dunnettreader + mathematics   25

Massimo Pigliucci, review - The Singular Universe and the Reality of Time - Scientia Salon 2015
He likes it quite a lot - downloaded as pdf to Note along with a second part that deals with the math portion of the book -- couldn't get the pdf to contain content beyond the pdf first page - saved to Instapaper
Instapaper  books  reviews  kindle-available  downloaded  cosmology  time  philosophy_of_science  physics  mathematics  from instapaper
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Goulding - Histories of Science in Early Modern Europe: Introduction to special issue (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 33-40 **--** Articles in the issue *--* James Steven Byrne, Humanist History of Mathematics? Regiomontanus's Padua Oration in Context (pp. 41-61) *--* Robert Goulding, Method and Mathematics: Peter Ramus's Histories of the Sciences (pp. 63-85) *--* Nicholas Popper, "Abraham, Planter of Mathematics": Histories of Mathematics and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (pp. 87-106) *--* Lauren Kassell, "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (pp. 107-122) -- helpful on recent historiography on humanists, science and history writing -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  history_of_science  mathematics  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  humanism  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  astrology  magic  education-higher  natural_philosophy  reading  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-writing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
K. Vela Velupillai - Conning Variations on the Theme of in :: SSRN - Journal of Economic Surveys, Vol. 21, Issue 3, pp. 466-505, July 2007
K. Vela Velupillai, National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG) - Department of Economics; Università degli Studi di Trento - Department of Economics and Management. -- The mathematization of economics is almost exclusively in terms of the mathematics of real analysis which, in turn, is founded on set theory (and the axiom of choice) and orthodox mathematical logic. In this paper I try to point out that this kind of mathematization is replete with economic infelicities. The attempt to extract these infelicities is in terms of three main examples and one general discussion: dynamics, policy and rational expectations and learning are the examples; a game theory without subjectivism, based on the axiom of determinateness, is discussed in general terms. The focus is on the role and reliance of standard fixed-point theorems in orthodox mathematical economics. -- Pages in PDF File: 40 -- via Lars Syll -- didn't download -- added to My Briefcase
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_social_science  mathematics  economic_theory  economic_models  deduction  rational_expectations  game_theory  mathematization 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Frédérique Aït-Touati, Stephen Gaukroger, Le monde en images. Voir, représenter, savoir, de Descartes à Leibniz (2015) | Classiques Garnier, coll. « Histoire et philosophie des sciences »
Frédérique Aït-Touati, Stephen Gaukroger, Le monde en images. Voir, représenter, savoir, de Descartes à Leibniz, Paris, Classiques Garnier, coll. « Histoire et philosophie des sciences », 2015, 128 p., ISBN : 978-2-8124-2589-9. -- Dans les débats classiques des 17thC-18thC, la représentation est considérée avant tout comme une question rhétorique et psychologique, mais à la fin du 18thC, elle devient une question épistémologique. Cet ouvrage explore le contexte de cette transformation et ses sources. l’émergence du problème de la représentation -- not edited collection, but co-authored study of a bit over 100 pages -- Chapters in TOC -- 1. Rhétorique et théorie de l’image vive 2. la révolution cartésienne  3. représenter l’invisible - Philosophie naturelle et visualisation chez Robert Hooke   4. les limites de la visualisation - Le débat entre Newton et Leibniz sur l’algèbre (a) La géométrie contre l’analyse  (b) L’analyse infnitésimale et la question de la preuve directe (c) La géométrie contre le calcul diférentiel  (d) Visualisation et capacités cognitives humaines  (e) Visualisation -- online pruce 19€
books  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  natural_philosophy  astronomy  ontology  epistemology  17thC  18thC  Descartes  representation-metaphysics  ideas-theories  Hooke  Leibniz  Newton  scientific_method  scientific_culture  instruments  microscope  telescope  unobservables  mathematics  geometry  calculus  cognition  analysis-logic  images  rhetoric  rhetoric-visual 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Yitzhak Y. Melamed, review - Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - September 11, 2014
Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature, Oxford University Press, 2014, 143pp.,-- Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Johns Hopkins University -- one can easily trace the influence of "continental" figures such as Étienne Balibar and Antonio Negri on Almog's reading. But Almog is an acolyte of no one (except Nature, and to a lesser extent, Spinoza). The book is marked by the freshness of an independently thinking mind, a mind which appears at some moments to be celebrating a quasi-religious "new-birth." This book is rich in genuine insights, though it does not engage in patient, close analysis of arguments and texts. Toward the end Almog unfolds his discontent with the "dissective philosopher" who "run[s] his deductions, and feel[s] the gratification of being the master of a domain of propositions" (107). For Almog, Part I of Spinoza's Ethics is a paradigm of such "dissective philosophy," and the philosophical key is letting go of such an analytic attitude and "letting instead the key come to you by way of understanding informally 'love of God (Nature)'" (107). I do not share these views, and I will shortly explain why. More importantly, I believe this "New Age" attitude really harms the work, which could have been even more impressive than it is.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  style-philosophy  continental_philosophy  nature  anthropocentrism  human_nature  humanism  mathematics  Platonism  political_philosophy  sociability  moral_philosophy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Dougherty's Calculus Textbook Project - Math Chair, Southwest Oklahoma State
This page contains excerpts from my calculus textbook project, written in collaboration with John Gieringer of Alvernia University, Reading, Pennsylvania. (9,662,820 bytes, updated November 20, 2012) -- What's Different? - Our textbook is meant to be read--curled up with and read! We go into much detail, with more examples than most in the topics which are the most confusing. If you currently are using one of the standard textbooks, you can use ours as a supplement. If you want to learn calculus on your own, ours can be your main text (though the standard ones have more exercises). We occasionally hear from folks around the world who happened upon this site that they found it useful, and we hope you agree. A few "differences" might turn off some readers, particularly regarding the first two chapters. We spend a chapter on symbolic logic so we can use it elsewhere, including a rather in-depth (for a calculus book) development of epsilon-delta proofs. If you just want more complete examples for derivative and integral problems, you can go to those sections (preferably from the current "whole book" file linked above). If you want a much deeper, and more useful and "form-based" discussion of limits (to better prepare students for things like convergence tests and improper integrals), check those out. Another difference is that there is a very expanded Chapter 2, which is still preliminary but has some good algebraic stuff which is easier to accomplish after raising the sophistication level, made possible by a study of Chapter 1's logic. -- downloaded pdf of Symbolic Logic, Chapter 2 and whole text to Note
logic  mathematics  etexts  downloaded 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
JOEL ISAAC -- DONALD DAVIDSON AND THE ANALYTIC REVOLUTION IN AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY, 1940–1970 (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 757-779 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
JOEL ISAAC - Christ's College, Cambridge -- Histories of analytic philosophy in the United States have typically focused on the reception of logical positivism, and especially on responses to the work of the Vienna Circle. Such accounts often call attention to the purportedly positivist-inspired marginalization of normative concerns in American philosophy: according to this story, the overweening positivist concern for logic and physics as paradigms of knowledge displaced questions of value and social relations. This article argues that the reception framework encourages us to mistake the real sources of the analytic revolution in post-war philosophy. These are to be found in debates about intentional action and practical reasoning – debates in which ‘normative’ questions of value and social action were in fact central. Discussion of these topics took place within a transatlantic community of Wittgensteinians, ordinary languages philosophers, logical empiricists, and decision theorists. These different strands of ‘analytical’ thinking were bound together into a new philosophical mainstream not by a positivist alliance with logic and physics, but by the rapid development of the mathematical and behavioural sciences during the Second World War and its immediate aftermath. An illustrative application of this new framework for interpreting the analytic revolution is found in the early career and writings of Donald Davidson.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  20thC  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  Wittgenstein  ordinary_language_philosophy  behavioralism  social_sciences-post-WWII  decision_theory  mathematics  logic  empiricism  US  cultural_history  academia  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
17 Equations That Changed The World | Business Insider March 2014
In 2013, mathematician and science author Ian Stewart published a book on 17 Equations That Changed The World. We recently came across this convenient table on Dr. Paul Coxon's twitter account by mathematics tutor and blogger Larry Phillips that summarizes the equations. (Our explanation of each is below):
science  mathematics 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric Steinhart - Royce's Model of the Absolute | JSTOR: Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society, Vol. 48, No. 3 (Spring 2012), pp. 356-384
At the end of the 19th century, Royce uses the mathematical ideas of his day to describe the Absolute as a self-representative system. Working closely with Royce's texts, I will develop a model of the Absolute that is both more thoroughly formalized and that is stated in contemporary mathematical language. As I develop this more formal model, I will show how structures found within it are similar to structures widely discussed in current analytic metaphysics. The model contains structures found in the recent analytic metaphysics of modality; it contains Democritean worlds as defined by Quine; it contains Turing-computable sequences; and it contains networks of interacting software objects as defined by Dennett. Much of the content of recent analytic metaphysics is already implicit in Royce's study of the Absolute. Far from being an obsolete system of historical interest only, Royce's metaphysics is remarkably relevant today. -- paywall
article  jstor  paywall  intellectual_history  19thC  US  pragmatism  idealism  mathematics  Absolute  analytical_philosophy  Quine  metaphysics  systems-self-representative  Dennett  networks-information  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Adrian Johns - Identity, Practice, and Trust in Early Modern Natural Philosophy | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 4 (Dec., 1999), pp. 1125-1145
Historians of early modern science face a serious problem, in that there was no science in early modern society. There were, however, other enterprises in the early modern period devoted to the understanding and manipulation of the physical world. This review identifies important trends in historians' attempts to comprehend those enterprises. In particular, it identifies four leading currents. The first is the move to characterize these different enterprises themselves, and in particular to understand natural philosophy and the mathematical sciences as distinct practical endeavours. The second is the attention now being paid to the social identity of the investigator of nature. The third is the attempt to understand the history of science as a history of practical enterprises rather than propositions or theories. The fourth, finally, is the understanding of natural knowledge in terms of systems of trust, and in particular in terms of the credit vested in rival claimants. In a combination of these, the review suggests, lies a future for a discipline that has otherwise lost its subject. -- didn't download
article  jstor  historiography  intellectual_history  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  historical_sociology  17thC  18thC  Scientific_Revolution  science-and-religion  technology  Innovation  Royal_Society  Republic_of_Letters  natural_philosophy  mathematics  mechanism  corpuscular  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Issue TOC - Observation and Experiment in 17thC Anatomy | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6, 2008
(1) Observation and Experiment in Mechanistic Anatomy (pp. 531-532) Domenico Bertoloni Meli and Rebecca Wilkin. *-- (2) Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks (pp. 533-567) Rebecca M. Wilkin. *-- (3) Harvey's and Highmore's Accounts of Chick Generation (pp. 568-614) Karin J. Ekholm. *-- (4) Experimenting with Chymical Bodies: Reinier de Graaf's Investigations of the Pancreas (pp. 615-664) Evan R. Ragland. *-- (5) The Collaboration between Anatomists and Mathematicians in the Mid-17thC with a Study of Images as Experiments and Galileo's Role in Steno's "Myology" (pp. 665-709) Domenico Bertoloni Meli
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  medicine  experimental_philosophy  anatomy  physiology  mechanism  corpuscular  17thC  Descartes  Malebranche  Harvey  chemistry  mathematics  Galileo  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Nathaniel Jason Goldberg: Historicism, Entrenchment, and Conventionalism | JSTOR: Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie, Vol. 40, No. 2 (December 2009), pp. 259-276
Downloaded pdf to Note -- . V. Quine famously argues that though all knowledge is empirical, mathematics is entrenched relative to physics and the special sciences. Further, entrenchment accounts for the necessity of mathematics relative to these other disciplines. Michael Friedman challenges Quine's view by appealing to historicism, the thesis that the nature of science is illuminated by taking into account its historical development. Friedman argues on historicist grounds that mathematical claims serve as principles constitutive of languages within which empirical claims in physics and the special sciences can be formulated and tested, where these mathematical claims are themselves not empirical but conventional. For Friedman, their conventional, constitutive status accounts for the necessity of mathematics relative to these other disciplines. Here I evaluate Friedman's challenge to Quine and Quine's likely response. I then show that though we have reason to find Friedman's challenge successful, his positive project requires further development before we can endorse it. -- 88 references
article  jstor  intellectual_history  20thC  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  Quine  Carnap  Kuhn  historicism  empiricism  Logical_Positivism  naturalism  mathematics  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
Timothy C. Johnson - Reciprocity as the Foundation of Financial Economics | SSRN - Oct 2013
This paper argues that the fundamental principle of contemporary financial economics is balanced reciprocity, not the principle of utility maximisation that is important in economics more generally. The argument is developed by analysing the mathematical Fundamental Theory of Asset Pricing with reference to the emergence of mathematical probability in the seventeenth century in the context of the ethical assessment of commercial contracts. This analysis is undertaken within a framework of Pragmatic philosophy and Virtue Ethics. The purpose of the paper is to mitigate future financial crises by reorienting financial economics to emphasise the objectives of market stability and social cohesion rather than individual utility maximisation. -- Downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  economic_history  legal_history  economic_theory  Aristotle  Aquinas  Papacy  medieval_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  moral_philosophy  moral_economy  financial_innovation  probability  mathematics  commerce  risk  interest_rates  prices  pragmatism  virtue_ethics  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Magic, maths and money: How economics suffers from de-politicised mathematics Sept 2013
An intellectual_history of mathematics from 1900 - battles of formalists with a neo-Kantian cast against the social and intellectual turmoil of European wars that abstracted to such an extent it lost touch with the physical sciences. Success of Operations Research during WWII increased embrace by post-WWII social sciences especially economics. Mathematics has regained applied connections with physics but economics, especially financial mathematics which is the most abstract (?) math these days, hasn't relinked with reality in the same way.
20thC  21stC  intellectual_history  mathematics  entre_deux_guerres  social_sciences-post-WWII  economic_models  financial_system  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview with Timothy Williamson - modality and metaphysics » 3:AM Magazine Sept 2013
His first interview with 3ammagazine pioneered the End Times series. He’s invited back with a new book to join the series he inspired and broods to the depths on why naturalism is an unhelpful term, why ‘mad dog naturalist’ Alex Rosenberg is brave but wrong, why Paul Horwich’s Wittgensteinianism is also deeply mistaken, about why there’s a need to dirty one’s hands on technicalities if you want to be able to choose between competing theories, about necessitism vs contingentism, permanentism vs temporaryism, an aside about death, about Ruth Barcan Marcus’s key axiom, about his deepened respect for Rudolph Carnap, about Kripke’s fantastic success story, and Bob Stalnaker’s and Kit Fine’s contributions too, and about higher order modal logic being an alternative paradigm for core metaphysical theories.
books  metaphysics  logic  semantics  mathematics  modal_logic  Leibniz  Carnap  contingency  necessity  Wittgenstein  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
John V. Pickstone: Sketching Together the Modern Histories of Science, Technology, and Medicine (2011)
JSTOR: Isis, Vol. 102, No. 1 (March 2011), pp. 123-133 -- roundup and looking forward article in issue Focus: Between and Beyond “Histories of Science” and “Histories of Medicine” -- downloaded pdf to Note -- This essay explores ways to “write together” the awkwardly jointed histories of “science” and “medicine”—but it also includes other “arts” (in the old sense) and technologies. It draws especially on the historiography of medicine, but I try to use terms that are applicable across all of science, technology, and medicine (STM). I stress the variety of knowledges and practices in play at any time and the ways in which the ensembles change. I focus on the various relations of “science” and “medicine,” as they were understood for a succession of periods—from mainly agricultural societies, through industrial societies, to our biomedical present—trying to sketch a history that encompasses daily practices and understandings as well as major conceptual and technical innovations. The model is meant to facilitate inquiry across topics and across times, including those to come.
article  jstor  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  history_of_science  medicine  technology  biology  chemistry  physiology  natural_philosophy  mathematics  communication  IT  evolution  university  academies  education  industry  Industrial_Revolution  Renaissance  Enlightenment  Scientific_Revolution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Mark Setterfield: What Is Analytical Political Economy? (2003)
JSTOR: International Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 4-16
Symposium on Post Walrasian Economics, Macroeconomic Policy, and the Future of Analytical Political Economy

Useful taxonomy
article  jstor  political_economy  intellectual_history  social_theory  mathematics  economic_models  logic  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
J. Barkley Rosser, Jr.: Weintraub on the Evolution of Mathematical Economics: A Review Essay (2003)
JSTOR: Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Vol. 25, No. 4 (Summer, 2003), pp. 575-589

This essay discusses the implications for the evolution of mathematical economics of the ideas presented in E. Roy Weintraub's How Economics Became a Mathematical Science. A central issue in the discussion is the nature of formalism and axiomatization in mathematical economics, how that has evolved in mathematics, and how that evolution has influenced developments in economics. It is argued that modern mathematical economics has followed mathematics itself in moving beyond hyper-formalistic approaches such as Bourbakism to the use of other approaches, such as computer simulation and more inductive methods. The essay will also argue that mathematics is useful in developing Post Keynesian economics.
article  jstor  economic_models  20thC  intellectual_history  mathematics  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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