dunnettreader + medieval + norman_conquest   2

Pollock and Maitland - The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I, 2 vols. [1898] (rprnt 2010 of 2nd ed CUP 1968, notes & bibliography S.F. Milson) - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Frederick Pollock, The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I. Reprint of 2nd edition, with a Select Bibliography and Notes by Professor S.F. Milsom. (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2010). 2 vols. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2312> -- First published in 1895, Sir Frederick Pollock and Frederic William Maitland’s legal classic The History of English Law before the Time of Edward I expanded the work of Sir Edward Coke and William Blackstone by exploring the origins of key aspects of English common law and society and with them the development of individual rights as these were gradually carved out from the authority of the Crown and the Church. Although it has been more than a century since its initial publication, Pollock and Maitland’s work is still considered an accessible and useful foundational reference for scholars of medieval English law
books  etexts  Medieval  British_history  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  common_law  feudalism  ancient_constitution  canon_law  local_government  monarchy  civil_liberties  property_rights  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Julia Crick: "Pristina Libertas": Liberty and the Anglo-Saxons Revisited (2004)
JSTOR: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society, Sixth Series, Vol. 14 (2004), pp. 47-71
The association between liberty and the Anglo-Saxons has been rendered mythical by later retellings, both in the Middle Ages and afterwards. This later history notwithstanding, it is argued here that liberty occupied a significant place in the early English documentary record. Originally part of the cultural and linguistic inheritance from late antiquity, the notion of liberty was deployed by English churchmen in defence of monastic freedom from the eighth century onwards, creating an archival legacy which was rewritten and imitated in later centuries, becoming fixed in institutional memory as fiscal and legal freedoms bestowed on the populations of monasteries and towns by pre-Conquest kings.

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jstor  article  British_history  legal_history  Norman_Conquest  Medieval  liberty  downloaded  EF-add  bibliography  English_constitution 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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