dunnettreader + literary_theory   29

Jean Rohou - La périodisation : une reconstruction révélatrice et explicatrice (2002) | Cairn.info - Revue d'histoire littéraire de la France
Jean Rohou, La périodisation : une reconstruction révélatrice et explicatrice, Revue d'histoire littéraire de la France, 2002/5 (Vol. 102) -- La périodisation en histoire littéraire, Page 707 à 732 -- lengthy lead article in issue devoted to periodization calling for "rigorous method" -- no abstract - downloaded pdf to Note
article  French_lit  French_language  periodization  historiography  literary_theory  literary_history  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Isabelle Tournier - Événement historique, événement littéraire (2002) | Cairn.info - Revue d'histoire littéraire de la France
Isabelle Tournier - Événement historique, événement littéraire: Qu'est-ce qui fait date en littérature? Revue d'histoire littéraire de la France
2002/5 (Vol. 102), La périodisation en histoire littéraire -- Page 747 à 758 -- Partant du constat que la catégorie d’événement a été peu, pas ou mal pensée par l’histoire littéraire, quand elle aurait pu être au fondement d’une périodisation consciente, l’article s’attache à comprendre le pourquoi de ce quasi-silence méthodologique. Il invoque de récents travaux d’historiens pour proposer de traiter des œuvres comme événements, dans le temps. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  literary_history  periodization  historiography  literary_theory  French_lit  French_language  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
MARK SALBER PHILLIPS - RETHINKING HISTORICAL DISTANCE: FROM DOCTRINE TO HEURISTIC | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 2011)
History and Theory, Vol. 50, No. 4, THEME ISSUE 50: Historical Distance: Reflections on a Metaphor (December 2011), pp. 11-23 -- I argue that distance needs to be reconceived in terms of the wider set of engagements that mediate our relations to the past, as well as the full spectrum of distance-positions from near to far. Re-imagined in these terms, distance sheds its prescriptiveness and becomes a valuable heuristic for examining the history of historical representation. When distance is studied in relation to the range of mediations entailed in historical representation, it becomes evident that the plasticities of distance/proximity are by no means limited to gradients of time; rather, temporality is bound up with other distances that come from our need to engage with the historical past as (simultaneously) a realm of making, oí feeling, of doing, and of understanding. Thus for every historical work, we need to consider at least four basic dimensions of representation as they relate to the problem of mediating distance: 1. the genres, media, and vocabularies that shape the history's formal structures of representation; 2. the affective claims made by the historical account, including the emotional experiences it promises or withholds; 3. the work's implications for action, whether of a political or moral nature; and 4. the modes of understanding on which the history's intelligibility depends. These overlapping, but distinctive, distances—formal, affective, ideological, and conceptual—provide an analytic framework for examining changing modes of historical representation. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  historicism  philosophy_of_history  historians  genre  rhetoric-writing  literary_theory  reception  epistemology-history  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
John Sellars - Plato's Apology of Socrates, A Metaphilosophical Text (2014) | Academia.edu
Philosophy and Literature 38/2 (2014), 433-45 -- Plato’s Apology is not merely an account of Socrates’ trial, it is also a work of metaphilosophy, presenting Socrates’ understanding of the nature and function of philosophy. This is a vital part of the text’s apologetic task, for it is only with reference to Socrates’ understanding of what philosophy is that we can understand, and so justify, his seemingly antisocial behaviour. Plato presents to us Socrates’ metaphilosophy in two ways: via what Socrates says and what he does. This twofold method of presentation is appropriate, if not essential, given the conception of philosophy that Socrates is presented as holding. -- Keywords: Metaphilosophy, Plato, and Socrates -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Plato  Socrates  metaphilosophy  philosophy  philosophy-as-way-of-life  dialogue  rhetoric-writing  literary_theory  style-philosophy  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Antoine Compagnon - La littérature, pour quoi faire ? - Leçon inaugurale - Collège de France - 30 novembre 2006
Full text readable on the site of Open Edition -- pdfs or eoubs only with library access etc -- Collège de France now has this arrangement for ensuring open access to their members' publications -- goes with their policy of videos and podcasts of lectures
books  etexts  literary_history  lit_crit  literary_theory  French_lit  courses 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas G. Pavel - The Lives of the Novel: A History. (2013 hdbk, 2015 obk) | Princeton University Press
This is a bold and original original history of the novel from ancient Greece to the vibrant world of contemporary fiction. In this wide-ranging survey, Pavel argues that the driving force behind the novel's evolution has been a rivalry between stories that idealize human behavior and those that ridicule and condemn it. Impelled by this conflict, the novel moved from depicting strong souls to sensitive hearts and, finally, to enigmatic psyches. Pavel analyzes more than a hundred novels from Europe, North and South America, Asia, and beyond, resulting in a provocative reinterpretation of its development. According to Pavel, the earliest novels were implausible because their characters were either perfect or villainous. In the 18thC and 19thC, novelists strove for greater credibility by describing the inner lives of ideal characters in minute detail (as in Richardson's case), or by closely examining the historical and social environment (as Scott and Balzac did). Yet the earlier rivalry continued: Fielding held the line against idealism, defending the comic tradition with its flawed characters, while Charlotte Brontë and George Eliot offered a rejoinder to social realism with their idealized vision of strong, generous, and sensitive women. In the twentieth century, modernists like Proust and Joyce sought to move beyond this conflict and capture the enigmatic workings of the psyche. Pavel concludes his compelling account by showing how the old tensions persist even within today's pluralism, as popular novels about heroes coexist with a wealth of other kinds of works, from satire to social and psychological realism. -- Prof. of French, Comparative Literature, and Social Thought at the U. of Chicago, also "Fictional Worlds" and "The Spell of Language." -- downloaded introduction to Note
books  kindle-available  literary_history  literary_theory  lit_crit  novels  fiction  Greek_lit  Latin_lit  Medieval  Renaissance  Cervantes  Fielding  Richardson  Defoe  Scott_Sir_Walter  Balzac  Eliot_George  Proust  satire  cultural_critique  politics-and-literature  cultural_history  sentimentalism  character-fiction  psychology  historical_fiction  realism-literature  Modernism  romances  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Lucie Campos interview with Gisèle Sapiro - Geopolitics of Translation in Social Sciences and Humanities - Books & ideas - March 2015 (French original 2014)
Translated by Lucy Garnier -- Tags : translation | publishing | Bourdieu -- As publishing markets become increasingly international, sociology looks at the translation of work in the social sciences and humanities. Gisèle Sapiro shows the effects that the crossover between the academic and publishing spheres has on translation practices. -- Gisèle Sapiro is Director of the European Centre for Sociology and Political Science. She edited the collective volumes Pierre Bourdieu, sociologue (Fayard: 2004) and Pour une histoire des sciences sociales (Fayard: 2004) and has written several books of reference on the sociology of knowledge production, the intellectual field, and the international circulation of ideas, including Translatio. Le marché de la traduction en France à l’heure de la mondialisation (CNRS: 2008), Les Contradictions de la globalisation éditoriale (Nouveau Monde: 2009), and L’Espace intellectuel en Europe, XIXe-XXIe siècles: de la formation des États-nations à la mondialisation (La Découverte: 2009). The author and her research team have published a series of reports on literary exchange in the era of globalisation. After Traduire la littérature et les sciences humaines and Paris-New York the latest of these accounts, "Les Sciences humaines et sociales françaises en traduction" published online in July 2014, presents some of the directions taken by the European project she is coordinating on international cooperation in the social sciences and humanities. -' saved in Instapaper
19thC  20thC  21stC  Republic_of_Letters  intellectual_history  translation  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  networks  networks-information  intelligentsia  literary_theory  cultural_influence  cultural_exchange  language-national  humanities  publishing  academia  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  globalization  cosmopolitanism  circulation-ideas  Bourdieu  Foucault  Derrida  humanities-finance  social_sciences-finance  education-higher  education-finance  universal_language-Latin  universal_language-English  books  Instapaper  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Works by Kenneth Burke | KB Journal - Bibliographies
Lengthy -- divided into categories, e.g. books (non-fiction), essays, poetry, fiction -- notes the main changes and additions to each edition of his major works, including tracking hardback and paperback versions, which is almost impossible to sort out on Amazon -- they note the bibliographies are updated (probably mostly the secondary works page) -- downloaded as pdf to Note
Burke_Kenneth  bibliography  US_history  20thC  intellectual_history  cultural_history  cultural_critique  social_theory  economic_theory  lit_crit  literary_theory  literary_language  rhetoric  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-moral_basis  political_culture  political_sociology  action-theory  philosophy_of_language  epistemology  epistemology-social  dialectic  dialogue  historiography  English_lit  Shakespeare  poetry  poetics  theater  psychology  meaning  perspectivism  pragmatism  progressivism  socialism  communism  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Milton, the Metaphysicals, and Romanticism | Renaissance and early modern literature | Cambridge University Press
Lisa Low, Pace University, New York - Anthony John Harding, University of Saskatchewan -- Both the English Civil War and the French Revolution produced in England an outpouring of literature reflecting intense belief in the arrival of a better world, and new philosophies of the relationship between mind, language and cosmos. This is the first book to explore the significance of the connections between the literature of these two periods. The volume analyses Milton's influence on Romantic writers including Blake, Beckford, Wordsworth, Shelley, Radcliffe and Keats, and examines the relationships between other 17thC poets - Donne, Marvell, Vaughan, Herrick, Cowley, Rochester and Dryden - and Romantic writers. Representing a wide range of theoretical approaches, it is a provocative and challenging assessment of the relationship between two of the richest periods of British literary history. **--** Introduction - Milton, the metaphysicals, and romanticism: reading the past, reflecting the present - Lisa Elaine Low and Anthony John Harding *-* 1. The other reading transactional epic in Milton, Blake, and Wordsworth - Tilottama Rajan *-* 2. Newton's pantocrator and Blake's recovery of Miltonic prophecy - G. A. Rosso *-* 3. Milton's hell: William Beckford's place in the graphic and the literary tradition - Elinor Shaffer *-* 4. How theories of Romanticism exclude women: Radcliffe, Milton, and the legitimation of the gothic novel - Annette Wheeler Cafarelli *-* 5. Wordsworth, Milton, and the inward light - Nicola Zoe Trott *-* 6. De-fencing the poet: The political dilemma of the poet and the people in Milton's Second Defense and Shelley's Defence of Poetry - Michael Chappell *-* 7. Keats's Marginalia in Paradise Lost - Beth Lau *-* 8. What the mower does to the meadow: action and reflection in Wordsworth and Marvell - Frederick Burwick *'* 9. Kidnapping the poets: the Romantics and Henry Vaughan - John T. Shawcross *-* 10. 'Against the Stream Upwards': Coleridge's Recovery of John Donne - Anthony John Harding *-* 11. Coleridge, Keats, Lamb and 17thC drinking songs - Anya Taylor *-* 12. Marvell, Keats, Wallace Stevens, and the (early) modern meditation poem - Lisa Elaine Low. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  Romanticism  poetry  Metaphysicals  English_Civil_War  French_Revolution-impact  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Keats  Shelley  Newtonian  Blake_William  authors-women  Radcliffe  novels  Gothic-fiction  subjectivity  Milton  Paradise_Lost  Marvell  Donne  politics-and-literature  politics-and-art  public_sphere  cultural_critique  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Marshall Brown, ed. - The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism: Romanticism, Vol. 5 (pbk 2007) | Cambridge University Press
This latest volume in the celebrated Cambridge History of Literary Criticism addresses literary criticism of the Romantic period, chiefly in Europe. Its seventeen chapters are by internationally respected academics and explore a range of key topics and themes. The book is designed to help readers locate essential information and to develop approaches and viewpoints for a deeper understanding of issues discussed by Romantic critics or that were fundamental to their works. Primary and secondary bibliographies provide a guide for further research. **--** Introduction *-* 1. Classical standards in the Romantic period - Paul H. Fry *-* 2. Innovation and modernity Alfredo De Paz *-* 3. The French Revolution - David Simpson *-* 4. Transcendental philosophy and romantic criticism - David Simpson *-* 5. Nature - Helmut J. Schneider *-* 6. Scientific models - Joel Black *-* 7. Religion and literature - E. S. Shaffer
8. Romantic language theory and the art of understanding - Kurt Mueller-Vollmer *-* 9. The Romantic transformation of rhetoric - David Wellbery *-* 10. Romantic irony - Gary Handwerk *-* 11. Theories of genre - Tilottama Rajan *-* 12. Theory of the novel - Marshall Brown *-* 13. The impact of Shakespeare - Jonathan Arac *-* 14. The vocation of criticism and the crisis of the republic of letters - Jon Klancher *-* 15. Women, gender, and literary criticism - Theresa M. Kelley *-* 16. Literary history and historicism - David Perkins *-* 17. Literature and the other arts - Herbert Lindenberger **--** downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  philosophy_of_language  Shakespeare-influence  classicism  modernity  German_Idealism  science-public  reason  irony  professionalization  authors-women  subjectivity  nature  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Rita Felski - "Context Stinks!" | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 42, No. 4 (AUTUMN 2011), pp. 573-591
This essay draws on the work of Bruno Latour to question conventional methods of "historicizing" and "contextualizing" works of art. Context is typically equated with original historical context, and the act of historicizing a text becomes a matter of linking it to other texts and events in the same slice of time. Such historicist approaches, I argue, cannot account for the transtemporal movement of texts, their ability to resonate across different periods, and the ways in which they speak to us now. Moreover, traditional models of context and its correlates (society, power, ideology, etc.) tend to downplay or actively deny the agency of artworks. What if we were to think of these artworks as nonhuman actors who modify states of affairs by making a difference? Such an approach calls on us to recognize the specificity of works of art as well as their sociability and wordliness. Artworks are not heroic actors engaged in endless opposition, subversion, and resistance; rather they are coactors and codependents, enmeshed in multiple attachments and associations that enable them to survive. -- Project MUSE
article  jstor  paywall  Project_MUSE  historiography  literary_history  literary_theory  art_history  historicism  contextualism  influence-literary  influence-art  Latour  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Srinivas Aravamudan - Enlightenment Orientalism: Resisting the Rise of the Novel (2011) 360 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
A MUST BUY -- Srinivas Aravamudan here reveals how Oriental tales, pseudo-ethnographies, sexual fantasies, and political satires took Europe by storm during the eighteenth century. Naming this body of fiction Enlightenment Orientalism, he poses a range of urgent questions that uncovers the interdependence of Oriental tales and domestic fiction, thereby challenging standard scholarly narratives about the rise of the novel. More than mere exoticism, Oriental tales fascinated ordinary readers as well as intellectuals, taking the fancy of philosophers such as Voltaire, Montesquieu, and Diderot in France, and writers such as Defoe, Swift, and Goldsmith in Britain. Aravamudan shows that Enlightenment Orientalism was a significant movement that criticized irrational European practices even while sympathetically bridging differences among civilizations. A sophisticated reinterpretation of the history of the novel, Enlightenment Orientalism is sure to be welcomed as a landmark work in eighteenth-century studies.
books  kindle-available  buy  intellectual_history  cultural_history  literary_history  Renaissance  16thC  17thC  18thC  fiction  novels  lit_crit  literary_theory  Enlightenment  English_lit  French_lit  orientalism  Defoe  Swift  Voltaire  Diderot  Montesquieu  Behn  Manley  Montagu_Lady_Mary  realism  empiricism  moral_philosophy  self  subjectivity  self-examination  self-and-other  self-knowledge  travel  romances  satire  utopian  exploration  cultural_critique  Biblical_criticism  philology  antiquaries  comparative_religion  comparative_anthropology  chronology  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  xenophobia  national_ID  racialism  colonialism  imperialism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
STEPHEN ARATA - Henry James, "The Art of Fiction" (1884) | JSTOR: Victorian Review, Vol. 35, No. 1 (Spring 2009), pp. 53-56
Short but helpful positioning of Art of Fiction in late Victorian belles lettres, including the article by Walter Besant with same title to which James was in part responding to. Comments on shifts in James' appreciation of Matthew Arnold - disagreed with Arnold that criticism was most needed when literary cultural life in a slump - for James literary criticism was an integral part of an era of lively, creative culture and literature. -- didn't download
article  jstor  literary_history  19thC  lit_crit  literary_theory  novels  fiction  culture  literature-and-morality  James_Henry  Arnold_Matthew  Victorian  English_lit  belles-lettres  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Cole, The Birth of Theory (pub date June 21 2014) eBook: : Amazon.com
Modern theory needs a history lesson. Neither Marx nor Nietzsche first gave us theory—Hegel did. Andrew Cole presents a refreshingly clear and lively account of the origins and legacy of Hegel’s dialectic as theory. Cole explains how Hegel boldly broke from modern philosophy when he adopted medieval dialectical habits of thought to fashion his own dialectic. While his contemporaries rejected premodern dialectic as outdated dogma, Hegel embraced both its emphasis on language as thought and its fascination with the categories of identity and difference, creating what we now recognize as theory, distinct from systematic philosophy. Hegel also used this dialectic to expose the persistent archaism of modern life itself, establishing a method of social analysis that has influenced everyone from Marx and the nineteenth-century Hegelians, to Nietzsche and Bakhtin, all the way to Deleuze and Jameson. By uncovering these theoretical filiations across time, Cole will not only change the way we read Hegel, but also the way we think about the histories of theory. ... chapters that powerfully reanimate the overly familiar topics of ideology, commodity fetishism, and political economy, ...a groundbreaking reinterpretation of master/slave dialectic, ...places the disciplines of philosophy, literature, and history in conversation with one another. Daring to reconcile the sworn enemies of Hegelianism and Deleuzianism, this timely book will revitalize dialectics for the 21stC.
books  kindle-available  buy  intellectual_history  revisionism  medieval_philosophy  19thC  Hegel  dialectic  philosophy_of_language  difference  identity  20thC  theory  postmodern  Hegelian  Hegelians-French  social_theory  social_sciences  Nietzsche  Bakhtin  Deleuze  literary_theory  literary_history  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric Slauter, review essay - History, Literature, and the Atlantic World | JSTOR: Early American Literature, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2008), pp. 153-186
Looks at the way historians and literary studies of early America confront each other in methods, interdisciplinary work etc - reviewing extensive number of works from past decade or so. Of interest re methodology for intellectual_history, reception theory, public opinion, publishing, bottom up and top down approaches, etc of potential use for writings by Bolingbroke, Swift and Pope. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  literary_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Atlantic  British_Empire  American_lit  English_lit  literary_theory  literacy  publishing  public_sphere  political_culture  economic_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
ED WHITE and MICHAEL DREXLER - The Theory Gap | JSTOR: Early American Literature, Vol. 45, No. 2 (2010), pp. 469-484
Where does early American lit fit into literary theory, cultural studies, various types of historiography dealing with colonial America, early Republic and the Atlantic. The issue arises due to early American lit becoming an area of study as "theory" was starting decline, the cultural turn was underway, and the modest "canon" was being evaluated and expanded as an anti or counter canonical approach was gaining ground. -- didn't download
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Atlantic  English_lit  American_lit  literary_history  literary_theory  cultural_history  canon  historiography 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Marshall interview of Peter Kivy - Apologia pro vita sua: my work in philosophy » 3:AM Magazine
Peter Kivy, you are a leading figure in the philosophy of aesthetics, with particular interest in music and literature. Can you begin by telling us what made you become a philosopher and what were the philosophical puzzles that interested you?. Can you then tell us about the music problem, and in particular how emotions get into the music? After that can you say how you approach the old literature problem as to whether fiction, in particular, a novel, could be a source of knowledge? In doing so can you say why and how music and novels enthral us? -- see also his recommended books - most are recent in philosophy of literature, narrative, metaphor etc
aesthetics  lit_crit  literary_theory  music  music_history  novels  narrative  metaphor  epistemology-moral  Hutcheson  bibliography  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Literature index page
(1) Medieval Attitudes toward Literature (2) Literary Relations -- ** Dante and Boccaccio, ** The Proem of the Decameron: Boccaccio between Ovid and Dante, ** Authorship, ** The Decameron and the English Romantics -- (3) Narratology and Structural Exegesis -- ** Numerology in the Decameron, ** The Novella before Boccaccio, ** Performance and Interpretation, ** Performance and Interpretation 2, ** Nightingales and Filostrato's Apologia (V.4), ** The Rubrics of the Decameron, ** Madonna Filippa (VI.7): Feminist Mouthpiece or Misogynistic Tool? -- (4) Hypertext -- ** Hypertext, Hypermedia and the History of the Text, ** Boccaccio Online: Teaching the Decameron as Hypertext at Brown University -- (5) Theoretical Perspectives -- ** Poststructuralism and a Figural Narrative Model, ** Lotman and the Problem of Artistic Space, ** Weinrich and the Grammar of the Frame, ** The Narrative Frame, ** Framing the Decameron, ** Seduction by Silence in the Frame -- (6) La novella tra Testo e Ipertesto: il Decameron come modello
website  literary_history  lit_crit  Italian_lit  English_lit  14thC  Medieval  Renaissance  humanism  Latin_lit  Boccaccio  Ovid  Dante  Romanticism  narrative  literary_theory  digital_humanities 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton on Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism | Philosophy and Literature 23 (1999): 243-55. Denis Dutton
Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism (Cambridge University Press, $39.95) is notable not only for its passion, but for the way it supplies a new take on familiar problems. -- Etlin, however, is an architectural historian, and it’s refreshing to come across a cultural warrior lobbing grenades from a different academic encampment. -- Etlin’s book is excessively ambitious in trying to attack poststructuralism from dozens of angles; this, however, is part of its charm. He is bravely willing to take on anyone — Hayden White, Foucault, Nietzsche, Derrida, Bourdieu, de Man, Norman Bryson, Freud — and has no hesitation in identifying heroes and heroines, from Rembrandt to Jane Austen to Jefferson to Victor Hugo to Frank Lloyd Wright. -- Etlin says that not since Hegel have intellectuals displayed the hubris they show today, “attributing to themselves the power to arbitrate all meaning.” Their celebration of complexity and ambiguity becomes a form of “boundless egotism.” Poststructuralists are as suckered by the notion that texts are hidden repositories of obscure meanings as previous generations of intellectuals were suckered by the forces of astrology or alchemy. But their feelings of power, freedom, and discovery are illusory. "....Claims about variety, endless or even limited, can never be merely asserted; they must be demonstrated with coherent solutions.” -- Etlin’s brief but incisive treatment of Walter Benjamin’s 1935 essay “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” is quite typical of the provocations of his book, making me wonder why this essay is continuously reproduced, forced on students, and cited in articles. Benjamin’s so-called pathbreaking discourse is wrong on virtually all major counts, as Etlin shows.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  lit_crit  humanism  anti-humanism  19thC  20thC  poststructuralist  postmodern  social_theory  literary_theory  historiography-postWWII  epistemology-history  complexity  diversity  hermeneutics  deconstruction  narrative  aesthetics  mass_culture  Benjamin  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton, review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation | Philosophy and Literature 16 (1992): 432-37
Delightful Denis Dutton review - Umberto Eco, Interpretation and Overinterpretation (Cambridge University Press, $39.95 hardbound, $11.95 paper) -- presents three lectures by Umberto Eco, with responses by Richard Rorty, Jonathan Culler, and Christine Brooke-Rose, a final rejoinder by Eco, and a general introduction by Stefan Collini. The occasion was the Clare Hall Tanner Lectures, and they apparently packed out one of the biggest auditoriums at Cambridge University in 1990. There was more debate, including Frank Kermode, Malcolm Bradbury, and David Lodge, than is included here, and one imagines it was an exciting occasion. -- quite splendid description of debate between Eco and Rorty. Culler who is more open ended than Eco on limits to interpretation turns his guns on the self described American pragmatists, Rorty and Stanley Fish. Needless to say Dutton is reluctant to put Rorty in the same tradition as Dewey - Eco's voracious curiosity and wonder about the world is more in Dewey’s line - and is appalled at labeling Fish a pragmatist. Definitely to buy.
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february 2014 by dunnettreader
Edward Schiappa - Sophistic Rhetoric: Oasis or Mirage? | JSTOR: Rhetoric Review, Vol. 10, No. 1 (Autumn, 1991), pp. 5-18
Survey of what the move to the Sophists as alternative to Plato and Aristotle rhetoric -- pedagogy, social and political issues, epistemic position of rhetoric --heavily cited -- downloaded pdf to Note
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february 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue -Living Alone Together [Introduction and key article by Tzvetan Todorov] | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1, Winter, 1996
Issue Introduction - Living Alone Together (pp. 1-14) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* Replies to Introduction *--* (1) Community and Individuality (pp. 15-24) Patricia H. Werhane. *--* (2) A Reply to Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 25-34) Frances Ferguson. *--* (3) "Living Together Alone or Together": Commentary on Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 35-41) Stephen A. Mitchell. *--* (4) [downloaded] Todorov's Otherness (pp. 43-55) Robert Wokler. *--* (5) Misanthropology (pp. 57-72) Gary Saul Morson. *--* (6) Conflict and Sociability in Hegel, Freud, and Their Followers: Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 73-82) Daniel Burston. *--* (7) Regarding Others (pp. 83-93) Stewart Justman. *--*--* Response *--* The Gaze and the Fray (pp. 95-106) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* A. Self and Others in Culture. *--* Keeping the Self Intact during the Culture Wars: A Centennial Essay for Mikhail Bakhtin (pp. 107-126) Caryl Emerson. *--* Cultural Dreaming and Cultural Studies (pp. 127-144) Marianne DeKoven. *--* Orality, Literacy, and Their Discontents (pp. 145-159) Denis Donoghue.
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february 2014 by dunnettreader

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