dunnettreader + medieval + lit_crit   6

Thomas G. Pavel - The Lives of the Novel: A History. (2013 hdbk, 2015 obk) | Princeton University Press
This is a bold and original original history of the novel from ancient Greece to the vibrant world of contemporary fiction. In this wide-ranging survey, Pavel argues that the driving force behind the novel's evolution has been a rivalry between stories that idealize human behavior and those that ridicule and condemn it. Impelled by this conflict, the novel moved from depicting strong souls to sensitive hearts and, finally, to enigmatic psyches. Pavel analyzes more than a hundred novels from Europe, North and South America, Asia, and beyond, resulting in a provocative reinterpretation of its development. According to Pavel, the earliest novels were implausible because their characters were either perfect or villainous. In the 18thC and 19thC, novelists strove for greater credibility by describing the inner lives of ideal characters in minute detail (as in Richardson's case), or by closely examining the historical and social environment (as Scott and Balzac did). Yet the earlier rivalry continued: Fielding held the line against idealism, defending the comic tradition with its flawed characters, while Charlotte Brontë and George Eliot offered a rejoinder to social realism with their idealized vision of strong, generous, and sensitive women. In the twentieth century, modernists like Proust and Joyce sought to move beyond this conflict and capture the enigmatic workings of the psyche. Pavel concludes his compelling account by showing how the old tensions persist even within today's pluralism, as popular novels about heroes coexist with a wealth of other kinds of works, from satire to social and psychological realism. -- Prof. of French, Comparative Literature, and Social Thought at the U. of Chicago, also "Fictional Worlds" and "The Spell of Language." -- downloaded introduction to Note
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june 2015 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Literature index page
(1) Medieval Attitudes toward Literature (2) Literary Relations -- ** Dante and Boccaccio, ** The Proem of the Decameron: Boccaccio between Ovid and Dante, ** Authorship, ** The Decameron and the English Romantics -- (3) Narratology and Structural Exegesis -- ** Numerology in the Decameron, ** The Novella before Boccaccio, ** Performance and Interpretation, ** Performance and Interpretation 2, ** Nightingales and Filostrato's Apologia (V.4), ** The Rubrics of the Decameron, ** Madonna Filippa (VI.7): Feminist Mouthpiece or Misogynistic Tool? -- (4) Hypertext -- ** Hypertext, Hypermedia and the History of the Text, ** Boccaccio Online: Teaching the Decameron as Hypertext at Brown University -- (5) Theoretical Perspectives -- ** Poststructuralism and a Figural Narrative Model, ** Lotman and the Problem of Artistic Space, ** Weinrich and the Grammar of the Frame, ** The Narrative Frame, ** Framing the Decameron, ** Seduction by Silence in the Frame -- (6) La novella tra Testo e Ipertesto: il Decameron come modello
website  literary_history  lit_crit  Italian_lit  English_lit  14thC  Medieval  Renaissance  humanism  Latin_lit  Boccaccio  Ovid  Dante  Romanticism  narrative  literary_theory  digital_humanities 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web
In his Western Canon Harold Bloom thus recently acknowledges the crucial position of Boccaccio's Decameron : "Ironic storytelling whose subject is storytelling is pretty much Boccaccio's invention, and the purpose of this breakthrough was to free stories from didacticism and moralism, so that the listener or reader, not the storyteller, became responsible for their use, for good or for ill." The Decameron has elicited throughout the centuries fundamental discussions on the nature of narrative art, on the tenets of medieval versus modern morality, on the social and educational value of any form of artistic and literary expression. A true encyclopedia of early modern life and a summa of late medieval culture, the Decameron is also a universal repertory of perennially human situations and dilemmas: it is the perfect subject for an experiment in a new form of scholarly and pedagogical communication aimed at renewing a living dialogue between a distant past and our present. The guiding question of our project is how contemporary informational technology can facilitate, enhance and innovate the complex cognitive and learning activities involved in reading a late medieval literary text like Boccaccio's Decameron. We fundamentally believe that the new electronic environment and its tools enable us to revive the humanistic spirit of communal and collaboratively "playful" learning of which the Decameron itself is the utmost expression.
website  Medieval  Renaissance  14thC  Italy  Italian_lit  narrative  digital_humanities  Boccaccio  cultural_history  humanism  literary_history  lit_crit 
may 2014 by dunnettreader

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