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Spinoza Research Network - Home
The Spinoza Research Network was set up in 2008 and funded by an AHRC Networks Grant between 2008 and 2010 at the University of Dundee. The funded project focused on contemporary interdisciplinary connections to seventeenth-century philosopher Baruch Spinoza and built up a membership of over 200 members in Philosophy, Politics, Law, Literature, Music, Psychology, History, Medicine, Gender Studies, Education, and many other academic and non-academic disciplines.

The grant has now expired, but the Network continues as an interdisciplinary group of academics, students, and others interested in Spinoza around the world. Working together, sharing research and developing new projects, we investigate how Spinoza is used both within philosophy and beyond it, both inside and outside of academia.

As of 2013 the Network is based at the University of Aberdeen.
moral_philosophy  politics-and-religion  Hobbes  website  philosophy_of_religion  monism  immanence  logic  Spinoza  religious_belief  epistemology  metaphysics  bibliography  political_philosophy  Judaism  Descartes  17thC  religion-established  tolerance  history_of_science  Biblical_exegesis  Biblical_authority  scepticism  transcendence  intellectual_history 
october 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R Westphal - Empiricism, Pragmatic Realism & the A Priori in "Mind and the World Orde" (draft - forthcoming 2017 | Academia.edu
Forthcoming in: Carl SACHS & Peter OLEN eds., Contemporary Perspectives on C. I. Lewis: Pragmatism in Transition (London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017) --This paper re-examines how C.I. Lewis’s pragmatic realism in Mind and the World Order (1929, ‘MWO’) contrasts to logical empiricism, and to Lewis’s later An Analysis of Knowledge and Valuation (1946, ‘AKV’), to highlight several important philosophical points Lewis clearly understood and argued for in MWO, which we need to recover today. MWO is expressly an ‘Outline of a Theory of Knowledge’; nevertheless, it provides several important lessons about human knowledge, action and our worldly context. These are highlighted by contrast to some key points in Carnap’s empiricist semantics (§2) and by considering a point important to scientific realism, not properly accommodated by Carnap’s semantics: Reichenbach’s (1920, 1922) ‘coördination’ (Zuordnung) principles – a very important point about scientific measurement procedures, central both to Peirce and to MWO (§3). These coördinating principles for exact scientific measurements highlight the contrast between the meta-linguistic ‘relative a priori’ admissible by empiricist semantics (Friedman 1999, 2001), and Lewis’ robustly realist ‘pragmatic a priori’ in MWO. I re-examine key features of MWO (§4), including Lewis’s rejection of mythical givenness and of a series of false dichotomies which still plague current discussions of epistemology, pragmatism and history and philosophy of science. -- Research Interests: Epistemology, Semantic Externalism, Pragmatism (Philosophy), Explication (Philosophy), Clarence Irving Lewis,
paper  downloaded  intellectual_history  20thC  pragmatism  Logical_Positivism  empiricism  Lewis_CI  Carnap  metaphysics  epistemology  apriori  philosophy_of_science  logic  semantics  Peirce  realism-scientific  scientific_method  myth_of_the_given 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
Kenneth R Westphal - 'Analytic Philosophy
The definitive version of this article appears in:
The Owl of Minerva , 42.1–2 (2010–11):1–18.
Rejection of the philosophical relevance of history of philosophy remains pronounced within contemporary Anglophone analytic philosophy. The two main reasons for this rejection presuppose that strict deduction isboth necessary and sufficient for rational justification. However, this justificatory ideal of scientia holds only within strictly formal domains. This is confirmed by a neglected non-sequitur in van Fraassen’s original defence of ‘Constructive Empiricism’. Conversely, strict deduction is insufficient for rationaljustification in non-formal, substantive domains of inquiry. In non-formal, substantive domains, rational justification is also, in part, ineliminably social and historical, for sound reasons Hegel was the first to articulate. -- Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
history_of_philosophy  historical_sociology  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  deduction  contextualism  evolution-social  development_process  Hegel  contingency  intellectual_history  logic  historicism  evolution-as-model  philosophy_of_social_science  van_Frassen  article  downloaded  analysis-logic  epistemology  epistemology-social  empiricism 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Richard Dien Winfield - Lecture Course on Hegel's Science of Logic | Internet Archive : Free Download
(Spring 2009) This course is an examination of the Science of Logic, Hegel's attempt to develop a foundation-free, systematic philosophy. The book is discussed in its entirety.

G. W. F. Hegel. Science of Logic, trans. A. V. Miller (London: George Allen
intellectual_history  logic  German_Idealism  lecture  Absolute_idealism  dialectic  Hegel  19thC  audio 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Mahrad Almotahari interview with Richard Marshall - Not and Other Metalinguistic Stuff - 3AM
Interview by Richard Marshall. Mahrad Almotahari is an Assistant Professor and a member of UIC’s Laboratory of Integrative Neuroscience. He earned his PhD from…
Instapaper  interview  philosophy_of_science  neuroscience  cognition  mind  mind-body  linguistics  logic  from instapaper
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Thomas L. Prendergast - The Structure of the Argument in Peirce's "Questions concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man" (1977 | JSTOR - Charles S. peirce Society
The Structure of the Argument in Peirce's "Questions concerning Certain Faculties Claimed for Man"
Thomas L. Prendergast
Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society
Vol. 13, No. 4 (Fall, 1977), pp. 288-305
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
pragmatism  Peirce  intuitionism  logic  jstor  article  downloaded  certainty  Cartesians  demonstration  Descartes  inference 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Bernard Dantier, “Philosophie de la connaissance et connaissance de la philosophie: Hegel, La Science de la logique”. Extrait de: G.W.F. Hegel, La science de la logique
“Philosophie de la connaissance et connaissance de la philosophie: Hegel, La Science de la logique”.
Extrait de: G.W.F. Hegel, La science de la logique – Encyclopédie des sciences philosophiques (Éditions de 1827 et 1830), Paris, Librairie Philosophique Vrin, 1986, traduction de Bernard Bourgeois, pp. 163-184 et pp. 283-293.
logic  epistemology  etexts  downloaded  Hegel 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Richard Rorty - Davidson between Wittgenstein and Tarsk | JSTOR - Critica (1998)
Davidson between Wittgenstein and Tarski
Richard Rorty
Crítica: Revista Hispanoamericana de Filosofía
Vol. 30, No. 88 (Apr., 1998), pp. 49-71
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
article  analytical_philosophy  downloaded  logic  Logical_Positivism  pragmatism  epistemology  jstor  truth  Wittgenstein  Davidson  Rorty  epistemology-social 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Sino Knuuttila - Medieval Theories of Future Contingents [updated 2015] | (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)
Related Entries
Auriol [Aureol, Aureoli], Peter | Boethius, Anicius Manlius Severinus | fatalism | free will: divine foreknowledge and | future contingents | Gersonides | Gregory of Rimini | Holkot [Holcot], Robert | modality: medieval theories of | prophecy
contingency  Boethius  modal_logic  logic  free_will  Cicero  divine_​omniscience  Aristotle  fate  Abelard  Aquinas  necessity  SCOTUS  Providence  prophecy  medieval_philosophy  future_contingents  God-attributes 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Mediaeval Logic and Philosophy - Paul Vincent Spade
Translations, notes, course materials and articles downloadable as pdfs -- he wrote the William of Ockham entry for the Stanford EP, lots if materials on universals, and goes back to Boethius, including B's commentary on Porphyry questions
Neoplatonism  medieval_philosophy  universals  translation  courses  Boethius  logic  website  Ockham  article  etexts  nominalism  Aristotle 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
The Virtual Issue No. 1 – Truth (2014 - conference 2013 | The Aristotelian Society
In celebration of the 125th year of the Proceedings, we are proud to present the first Virtual Issue of the Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society. The Virtual Issue is based upon an Online Conference on the theme of Truth that took place 12th–18th April 2013. This weeklong event featured papers from our back catalogue, commentaries on these papers delivered by contemporary philosophers, and an online-based discussion forum that was open to all. The Virtual Issue comprises the classic papers and commentaries from the conference.
epistemology  21stC  apriori  intellectual_history  books  anti-foundationalism  epistemology-naturalism  downloaded  logic  analytical_philosophy  ebooks  aporia  20thC  foundationalism  moral_philosophy  social_epistemology  truth  virtue_epistemology 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Nadeem J. Z. Hussain and Lydia Patton - Friedrich Albert Lange | Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy August 2012 revision of original May 2095
Friedrich Albert Lange (b. 1828, d. 1875) was a German philosopher, pedagogue, political activist, and journalist. He was one of the originators of neo-Kantianism and an important figure in the founding of the Marburg school of neo-Kantianism. He also played a significant role in the German labour movement and in the development of social democratic thought. His book, The History of Materialism, was a standard introduction to materialism and the history of philosophy well into the twentieth century. -- 1. Life and Intellectual Career -- 2. Pedagogy -- 3. The Labor Question -- 4. Neo-Kantianism ** 4.1 The Ethical Standpoint of the Ideal ** 4.2 Logic and Scientific Methodology -- downloaded as pdf to Note
intellectual_history  19thC  Germany  German_scholars  Lange_FA  neo-Kantian  Hegelian  German_Idealism  materialism-19thC  materialism  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_science  epistemology  epistemology-moral  epistemology-naturalism  ancient_philosophy  atomism  logic  scientific_method  socialism  labor  capitalism  Industrial_Revolution  social_democracy  physiology  mind  perception  sensation  Kant-ethics  bibliography 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Beatrice Kobow - How to Do Things with Fictions: Reconsidering Vaihinger for a Philosophy of Social Sciences (2013) | Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44: 201 via Cambridge Realist Workshop
The article reconstructs three key concepts of Hans Vaihinger: the idea of mental fictions as self-contradictory, provisory, conscious, and purposeful; the law of the devolution of ideas stating that an idea oscillates between dogma, hypothesis, or fiction; and the underlying assumption about human consciousness that the psyche constructs thoughts around perceptions like an oyster produces a pearl. In a second, constructive part, these concepts are applied in a discussion of John Searle’s social ontologically extended theory of speech acts. The article introduces the Vaihingerian as-if to Searle’s account of declarations. The explanatory work in a model of social reality as Searle has proposed it rests on the ability to show a necessary connection between collective and individual intentionality facilitated through linguistic structure. The methodological individualism of the model requires that motivational assumptions about collective structures be realized in individual brains. The as-if stance of the declarer provides just this connection. -- Keywords as-if, fiction, status function declarations, double direction of fit, deonticity, collective intentionality, speech act theory, social ontology, Vaihinger, Searle - downloaded to iPhone from http://www.csog.econ.cam.ac.uk/Cambridge-Realist-Workshop/realist-images/HowtoDoThingswithFictions.pdf/at_download/file
article  ontology-social  cognition-social  fiction-cognition  methodological_individualism  critical_realism  perception  downloaded  hypothesis  Searle  as-if  speech_acts  logic  sociology_of_knowledge  cognition  philosophy_of_social_science 
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Hartshorne: Biography and Psychology of Sensation | Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
(..) he insisted that metaphysics and empirical science have different aims and methods, each ensuring in its own way a disciplined objectivity. His “neoclassical” or “process” metaphysics is in the same family of speculative philosophy that one finds in the works of CS Peirce and the later writings of AN Whitehead. Although he did not style himself a disciple of either, he made significant contributions to the study of these philosophers even as he developed his own views. Like them, he endeavored in his own metaphysical thinking to give full weight to the dynamic, relational, temporal, and affective dimensions of the universe. He emphasized, as few before him had, in logic and in the processes of nature, the foundational nature of asymmetrical relations. He was also a theist (...) the revival of the ontological or modal argument for God’s existence...He insisted, however, that it was unavailing to appeal to ...any theistic argument) as support for theism without first rethinking the concept of deity. He argued that thinking about God had been handicapped by lack of attention to the logically possible forms of theism, and in place of the unmoved mover of classical theology, he proposed “the most, and best, moved mover.” He endorsed a “dipolar” version of theism according to which God is both necessary and contingent, but in different respects. He sought a “panentheism” in which God includes the creatures without negating their distinctiveness. -- entry also covers his 1st book on perception -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  20thC  metaphysics  philosophy_of_religion  Peirce  Whitehead  theism  Hartshorne  natural_religion  rational_religion  God-attributes  God-existence  analytical_philosophy  logic  logic-Peirce  process_theology  panentheism  ontological_argument  cosmology  Aristotelian  sensation  perception  empiricism  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Jag Bhalla - Is 'Information Theory' Misnamed? | Big Think - May 2015
by Jag Bhalla “Information theory” is misnamed. And information operates differently in physics versus biology. 1. Gregory Chaitin applies “information theory”… -- really nice mini essay on the inadequacy of "information theory" to deal with semantic complexity, and why different domains will have very different communication requirements and processes -- e.g. physics vs life sciences, such as genetics, which are much more like algorithms *to say nothing of social sciences and humanities) -- parallels his other mini essays on different logics for different domains, and different analogy-style reasoning for different disciplines -- with lots of links
philosophy_of_science  epistemology  logic  information_theory  communication  IT  physics  biology  links  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Piet Strydom - Inferential Dialectics: On Dialectical Reasoning in Critical Social Science and the Sociocultural World, (2015) | Academia.edu
Unpublished preliminary study for "Towards a New Cognitive Social Science" (book in progress) -- In this paper, I take as my starting point Norman Fairclough’s treatment of critical social analysis as a form of dialectical reasoning. While generally concurring with this equivalency despite a host of smaller disagreements on which I do not dwell, I venture to fill in a largely blank space in his argument by focusing on the internal workings of dialectical reasoning. The reference point for the core of my argument is the fact that Fairclough regards critical social analysis as based on epistemological dialectics which forms part of a larger set of relations, yet passes over the explication of the place and role of this basic form of dialectics in this constellation in favour of focusing on its practical dialectical nature. The point is, however, that an adequate grasp of practical dialectics requires the simultaneous consideration of the principal operative features of epistemological dialectics, not just in critical social analysis but more basically still also in social life itself. My proposal is that this could be done by introducing the inferential stance in order to consider what I call the dialectics of inference or inferential dialectics. This perspective forms part of a broader cognitive sociological approach that focuses on the cognitive processes – of which discourse is but one – on which the construction and structuring of society depend and which pervade the latter’s every fibre. -- Key words: Abduction, Badiou, Brandom, cognitive sociology, critical realism, critical social analysis, Critical Theory, deduction, dialectics, Fairclough, Hegel, induction, inference, Peirce, reasoning, social theory -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  cognition-social  constructivism  logic  logic-Peirce  deduction  abduction  inference  logic-Hegelian  dialectic  Brandom  critical_theory  critical_realism  pragmatism  induction  downloaded 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Pei Wang - A General Theory of Intelligence [an e-book under development] | Home
This eBook is an attempt to establish a theory that identifies the commonality within various forms intelligence, including human intelligence, computer intelligence, animal intelligence, alien intelligence, group intelligence, etc. -- NARS (Non-Axiomatic Reasoning System) - Most of the existing AI inference works with semi-axiomatic systems, which attempt to make partial extension or revision of mathematical logic, while keeping the other parts. What AI really needs are non-axiomatic systems, which do not assume the sufficiency of knowledge and resources in any aspect of the system. NARS is a concrete example of non-axiomatic system which uses a formal language "Narsese" to represent goals, actions, and beliefs.The basic unit of the language is term, which can be thought of as the name or label of a concept in the system. (..) The meaning of a term is determined by its extension and intension, which are the collection of the inheritance relations between this term and other terms, obtained from the experience of the system. NARS includes three variants of the inheritance relation: similarity (symmetric inheritance), implication (derivability), and equivalence (symmetric implication). (..)The meaning of a compound term is partially determined by its logical relations with its components, and partially by the system's experience on the compound term as a whole. Event is a special type of statement that have a time-dependent truth-value. Operation is a special type of event that can occur by the system's decision. Goal is a special type of event, that the system is attempting to realize, by carrying out certain operations. Beside goals to be achieved, NARS can accept tasks that are knowledge to be absorbed and questions to be answered. (..)If a event is judged to imply the achieving of a goal, then the desirability of the event is increased, and the system will also evaluate its plausibility(..). When an event is both desirable and plausible, the system will make the decision to turn the event into a goal to be actually pursued. The basic function of inference rules in NARS is to derive new beliefs from current beliefs.
etexts  books  intelligence  artificial_intelligence  mind  systems-complex_adaptive  systems-reflexive  systems_theory  epistemology-social  cognition  cognition-social  agent-based_models  logic  inference  decision_theory  rationality  rationality-bounded  learning  website  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Hegel's Theory of Mental Activity by Willem A. deVries (pdfs of Cornell University Press 1988)
Hegel's Theory of Mental Activity - Originally copyright Cornell University Press, 1988; Cornell kindly gave me back the copyright when the book went out of print, which change has been duly registered with the Copyright Office. So it is now copyright Willem A. deVries. The files contained here are graphical reproductions of the original text with an invisible text overlay, so they reproduce the look and pagination of the original, but can also be searched using Acrobat's find function. My grateful thanks to Stephen Butterfill for scanning the book and putting it into PDF format.
books  etexts  downloaded  intellectual_history  philosophes  German_Idealism  Hegel  17thC  18thC  19thC  Plato  Aristotle  Kant  empiricism  rationalist  mind  logic  logic-Hegelian  perception  rationality  phenomenology  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Angelica Nuzzo - The Social Dimension of Dialectical Truth: Hegel’s Idea of Objective Spirit « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (8): 10-25 (2013
Graduate Center and Brooklyn College, CUNY -- Special Issue 2: On the Future Direction of Social Epistemology -- In this essay I argue for the claim that Hegel’s dialectical idea of truth, which is articulated in its pure forms in the Logic as the process of comprehension of partial positions of truth in an ultimate systematic unity, is socially and historically constituted within the structures of what Hegel calls “spirit.” I start by bringing to the fore those controversial issues of the Goldman-Fuller debate on which Hegel has important suggestions to make. In placing Hegel within this debate, my claim is that his theory offers a ‘third way’ of shaping a social epistemology developed on the basis of a dialectic-speculative logic and such as having the notion of spirit at the center. What Hegel has to offer to us is a “dialectical” social epistemology where truth is indeed the fundamental aim of science and yet it is a historical and collective construction of spirit. I examine the access to and the elaboration of truth and knowledge proper, respectively, to subjective and objective spirit: the psychological, individual dimension of subjective spirit, and the social and institutional context of objective spirit. I argue that the dimension of objective spirit is the mediating center that organizes and gives “reality” to all the forms of spirit’s knowledge. I conclude by briefly discussing the role that Bildung plays in shaping and articulating the institutions of knowledge and the activity of science within the social sphere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
social_theory  epistemology  epistemology-social  analytical_philosophy  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science  logic  logic-Hegelian  Hegel  constructivism  dialectic-historical  dialectic  bildung  institutions  social_sciences  Absolute  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Miika Vähämaa - Secrets, Errors and Mathematics: Reconsidering the Role of Groups in Social Epistemology « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (9): 36-51 (2013)
Special Issue 2: On the Future Direction of Social Epistemology (SE) -- This paper claims that analytic social epistemology (ASE) has slowed, if not halted, the development of SE and the social sciences in general. I argue that SE is unavoidably subjective due to its collective nature. SE as it is generally understood, consists of the study of socially shared propositions and how they are understood by those communities. However, socially shared propositions of knowledge are not constrained by propositional logic but are rather enabled by the limited quanta of reason and logic embedded in linguistic structure. From the view of Goldman and his supporters , “real” knowledge is constrained by propositional logic, which is derived from language and is constructed in social settings. This view errs in its attempt to collapse social knowledge into propositional logic, downplaying the many social groups and practices that produce, create, restore and distort knowledge. The “subjective” and group-oriented nature of SE is demonstrated in this text by examples of secrets, errors and mathematics as discrete social domains in which knowledge is created and maintained. Examples in both philosophy and social sciences are important, since they reveal the weaknesses of strict ASE. A simple real-life example may be appealing to emotions and personal experiences of life whereas Wittgensteinian truth tables are rarely matters of personal attachment to anyone. The social in SE can only be properly considered from the viewpoint of social groups. Following an argument presented by Fuller, I show that “knowledge” is not a self-maintaining quality of human life, but rather a qualia that is regenerated situationally. All epistemic activities build upon such reorganization as it is conducted within social groups which seek to regenerate knowledge both to make sense of the world and to make sense of their own selves. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  social_theory  epistemology  epistemology-social  epistemology-naturalism  analytical_philosophy  social_psychology  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_science  logic  knowledge  constructivism  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Reviewed by Tom Donaldson - David J. Chalmers, Constructing the World (OUP 2014) // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // August 2014
Stanford University -- This is a monumental book, in several respects. Most obviously, it’s very long: longer, by my estimate, than the Critique of Pure Reason b y a margin of about three and a half Tractatus. It is also vast in scope: Chalmers discusses a huge range of topics in formal and informal epistemology, metaphysics, the philosophy of language, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of science. There is even some history: Carnap is the ‘hero’ of Constructing the World (p. xvii), and one of Chalmers’ goals is to reassess Carnap’s work — especially the Aufbau. Paper copies of the book contain eight chapters and seventeen short supplemental ‘excursuses’. Chalmers has also made one extra chapter and four additional excursuses available online. The book is based on Chalmers’ 2010 John Locke lectures, which the Oxford University philosophy department has to its great credit put online in mp3 format. Chalmers has made no major changes to his position or terminology between delivering the lectures and completing the book, so those who like to take their philosophy aurally can start with the online lectures before turning to the written text for more detail. -- In section one I discuss Chalmers’ use of the vexed term ‘a priori’. In section two I discuss Chalmers’ defence of the claim that there are a priori truths (including synthetic a priori truths) from empiricist doubters. In section three I explain how Chalmers defends his ‘scrutability theses’. In section four I outline the Fregean theory of sense.
books  reviews  kindle-available  logic  Carnap  Frege  Quine  metaphysics  epistemology  philosophy_of_language  mind  consciousness  subjectivity  apriori  philosophy_of_science 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Reviewed by Jocelyn Benoist - Vincent Descombes, The Institutions of Meaning: A Defense of Anthropological Holism // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // August 2014
Reviewed by Jocelyn Benoist, University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne This is the English translation by Stephen Adam Schwartz of Vincent Descombes’ Les Institutions du Sens (Paris, Editions de Minuit, 1996). It is the sequel to The Mind’s Provisions: A Critique of Cognitivism, also translated into English by Schwartz (Princeton University Press, 2001; French original version: La Denrée Mentale, Paris, Editions de Minuit, 1995). The two books should be considered together as a whole, to which the author himself gave the title of The Disputes of Mind. -- This impressive work is indeed a major contribution to the philosophy of mind. Perhaps the cognitivist wave is not as powerful today as it was twenty years ago, which may render the ‘dispute’ less intense nowadays, but the concept of mind provided by the author is no less topical. --. It is clear that this book is a milestone in the contemporary philosophy of mind and should absolutely be read by every philosopher or scientist interested in the nature of the mind today. It pursues an intense debate with contemporary cognitivism and with Continental theories and ‘deconstruction’ of mind, and develops a totally unique perspective at the crossroads of the Analytic and French traditions. Maybe, like every polemical work, it depends a bit too much on what it criticizes. However, beyond the polemic, it seems to me that this book does indeed promise a new philosophy of mind that defines the mind by itself and no longer by any transcendent principle — either ‘the Subject’ or ‘Society’ — that in a sense would not already be mindful. Thus, it seems to me that we should read this book as a plea for the non-metaphysical irreducibility of the mind. And what do we need more today than a non-metaphysical (I have not said: anti-metaphysical) anti-reductionism?
books  reviews  philosophy_of_language  mind  sociability  structuralist  poststructuralist  continental_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  phenomenology  hermeneutics  subjectivity  deconstruction  Peirce  logic  society  constructivism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen Paskey - The Law is Made of Stories: Erasing the False Dichotomy between Stories and Legal Rules (May 30, 2014) :: SSRN
SUNY Buffalo Law School -- Legal Comm. & Rhetoric: JALWD, vol. 11 (Fall 2014, Forthcoming) - SUNY Buffalo Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2014-031 -- When lawyers think of legal analysis, they think chiefly of logic and reason. Stories are secondary. As Michael Smith explains, our legal system “is not founded on narrative reasoning” but on “a commitment to the rule of law.” The article suggests that this dichotomy between “rule-based reasoning” and “narrative reasoning” is false, and that narrative and stories are central to legal reasoning, including rule-based reasoning. In doing so, the article uses literary narrative theory to show that every governing legal rule has the structure of a “stock story”: the elements of the rule correspond to elements of a story. It follows that lawyers do not rely on stories simply because they are persuasive. They do so because a story is literally embedded in the structure of governing rules, and those rules can be satisfied only by telling a story. Thus, many analytical moves we label “rule-based reasoning” can be understood as a type of narrative reasoning, in which a client’s story is compared to and contrasted with the stock story embedded in the rule. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  narrative  legal_reasoning  logic  precedent  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Dougherty's Calculus Textbook Project - Math Chair, Southwest Oklahoma State
This page contains excerpts from my calculus textbook project, written in collaboration with John Gieringer of Alvernia University, Reading, Pennsylvania. (9,662,820 bytes, updated November 20, 2012) -- What's Different? - Our textbook is meant to be read--curled up with and read! We go into much detail, with more examples than most in the topics which are the most confusing. If you currently are using one of the standard textbooks, you can use ours as a supplement. If you want to learn calculus on your own, ours can be your main text (though the standard ones have more exercises). We occasionally hear from folks around the world who happened upon this site that they found it useful, and we hope you agree. A few "differences" might turn off some readers, particularly regarding the first two chapters. We spend a chapter on symbolic logic so we can use it elsewhere, including a rather in-depth (for a calculus book) development of epsilon-delta proofs. If you just want more complete examples for derivative and integral problems, you can go to those sections (preferably from the current "whole book" file linked above). If you want a much deeper, and more useful and "form-based" discussion of limits (to better prepare students for things like convergence tests and improper integrals), check those out. Another difference is that there is a very expanded Chapter 2, which is still preliminary but has some good algebraic stuff which is easier to accomplish after raising the sophistication level, made possible by a study of Chapter 1's logic. -- downloaded pdf of Symbolic Logic, Chapter 2 and whole text to Note
logic  mathematics  etexts  downloaded 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, by Simon Blackburn | Answers.com
The Oxford Dictionary of Philosophy, by Simon Blackburn, Oxford University Press
This dictionary covers every aspect of philosophy from Aristotle to Zen. Entries include biographies of famous and influential philosophers, in-depth analysis of philosophical terms and concepts, a chronology of philosophical events from antiquity to the present day, and coverage of themes from Chinese, Indian, Islamic and Jewish philosophy.
books  etexts  reference  intellectual_history  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  philosophy_of_social_science  philosophy_of_religion  metaphysics  metaethics  epistemology  ontology  logic  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  political_philosophy 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
JOEL ISAAC -- DONALD DAVIDSON AND THE ANALYTIC REVOLUTION IN AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY, 1940–1970 (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 757-779 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
JOEL ISAAC - Christ's College, Cambridge -- Histories of analytic philosophy in the United States have typically focused on the reception of logical positivism, and especially on responses to the work of the Vienna Circle. Such accounts often call attention to the purportedly positivist-inspired marginalization of normative concerns in American philosophy: according to this story, the overweening positivist concern for logic and physics as paradigms of knowledge displaced questions of value and social relations. This article argues that the reception framework encourages us to mistake the real sources of the analytic revolution in post-war philosophy. These are to be found in debates about intentional action and practical reasoning – debates in which ‘normative’ questions of value and social action were in fact central. Discussion of these topics took place within a transatlantic community of Wittgensteinians, ordinary languages philosophers, logical empiricists, and decision theorists. These different strands of ‘analytical’ thinking were bound together into a new philosophical mainstream not by a positivist alliance with logic and physics, but by the rapid development of the mathematical and behavioural sciences during the Second World War and its immediate aftermath. An illustrative application of this new framework for interpreting the analytic revolution is found in the early career and writings of Donald Davidson.
article  paywall  intellectual_history  20thC  analytical_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  Wittgenstein  ordinary_language_philosophy  behavioralism  social_sciences-post-WWII  decision_theory  mathematics  logic  empiricism  US  cultural_history  academia  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Taliaferro - Dualism and the Problem of Individuation | JSTOR: Religious Studies, Vol. 22, No. 2 (Jun., 1986), pp. 263-276
Quite helpful review of various metaphysical debates from Descartes onwards, how the "substance" debates have evolved, including the old identity of indiscernables claim that's been thoroughly challenged in post WWII analytical_philosophy. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  20thC  Descartes  Locke  Butler  Reid  metaphysics  ontology  substance  soul  dualism  physicalism  mind-body  consciousness  immortality  universals  particulars  identity  self  analytical_philosophy  logic  Leibniz  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael P. Lynch, review essay - Beyond the Walls of Reason: The Last Word by Thomas Nagel | JSTOR: The Philosophical Quarterly, Vol. 49, No. 197 (Oct., 1999), pp. 529-536
Nagel attacks primarily perspectivism, lumping naturalists (e.g. Quine, Dennett) and contextualists (e.g. Rorty, Putnam) with (certain forms of? ) relativism -- Lynch teasing apart threads in Nagel's argument looks interesting -- Nagel accuses perspectivism of having to adopt a "view from nowhere" whereas one of the motivations for perspectivism is that absolute reason, truth etc requires the "view from nowhere" or God's eye view -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  metaphysics  epistemology  perspectivism  relativism  logic  Nagel  Quine  Dennett  Rorty  Putnam  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Cahill - Ethics and the "Tractatus": A Resolute Failure | JSTOR: Philosophy, Vol. 79, No. 307 (Jan., 2004), pp. 33-55
He's in the New Wittgenstein camp. Very useful development of themes across the New Wittgenstein crowd, distinguishing PI from Tractatus and why Wittgenstein came to see the Tractatus as a failure, not only in method, but in still being wedded to the intellectualizing impulse of philosophy, to elaborate the world as it really is by unlocking the central problem. His ethical objectives in the Tractatus have been developed by New Wittgenstein proponents, with analogies to Kierkegaard, St Paul and Augustine. -- read online, didn't download
article  jstor  20thC  21stC  philosophy_of_language  moral_philosophy  dogmatism  analytical_philosophy  Wittgenstein  Frege  Russell_Bertrand  Kierkegaard  Paul  Augustine  logic  Logical_Positivism  syntax  language-bad_metaphysics  language_games  concepts  propositions  predicate  bibliography  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Steven Green - Hans Kelsen and the Logic of Legal Systems :: SSRN 53 Alabama Law Review 365-413 (2003)
Hans Kelsen's formalism and Kantianism have been barriers to an appreciation of his work in the US. This article offers a sympathetic reading of Kelsen's approach in legal theory by drawing analogies between it and the writings of Gottlob Frege. For Frege, the subject matter of logic is the necessary relations between linguistic meanings. These relations can be seen as necessary only on the assumption that linguistic meanings are abstract objects that cannot be reduced to anything empirical. For this reason Frege rejected psychologism in logic. Like many other late-19thC anti-psychologists, Frege offered a Neo-Kantian account of how non-empirical knowledge of meanings is possible. Analogously, Kelsen argued that legal meanings are abstract objects. Kelsen proposed an analysis of the necessary relations between legal meanings - a logic of legal systems - that is similar to the Fregean logician's account of language. Kelsen offered a Neo-Kantian account of how knowledge of legal meanings is possible. Although I do not undertake to defend the details of Kelsen's approach, I hope to make his third way between empiricist and natural law theories approaches in jurisprudence more understandable and attractive to American audiences. -- Keywords: Hans Kelsen, Kant, Frege, Neo-Kantianism, logic, legal systems, jurisprudence, philosophy of law - Green now says he's happy with most of the paper except the 1st part dealing with Frege -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment: The Writings of Gershom Carmichael, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne (2002)- Online Library of Liberty
Gershom Carmichael, Natural Rights on the Threshold of the Scottish Enlightenment: The Writings of Gershom Carmichael, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1707> -- Carmichael was a Scottish jurist and philosopher who became the first Professor of Moral Philosophy at the University of Glasgow in 1727. His writings on natural rights theory, theology, and logic were very influential. [The volume has selections in each of the foregoing categories] -- since he wrote mainly in Latin, this edition is one of few ways to get access today to his thought -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  Carmichael_Gershom  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  logic  natural_law  natural_rights  natural_religion  civil_society  moral_sentiments  human_nature  sociability  Pufendorf  Hutcheson  Kirk  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
J. Paul Hunter - FORM AS MEANING: POPE AND THE IDEOLOGY OF THE COUPLET | JSTOR: The Eighteenth Century, Vol. 37, No. 3 (FALL 1996), pp. 257-270
Outstanding description of how Pope uses couplets not to set up binaries where one is victor or produce Hegelian synthesis - used to complicate, refuse closure etc - the antithesis of what Pope and his era usually accused of - uses Rape of the Lock and Windsor Forest to illustrate-- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  English_lit  literary_history  lit_crit  poetry  metre  couplet  Pope  dialectic  logic  rhetoric  aporia  Bolingbroke  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Critical Miscellanies: Second Series - John Morley - Google Books
Expanded and revised articles from Fortnightly Review -- Duplicates Macaulay piece from Vol 6 of his collected works -- most devoted to France in 18thC (including a long piece on Robespierre and another long one on Turgot) - looks like JS Mill died during this period, so there are several retrospective pieces on Mill, his Autobiography etc. -- Added to Google_Books library
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may 2014 by dunnettreader
Hegel-by-Hypertext etexts and resources | Andy Blunden [marxists.org]
All of Hegel's works, heavily annotated. Articles, analysis, works by Marx and Engels dealing with Hegel and/or dialectic, and lots of Marxist commentary on Hegel, especially reacting to Lenin’s study of Hegel and how it affects reading Marx.
website  etexts  19thC  20thC  German_Idealism  Hegel  Hegelian  Hegelians-French  Marx  Marxist  existentialism  Sartre  historiography-19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  metaphysics  logic  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Wilde - Logic: Dialectic and contradiction [Cambridge Companion to Marx] (1991)
Lawrence Wilde (1991) -- Logic: Dialectic and contradiction -- Source: The Cambridge Companion to Marx, ed. Terrell Carver, 1991
etext  article  books  intellectual_history  19thC  Marx  logic  dialectic  dialectic-historical 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Hutcheson - Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind - Online Library of Liberty
Francis Hutcheson, Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind, ed. James Moore and Michael Silverthorne, texts translated from the Latin by Michael Silverthorne, introduction by James Moore (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 5/5/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1723> Until the publication of this Liberty Fund edition, all but one of the works contained in Logic, Metaphysics, and the Natural Sociability of Mankind were available only in Latin. This milestone English translation will provide a general audience with insight into Hutcheson’s thought. In the words of the editors: “Hutcheson’s Latin texts in logic and metaphysics form an important part of his collected works. Published respectively in 1756 and, in its second edition, 1744, these works represent Hutcheson’s only systematic treatments of logic, ontology, and pneumatology, or the science of the soul. They were considered indispensable texts for the instruction of students in the eighteenth century.” -- the introduction is very useful -- pdf of LibFund typesetting
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may 2014 by dunnettreader
Middle Knowledge [Molinism] - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
** Assumptions
** Scientia Media
** Objections to Middle Knowledge
** Rejection of Libertarian Freedom
** Libertarian Responses
** The Truth of Counterfactuals of Creaturely Freedom
** Objections to the Principle of Conditional Excluded Middle
** Molinist Responses
** Molinism and Determinism
** The Grounding Objection
** Molinist Responses
** The Usefulness of Middle Knowledge
** Viciously Circular
** Not True Soon Enough
** Molinist Responses
theology  theodicy  philosophy_of_religion  logic  modal_logic  God-attributes  free_will  Providence  Calvinist  Jesuits  Counter-Reformation  Genesis  creation_ex_nilho  EF-add 
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Brandom - Pragmatism, Inferentialism, and Modality in Sellars's Arguments against Empiricism
"Pragmatism, Inferentialism, and Modality in Sellars's Arguments against Empiricism", in Empiricism, Perceptual Knowledge, Normativity, and Realism, Willem deVries (ed.), Oxford University Press, 2009...
paper  analytical_philosophy  pragmatism  epistemology  logic  inference  empiricism  Sellars  downloaded  EF-add  from notes
april 2014 by dunnettreader
Thérèse-Anne Druart, review - Peter Adamson (ed.), Interpreting Avicenna: Critical Essays // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // March 2014
Cambridge University Press -- Books giving an overview of the whole of Avicenna’s works are few and far between. In 2010 Jon McGinnis offered such an overview in the Oxford University Press series “Great Medieval Thinkers.” The aim of the book edited by Peter Adamson is quite different and so does not reduplicate it in any way. McGinnis gives a philosophical and fairly systematic presentation of Avicenna’s views and arguments that also includes a section on medicine and another on the Avicennan heritage. Though following a similar outline, Adamson asked the contributors to focus on cutting-edge research and more specific issues inside particular fields, such as logic, metaphysics, etc. The point was not to present the basic and more studied views of Avicenna, but rather to pay attention to what has been little studied or deserves more study. The two books nicely complement each other. For instance, if one has no grounding in Avicenna’s metaphysics, it would be better to begin with McGinnis’s two chapters on the topic and then move to more specific issues as presented by Stephen Menn and Peter Adamson, even if the title of Menn’s chapter is simply “Avicenna’s Metaphysics.”
books  reviews  intellectual_history  medieval_philosophy  Islamic_civilization  Islam-Greek_philosophy  Avicenna  Aristotelian  logic  metaphysics  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Nathan Houser, review - Paul Forster, Peirce and the Threat of Nominalism // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // March 2013
Key ideas and insights from Peirce are frequently featured in contemporary research ranging across much of philosophy, and across other disciplines, yet when these ideas are considered together, it is difficult to see how they can belong to one system of thought. A notable accomplishment of Paul Forster... is that he has achieved a comprehensive account of most of Peirce's leading ideas in a way that gives the reader a grasp of how everything fits together in the context of Peirce's battle against nominalism. This is no mere device for unifying Peirce's wide-ranging ideas; his opposition to nominalism motivated him as nothing else did and, as Forster shows, is central to his philosophical program. While Peirce's argument against nominalism was strictly philosophical, his objection to it extended beyond logic to what he regarded as the undesirable consequences of nominalism for civilization. Peirce understood nominalism in the broad anti-realist sense usually attributed to William of Ockham, as the view that reality consists exclusively of concrete particulars and that universality and generality have to do only with names and their significations. This view relegates properties, abstract entities, kinds, relations, laws of nature, and so on, to a conceptual existence at most. Peirce believed nominalism (including what he referred to as "the daughters of nominalism": sensationalism, phenomenalism, individualism, and materialism) to be seriously flawed and a great threat to the advancement of science and civilization. His alternative was a nuanced realism that distinguished reality from existence and that could admit general and abstract entities as reals without attributing to them direct (efficient) causal powers. Peirce held that these non-existent reals could influence the course of events by means of final causation (conceived somewhat after Aristotle's conception), and that to banish them from ontology, as nominalists require, is virtually to eliminate the ground for scientific prediction as well as to underwrite a skeptical ethos unsupportive of moral agency.
books  reviews  19thC  intellectual_history  Peirce  logic  nominalism  universals  laws_of_nature  kinds  philosophy_of_science  pragmatism  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Timothy J. Nulty, review - David Egan, Stephen Reynolds, and Aaron James Wendland (eds.), Wittgenstein and Heidegger // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
Readers familiar with both Heidegger and Wittgenstein will find in this book detailed and thorough expressions of perhaps some of their own intuitions about the similarities and differences between these two influential twentieth-century philosophers. The 16 essays provide insights and arguments published for the first time. Even those who consider themselves well-versed in the works of Heidegger and Wittgenstein are sure to find this book worth their time... -- Braver examines Heidegger's and Wittgenstein's views of fundamental logical principles [and] succeeds in showing how Wittgenstein and Heidegger gave very similar answers to questions about the basic principles that are supposed to guide our thinking. For Wittgenstein, the target of critique was the Law of Non-contradiction, while for Heidegger it was the Principle of Sufficient Reason. Both philosophers return logic and reason to the human domain. One is reminded of the American pragmatist William James and his attempt to provide an account of truth that was cognizant of the finite, contextual nature of human understanding. Logic and reason are not transcendent to our practices; they are not answerable to "Meaning or Reason or anything metaphysical or capitalized" ... In giving up a transcendent source of justification, we only lose what we never had in the first place.
books  reviews  20thC  intellectual_history  metaphysics  logic  philosophy_of_language  ontology  Wittgenstein  Heidegger  phenomenology  empiricism  pragmatism  James_William  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Graham Priest - What is so Bad about Contradictions? | JSTOR: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 95, No. 8 (Aug., 1998), pp. 410-426
On paradox, law of excluded middle, indeterminancy, counterfactuals and other logic problems -- frequently cited re narratology -- didn't download
article  jstor  logic  paradox  counterfactuals  aporia  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Hanna - Rationality and the Ethics of Logic | JSTOR: The Journal of Philosophy, Vol. 103, No. 2 (Feb., 2006), pp. 67-100
Argues for a proto logic that's normative. Extensive discussion of links and separation of logic and psychology from early moderns through Frege and Husserl to various stages of 20thC. Looks useful for intellectual_history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  epistemology  moral_psychology  action-theory  logic  reason  human_nature  psychologism  phenomenology  analytical_philosophy  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
David Enoch and Joshua Schechter - How Are Basic Belief-Forming Methods Justified? | JSTOR: Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Vol. 76, No. 3 (May, 2008), pp. 547-579
In this paper, we present an account of in virtue of what thinkers are justified in employing certain basic belief-forming methods. The guiding idea is inspired by Reichenbach's work on induction. There are certain projects in which thinkers are rationally required to engage. Thinkers are epistemically justified in employing a belief-forming method that is indispensable for successfully engaging in such a project. We present a detailed account based on this intuitive thought, and address objections to it. We conclude by commenting on the implications that our account may have for other important epistemological debates. -- deals with the sort of issues Reid "solved" by common sense philosophy, covers a priori logic as well as handling of perceptual evidence -- how to avoid regress -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  epistemology  logic  induction  belief  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Reviewed by Cheryl Misak - Christopher Hookway, The Pragmatic Maxim: Essays on Peirce and Pragmatism // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // April 2013
Christopher Hookway, The Pragmatic Maxim: Essays on Peirce and Pragmatism, Oxford University Press, 2013, 256pp., $75.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780199588381.

Reviewed by Cheryl Misak, University of Toronto
books  reviews  pragmatism  epistemology  logic  philosophy_of_science  truth  Peirce  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
John Dewey: How We Think (1910) | George Herbert Mead Project
John Dewey. How we think. Lexington, Mass: D.C. Heath, (1910)

Part One: The Problem of Training Thought

Chapter One: What is Thought?

Chapter Two: The Need for Training Thought

Chapter Three: Natural Resources in the Training of Thought

Chapter Four: School Conditions and the Training of Thought

Chapter Five: The Means and End of Mental Training: The Psychological and The Logical

Part Two: Logical Considerations

Chapter Six: The Analysis of a Complete Act of Thought

Chapter Seven: Systematic Inference: Induction and Deduction

Chapter Eight: Judgment: the Interpretation of Facts

Chapter Nine: Meaning: or Conceptions and Understanding

Chapter Ten: Concrete and Abstract Thinking

Chapter Eleven: Empirical and Scientific Thinking

Part Three: The Training of Thought

Chapter Twelve: Activity and the Training of Thought

Chapter Thirteen: Language and the Training of Thought

Chapter Fourteen: Observation and Information in the Training of Mind

Chapter Fifteen: The Recitation and the Training of Thought

Chapter Sixteen: Some General Conclusions

Notes
books  online_texts  Dewey  intellectual_history  20thC  US_history  mind  psychology  thought  logic  language  education  meaning  concepts  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
John Dewey: Essays in Experimental Logic (1916) | George Herbert Mead Project
When stock of Studies in Logical Theory (1903) had been exhausted, it was supplanted by Essays in Experimental Logic which retained Dewey's papers but dropped the students. -- . The first and introductory chapter has been especially written for the volume. The other essays are in part reprinted and in part rewritten, with additions from various contributions to philosophical periodicals. "Some Stages of Logical Thought" antedates the essays taken from the volume of Studies, having been published in 1900; the other essays have been written from the standpoint of what is now termed a behavioristic psychology, though some of them antedate the use of the term as a descriptive epithet.

The Relationship of Thought and Its Subject-Matter

The Antecedents and Stimuli of Thinking

Data and Meanings

The Objects of Thought

Some Stages of Logical Thought

The Logical Character of Ideas

The Control of Ideas by Facts

Naive Realism vs Presentative Realism

Epistemological Realism: The Alleged Ubiquity of the Knowledge Relation

The Existence of the World as a Logical Problem

What Pragmatism Means by Practical

An Added Note as to the "Practical"

The Logic of Judgments of Practice
books  online_texts  Dewey  20thC  intellectual_history  US_history  logic  epistemology  ideas-theories  meaning  pragmatism  praxis  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview with Timothy Williamson - modality and metaphysics » 3:AM Magazine Sept 2013
His first interview with 3ammagazine pioneered the End Times series. He’s invited back with a new book to join the series he inspired and broods to the depths on why naturalism is an unhelpful term, why ‘mad dog naturalist’ Alex Rosenberg is brave but wrong, why Paul Horwich’s Wittgensteinianism is also deeply mistaken, about why there’s a need to dirty one’s hands on technicalities if you want to be able to choose between competing theories, about necessitism vs contingentism, permanentism vs temporaryism, an aside about death, about Ruth Barcan Marcus’s key axiom, about his deepened respect for Rudolph Carnap, about Kripke’s fantastic success story, and Bob Stalnaker’s and Kit Fine’s contributions too, and about higher order modal logic being an alternative paradigm for core metaphysical theories.
books  metaphysics  logic  semantics  mathematics  modal_logic  Leibniz  Carnap  contingency  necessity  Wittgenstein  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Mark Setterfield: What Is Analytical Political Economy? (2003)
JSTOR: International Journal of Political Economy, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Summer, 2003), pp. 4-16
Symposium on Post Walrasian Economics, Macroeconomic Policy, and the Future of Analytical Political Economy

Useful taxonomy
article  jstor  political_economy  intellectual_history  social_theory  mathematics  economic_models  logic  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
The ‘Early’ Logical Empiricism of J.M. Keynes versus the Rhetoric of Subjectivism by Michael Emmett Brady :: SSRN
International Journal of Applied Economics and Econometrics, Volume 20, No. 2, April-June 2012, pp. 278-310 

Abstract:      Economists have been unable to comprehend the logical framework of Keynes’ A Treatise on Probability (1921) and General Theory (1936). This is due to their failure to read both works in their entirety. Instead, they concentrate on the first three chapters of Part I of the General Theory or the Treatise. This can be attributed to an “approach” to philosophy which rejects any type of formal, analytical, logical technique in favor of a purely speculative approach that eventually leads down the road to a priorism and subjectism. Keynes's decision approach is based on the general case of non-linearity and non-additivity. His decision theory incorporates neoclassical decision theory as a special case.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 71

Downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  economic_models  rational_choice  Keynes  logic  probability  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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