dunnettreader + medieval + italy   6

FRANCE, ANATOLE : Le Puits de sainte Claire ( Nouvelles - Contes) || Ebooks libres et gratuits
Les nouvelles qui composent ce recueil, se déroulent en Italie, une Italie rêvée par l'auteur, entre Moyen-Âge et Renaissance, inspirée par les contes de Boccace, les Vies de Vasari et surtout les Fioretti qui racontent la vie de saint François d'Assise. Il s'agit, pour la plupart, d'anecdotes écrites dans une langue raffinée et parfois archaïque, qui évoqueront des images de tombeaux antiques et de fresques florentines. Certains voudront, derrière la beauté de l'écriture, tirer une signification de ces récits divers, marqués par la place tenue par les questions religieuses et la dialectique éternelle de la vie et de la mort. La leçon à retenir, peut-être, est celle qu'illustre le plus long texte de ce recueil et qui est ainsi formulée : «La vérité est blanche.»
ebooks  downloaded  Medieval  Italy  French_lit  French_language  fiction  historical_fiction 
november 2016 by dunnettreader
The Works of John Adams, vol. 5 (Defence of the Constitutions Vols. II and III) - Online Library of Liberty
John Adams, The Works of John Adams, Second President of the United States: with a Life of the Author, Notes and Illustrations, by his Grandson Charles Francis Adams (Boston: Little, Brown and Co., 1856). 10 volumes. Vol. 5. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2103> -- A 10 volume collection of Adams’ most important writings, letters, and state papers, edited by his grandson. Vol. 5 contains volumes 2 [Italian Republics of the Middle Ages -Florence and Machiavelli] and 3 [other Italian Republics of the Middle Ages] of Defence of the Constitutions of the US. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  Medieval  13thC  14thC  15thC  Renaissance  Italy  city_states  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  Florence  Machiavelli  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_order  faction  class_conflict  social_order  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web
In his Western Canon Harold Bloom thus recently acknowledges the crucial position of Boccaccio's Decameron : "Ironic storytelling whose subject is storytelling is pretty much Boccaccio's invention, and the purpose of this breakthrough was to free stories from didacticism and moralism, so that the listener or reader, not the storyteller, became responsible for their use, for good or for ill." The Decameron has elicited throughout the centuries fundamental discussions on the nature of narrative art, on the tenets of medieval versus modern morality, on the social and educational value of any form of artistic and literary expression. A true encyclopedia of early modern life and a summa of late medieval culture, the Decameron is also a universal repertory of perennially human situations and dilemmas: it is the perfect subject for an experiment in a new form of scholarly and pedagogical communication aimed at renewing a living dialogue between a distant past and our present. The guiding question of our project is how contemporary informational technology can facilitate, enhance and innovate the complex cognitive and learning activities involved in reading a late medieval literary text like Boccaccio's Decameron. We fundamentally believe that the new electronic environment and its tools enable us to revive the humanistic spirit of communal and collaboratively "playful" learning of which the Decameron itself is the utmost expression.
website  Medieval  Renaissance  14thC  Italy  Italian_lit  narrative  digital_humanities  Boccaccio  cultural_history  humanism  literary_history  lit_crit 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Rime Royal (general note) - Harvard Chaucer site
When Chaucer first began writing the dominant form of verse was the English four-beat couplet, probably derived from the French octosyllabic (eight syllable) couplet, though often more free in the number of syllables allowed in the line. Chaucer's earliest works were in this form. -- Chaucer used this four-beat line for the last time in the House of Fame. He experimented with a variety of stanza forms in iambic pentameter (ten syllables, with five stressed syllables) and in The Legend of Good Women he used (for the first time in English) the iambic pentameter couplets familiar to every reader of The Canterbury Tales. Readers who know this form from later writers, such as Alexander Pope, should note that Chaucer's verses are not "heroic" or "closed" couplets -- what 16thC critic George Gascoigne called "riding rime". -- Rime Royal is a stanza that Chaucer adopted in his middle years, when he was greatly influenced by the Italian writers, most notably Giovanni Boccaccio. This is the stanza Chaucer used in his great Troilus and Criseyde (which he based on Boccaccio's Il Filostrato). It consists of seven iambic pentameter lines riming ababbcc. -- Where Chaucer got the form is not known; it was never used in English before Chaucer. In French a similar stanza called chant royal sometimes appears in lyric poetry, and it has been held that Chaucer adopted the form from the works of Guillaume de Machaut (c. 1300-1377). Or Chaucer may have adapted the Italian ottava rime, which consists of eight eleven-syllabled lines. riming abababcc; -- To adapt ottava rima to a seven-line form he had merely to drop the fifth line.
Chaucer  English_lit  poetry  Medieval  Italy  Renaissance  Boccaccio  Pope  meter  versification  style 
may 2014 by dunnettreader

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