dunnettreader + literacy   12

Thomas Grillot - Jack Goody’s Historical Anthropology: The Need to Compare - Books & ideas - 4 February 2013
translated by John Zvesper - French version Nov 2012 -- A highly respected figure in African studies, Jack Goody has become a distinctive voice in the torrent of academic critiques of western ethnocentrism. His work, spanning more than sixty years, has been based on a single ambition: comparison, for the sake of more accurately locating European history within Eurasian and world history. -- serves as a useful intro to stages of debates within the post-WWII social sciences -- he retired in 1984, though a very active retirement -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  social_sciences-post-WWII  anthropology  Sub-Saharan_Africa  oral_culture  literacy  language-history  writing  alphabet  ancient_Greece  comparative_anthropology  comparative_history  world_history  Eurocentrism  Eurasia  Eurasian_history  cultural_change  cultural_transmission  cultural_exchange  historiography  historiography-postWWII  historicism  epistemology-history  sociology_of_knowledge  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
James Chandler, ed. - The Cambridge History of English Romantic Literature (pbk 2012) | Cambridge University Press
The Romantic period was one of the most creative, intense and turbulent periods of English lit (..) revolution, reaction, and reform in politics, and by the invention of imaginative literature in its distinctively modern form. (..) an engaging account of 6 decades of literary production around the turn of the 19thC. Reflecting the most up-to-date research, (..) both to provide a narrative of Romantic lit and to offer new and stimulating readings of the key texts. (...) the various locations of literary activity - both in England and, as writers developed their interests in travel and foreign cultures, across the world. (..) how texts responded to great historical and social change. (..) a comprehensive bibliography, timeline and index, **--** Choice: 50 years ago, lit studies was awash in big theories of Romanticism, (e.g. M. H. Abrams, Geoffrey Hartman, Harold Bloom); 2 decades later, Marilyn Butler argued that the very label "Romantic" was "historically unsound." This collection suggests that no consensus has yet emerged: instead, the best of the essays suggest continuities with periods before and after. Rather than big theories, (..) kaleidoscopic snapshots of individual genres (the novel, the "new poetry," drama, the ballad, children's literature); larger intellectual currents (Brewer ... on "sentiment and sensibility"); fashionable topics (imperialism, publishing history, disciplinarity); and--most interesting--the varying cultures of discrete localities (London, Ireland, Scotland).(..) an excellent book useful not as a reference resource, (..) but for its summaries of early-21st-century thinking about British lit culture 1770s-1830s. -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  Romanticism  literary_history  literary_language  literary_theory  lit_crit  18thC  19thC  British_history  cultural_history  literature-and-morality  politics-and-literature  French_Revolution-impact  sociology_of_knowledge  Enlightenment  religious_lit  genre  gender_history  historicism  art_history  art_criticism  novels  rhetoric-writing  intellectual_history  morality-conventional  norms  sensibility  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  publishing  publishing-piracy  copyright  British_politics  British_Empire  Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  landed_interest  landowners-Ireland-Anglo_elite  authors  authors-women  political_culture  elite_culture  aesthetics  subjectivity  self  self-fashioning  print_culture  readership  fashion  credit  poetry  literary_journals  historical_fiction  historical_change  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  Evangelical  literacy  theater  theatre-sentimental  theatre-politics  actors  downloaded 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert C. Allen - Progress and Poverty in Early Modern Europe | JSTOR - The Economic History Review, New Series, Vol. 56, No. 3 (Aug., 2003) , pp. 403-443
An econometric model of economic development is estimated with data from leading European countries between 1300 and 1800. The model explores the impact of population, enclosure, empire, representative government, technology, and literacy on urbanization, agricultural productivity, proto-industry, and the real wage. Simulations show that the main factors leading to economic success in north-western Europe were the growth of American and Asian commerce and, especially, the innovations underlying the export of the new draperies in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The enclosure of the open fields, representative government, and the spread of literacy did not play major roles. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  economic_history  Europe-Early_Modern  Great_Divergence  North-Weingast  agrarian_capitalism  literacy  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  British_Empire  Dutch  colonialism  trade  Asia  textiles  Innovation  agriculture  urbanization  wages  labor_history  manufacturing  productivity  export-led  Industrial_Revolution  proto-industry  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Nico Voigtländer, Mara Squicciarini, Knowledge elites, enlightenment, and industrialisation | vox 13 July 2014
Although studies of contemporary economies find robust associations between human capital and growth, past research has found no link between worker skills and the onset of industrialisation. This column resolves the puzzle by focusing on the upper tail of the skill distribution, which is strongly associated with industrial development in 18th-century France. -- uses density of subscriptions to the Encyclopédie to analyze spatial distribution of knowledge elites which they find strongly associated with industrialization post 1750.
economic_history  economic_growth  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  18thC  19thC  academies  elite_culture  bourgeoisie  nobility  technology  Innovation  sociology_of_knowledge  knowledge_economy  education  literacy  Encyclopédie  scientific_culture  science-public  Scientific_Revolution  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Amparo Castelló-Climent, Rafael Doménech - Human capital and income inequality | vox , 23 April 2014
Most developing countries have made a great effort to eradicate illiteracy. As a result, the inequality in the distribution of education has been reduced by more than half from 1950 to 2010. However, inequality in the distribution of income has hardly changed. This column presents evidence from a new dataset on human capital inequality. The authors find that increasing returns to education, globalisation, and skill-biased technological change can explain why the fall in human capital inequality has not been sufficient to reduce income inequality.
paper  economic_history  economic_theory  human_capital  literacy  inequality  education  education-higher  globalization  technology  wages  labor  political_economy  global_economy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Eric Slauter, review essay - History, Literature, and the Atlantic World | JSTOR: Early American Literature, Vol. 43, No. 1 (2008), pp. 153-186
Looks at the way historians and literary studies of early America confront each other in methods, interdisciplinary work etc - reviewing extensive number of works from past decade or so. Of interest re methodology for intellectual_history, reception theory, public opinion, publishing, bottom up and top down approaches, etc of potential use for writings by Bolingbroke, Swift and Pope. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  literary_history  cultural_history  political_history  17thC  18thC  American_colonies  Early_Republic  Atlantic  British_Empire  American_lit  English_lit  literary_theory  literacy  publishing  public_sphere  political_culture  economic_culture  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kevin Sharpe, review essay - Print, Polemics, and Politics in 17thC England | JSTOR: Journal of British Studies, Vol. 41, No. 2 (Apr., 2002), pp. 244-254
Writing and Society: Literacy, Print and Politics in Britain, 1590-1660 by Nigel Wheale; Whores of Babylon: Catholicism, Gender and Seventeenth-Century Print Culture by Frances E. Dolan; Political Passions: Gender, The Family and Political Argument in England, 1680-1714 by Rachel Weil; The Age of Faction: Court Politics, 1660-1702 by Alan Marshall -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  bookshelf  reviews  jstor  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  cultural_history  publishing  print_culture  public_sphere  political_press  anti-Catholic  gender_history  family  patriarchy  Restoration  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Anne  partisanship  faction  parties  court_culture  courtiers  Whigs  Whig_Junto  Tories  Glorious_Revolution  English_Civil_War  literacy  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Special Issue -Living Alone Together [Introduction and key article by Tzvetan Todorov] | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1, Winter, 1996
Issue Introduction - Living Alone Together (pp. 1-14) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* Replies to Introduction *--* (1) Community and Individuality (pp. 15-24) Patricia H. Werhane. *--* (2) A Reply to Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 25-34) Frances Ferguson. *--* (3) "Living Together Alone or Together": Commentary on Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 35-41) Stephen A. Mitchell. *--* (4) [downloaded] Todorov's Otherness (pp. 43-55) Robert Wokler. *--* (5) Misanthropology (pp. 57-72) Gary Saul Morson. *--* (6) Conflict and Sociability in Hegel, Freud, and Their Followers: Tzvetan Todorov's "Living Alone Together" (pp. 73-82) Daniel Burston. *--* (7) Regarding Others (pp. 83-93) Stewart Justman. *--*--* Response *--* The Gaze and the Fray (pp. 95-106) Tzvetan Todorov and Marilyn Gaddis Rose. *--*--* A. Self and Others in Culture. *--* Keeping the Self Intact during the Culture Wars: A Centennial Essay for Mikhail Bakhtin (pp. 107-126) Caryl Emerson. *--* Cultural Dreaming and Cultural Studies (pp. 127-144) Marianne DeKoven. *--* Orality, Literacy, and Their Discontents (pp. 145-159) Denis Donoghue.
journal  article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  lit_crit  literary_theory  human_nature  social_theory  moral_philosophy  psychology  sociability  self  self-love  self-development  bildung  self-and-other  ancient_philosophy  Plato  Platonism  Socrates  Aristotle  Cicero  community  individualism  authenticity  constructivism  Rousseau  Hegel  Freud  conflict  Bakhtin  conversation  dialogue  literacy  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Raven - New Reading Histories, Print Culture and the Identification of Change: The Case of 18thC England | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 23, No. 3 (Oct., 1998), pp. 268-287
This article considers the consequences of new reading histories that have pursued the question of reading practices -- how people read texts, rather than just who readers were and what it was that they read. New theoretical considerations widen our appreciation of the difficulty in recovering the history of reading, but they must also confront the limitations and peculiarities of the evidence available. Using eighteenth-century England as a case study, the article reviews recent work -- much from diverse research not usually associated with reading history -- and assesses the potential for future study. Important questions about the relationship between literature, belief and action, about the nature of 'popular' and 'elite' culture, about the archaeology of political and social thought, and about the dissemination and control of ideas, cannot be determined without asking what reading meant. Such enquiry is particularly rewarding in writing the history of the transitional and diverse society of eighteenth-century England. It also reinforces concern that pursuit of new reading histories through an exploration of reading practice can marginalise the evaluation of change by concentrating on an examination of the singular and the synchronic. Only by the broadest research strategies, the article suggests, can new reading history most fully contribute to an understanding of eighteenth-century English social history. -- interesting bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  social_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  historiography  historical_change  literacy  reading  reader_response  readership  popular_culture  elite_culture  intelligentsia  public_opinion  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Philip Gould - Wit and Politics in Revolutionary British America: The Case of Samuel Seabury and Alexander Hamilton | JSTOR: Eighteenth-Century Studies, Vol. 41, No. 3 (Spring, 2008), pp. 383-403
This essay reads the famous exchange of anonymously written pamphlets between the American loyalist Samuel Seabury and the patriot Alexander Hamilton as an episode in transatlantic literary history. Reading the political pamphlet as a genre in which literary and cultural debates over taste and style simultaneously were taking place, this essay argues that for both patriot and loyalist writers, demonstrating British cultural literacy was crucial to establishing political authorship in America. The subsequent debates between Seabury and Hamilton over such subjects as wit and classical expression testify to the ongoing importance of this literacy as well as the larger dissonance between the political and cultural dimensions of the American Revolution. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  cultural_history  intellectual_history  political_history  literary_history  18thC  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Loyalists  Hamilton  political_press  style  prose  lit_crit  wit  Pope  satire  Johnson  American_lit  literacy  cultural_capital  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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