dunnettreader + medieval + intellectual_history   11

Book Announcement: From Aristotle’s teleology to Darwin’s genealogy
see kindle sample - covers why scientific revolution didn't have the sort of impact that mathematization had in physical sciences - claims that yhe cornerstones of thinkijg re human sciences remained essentialist and fixistmore due to late scholastic snd Rensissance incorporation of Aristotelian principles than religiously driven creationusm - they fid converge and, especially in Anglo countries, reinflorced by 18thC "natural theology" - Darwin uses the anomalies that have no adaptationist utility, like sightless moles, to blow up the functionalist teleological foundation of yhe Aristotelian approach to species
Pocket  17thc  18thc  19thc  Darwin  ancient_greece  aristotle  bible-as-history  biology  books  creationist  deism  early_modern  evolution  geology  history_of_science  intellectual_history  kindle-available  medieval  natural_theology  physiology  renaissance  scholasticism  scientific_revolution 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
In the Middle: Do Stones Have Souls? -Jeffrey Cohen - Nov 2013
Additional material from the final chapter of a book to be published Spring 2015. -- impact of Aristotle and anima on 13thC notions of souls (tripartite for human - vegetative, sensible, rational), classification of material world, and Albertus Magnus opus on minerals, insisting they had no souls yet assigning agency to features of particular minerals especially as linked with biology, human usage. -- notes of references and reader comments of interest
13thC  medieval_history  Medieval  Aristotle  soul  theology  history_of_science  intellectual_history  alchemy  microcosm  bibliography  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Carlos Fraenkel's "Philosophical Religions" Reviewed by Peter Gordon | New Republic
In a remarkable and important book, Carlos Fraenkel characterizes Lessing as one of the late exponents for an intellectual tradition of philosophical religion that stretches as far back as late antiquity. This is a tradition that united pagan thinkers such as Plato with Christians (Origen and Eusebius) and Muslims (Al-Fārābī and Averroes) and Jews (Philo and Maimonides) in a shared philosophical vision, according to which historically distinctive religions should not be understood in the literal sense. They must be interpreted instead in allegorical fashion, so as to grasp their higher and purely rational content. This allegorical content is far from self-evident. But those who are incapable of philosophizing, or have not yet arrived at the requisite intellectual maturity, are not lost: the historical forms of a given religion offer just the sort of moral and political instruction most of us need if we are to conduct our lives with virtue and for the common good. Only the philosopher will understand that the historical forms have an educative function
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Aristotle  Judaism  Islam  Medieval  theology  Early_Christian  Spinoza  allegory  Biblical_criticism  Bible-as-history  Strauss  Enlightenment  Bolingbroke  monotheism  reason  Neoplatonism  Aquinas  scholastics  Deism  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter E. Gordon - The Unintended Reformation (review series): Has modernity failed? « The Immanent Frame Sept 2013
[Brad Gregory's] His real concern, on my reading, is that modernity cannot survive if it refuses the meta-ethical ideal that once served as the organizing principle for medieval Christianity. But what philosophical or historical arguments could convince us that this ideal was special? And why should we not continue to believe that our own modern ideals only need to be realized with greater fidelity? Here we confront a certain asymmetry in the way Gregory writes about the various “failures” of distinctive ethical schemes: He seems to think that the modern alternatives have all failed because of their intrinsic defects, whereas the Christian ideal failed only because we failed to measure up to its demands. In the one case the failure points to a basic flaw in the metaphysical scheme itself; in the other case the failure was merely one of execution.
books  kindle-available  reviews  intellectual_history  religious_history  Medieval  Christianity  Catholics  Reformation  modernity  secularism  liberalism  metaphysics  moral_philosophy  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
R. Koebner: JSTOR: Despot and Despotism: Vicissitudes of a Political Term (1951)
JSTOR: Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, Vol. 14, No. 3/4 (1951), pp. 275-302 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Voltaire was very displeased with how Montesquieu popularized the neologism which first made its appearance in 17thC France and was adopted by the secret Bougainvilliers, Fenelon, Saint Simon opponents of Louis XIV. The paper then traces despot related usage starting with Plato and Aristotle through Church Fathers and Renaissance.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  etymology  philology  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Early_Christian  Medieval  Renaissance  Papacy  monarchy  Absolutism  Ottomans  China  France  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  Louis_XIV  enlightened_absolutism  Hobbes  Bayle  Fenelon  Bougainvilliers  Saint_Simon  Voltaire  Montesquieu  liberty  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Birgit Svensson: Can Baghdad Reclaim Its Title As Intellectual Capital Of The Middle East? | DIE WELT/Worldcrunch June 2013
As an Arabic saying goes, Middle Eastern books are “written in Cairo, printed in Beirut, and read in Baghdad.” At no time was this truer than in the days of the Abbasids, who reached their political and cultural highpoint in the 8th and 9th centuries while Europe was in the dark Middle Ages.

Traces of all this aren’t so easy to find anymore. The war and terror destroyed most of what remained. But now one of the old centers is being revived: the Bayt al-Hikma, or House of Wisdom, founded by Al Ma’mun (786-833), the son of Harun al-Rashid from One Thousand and One Nights. His intention was to create a gathering place for the intellectual elite — and the goal is the same today.
Medieval  Islamic_civilization  elites  intellectual_history  intelligentsia  Iraq  cultural_history  publishing  MENA 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

13thC  16thC  17thc  18thc  19thc  Absolutism  agriculture  alchemy  allegory  ancient_greece  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Rome  antiquity  Aquinas  Aristotelian  aristotle  article  Augustine  Bacon  Bayle  bible-as-history  Biblical_authority  Biblical_criticism  Biblical_exegesis  bibliography  biology  Blumenberg  Bolingbroke  books  Bougainvilliers  bourgeoisie  Boyle  British_history  capitalism  Catholics  China  Christianity  Church_Fathers  colonialism  commerce  consumers  cosmology  creationist  cultural_history  curiosity  Darwin  deism  Descartes  development  downloaded  Early_Christian  early_modern  economic_growth  economic_history  EF-add  elites  energy  enlightened_absolutism  Enlightenment  Enlightenment-ongoing  epistemology  equality  esotericism  etymology  Europe-Early_Modern  evolution  experimental_philosophy  Fenelon  find  France  free_trade  French_Enlightenment  geology  Germany  gnostic  Great_Chain_of_Being  Great_Divergence  historical_change  historical_sociology  history_of_science  Hobbes  improvement  incentives  industrialization  Industrial_Revolution  industry  Innovation  institutional_economics  intellectual_history  intelligentsia  Iraq  Islam  Islamic_civilization  jstor  Judaism  kindle-available  legal_history  liberalism  liberty  Louis_XIV  medieval  medieval_history  MENA  metaphysics  microcosm  microeconomics  modernity  monarchy  monotheism  Montesquieu  moral_philosophy  natural_capital  natural_philosophy  natural_theology  nature-mastery  Neoplatonism  North-Weingast  Ottomans  Papacy  philology  physiology  Plato  Pocket  political_economy  political_philosophy  property  property_rights  Prussia  publishing  rationality  reason  Reformation  religious_history  renaissance  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  reviews  Roman_Republic  Royal_Society  Saint_Simon  scholasticism  scholastics  science-and-religion  scientific_revolution  Scottish_Enlightenment  secularism  social_order  social_theory  soul  Spinoza  Strauss  technology  theology  trade  trading_companies  transport  Voltaire 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: