dunnettreader + literary_journals   8

James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright, eds. - Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre Re forming Literature 1789–1837 (2006 pbk) | Cambridge University Press
Tilottama Rajan, University of Western Ontario and Julia M. Wright, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia **--** Romanticism has often been associated with lyric poetry, or otherwise confined within mainstream genres. As a result, we have neglected the sheer diversity and generic hybridity of a literature that ranged from the Gothic novel to the national tale, from monthly periodicals to fictionalized autobiography. In this new volume some of the leading scholars of the period explore the relationship between ideology and literary genre from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The introduction offers a fresh examination of how genre was rethought by Romantic criticism. **--** Introduction Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright **--** Part I. Genre, History, and the Public Sphere: 1. Godwin and the genre reformers: on necessity and contingency in romantic narrative theory - Jon Klancher *-* 2. Radical print culture in periodical form - Kevin Gilmartin *-* 3. History, trauma, and the limits of the liberal imagination: William Godwin's historical fiction - Gary Handwerk *-* 4. Writing on the border: the national tale, female writing, and the public sphere - Ina Ferris. **--** Part II. Genre and Society: 5. Genres from life in Wordsworth's art: Lyrical Ballads 1798 - Don Bialostosky *-* 6. 'A voice in the representation': John Thelwall and the enfranchisement of literature - Judith Thompson *-* 7. 'I am ill-fitted': conflicts of genre in Elisa Fenwick's Secresy - Julia M. Wright *-* 8. Frankenstein as neo-Gothic: from the ghost of the couterfeit to the monster of abjection - Jerrold E. Hogle **--** Part III. Genre, Gender, and the Private Sphere: 9. Autonarration and genotext in Mary Hays' Memoirs of Emma Courtney - Tilottama Rajan *-* 10. 'The science of herself': scenes of female enlightenment - Mary Jacobus *-* 11. The failures of romanticism Jerome McGann -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_history  British_history  British_politics  genre  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  literary_journals  literary_history  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  narrative  narrative-contested  Hunt_Leigh  censorship  Hazlitt_William  Godwin_Wm  historical_fiction  historical_change  necessity  contingency  women-intellectuals  authors-women  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  Shelley_Mary  imagination  magazines  newspapers  gender  gender_history  Wordsworth  poetry  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Romanticism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
HEATHER ELLIS - 'This starting, feverish heart': Matthew Arnold and the Problem of Manliness | JSTOR: Critical Survey, Vol. 20, No. 3, Victorian Masculinities (2008), pp. 97-115
Fascinating re Victorian obsession with sturdy, active "manliness" uncorrupted by effeminate activities like poetry or scholarship - Arnold greatly influenced by Cardinal Newman's revaluation of Christian manliness with what were feminine stereotypes - love of poetry, contemplation, etc. But Arnold also quasi idolized his father, Thomas Arnold, arch critic of Newman and promoter of all the vigorous manly virtues. Lots of quotes across much of 19thC from the literary journals, where conflicts over cultural ideals were waged re education, literary form and style, appropriate models for exemplary history and so on. Among Arnold's critics James Fitzjames Stephen. Leslie Stephen's brother was a nasty piece of work. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  English_lit  19thC  British_history  Victorian  masculinity  culture_wars  Newman_JH  Arnold_Matthew  cultural_critique  Tractarians  Oxford  education-higher  education-civic  Stephen_Leslie  literary_journals  poetics  High_Church  high_culture  downloaded 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
JENNIFER BATT - From the Field to the Coffeehouse: Changing Representations of Stephen Duck | JSTOR: Criticism, Vol. 47, No. 4 (FALL 2005), pp. 451-470
Vol. 47, No. 4, Special Issue: Learning to Read in the Long Revolution: New Work on Laboring-Class Poets, Aesthetics, and Politics (FALL 2005) -- covers 2 presentations of Duck, both awkward in their own way - 1. Joseph Spence who thought Duck was an extraordinary individual, and supported his transformation to poet patronized by Queen Caroline, but presents him in his laboring milieu in agriculture Wiltshire 2. Grub-Street Journal report of an encounter with Duck in a Richmond coffeehouse after Queen Caroline had granted him a small house in Richmond - the paper was opposition and often mocked the patronage choices of the court - presenting Duck as a (undeserving? ) fish out of water -- see bibliography of political and literary journals, especially opposition, in 1730s including the Craftsman -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  1730s  English_lit  poetry  elite_culture  print_culture  patronage  Queen_Caroline  political_press  literary_journals  Craftsman  opposition  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  high_culture  lower_orders  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Leila W. Kinney - Genre: A Social Contract? | JSTOR: Art Journal, Vol. 46, No. 4 (Winter, 1987), pp. 267-277
Vol. 46, No. 4, issue focus - The Political Unconscious in Nineteenth-Century Art (Winter, 1987) - Impressionists, critical support, seen within boulevard culture that was autonomous, if not oppositional, to authoritarianism of the 2nd Empire and its forms of censorship -- didn't download
article  jstor  cultural_history  political_history  art_history  19thC  France  Paris  Napoleon_III  authoritarian  censorship  painting  art_criticism  journalism  literary_journals  elite_culture 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Mary Waters, review: April London, Literary History Writing, 1770–1820 | Eighteenth-Century Studies (2011)
Project MUSE -- downloaded pdf to Note -- London rejects the widely held notion that literary history writing was relatively homogenous in form and that literary historians have concerned themselves primarily with constructing a transcendent literary canon. Rather, she argues that, originating in opposition to such hegemonic efforts as Samuel Johnson’s Lives of the Poets, early instances of literary history take an array of forms, including biography, autobiography, memoir, antiquarianism, bibliography, specimens, anecdotes, and “secret history” (5). This variety accommodated a diverse readership much broader than the traditional reading audiences among the learned classes while allowing literary historians to embed into discussions of Britain’s literary past implicit or even overt stances on the nation’s political culture...... The book’s entire third section, “Isaac D’Israeli and Literary History,” reads D’Israeli’s forty-year literary career as engaging questions of historiographic method and text reception from a vantage point of progressive political disillusionment. Its two chapters show that D’Israeli’s emphasis on opinion and anecdotal material undermines classical historiographic methods and brings questions about evidence and the grounds of knowledge into the construction of literary history. Initially espousing a belief that intellectual change precedes social change, D’Israeli reveals in his late career greater consciousness of limits on the remediating power of literary history and a solemn prognosis for the future reputations of socially marginalized writers like him.
books  reviews  literary_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  biography-writing  anecdotes  lit_crit  literary_journals  popular_culture  high_culture  readership  publishing  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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