dunnettreader + mechanism   25

Book Event: Jenny Davidson’s "Breeding: A Partial History of the 18thC" | The Valve - A Literary Organ |- May 2009
Note - this doesn't appear organized by tag in their archives
Book Event: Jenny Davidson’s Breeding
Posted by Scott Eric Kaufman on 05/25/09
Beginning tomorrow, The Valve will be hosting a book event on Jenny Davidson‘s Breeding: A Partial History of the Eighteenth Century. Peter Gay has already reviewed the book for Bookforum, which is rather remarkable when you consider this was an academic book published by a university press—then again, it’s a rather remarkable book.
The introduction and first two chapters are available online.
cultural_history  Enlightenment  evolution  reviews  aristocracy  mechanism  18thC  inheritance  books  literary_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  novels  nature-nurture  fiction  nobility  intellectual_history  materialism  character-formation  social_order  determinism  human_nature  natural_history  French_Enlightenment 
june 2017 by dunnettreader
Alex Wetmore - Sympathy Machines: Men of Feeling and the Automaton (2009) | JSTOR - Eighteenth-Century Studies
Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 43, No. 1 (FALL 2009), pp. 37-54 -- Recent discussions of the automaton in eighteenth-century British culture have situated this figure in relation to shifting concepts of feminine identity. However, comparatively little attention has been spent on the automaton's relation to masculinity. In light of this, my essay considers parallels between automata and representations of men of feeling in the sentimental novels of Sterne, Smollett, and Mackenzie. Juxtaposing these novels with spectacles of automata like Cox's Museum reveal at least two interesting insights: (1) the man of feeling's automatically-reactive sensibility destabilizes eighteenth-century conceptual boundaries between humans and machines; and (2) in breaching these boundaries, men of feeling point to important shifts in the relationship between the mechanical and the virtuous as the century progresses. -- looks like a useful lit survey -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  18thC  Enlightenment  natural_philosophy  mechanism  materialism  psychology  physiology  moral_philosophy  automatons  sensibility  man-of-feeling  moral_sentiments  masculinity  sentimentalism  novels  Sterne  Smollett  social_theory  civil_society  politeness  manners  authenticity  self  self-knowledge  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeffrey K. McDonough, review - Justin E. H. Smith, Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // April 17, 2012
Justin E. H. Smith, Divine Machines: Leibniz and the Sciences of Life, Princeton University Press, 2011, 392pp., $45.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780691141787.
Reviewed by Jeffrey K. McDonough, Harvard University -- It is widely recognized that Leibniz's philosophical thought is deeply influenced by the mathematics, physics and philosophical theology of his era. Justin E. H. Smith's Divine Machines argues that many of Leibniz's most central philosophical doctrines are similarly bound up with the life sciences of his time, where the "life sciences" are understood very broadly to include fields as diverse as alchemy, medicine, taxonomy, and paleontology. Smith's groundbreaking exploration represents an important contribution to our understanding of both Leibniz's philosophy and the study of life in the early modern era. It is to be recommended to historians, philosophers, and historians of philosophy alike. Below I highlight four central topics in Smith's book, raising some reservations along the way.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  17thC  Leibniz  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  monads  causation  species  teleology  anatomy  biology  medicine  microscope  fossils  reproduction  theodicy  creation  mechanism  organism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview - Jeffrey K. McDonough -Leibniz, Berkeley, Kant, Frege; bees, toasters and Julius Caesar » 3:AM Magazine - September 2014
Good overview of different approaches to Leibniz. Causation and relation of divine and creaturely activity - Scholastics, Berkeley, Malebranche, Leibniz. Difference between Malebranche and Berkeley’s idealism. Kant on refutation of idealism re Cartesian scepticism of external world.
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Leibniz  Berkeley  Malebranche  Kant  substance  metaphysics  causation  teleology  theodicy  creation  mind-body  volition  mechanism  physics  philosophy_of_science  history_of_science  optics  idealism  scepticism  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Alex Rosenberg - Paul Krugman’s Philosophy of Economics, and What It Should Be » 3:AM Magazine
All the New Classical economists need to defend the dominant “paradigm” in economics against Krugman and other dissenters are the tools he grants them—maximization and equilibrium. -- Rosenberg then goes into Keynes, Knight, Soros re uncertainty and reflexivity. Comes up with too strong a conclusion that since economics is an historical science, you can't make predictions. But there's a big difference between predictions of a long term outcome, or even a specific business cycle and yet have history-confirmed principles that, e.g. fiscal policy should be countercyclical or that a balance sheet recession is unlikely to push prices up, and monetary policy loses traction so it's not going to generate inflation, or a monetary union without a fiscal union and consolidated banking regulation is likely to blow up. Worse, Rosenberg is reiterating the false myth that the Keynesian thinking couldn't explain the 1970s and the New Classicals could. History contradicts the macro implications of EMH, Ricardian equivalence, RBC, etc. Actually it was Friedman monetarism that "explained" the 1970s, and when Friedman theory was attempted in the 1980s it had to be abandoned since it simply didn't work. The New Classicals were initially along for the monetarism ride and consolidated ideologically in academia by ignoring real world failures, which were relatively unimportant during the Great Moderation which they claimed to have produced or at least understood.
economic_history  intellectual_history  economic_theory  macroeconomics  microfoundations  neoclassical_economics  Keynesian  political_economy  philosophy_of_social_science  methodology  monetarism  monetary_policy  fiscal_policy  causation-social  mechanism  systems_theory  complexity  risk-systemic  uncertainty  probability 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Gary Lachman on Iain McGilchrist, The Master and His Emissary - Oppositional Thinking | The Los Angeles Review of Books 2013
Gary Lachman on Iain McGilchrist, The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World -- But even if you don't accept McGilchrist's thesis, the book is a fascinating treasure trove of insights into language, music, society, love, and other fundamental human concerns. One of his most important suggestions is that the view of human life as ruthlessly driven by "selfish genes" and other "competitor" metaphors may be only a ploy of left brain propaganda, and through a right brain appreciation of the big picture, we may escape the remorseless push and shove of "necessity." I leave it to the reader to discover just how important this insight is. Perhaps if enough do, we may not have to settle for what's left when there's no right.
books  reviews  kindle-available  history_of_science  neuroscience  psychology  phenomenology  mind  mind-body  creativity  imagination  mechanism  holism  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  technology 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Anthony Chemero and Michael Silberstein - After the Philosophy of Mind: Replacing Scholasticism with Science | JSTOR: Philosophy of Science, Vol. 75, No. 1 (January 2008), pp. 1-27
We provide a taxonomy of the two most important debates in the philosophy of the cognitive and neural sciences. The first debate is over methodological individualism: is the object of the cognitive and neural sciences the brain, the whole animal, or the animal—environment system? The second is over explanatory style: should explanation in cognitive and neural science be reductionist‐mechanistic, interlevel mechanistic, or dynamical? After setting out the debates, we discuss the ways in which they are interconnected. Finally, we make some recommendations that we hope will help philosophers interested in the cognitive and neural sciences to avoid dead ends. -- partially a lit survey so good bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  philosophy_of_science  metaphysics  mind  mind-body  neuroscience  reductionism  mechanism  cognition  ontology  methodology  levels_of_analyis  critical_realism  emergence  individualism-methodology  unit_of_analysis  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Heyd - From a Rationalist Theology to Cartesian Voluntarism: David Derodon and Jean-Robert Chouet | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Oct. - Dec., 1979), pp. 527-542
Shift from proto Leibniz determinism to extreme Voluntarism - 1660 and later in Geneva - Chouet introduced Cartesian mechanism to French Reformed - a perspective on the relationship between theology and 17thC mechanical philosophy -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  religious_history  science-and-religion  17thC  Geneva  Calvinist  rational_religion  God-attributes  determinism  voluntarism  laws_of_nature  Descartes  Cartesian  mechanism  natural_philosophy  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
A BOOK IN PROGRESS [PART 10]: SPINOZA’S ETHICS | Pandaemonium
C Chapter 11, which explores the ethical claims of Thomas Hobbes and Baruch Spinoza. The rise of the market economy and the growth of religious scepticism had, by the seventeenth century, corroded the ability of both God and community to warrant moral behaviour. Who or what could now authorize moral rules? This was the question now facing moral philosophers. One answer was revolutionary: humans could. Human nature, needs, desires, aspirations and possibilities would act as warrant for the moral good. But how human nature would play this role remained perplexing. -- Hobbes and Spinoza gave very different answers to this challenge, answers that were both to be highly influential. Hobbes helped launch a British tradition of moral philosophy; in his wake come Shaftesbury, Locke, Hume, Bentham and Mill. Spinoza helped shape what is now often called the ‘Continental’ tradition. Thinkers as diverse as Rousseau, Kant, Hegel, Marx and Nietzsche were all in his debt. The distinctions between the two traditions are often overplayed. Nevertheless, the ideas of Hobbes and Spinoza were to shape the way that the modern world came to look at the question of moral rules through the distinct answers they gave as to what should warrant moral behaviour. -- This extract is taken from the section on Spinoza’s Ethics.
intellectual_history  17thC  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  Spinoza  human_nature  moral_psychology  metaphysics  Descartes  mechanism  dualism  mind-body  necessity  free_will  change-social  continental_philosophy  Enlightenment  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview with Lisa Downing - Early Mod philosophy » 3:AM Magazine - May 2014
Lisa Downing is the philosopher who thinks all the time about the early modern philosophers of Europe, especially 17th and 18th century philosophy, about how philosophical analysis and historical exactitude compliment each other, on adding to the canonical philosophers of the period, on why Malebranch is the closest to re-entry, and Robert Boyle, on Descartes vs Newton, on avoiding anachronism, on the dynamism of the period, on primary and secondary qualities, on resisting the idea that historical views have to be relevant, on Berkeley, on tensions in Locke, on women philosophers of the time and on rejecting the occult. This one is kick-ass! Yo!
intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  Descartes  Cartesian  Malebranche  Locke  Boyle  Berkeley  Newton  Clarke  Leibniz  Hobbes  mind-body  causation  God-attributes  Providence  mechanism  substance  metaphysics  Aristotelian  qualia  perception  natural_philosophy  free_will  Scientific_Revolution  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Anya Plutynski, review - Hsiang-Ke Chao, Szu-Ting Chen, and Roberta L. Millstein (eds.), Mechanism and Causality in Biology and Economics // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // March 2014
Reviewed by Anya Plutynski, Washington University in St. Louis -- while the themes are consistent, the authors' examples, approaches and conclusions were not. I take this to be one of the strengths of the volume: reading it is like listening in on a conversation among amicable but not always like-minded peers. Some authors place a good deal of emphasis on the utility of the mechanistic perspective in addressing core problems in philosophy of science (Darden, Carl Craver and Marie Kaiser, Steel); others see mechanism as less central to characterizing scientific explanation, method, or discovery, at least in some domains (Till Grüne-Yanoff, David Teirra and Julian Reiss). While the dividing lines are not always so sharp, one can draw some rough and general conclusions: while thinking in terms of mechanisms can be enormously important, especially in applied contexts where concerns of intervention and control dominate, there are a wide array of open philosophical questions about how we use formal models in representing dynamical behavior, what kinds of statistical tools are best at assessing causal relationships, and when we have a causal relation in general that may or may not avail itself of mechanistic thinking. It seems that when and why thinking in terms of mechanism is of use is a very context specific matter.
books  reviews  philosophy_of_science  mechanism  mechanisms-social_theory  causation  causation-evolutionary  evolutionary_biology  economic_theory  economic_models  statistics  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Simon Schaffer - Dévots et philosophes mécanistes: Ames et esprits dans la philosophie de la Nature, à l'époque de la Restauration anglaise | JSTOR: Ethnologie française, nouvelle serie, T. 23, No. 3 (Septembre 1993), pp. 316-335
Recent historiography of the Scientific Revolution has challenged the assumption that the achievements of seventeenth-century natural philosophy can easily be described as the mechanization of the world-picture. The clock-work world was triumphant and inevitably so. However, a close examination of one key group of natural philosophers working in England during the 1670s shows that their program necessarily incorporated souls and spirits, attractions and congruities, within both their ontology and their epistemology. Any natural philosophical strategy which excluded spirits and sympathies from its world was condemned as tending to subversion and irreligion. Through a description of the historical context of experimental work, the present article sets out to show how a philosophy of matter and spirit was deliberately constructed by the end of the seventeenth century. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  17thC  British_history  natural_philosophy  experimental_philosophy  mechanism  soul  mind-body  Boyle  More_Henry  scepticism  atheism_panic  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Identity, Practice, and Trust in Early Modern Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1125-1145
Historians of early modern science face a serious problem, in that there was no science in early modern society. There were, however, other enterprises in the early modern period devoted to the understanding and manipulation of the physical world. This review identifies important trends in historians' attempts to comprehend those enterprises. In particular, it identifies four leading currents. The first is the move to characterize these different enterprises themselves, and in particular to understand natural philosophy and the mathematical sciences as distinct practical endeavours. The second is the attention now being paid to the social identity of the investigator of nature. The third is the attempt to understand the history of science as a history of practical enterprises rather than propositions or theories. The fourth, finally, is the understanding of natural knowledge in terms of systems of trust, and in particular in terms of the credit vested in rival claimants. In a combination of these, the review suggests, lies a future for a discipline that has otherwise lost its subject. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  historical_sociology  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  technology  Innovation  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  natural_philosophy  mathematics  mechanism  corpuscular  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rebecca M. Wilkin - Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2008), pp. 533-567
This essay examines the determination by Cartesians to explain the maternal imagination's alleged role in the formation of birthmarks and the changing notion of monstrosity. Cartesians saw the formation of birthmarks as a challenge through which to demonstrate the heuristic capacity of mechanism. Descartes claimed to be able to explain the transmission of a perception from the mother's imagination to the fetus' skin without having recourse to the little pictures postulated by his contemporaries. La Forge offered a detailed account stating that the failure to explain the maternal imagination's impressions would cast doubt on mechanism. Whereas both characterized the birthmark as a deformation or monstrosity in miniature, Malebranche attributed a role to the maternal imagination in fashioning family likenesses. However, he also charged the mother's imagination with the transmission of original sin. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  theology  science-and-religion  17thC  mechanism  reproduction  mothers  imagination  original_sin  monstrosity  Descartes  Malebranche  Cartesian  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - Observation and Experiment in 17thC Anatomy | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6, 2008
(1) Observation and Experiment in Mechanistic Anatomy (pp. 531-532) Domenico Bertoloni Meli and Rebecca Wilkin. *-- (2) Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks (pp. 533-567) Rebecca M. Wilkin. *-- (3) Harvey's and Highmore's Accounts of Chick Generation (pp. 568-614) Karin J. Ekholm. *-- (4) Experimenting with Chymical Bodies: Reinier de Graaf's Investigations of the Pancreas (pp. 615-664) Evan R. Ragland. *-- (5) The Collaboration between Anatomists and Mathematicians in the Mid-17thC with a Study of Images as Experiments and Galileo's Role in Steno's "Myology" (pp. 665-709) Domenico Bertoloni Meli
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  medicine  experimental_philosophy  anatomy  physiology  mechanism  corpuscular  17thC  Descartes  Malebranche  Harvey  chemistry  mathematics  Galileo  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eyal Chowers - The Physiology of the Citizen: The Present-Centered Body and Its Political Exile | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 30, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 649-676
Shift from civic humanism's optimistic view of man's capacity to build for the future and control sociopolitical environment to pessimistic view of capacity of citizens under raison d'Etat -- 16thC and 17thC increasingly focused on multipart, shifting self and passions vs reason rather than the development of a stable character that Renaissance humanism concerned with. Ties shift to new views of anatomy (eg Harvey) and connections between physiology and psychology and impact on different notions of time relative to self, society and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  cultural_history  natural_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  British_history  France  Italy  Italian_Wars  Renaissance  humanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  raison-d'-état  Absolutism  emotions  physiology  psychology  medicine  self  time  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Descartes  Gassendi  Hobbes  Locke  Harrington  Harvey  identity  character  mechanism  thinking_matter  mind  mind-body  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little - Understanding Society: Meso causes and microfoundations | September 10 2013
In earlier posts I've paid attention to the need for microfoundations and the legitimacy of meso-level causation. And I noted that there seems to be a prima facie tension between the two views in the philosophy of social science. I believe the two are compatible if we understand the microfoundations thesis as a claim about social ontology and not about explanation, and if we interpret it in a weak rather than a strong way. Others have also found this tension to be of interest. The September issue of The Philosophy of the Social Sciences" provides a very interesting set of articles on this set of issues.

Particularly interesting is a contribution by Tuukka Kaidesoja, "Overcoming the Biases of Microfoundations: Social Mechanisms and Collective Agents".
social_theory  microfoundations  causation  mechanism  mesolevel  organizations  critical_realism  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Daniel Little - Understanding Society: Social mechanisms and meso-level causes September 2013
Paper downloaded to Note -- blog post summarizes and has lots of links to useful recent lit -- (This post summarizes a paper I presented at the British Society for the Philosophy of Science Annual Meeting in 2012.)

Here and elsewhere I want to defend the theoretical possibility of attributing causal powers to meso-level social entities and structures. In this I follow a number of philosophers and sociologists, including many critical realists (e.g. Roy Bhaskar, A Realist Theory of Science and Margaret Archer, Realist Social Theory: The Morphogenetic Approach) and also the recent thinking of Dave Elder-Vass (The Causal Power of Social Structures). But I also defend the idea of an actor-centered sociology, according to which the substance of social phenomena is entirely made up of the actions, interactions, and states of mind of socially constituted individual actors. Making out both positions, and demonstrating their consistency, is the work of this paper. I refer to this position as “relative explanatory autonomy” of the meso-level. This topic is of renewed interest because of the current influence and progress of analytical sociology (Peter Hedström, Dissecting the Social: On the Principles of Analytical Sociology; Hedström and Bearman, The Oxford Handbook of Analytical Sociology ; Peter Demeulenaere, Analytical Sociology and Social Mechanisms), which offers an emphatic “no” to the question; whereas critical realists are equally firm in defending an affirmative answer to the question.
social_theory  philosophy_of_science  ontology-social  microfoundations  causation  mesolevel  mechanism  critical_realism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Paul Schuurman : Determinism and Causal Feedback Loops in Montesquieu's Explanations for the MilitaryRise and Fall of Rome (2013) | T & F Online
British Journal for the History of Philosophy, Volume 21, Issue 3, 2013, pages 507- 528, Available online: 23 May 2013, DOI: 10.1080/09608788.2013.771612 -- Montesquieu's Considérations sur les causes de la grandeur des Romains et de leur décadence (1733/1734) is a methodological exercise in causal explanation on the meso-level applied to the subject of the military rise and fall of Rome. Rome is described as a system with contingent initial conditions that have a strong path-determining effect. Contingent and plastic initial configurations become highly determining in their subsequent operation, thanks to self-reinforcing feedback loops. Montesquieu's method seems influenced by the ruthless commitment to efficient causality and the reductionism of seventeenth-century mechanicist philosophy; but in contrast to these predecessors, he is more interested in dynamic processes than in unchangeable substances, and his use of efficient causality in the context of a system approach implies a form of holism that is lacking in his predecessors. The formal and conceptual analysis in this article is in many ways complementary with Paul Rahe's recent predominantly political analysis of the Considérations. At the same time, this article points to a problem in the works on the Enlightenment by Jonathan Israel: his account stresses a one-dimensional continuum consisting of Radical, Moderate and Counter-Enlightenment. This invites Israel to place the combined religious, political and philosophical views of each thinker on one of these three points. His scheme runs into trouble when a thinker with moderate religious and political views produces radical philosophical concepts. Montesquieu's Considérations is a case in point.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  18thC  Montesquieu  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  military_history  lessons-of-history  determinism  causation  social_theory  mechanism  path-dependency  historiography  Enlightenment  Radical_Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  find  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Harold J. Cook - Body and Passions: Materialism and the Early Modern State | JSTOR: Osiris, 2nd Series, Vol. 17 (2002), pp. 25-48
A group of works written in the mid-seventeenth-century Netherlands shows many defenders of commerce and republicanism embracing some of the most unsettling tenets of the new and experimental philosophy. Their political arguments were based on a view consonant with Cartesianism, in which the body and its passions for the most part dominate reason, instead of the prevailing idea that reason could and should dominate the passions and through them the body. These arguments were in turn related to some of the new claims about the body that flowed from recent anatomical investigations, in a time and place comfortable with materialism. If ever there were a group of political theorists who grounded their views on contemporary science, this is it: Johann de Witt, the brothers De la Court, and Spinoza. They believed that the new philosophy showed it was unnatural and impoverishing to have a powerful head of state, natural and materially progressive to allow the self-interested pursuit of life, liberty, and happiness. --downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_science  political_history  17thC  Dutch  Cartesian  Spinoza  de_Witt  mind-body  emotions  materialism  mechanism  experimental_philosophy  medicine  political_economy  commerce-doux  republicanism  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

related tags

15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  1690s  Absolutism  aesthetics  anatomy  ancient_Rome  aristocracy  Aristotelian  article  atheism_panic  authenticity  authority  automatons  Berkeley  bibliography  biology  book  books  bookshelf  Boyle  British_history  Calvinist  Cartesian  causation  causation-evolutionary  causation-social  change-social  character  character-formation  chemistry  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  civil_society  Clarke  cognition  commerce-doux  community  complexity  continental_philosophy  corpuscular  Counter-Enlightenment  creation  creativity  critical_realism  cultural_authority  cultural_capital  cultural_history  Descartes  determinism  de_Witt  discourse  downloaded  dualism  Dutch  ecclesiology  economic_history  economic_models  economic_theory  EF-add  emergence  emotions  English_Civil_War  English_lit  Enlightenment  enthusiasm  Epicurean  epistemology-social  Erastianism  evolution  evolutionary_biology  Exclusion_Crisis  experimental_philosophy  expertise  fiction  find  fiscal_policy  fossils  France  free_will  French_Enlightenment  Galileo  Gassendi  gender  Geneva  Germany  Glorious_Revolution  God-attributes  Harrington  Harvey  historical_sociology  historiography  history_of_science  Hobbes  holism  humanism  human_nature  idealism  identity  imagination  individualism-methodology  inheritance  Innovation  intellectual_history  Interregnum  Italian_Wars  Italy  journal  jstor  Kant  Keynesian  kindle-available  laws_of_nature  Leibniz  lessons-of-history  levels_of_analyis  literary_history  Locke  Machiavelli  macroeconomics  Malebranche  man-of-feeling  manners  masculinity  masses-fear_of  materialism  mathematics  mechanism  mechanisms-social_theory  medicine  mesolevel  metaphysics  methodology  microfoundations  microscope  military_history  mind  mind-body  monads  monetarism  monetary_policy  monstrosity  Montaigne  Montesquieu  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  More_Henry  mothers  natural_history  natural_philosophy  nature-nurture  necessity  neoclassical_economics  neuroscience  Newton  Newtonian  nobility  novels  ontology  ontology-social  optics  organism  organizations  original_sin  path-dependency  paywall  perception  phenomenology  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  physics  physiology  politeness  political_culture  political_discourse  political_economy  political_history  political_philosophy  popular_culture  power-knowledge  print_culture  probability  Providence  psychology  public_disorder  public_sphere  qualia  Radical_Enlightenment  raison-d'-état  rationality  rational_religion  reception  reductionism  religious_history  religious_lit  Renaissance  reproduction  republicanism  Republic_of_Letters  Restoration  reviews  risk-systemic  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Royal_Society  scepticism  science-and-religion  science-public  scientific_method  Scientific_Revolution  Scottish_Enlightenment  secularization  self  self-control  self-examination  self-fashioning  self-interest  self-knowledge  sensibility  sentimentalism  Smith  Smollett  sociability  social_history  social_order  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  soul  species  Spinoza  statistics  status  Sterne  sublime  substance  systems_theory  technology  teleology  theodicy  theology  thinking_matter  time  uncertainty  unit_of_analysis  Vitalism  volition  voluntarism 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: