianity  Roman_Catholicism  religious_history  religious_culture  religion-established  manuscripts  iconoclasm  philanthropy  intelligentsia  church_history  theology  Islam-expansion  Christianity-Islam_conflict 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Eamon Gearon - Turning Points in Middle Eastern History | The Great Courses
Turning Points in Middle Eastern History
Lectures at SAIS
36 lectures that covers the period from the rise of Islam and the last Caliph (1924)
The complaints hover around
(1) exclusion of important turning points - though most concern 20thC after 1924 eg foundling of Israel
And
(2) that he's "soft" (though not necessarily "biased") re Islam
The more open minded reviewers who know a lot of Western Civ history, but little re both Islam and the Middle East history, gave high marks for control and very high marks for delivery
Islam  buy  Islamic_civilization  18thC  20thC  MENA  courses  16thC  19thC  medieval_history  video  17thC 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Harl - The Barbarian Empires of the Steppes | The Great Courses
36 lectures - list price $320
- the video version is a must in order to follow the names of groups, locations and movements
A few bothered by mispronunciation and a lot of ahs - but most reviewers very enthusiastic - and replaying lectures to get all the info. Counters a few complaints that it's too superficial, or that it pays too much attention to the sedentary civilizations that were affected - the last complaint seems to miss the very purpose of the course.
Byzantium  Eastern_Europe  military_history  Central_Asia  empires  government-forms  medieval_history  military_tactics  Egypt  Persia  ancient_Rome  nomadic_invasions  cultural_history  Ghengis_Khan  trade  video  Eurasia  Roman_Empire  government-revenues  Ottomans  Iraq  Chinese_history  Black_Sea  Islamic_civilization  Atilla_the_Hun  ancient_history  India  Iran  China  late_antiquity  Sufis  Mamluks  cultural_exchange  military_technology  Golden_Horde  Turcic_tribes  Han_China  MENA  religious_history  Mongols  Tamerlane  Caliphate  courses  Buddhism  cultural_transmission  trade-policy  empires-tributary  barbarians  steppes 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
The Slavonic Tongue Is One | Language Hat
I’ve been reading Simon Franklin’s Writing, Society and Culture in Early Rus, c.950-1300, and I found the following passage so sensible and interesting I…
Instapaper  language-history  language-politics  language-national  medieval_history  Russia  Ukraine  from instapaper
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn review of Larry Siedentop's Invention of the Individual" - Did Christianity Create Liberalism? | Boston Review
Very interesting re the (19thC) "French" approach to liberalism -- historicist stressing process, contingency. Contrast with Anglo-Saxon social contract that takes the individual as its (unexamined) premiss, as does economic theory based on satisfying individual preferences etc. LS wrote an important article on the French approach. So Moyn sees LS as working to update and revise Guizot. Problem is LS (and all those claiming Christianity the basis of individual "natural rights") can't explain how the next world focus of Jesus and Paul became a this-world focus with the role of the individual as foundational. Moyn critiques the steps LS takes starting with the moral revolution of Augustine and working through the Middle Ages.
theology  natural_law  France  Instapaper  liberty  medieval_history  political_philosophy  Augustine  Guizot  liberalism  social_theory  historiography-19thC  individualism  medieval_philosophy  reviews  EF-add  social_contract  Constant  books  natural_rights  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  Augustinian  kindle-available  19thC  from instapaper
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Digital Scriptorium
The Digital Scriptorium is a growing image database of medieval and renaissance manuscripts that unites scattered resources from many institutions into an international tool for teaching and scholarly research. As a visual catalog, DS allows scholars to verify with their own eyes cataloguing information about places and dates of origin, scripts, artists, and quality. Special emphasis is placed on the touchstone materials: manuscripts signed and dated by their scribes. DS records manuscripts that traditionally would have been unlikely candidates for reproduction. It fosters public viewing of materials otherwise available only within libraries. Because it is web-based, it encourages interaction between the knowledge of scholars and the holdings of libraries to build a reciprocal flow of information. Digital Scriptorium looks to the needs of a very diverse community of medievalists, classicists, musicologists, paleographers, diplomatists and art historians. At the same time Digital Scriptorium recognizes the limited resources of libraries; it bridges the gap between needs and resources by means of extensive rather than intensive cataloguing, often based on legacy data, and sample imaging.Digital Scriptorium institutional partners have instituted a governance structure to plan jointly for the future of the program, in terms of scope, sustainability, and content.
website  images  Medieval  religious_lit  manuscripts  medieval_history  Latin_lit  art_history 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, trans. F.W. Maitland (CUP 1900) - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 10/2/2015. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> A translation by F.W. Maitland of part of vol. 3 of Das deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (1881) entitled “Die publicistischen Lehren des Mittelalters.” It is a short history of the evolution of modern political thought which emerged during the Middle Ages. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  ebooks  political_history  political_culture  political_philosophy  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  intellectual_history  19thC  German_scholars  German_historical_school  historicism  legal_history  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Bassino, Broadberry, Fukao, Gupta, and Takashima - Japan and the Great Divergence, 725 to 1874 | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal - 01 July 2015
Jean-Pascal Bassino, Stephen Broadberry, Kyoji Fukao, Bishnupriya Gupta, Masanori Takashima -- Japan was the first Asian nation to achieve modern economic growth. This column discusses new evidence suggesting that Japan’s growth started from a lower level than Britain’s and grew more slowly until the Meiji Restoration. The key to understanding modern economic growth seems to lie in identifying the forces that dampened growth reversals, rather than the forces responsible for growth itself. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_history  economic_growth  medieval_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  economic_theory  economic_sociology  Great_Divergence  Japan  development  UK_economy  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Krzysztof Pomian - European identity: Historical fact and political problem - Eurozine - August 2009 (original 2007)
An historian can define European identity descriptively, as Krzysztof Pomian demonstrates in a tour of European culture since the first millennium before Christ. But the real controversy lies elsewhere, in the political question: what of the European past is worth preserving? (..) What are we ready to abandon, and what are we attached to so strongly that under no circumstances will we allow ourselves be deprived of? To what extent must the future be patterned according to our expectations, rooted in the past, and to what extent are we ready to leave the shaping of it to forces we do not control, and which seem to be causing a growing estrangement from our familiar ideas about how that future should look? These questions, in many different forms, (..) must be addressed not to historians but to politicians, and in the last instance to the European citizenry, which as ultimate decision-maker must provide an answer. European identity is a historical fact. More and more, it is also becoming a political problem. -- Original in Dutch -- First published in L. Ornstein and L. Breemer (eds.), Paleis Europa. Grote denkers over Europa, as "De Europese identiteit : een historisch feit en een politiek problem", De Bezige Bij: Amsterdam 2007, 29-54 (Dutch version); Transit 37 (2009) (German version). -- downloaded pdf to Note
Europe  grand_narrative  collective_memory  identity  identity_politics  identity-multiple  national_ID  memory-cultural  cultural_history  Europe-exceptionalism  European_integration  EU  EU_governance  political_culture  nation-state  national_tale  national_origins  Roman_Empire  church_history  Christendom  Judeo-Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Olivier Christin - Le lent triomphe du nombre: Les progrès de la décision majoritaire à l’époque moderne | La Vie des idées - 11 mai 2012
L’Ancien Régime est généralement considéré comme une période de recul des libertés et d’oubli des systèmes représentatifs. Pourtant, des défis politiques et religieux nouveaux ont conduit à d’importants ajustements dans la mise en œuvre concrète de la décision majoritaire. Pour Olivier Christin, l’apport de l’époque moderne à la formation des pratiques de la décision politique qui seront celles de la révolution démocratique doit donc être réévalué. French version downloaded pdf to Note
political_history  political_culture  political_participation  democracy  majoritarian  minorities  Ancien_régime  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  Roman_law  canon_law  Europe-Early_Modern  church_history  rights-political  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
David Millon - The Ideology of Jury Autonomy in the Early Common Law :: SSRN - Nov 2000
Washington & Lee Public Law Research Paper No. 00-5 -- This article looks closely at the substantial discretion exercised by the premodern English jury. Through the sixteenth century, jurors enjoyed broad autonomy with respect to fact-finding. For much of the medieval period they came to court already knowledgeable about the facts of a case and rendered their verdicts on that basis. Even after they ceased to be self-informed and had to rely instead on evidence presented in court, jurors continued to exercise their fact-finding authority with substantial independence from judicial control and review. The premodern jury also had significant autonomy regarding what we would call questions of law, an aspect of jury discretion that has received little attention from historians. In this article I look closely at the evidence bearing on both facets of jury autonomy, including trial records, accounts of trial proceedings, and legislation relating to the jury. In addition, I attempt to shed some light on the ideological assumptions that justified the early common law's commitment to jury autonomy, a commitment that is hard to understand in light of the modern rule of law idea. -- PDF File: 44. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_history  British_history  medieval_history  16thC  common_law  trials  juries  evidence  epistemology-social  Europe-Early_Modern  legal_culture  legal_validity  legitimacy  civic_virtue  citizenship  local_government  public_goods  commonwealth  governance-participation  status  cities-governance  persona  judgment-independence  autonomy  authority  elites  clientelism  duties  duties-civic  community  rule_of_law  fairness  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Panel discussion - Max Weber’s work and its relation to historical writing (Dec 2014) :: German Historical Institute London (GHIL)
Chair: Andreas Gestrich (German Historical Institute London) -- Discussants: David d’Avray, Peter Ghosh and Joachim Radkau -- Max Weber is one of the most prestigious social theorists in recent history. Many of his academic works are modern classics. Even 100 years after his death, his books are still read, edited, translated and interpreted. In recent years a number of biographies have shed new light on Weber’s life and work. In commemoration of Max Weber’s 150th anniversary, the German Historical Institute hosts a discussion with three Weber experts, British historians David d’Avray and Peter Ghosh and German historian Joachim Radkau, on Max Weber’s work and its relation to historical writing. **--** Peter Ghosh is Jean Duffield Fellow in Modern History at St Anne’ College, University of Oxford. His research interests focus primarily on the history of ideas, both social and political theory and also the history of historiography. His latest publication Max Weber and The Protestant Ethic: Twin Histories (Oxford University Press, 2014) offers an intellectual biography of Weber framed along historical lines. **--** David d’Avray, Professor of Medieval History at University College London, has worked on medieval marriage, on preaching, on attitudes to kingship and death, on rationalities, and on ‘longue durée’ structures of papal history. In Rationalities in History: a Weberian Analysis (Cambridge University Press 2010), he writes a new comparative history in the spirit of Max Weber. Reassessing seminal Weberian ideas, he applies value rationality to the comparative history of religion and the philosophy of law. **--** Joachim Radkau is Professor for Modern History at the University of Bielefeld. His latest research interests concentrate on environmental history, the history of nature conservation, and Max Weber’s self and social perception. In his extensive biography Max Weber: Die Leidenschaft des Denkens (Carl Hanser Verlag, 2005) (Max Weber: Passion for thinking), Radkau embeds Weber’s life and work in their historical context. -- MP3 download, 113 min, 64.2 MB -- downloaded to Note
audio  intellectual_history  Weber  social_theory  comparative_history  historiography-19thC  German_historical_school  German_scholarship  historicism  philosophy_of_law  sociology_of_religion  medieval_history  longue_durée  Papacy  biography  political_philosophy  political_culture  religious_culture  religious_history  rationality  environment  ecology-history  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicolas Delalande & Thomas Grillot - Interview with Jocelyne Dakhlia - Pouvoir et passions en terre d’Islam | Feb 2014 - La Vie des idées
Also translated into English -- Domaine(s) : Histoire -- Mots-clés : Moyen-Orient | islam | démocratie | Moyen Âge -- Aux clichés tenaces sur le despotisme oriental ou l’incompatibilité de l’islam avec la démocratie, Jocelyne Dakhlia répond par l’enquête historique sur les formes et les logiques du pouvoir dans les sociétés musulmanes. Son œuvre prolifique, qui s’étend des cours sultaniennes du Moyen Âge à la Tunisie contemporaine, redéfinit les contours de la Méditerranée et invite à penser autrement l’histoire de l’Europe. -- downloaded pdf to Note
Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islamic_law  political_order  political-theology  political_history  religious_history  religious_culture  government-forms  orientalism  despotism  democracy  democratization  liberal_democracy  MENA  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  Mediterranean  North_Africa  19thC  20thC  21stC  historiography  modernity  Europe-exceptionalism  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
R.I. Moore - The Formation of a Persecuting Society: Authority and Deviance in Western Europe 950-1250, 2nd ed (2007) | Wiley Online Library
The 10th to 13thCs in Europe saw the appearance of popular heresy and the establishment of the Inquisition, the expropriation and mass murder of Jews, and the propagation of elaborate measures to segregate lepers from the healthy and curtail their civil rights. These were traditionally seen as distinct and separate developments, and explained in terms of the problems which their victims presented to medieval society. In this stimulating book, first published in 1987 and now widely regarded as a a classic in medieval history, Moore argues that the coincidences in the treatment of these and other minority groups cannot be explained independently, and that all are part of a pattern of persecution which now appeared for the first time to make Europe become, as it has remained, a persecuting society. Moore updates and extends his original argument with a new, final chapter, "A Persecuting Society". Here and in a new preface and critical bibliography, he considers the impact of a generation's research and refines his conception of the "persecuting society" accordingly, addressing criticisms of the 1st ed. -- free access to pdfs of new preface, a final bibliographical essay & the bibliography & index -- downloaded all pdfs but index to Air
books  bibliography  medieval_history  religious_history  political_history  social_history  10thC  11thC  12thC  13thC  persecution  heterodoxy  heresy  Judaism  Inquisition  Papacy  religious_culture  civil_liberties  authority  deviance  norms  hierarchy  Crusades  power  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Eva Botella-Ordinas & Domingo Centenero de Arce & Antonio Terrasa Lozano, « Une tradition hispanique de démocratie locale. Les cabildos abiertos du XVIe siècle à nos jours » | La Vie des idées - Oct 2011
« Occupe la place ! », scandent les Indignés. Selon trois historiens, ce recours aux assemblées locales s’ancre dans une tradition hispanique puissante et ancienne. Les formes locales de républicanisme participatif auraient persisté depuis le Moyen-âge, malgré les efforts constants pour les réduire. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  political_history  political_culture  Spain  Spanish_Empire  comparative_history  republicanism  democracy  democracy_deficit  political_participation  social_history  social_order  local_government  local_politics  radicals  revolutions  Europe-Early_Modern  Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Europe-19thC  medieval_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Ron Harris - (pdf) The Institutional Dynamics of Early Modern Eurasian Trade: The Commenda and the Corporation
The focus of this article is on legal-economic institutions that organized early- modern Eurasian trade. It identifies two such institutions that had divergent dispersion patterns, the corporation and the commenda. The corporation ended up as a uniquely European institution that did not migrate until the era of European colonization. The commenda that originated in Arabia migrated all the way to Western Europe and to China. The article explains their divergent dispersion based on differences in their institutional and geographical environments and on dynamic factors. It claims that institutional analysis errs when it ignores migration of institutions. It provides building blocks for the modeling of institutional migration. -- via Dick Langlois at organizationsandmarkets.com presented at Nov 2014 conference put together by Business History program at Harvard Business School, on the History of Law and Business Enterprise -- downloaded to iPhone
paper  downloaded  economic_history  institutional_economics  legal_history  medieval_history  firms-structure  firms-theory  trade  colonialism  Europe-Early_Modern  China  India  MENA  Islamic_law  business_practices  risk_management  economic_culture  cultural_influence  trade-cultural_transmission  corporate_law  business_history  comparative_economics  Eurasia  business  organizations 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Gustave Flaubert - Oeuvres (pdfs) | Ichiro Miyazawa at Kyoto University of Foreign Studies
Œuvres de jeunesse numérisées en mode image par Ichiro Miyazawa, site de Kyoto University of Foreign Studies -- via Centre Flaubert at U of Rouen -- the Kyoto site has pdfs of Flaubert's main works as well, but is linked for its extensive set of etexts of minor works and studies -- Les soirées d'étude, Narrations et discours, Mort du duc de Guise, Deux mains sur une couronne, Un parfum à sentir, Chronique normande du Xe siècle, La Femme du monde, Un secret de Philippe le Prudent, roi d'Espagne, La Peste à Florence, Bibliomanie, Rage et impuissance, La Dernière Heure, Une leçon d'histoire naturelle : genre Commis, La Main de fer, Rêve d'enfer, Passion et vertu, Agonies, Ivre et mort, Mémoires d'un fou, Étude sur Rabelais, Les Funérailles du Docteur Mathurin, Mademoiselle Rachel, Souvenirs, notes et pensées intimes, Novembre.
website  etexts  Flaubert  19thC  French_lit  fiction  literary_history  ancient_Rome  France  Wars_of_Religion  15thC  16thC  medieval_history  Rabelais 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue in Memory of Charles Tilly (1929–2008): Cities, States, Trust, and Rule - Contents | JSTOR: Theory and Society, Vol. 39, No. 3/4, May 2010
1 - Cities, states, trust, and rule: new departures from the work of Charles Tilly - Michael Hanagan and Chris Tilly [d-load] *-* 2 - Cities, states, and trust networks: Chapter 1 of 'Cities and States in World History' - Charles Tilly [d-load] *-* 3 - Unanticipated consequences of "humanitarian intervention": The British campaign to abolish the slave trade, 1807-1900 - Marcel van der Linden [d-load] *-* 4 - Is there a moral economy of state formation? Religious minorities and repertoires of regime integration in the Middle East and Western Europe, 600-1614 - Ariel Salzmann [d-load] *-* 5 - Inclusiveness and exclusion: trust networks at the origins of European cities - Wim Blockmans [d-load] *-* 6 - Colonial legacy of ethno-racial inequality in Japan - Hwaji Shin. *-* 7 - Legacies of empire? - Miguel Angel Centeno and Elaine Enriquez. *-* 8 - Cities and states in geohistory - Edward W. Soja [d-load] *-* 9 - From city club to nation state: business networks in American political development - Elisabeth S. Clemens [d-load] *-* 10 - Irregular armed forces, shifting patterns of commitment, and fragmented sovereignty in the developing world - Diane E. Davis *-* 11 - Institutions and the adoption of rights: political and property rights in Colombia - Carmenza Gallo *-* 12 - Taking Tilly south: durable inequalities, democratic contestation, and citizenship in the Southern Metropolis - Patrick Heller and Peter Evans *-* 13 - Industrial welfare and the state: nation and city reconsidered - Smita Srinivas *-* 14 - The forms of power and the forms of cities: building on Charles Tilly - Peter Marcuse [d-load] *-* 15 - Was government the solution or the problem? The role of the state in the history of American social policy
journal  article  jstor  social_theory  political_sociology  contention  social_movements  change-social  historical_sociology  nation-state  cities  city_states  urban_politics  urban_elites  urbanization  urban_development  economic_sociology  institutions  institutional_change  property_rights  civil_liberties  civil_society  political_participation  political_culture  inequality  class_conflict  development  colonialism  abolition  medieval_history  state-building  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  MENA  Europe-Early_Modern  Reformation  networks-business  US_history  US_politics  US_economy  welfare_state  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  elites  elite_culture  imperialism  empires  trust  networks-social  networks-religious  networks  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  geohistory  moral_economy  military_history  militia  guerrillas  mercenaires  sovereignty  institution-building 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Philippe Genet - La genèse de l'État moderne: Culture et société politique en Angleterre (2003) | Livres -- Amazon.fr
La genèse de l'État moderne est le fruit d'une lente évolution à partir de la seconde moitié du XIIIe siècle, qui a d'abord affecté les monarchies féodales d'Occident : il y a quelques années, elle a fait l'objet d'études systématiques de nombreux historiens en Europe, grâce au CNRS et à la Fondation européenne de la Science. Le présent ouvrage est une étude de cas, consacrée à l'Angleterre, à bien des égards la plus précoce et la plus cohérente des constructions politiques médiévales qui, paradoxalement, est peu étudiée par les historiens français. On y retrouve le primat de la guerre et de la fiscalité dans la dynamique de la genèse de l'État moderne, ainsi que la mise en place d'un système judiciaire garantissant la reproduction de la classe dominante dans des conditions satisfaisantes. Mais l'ouvrage permet surtout de relever et d'articuler la corrélation entre le développement et la vitalité de la société politique, dont l'existence est une condition sine qua non pour l'État moderne, et la mutation de la culture et du système de communication médiéval, tant au niveau des médias et de la langue qu'à celui des types de textes produits. Par l'analyse de plus de 2200 bio-bibliographies d'" auteurs " actifs dans les domaines de l'histoire et du politique, et au moyen d'une théorie des champs de production textuelle, se dégage ce qu'a été l'idéologie spécifique du féodalisme d'État. Alors naissent progressivement les catégories modernes du politique, ainsi que la notion d'une société politique " nationale " -- Recommended in Penguin history of England bibliographies
books  amazon.fr  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  13thC  14thC  15thC  nation-state  national_ID  political_culture  feudalism  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  judiciary  historiography  political_sociology  military_history  state-building  political_economy  elites  elite_culture  monarchy  taxes  fiscal-military_state  nobility 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Oxford Companion to Military History, ed. Richard Holmes: | Answers.com
The Oxford Companion to Military History, edited by Richard Holmes, Oxford University Press -- A complete overview of military history from classical times to the present, The Oxford Companion to Military History is an essential guide to how the world has been shaped by conflict. Entries on key topics such as intelligence, propaganda, peacekeeping and women in the military, are included, with over 70 maps showing the course of famous battles and campaigns.
books  etexts  military_history  military  war  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  propaganda  maritime_history  IR 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jim Hinch on The Swerve : How the World Became Modern - Why Stephen Greenblatt is Wrong — and Why It Matters | The Los Angeles Review of Books
Grotesque distortion of the Middle Ages in order to turn his story into a triumphilist celebration of secular modernism. -- notes Michael Dirda found it a shallow non-fiction potboiler that rubbed him the wrong way but couldn't fully pin down why. Hinch thinks the book garnered the big non-fiction awards because it told the literarati what they wanted to hear about themselves. Hinch does give the tale of finding the manuscript, and its diffusion high marks.
books  reviews  kindle  medieval_history  Renaissance  bad_history  Lucretius  modernity  secularization 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Colin Dickey, review - One Book Opens Another: On Lawrence Principe, “The Secrets of Alchemy” | The Los Angeles Review of Books - Nov 2012
Great review! -- more central: any study of alchemy reveals the stubborn fact that early modern thought was far more universalizing in its scope than our own age’s tendency to compartmentalize fields of knowledge, and approaching alchemy on its own terms means rethinking our own relationship to the intellectual past. Whereas we regard art, chemistry, religion, and philosophy as separate, discrete areas of study, the early moderns didn’t think like this. Alchemy blends together a variety of disciplines, methods, and philosophies, and any attempt to isolate its chemistry or its symbolism out from the rest is a willful misreading. As Principe stresses repeatedly, “premoderns tended to conceive of and visualize the world in multivalent terms, where each individual thing was connected to many others by webs of analogy and metaphor. This view stands in contrast to the modern tendency to compartmentalize and isolate things and ideas into separate disciplines.” The lasting value of a book like this one is its reminder that we misunderstand the past because we constantly look for ourselves in it.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  religious_history  natural_philosophy  alchemy  ancient_history  medieval_history  Islamic_civilization  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  19thC  20thC  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven D. Smith, review essay - Discourse in the Dusk: The Twilight of Religious Freedom? | JSTOR: Harvard Law Review, Vol. 122, No. 7 (May, 2009), pp. 1869-1907
Reviewed work(s): Religion and the Constitution — Volume 2: Establishment and Fairness by Kent Greenawalt -- Smith claims a millennium of tradition re church and state is unraveling (a la MacIntyre decadent tradition) and US policy and jurisprudence tends to ignore erosion of their fundamental justifications -- starts with Pope Gregory and Henry IV and investiture controversy -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  theology  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_history  church_history  civil_liberties  freedom_of_conscience  tolerance  pluralism  secularism  US_constitution  bill_of_rights  legal_theory  philosophy_of_law  medieval_history  Papacy  Reformation  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 3 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 3. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/873> -- Vol. 3 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including many essays on aspects of medieval law and some biographical essays. Includes trusts and corporations, canon law, miscellaneous bits on Elizabethan period, especially relations with Papacy-- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  medieval_history  legal_history  legal_system  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  Elizabeth  Reformation  canon_law  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Church_of_England  Wales  property  property-confiscations  corporations  corporate_law  trusts  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 1 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 1. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/871> -- Vol. 1 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including in vol. 1 his “Historical Sketch of Liberty and Equality”, an essay on Herbert Spencer, and essays on aspects of medieval law -- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  common_law  medieval_history  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  feudalism  English_constitution  property  contracts  torts  judiciary  Spencer_Herbert  Victorian  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages 1881] trans. and ed. Frederic William Maitland ( 1900) - Online Library of Liberty
Otto von Gierke, Political Theories of the Middle Ages, translated with an Introduction by Frederic William Maitland (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1900). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2562> -- image scan -' translation by F.W. Maitland of part of vol. 3 of Das deutsche Genossenschaftsrecht (1881) entitled “Die publicistischen Lehren des Mittelalters.” It is a short history of the evolution of modern political thought which emerged during the Middle Ages -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  medieval_history  medieval_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  Europe-Early_Modern  historiography-19thC  Germany  historicism  legal_history  legal_theory  nation-state  authority  government-forms 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe [1861] trans. Andrew R. Scoble, ed. Aurelian Craiutu - Online Library of Liberty
François Guizot, The History of the Origins of Representative Government in Europe, trans. Andrew R. Scoble, Introduction and notes by Aurelian Craiutu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/878> -- Guizot reflects on the principles, goals, and institutions of representative government in Europe from the fifth to the reign of the Tudors in England. In Part 1 he examines such topics as the “true” principles of representative government, the origin and consequences of the sovereignty of the people, and analyzes the architecture of the English Constitutional monarchy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  historiography-19thC  historians-and-politics  political_history  representative_institutions  constitutionalism  ancient_constitution  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Gothic_constitution  Goths  late_antiquity  Roman_Empire  medieval_history  Charlemagne  Papacy  canon_law  monarchy  nobility  Parliament  Parlement  estates  feudalism  Europe-Medieval  Europe-Early_Modern  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Germany  British_history  English_constitution  14thC  15thC  16thC  Anglo-French  Norman_Conquest  War_of_Roses  Hundred_Years_War  sovereignty  consent  popular_politics  political_participation  limited_monarchy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern [1947] - Online Library of Liberty
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2145> -- Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern explores the very roots of liberty by examining the development of modern constitutionalism from its ancient and medieval origins. Derived from a series of lectures delivered by Charles Howard McIlwain at Cornell University in the 1938–39 academic year, these lectures provide a useful introduction to the development of modern constitutional forms. -- Introduction states the "problem" beginning with Bolingbroke's definition of the Septennial Act and Whig abandonment of Revolution Principles, and Burke, Paine, arbitrary government and written constitutions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  government-forms  constitutionalism  English_constitution  US_constitution  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  legal_system  legal_history  legal_theory  judiciary  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  Absolutism  representative_institutions  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  medieval_history  feudalism  monarchy  limited_monarchy  resistance_theory  social_contract  public_opinion  political_participation  reform-political  reform-legal  Bolingbroke  Revolution_Principles  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Burke  Paine  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Heinrich Rommen, The Natural Law: A Study in Legal and Social History and Philosophy (1936) trans. Thomas R. Hanley, ed. Russell Hittinger - Online Library of Liberty
Heinrich Rommen, The Natural Law: A Study in Legal and Social History and Philosophy, trans. Thomas R. Hanley. Introduction and Bibliography by Russell Hittinger (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/676> -- Originally published in German in 1936, The Natural Law is the first work to clarify the differences between traditional natural law as represented in the writings of Cicero, Aquinas, and Hooker and the revolutionary doctrines of natural rights espoused by Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Beginning with the legacies of Greek and Roman life and thought, Rommen traces the natural law tradition to its displacement by legal positivism and concludes with what the author calls “the reappearance” of natural law thought in more recent times. In seven chapters each Rommen explores “The History of the Idea of Natural Law” and “The Philosophy and Content of the Natural Law.” In his introduction, Russell Hittinger places Rommen’s work in the context of contemporary debate on the relevance of natural law to philosophical inquiry and constitutional interpretation. - part of the German émigrés to the US - he sees the same sort of 17thC break as Strauss - wound up at Georgetown - didn't download
books  etexts  ancient_history  medieval_history  Renaissance  Reformation  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  natural_law  positivism  modernity  entre_deux_guerres  moral_philosophy  relativism  natural_rights  Strauss 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Milliner, review essay - Lenten Reading - Ephraim Radner, A Brutal Unity: The Spiritual Politics of the Christian Church | Books and Culture 2013
Radner, a Protestant, [argues] that something in our modern world has gone wrong. However, he places the blame less on an elusive pattern of secularization (Taylor) or on Protestant fragmentation (Gregory) than on the much wider phenomenon of Christian disunity... Christian disunity is what gave birth to—or rather, miscarried—the liberal democratic state. These are massive claims, and Radner marshals the erudition... A Brutal Unity is ..an "eristology," which Radner defines as "the study of hostility in its disordering forms and forces." -- Radner [opens with a] polemic against Wm Cavanaugh's The Myth of Religious Violence, [which] unjustifiably absolves Christians from their share in the violence of the liberal state. ...the nations as we know them arose from the inability of Christians to refrain from mutual murder. Radner marches his readers deep into the Rwandan genocide and the Holocaust.... "[Nazi death squads] were Protestants and Catholics both." To suggest otherwise—whether to exonerate Pope Pius XII or to overemphasize the role of Bonhoeffer—is to succumb to "hallucinogenic fantasy." "The dead bodies, as it were, are already gathered by the time churches admit to complicity in their murder." Radner explores Catholic and Protestant .. attempts to deny the reality of Christian disunity by carving out an inviolable space of "the Church as such"... The saving of the church from her own sins by concocting an invisible or elusive sanctity is, admittedly, a traditional theological move, but... were this approach employed Christologically, it would be plainly Gnostic. - Radner [makes] the villain of his story Ephiphanius of Salamis (d. 403), who listed heresies and distanced the church from her enemies, especially the Jews. ?..inaugurated the "Epiphanian paradigm" and its program of exclusionary violence...the church's "brutal unity." Providentialism and proceduralism are the [church's] blinders... The former is the notion that God was somehow at work in church councils, however violent; the latter is the idea that somehow bureaucratic decisions and parliamentary process betray the hand of God. We should, Radner believes, trust neither.
books  reviews  kindle-available  religious_history  church_history  Christianity  theology  intellectual_history  Early_Christian  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Christendom  Church_Fathers  church_councils  Reformation  Papacy  violence  genocide  Holocaust  Protestants  Catholics  modernity  religious_wars  nation-state  liberalism  ecclesiology  Augustine  Providence  heterodoxy  Judaism  gnostic  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
John Philip Jenkins: The Lost History of Christianity | Amazon.com: Kindle Store
Publishers Weekly - Revisionist history is always great fun, and never more so than when it is persuasively and cogently argued. Jenkins, the Penn State history professor whose book The Next Christendom made waves several years ago, argues that it's not exactly a new thing that Christianity is making terrific inroads in Asia and Africa. A thousand years ago, those continents were more Christian than Europe, and Asian Christianity in particular was the locus of tremendous innovations in mysticism, monasticism, theology and secular knowledge. The little-told story of Christianity's decline in those two continents—hastened by Mongol invasions, the rise of Islam and Buddhism, and internecine quarrels—is sensitively and imaginatively rendered. Jenkins sometimes challenges the assertions of other scholars, including Karen Armstrong and Elaine Pagels, but provides compelling evidence for his views. The book is marvelously accessible for the lay reader and replete with fascinating details to help personalize the ambitious sweep of global history Jenkins undertakes. This is an important counterweight to previous histories that have focused almost exclusively on Christianity in the West.
books  amazon.com  kindle-available  religious_history  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  medieval_history  church_history  religious_culture  MENA  Africa  Asia  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Buddhism  mysticism  monasticism  science-and-religion  Mongols  Eurasia  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Stuart Elden, 2013 The Birth of Territory, reviewed by Gerry Kearns | Society and Space - Environment and Planning D
The Birth of Territory interrogates texts from various dates to see if they describe rule as the legal control over a determined space. Time after time we learn that a set of political writings that concern land, law, terrain, sovereignty, empire, or related concepts do not articulate a fully-fledged notion of territory. We may end up asking like the proverbial kids in the back of the car: “Are we there yet.” Elden is certainly able to show that earlier formulations are reworked in later periods, as with the discussion of Roman law in the medieval period; there is a lot in the political thought of each period, however, that relates to land and power but does not get reworked in later times. This means that what really holds many of the chapters together is that they are studies of how land and power were discussed at that time, and that is not so very far from taking land and power as quasi-universals. In fact, there is probably a continuum between categories that have greater or lesser historical specificity, rather than there being a clear distinction between the two. Yet, I must admit that this singular focus gives a welcome coherence to the book for all that it seems to discard large parts of the exposition as not required for later chapters. -- see review for Elden views on Westphalia and HRE contra Teschke ; review references classic and recent works on geography, terrain, law,mapping
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  geography  bibliography  political_history  legal_history  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  ancient_history  Early_Christian  late_antiquity  Augustine  Papacy  Holy_Roman_Empire  feudalism  Italy  medieval_history  Renaissance  city_states  citizenship  sovereignty  territory  maps  landowners  property  Roman_law  exiles  Absolutism  16thC  17thC  Wars_of_Religion  France  Germany  British_history  Ireland  Irish-Gaelic  IR  IR_theory  colonialism  legal_theory  legitimacy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Biddick, The Shock of Medievalism (2012) eBook: Amazon.com
Biddick explores the 19thC foundations of medieval studies as an academic discipline as well as certain unexamined contemporary consequences of these origins. By pairing debates over current academic trends and issues with innovative readings of medieval texts, Biddick exposes the presuppositions of the field of medieval studies and significantly shifts the objects of its historical inquiry. Biddick describes how the discipline of medieval studies was defined by a process of isolation and exclusion—a process that not only ignored significant political and cultural issues of the 19thC but also removed the period from the forces of history itself. Wanting to separate themselves from popular studies of medieval culture, and valuing their own studies as scientific, 19thC academics created an exclusive discipline whose structure is consistently practiced today, despite the denials of most contemporary medieval scholars. Biddick supports her argument by discussing the unavowed melancholy that medieval Christians felt for Jews and by revealing the unintentional irony of nineteenth-century medievalists’ fabrication of sentimental objects of longing (such as the “gothic peasant”). The subsequent historical distortions of this century-old sentimentality, the relevance of worker dislocation during the industrial revolution, and other topics lead to a conclusion in which Biddick considers the impact of an array of factors on current medieval studies. Simultaneously displacing disciplinary stereotypes and altering an angle of historical inquiry, this book will appeal to readers who are interested in how historicizing processes can affect the development of academic disciplines
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  historiography  historiography-19thC  medieval_history  19thC  historicism  social_history  economic_culture  political_culture  intelligentsia  Industrial_Revolution  class_conflict  working_class  bourgeoisie  academia  disciplines  scientism  national_ID  folklore  nostalgia  sentimentalism  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Understanding Society: The Brenner debate revisited - Jan 2010
Very useful summary of the various causal theories re transition to capitalist agriculture and difference between England and France - though couched as Brenner debate it is much broader and slides into Great Divergence, rise of the West, etc -- But it seems clear in hindsight that these are false dichotomies. We aren't forced to choose: Malthus, Marx, or Smith. Economic development is not caused by a single dominant factor -- a point that Guy Bois embraces in his essay (Aston and Philpin, 117). Rather, all these factors were in play in European economic development -- and several others as well. (For example, Ken Pomeranz introduces the exploitation of the natural resources, energy sources, and forced labor of the Americas in his account of the economic growth of Western Europe (The Great Divergence: China, Europe, and the Making of the Modern World Economy). And I suppose that it would be possible to make a climate-change argument for this period of change as well.) Moreover, each large factor (population, prices, property relations) itself is the complex result of a number of great factors -- including the others on the list. So we shouldn't expect simple causal diagrams of large outcomes like sustained economic growth.
social_theory  economic_history  feudalism  capitalism  British_history  France  medieval_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  Great_Divergence  agriculture  industrialization  Industrial_Revolution  property_rights  entrepreneurs  class_conflict  economic_growth  causation-social  links  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Samuel Pufendorf - Introduction to the History of the Principal Kingdoms and States of Europe - Online Library of Liberty
Samuel von Pufendorf, An Introduction to the History of the Principal Kingdoms and States of Europe. Translated by Jodocus Crull (1695). Edited and with an Introduction by Michael J. Seidler (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2013). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2594> -- What reviewers like Le Clerc, Rechenberg, Bayle, and (Henri) Basnage de Beauval appreciated about Pufendorf’s historical writing matched his own assessment of what mattered. Most important was the reliance on documentation and first-hand reports, rather than hearsay or speculation. As royal historiographer in Stockholm and Berlin, Pufendorf made thorough use of the archives to which he had privileged access. He also travelled in Europe to obtain source materials, and he attempted sometimes to obtain important records through personal connections—even from parties otherwise unlikely to provide them, such as the court of Rome. Indeed, Pufendorf’s principled reliance on archival materials—that is, his writing of “public” rather than “private” history—sometimes provoked complaints that he had revealed state secrets and led to censorship of certain works for this reason. Other commendations of Pufendorf’s historiographical method noted his avoidance of speculation about the motives of historical actors, and his self-limitation to what he took to be the implications of the documentary evidence. In Tacitean fashion (sine studio et ira: “without bias or malice,” Annals I.1)
etexts  Europe  Europe-Early_Modern  medieval_history  Renaissance  political_history  17thC  historiography-17thC  Pufendorf  evidence  Holy_Roman_Empire  France  Spain  Italy  Germany  Sweden  Denmark  Dutch  Austria  Hungary  Poland  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Şevket Pamuka1 and Maya Shatzmiller - Plagues, Wages, and Economic Change in the Islamic Middle East, 700–1500 | The Journal of Economic History - Cambridge Journals Online
This study establishes long-term trends in the purchasing power of the wages of unskilled workers and develops estimates for GDP per capita for medieval Egypt and Iraq. Wages were heavily influenced by two long-lasting demographic shocks, the Justinian Plague and the Black Death and the slow population recovery that followed. As a result, they remained above the subsistence minimum for most of the medieval era. We also argue that the environment of high wages that emerged after the Justinian Plague contributed to the Golden Age of Islam by creating demand for higher income goods.
article  paywall  economic_history  economic_culture  demography  Islamic_civilization  medieval_history  Medieval  plague  Labor_markets  consumers  wages  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
David Rollison - The Specter of the Commonalty: Class Struggle and the Commonweal in England before the Atlantic World | JSTOR: The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, Vol. 63, No. 2 (Apr., 2006), pp. 221-252
Part of what he developed as his book on the long commonwealth tradition and popular politics in England from early medieval period onwards. This article more academic and footnoted, so excellent bibliography as well as shorter version of a key part of his argument. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  kindle  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  Europe-Early_Modern  15thC  16thC  17thC  political_philosophy  political_culture  popular_politics  populism  riots  commonwealth  body_politic  class_conflict  social_history  historiography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
In the Middle: Do Stones Have Souls? -Jeffrey Cohen - Nov 2013
Additional material from the final chapter of a book to be published Spring 2015. -- impact of Aristotle and anima on 13thC notions of souls (tripartite for human - vegetative, sensible, rational), classification of material world, and Albertus Magnus opus on minerals, insisting they had no souls yet assigning agency to features of particular minerals especially as linked with biology, human usage. -- notes of references and reader comments of interest
13thC  medieval_history  Medieval  Aristotle  soul  theology  history_of_science  intellectual_history  alchemy  microcosm  bibliography  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
In the Middle: Confessio lapidis - Jeffrey Cohen - Feb 2012
Introduction to the last chapter of his book draft - see other post re impact of Aristotle and anima on 13thC notions of souls (tripartite for human - vegetative, sensible, rational), classification of material world, and Albertus Magnus opus on minerals, insisting they had no souls yet assigning agency to features of particular minerals especially as linked with biology, human usage.

Now held in the Bodleian Library, the Fairfax 3 manuscript of John Gower’s Confessio Amantis contains on its opening page a vivid illustration of an episode narrated later in the poem’s prologue: the biblical king Nebuchadnezzar is dreaming in bed (fol. 002r, upper left corner). A tall man, seemingly composed of a variety of materials, looms in menacing stillness over his sleeping form. This figure’s face is turned towards the slumbering king and thus cannot be discerned by us. A craggy boulder levitates behind and above the bed, at eye level to the standing form. As we read the poem itself (Prol. 585–880) and perhaps recall the story told in the Book of Daniel upon which it is based, we realize that this rock is hurtling, meteor-like, from the side of a mountain to a fateful rendezvous with an immense statue haunting Nebuchadnezzar’s sleep. The stone, small because approaching from such distance, will smash the strange form to dust “With which ston al tobroke was … al was into pouldre broght” 621, 623). Gower follows Daniel in describing the statue as a monstrous embodiment of human time, smashed when “A gret ston from an hull on hyh / Fel doun of sodein aventure” (618-19). This knowledge makes the illustration come to life. The rock becomes kinetic and perilous: the boulder hurtles towards the bed, towards the menacing statue, and therefore towards us.
medieval_history  Medieval  English_lit  Biblical_allusion  Golden_Age  time  eschatology  materialism  posthumanism 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Biddick, review - Davis, Kathleen. Periodization and Sovereignty: How Ideas of Feudalism and Secularization Govern the Politics of Time. - The Medieval Review
Read book as Kindle rental -- the 1st part on feudalism was fascinating but the sovereignty stuff, and the whole Schmitt vs Blumenberg on importing theological structures of thought and power relations into European modern history, Agabiem on the exception, sovereignty as miracles, non Christians as excluded due to lack of miracle power, etc was just too "theory" to be understood. The reviwer, Kathleen Biddick, just thinks it's the cat's meow. Periodization should be questioned re the assumptions and motivations for carving at particular joints. But the universalizing impulse of discovering patterns of power and domination across eras and cultures is equally suspicious. And medievalists, who rightly point to lots more continuity across time and geography than traditional periodization allows, seem to be going to opposite extreme and getting a bit too ambitious re the scope of their discipline. The 18thC or the 20thC wasn't the 12thC, and Blumenberg has a point that recasting the modern era in medieval vocabulary doesn't necessarily tell us much re the 20thC. Seems to be the same sort of mischief that Davis describes in the application of the newly invented "feudalism" to colonial India.

The Medieval Review 09.04.06 [date is wrong book published in 2008] --

Davis, Kathleen. Periodization and Sovereignty: How Ideas of Feudalism and Secularization Govern the Politics of Time. The Middle Ages Series. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. Pp. 208 --

Composed in two parts, it intentionally folds in on itself in order to mark performatively the double bind of periodization--a mimesis of temporality and a Western juridical concept of sovereignty. Her aim is to explicate how the time of periodization is the time of sovereignty, or, put another way, sovereignty is a mode of temporality. Davis is at her most insightful when she shows the violent imbrications of periodization, sovereignty, and colonial enslavement. Does periodization ever let go?
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  historiography  periodization  secularization  modernization  medieval_history  postcolonial  feudalism  Norman_Conquest  Hume-historian  British_Empire  India  sovereignty  political-theology  Schmitt  Hobbes 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Kenneth Chase: Firearms: A Global History to 1700: 9780521722407: Amazon.com: Books
Kenneth Chase traces the history of firearms from their invention in China in the 1100s to the 1700s, when European firearms had become clearly superior. In Firearms, Chase asks why it was the Europeans who perfected firearms, not the Chinese, and answers this question by looking at how firearms were used throughout the world. Early firearms were restricted to infantry and siege warfare, limiting their use outside of Europe and Japan. Steppe and desert nomads imposed a different style of warfare on the Middle East, India, and China--a style incompatible with firearms. By the time that better firearms allowed these regions to turn the tables on the nomads, Japan's self-imposed isolation left Europe with no rival in firearms design, production, or use, with lasting consequences.
books  military_history  economic_history  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  Asia  China  India  Ottomans  Europe-Early_Modern  Military_Revolution  Great_Divergence 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
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