dunnettreader + liberalism   178

Jeffrey Edward Green - Rawls and the Forgotten Figure of the Most Advantaged: In Defense of Reasonable Envy toward the Superrich (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
politics-and-money  political_participation  inequality-wealth  regulatory_capture  political_philosophy  political_culture  tax_havens  Early_Republic  inequality  estate_tax  intellectual_history  inheritance  republicanism  Plato-Republic  elites-political_influence  Jefferson  Harrington  crony_capitalism  Europe-Early_Modern  fairness  article  Aristotle  social_capital  social_theory  Rawls  social_democracy  Machiavelli  Plato  inequality-opportunity  jstor  bibliography  ancient_Rome  regulation  justice  liberalism  egalitarian  regulatory_avoidance  interest_groups  legitimacy  deliberative_democracy  political_history  class_conflict  downloaded  education-elites  social_order  elites-self-destructive  Roman_Republic  ancient_Greece  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
David Ciepley - Beyond Public and Private: Toward a Political Theory of the Corporation (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article challenges the liberal, contractual theory of the corporation and argues for replacing it with a political theory of the corporation. Corporations are government-like in their powers, and government grants them both their external "personhood" and their internal governing authority. They are thus not simply private. Yet they are privately organized and financed and therefore not simply public. Corporations transgress all the basic dichotomies that structure liberal treatments of law, economics, and politics: public/private, government/market, privilege/equality, and status/contract. They are "franchise governments" that cannot be satisfactorily assimilated to liberalism. The liberal effort to assimilate them, treating them as contractually constituted associations of private property owners, endows them with rights they ought not have, exacerbates their irresponsibility, and compromises their principal public benefit of generating long-term growth. Instead, corporations need to be placed in a distinct category—neither public nor private, but "corporate"—to be regulated by distinct rules and norms. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
organizations  institutional_economics  corporations  corporate_citizenship  markets-dependence_on_government  article  corporate_control  institutions  management  public-private_gaps  bibliography  social_contract  liberalism  jstor  property_rights  downloaded  corporate_law  political_theory  managerialism  corporate_governance  corporate_personhood  firms-organization  property 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
W. James Booth - Culture and Continuity: A Response to Alan Patten's "Rethinking Culture: The Social Lineage Account" (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
Alan Patten's social lineage account of cultural continuity is the most recent effort to provide multicultural theory with a non-essentialist concept of culture, its continuity and loss that meets broadly liberal normative desiderata. In this essay, I argue that it too fails to offer an alternative essentialism, to meet standard liberal normative stipulations, and to construct a theory of continuity sufficient to underpin the present claims of involuntarily incorporated communities. That result is theoretically interesting for it shows the deep intractability of the problems at the core of liberal multiculturalism. - Downloaded via iphone
downloaded  jstor  identity-multiple  community  liberalism  article  multiculturalism  bibliography  political_culture  nationalism  immigration  political_theory  books  essentialism  culture_wars  reviews  cultural_change  political_sociology  minorities  political_science  national_ID 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Alan Patton - Cultural Preservation and Liberal Values: A Reply to William James Booth (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
William James Booth elaborates three main challenges to my social lineage account (Patten 2011). Conceptually, he finds the proposal to be question-beginning. Normatively, he thinks that it has objectionable implications. And, substantively, he claims that the proposal is unhelpful, that it fails to explain a case of theoretical importance for multiculturalism. In this reply, I argue that each of these challenges misses the target. The social lineage account continues to offer a promising, nonessentialist basis for normative multiculturalism. - Downloaded via iphone
cultural_change  social_theory  US_politics  indigenous_peoples  US_society  culture_wars  political_sociology  cultural_diversity  minorities  identity-multiple  political_culture  culture  essentialism  political_theory  downloaded  liberalism  multiculturalism  national_ID  article  bibliography  nationalism  political_science  jstor  cultural_transmission  community  US_politics-race  cultural_stability  mass_culture 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Jason Frank - Review essay, Democracy and Domination in America (2012) | Political Theory on JSTOR
Reviewed Works:
In The Shadow of Dubois:Afro-Modern Political Thought in America by Robert Gooding-Williams;
The Undiscovered Dewey:Religion, Morality, and the Ethos of Democracy by Melvin L. Rogers
Review by: Jason Frank
Political Theory
Vol. 40, No. 3 (June 2012), pp. 379-386
Published by: Sage Publications, Inc.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41703030
Page Count: 8
Downloaded via Air to Dbox
downloaded  books  reviews  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  US_history  US_politics  Douglass  Dubois  Dewey  political_philosophy  political_participation  domination  liberty  liberalism  republicanism  slavery  racial_discrimination  identity_politics  deliberative_democracy  democracy 
april 2017 by dunnettreader
Akeel Bilgrami, ed. - Beyond the Secular West (2016) | Columbia University Press
What is the character of secularism in countries that were not pervaded by Christianity, such as China, India, and the nations of the Middle East? To what extent is the secular an imposition of colonial rule? How does secularism comport with local religious cultures in Africa, and how does it work with local forms of power and governance in Latin America? Has modern secularism evolved organically, or is it even necessary, and has it always meant progress? A vital extension of Charles Taylor's A Secular Age, in which he exhaustively chronicled the emergence of secularism in Latin Christendom, this anthology applies Taylor's findings to secularism's global migration. (...) What began as a modern reaction to—as well as a stubborn extension of—Latin Christendom has become a complex export shaped by the world's religious and political systems. Brilliantly alternating between intellectual and methodological approaches, this volume fosters a greater engagement with the phenomenon across disciplines.
Preface, by Akeel Bilgrami
1. Can Secularism Travel?, by Charles Taylor
2. The Sufi and the State, by Souleymane Bachir Diagne
3. The Individual and Collective Self-Liberation Model of Ustadh Mahmoud Mohamed Taha, by Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im
4. Creating Democratically Friendly Twin Tolerations Outside of Latin Christendom: Tunisia, by Alfred Stepan
5. Secularism and the Mexican Revolution, by Claudio Lomnitz
6. Is Confucianism Secular?, by Peter van der Veer
7. Disenchantment Deferred, by Sudipta Kaviraj
8. An Ancient Indian Secular Age?, by Rajeev Bhargava
9. Gandhi's Radicalism: An Interpretation, by Akeel Bilgrami
10. A Secular Age Outside Latin Christendom: Charles Taylor Responds
books  kindle-available  secularization  modernity  modernization  Islam  tolerance  liberalism  decolonization  secularism  universalism  MENA  Tunisia  Mexico  India  ancient_India  Gandhi  Sufis  Confucianism  connected_history  Taylor_Charles  Christianity  Christendom 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Duncan Bell - Reordering the World: Essays on Liberalism and Empire. (2016) | Princeton University Press
Reordering the World is a penetrating account of the complexity and contradictions found in liberal visions of empire. Focusing mainly on 19thC Britain—at the time the largest empire in history and a key incubator of liberal political thought— Bell sheds new light on some of the most important themes in modern imperial ideology. The book ranges widely across Victorian intellectual life and beyond. The opening essays explore the nature of liberalism, varieties of imperial ideology, the uses and abuses of ancient history, the imaginative functions of the monarchy, and fantasies of Anglo-Saxon global domination. They are followed by illuminating studies of prominent thinkers, including J. A. Hobson, L. T. Hobhouse, John Stuart Mill, Henry Sidgwick, Herbert Spencer, and J. R. Seeley. While insisting that liberal attitudes to empire were multiple and varied, Bell emphasizes the liberal fascination with settler colonialism. It was in the settler empire that many liberal imperialists found the place of their political dreams. -- Duncan Bell is Reader in Political Thought and International Relations at the University of Cambridge and a Fellow of Christ's College. His books include The Idea of Greater Britain: Empire and the Future of World Order, 1860–1900 (Princeton). Intro downloaded to Tab
books  kindle-available  19thC  British_history  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  British_Empire-military  liberalism  IR_theory  colonial_governance  settler_colonies  imperialism  intellectual_history  competition-interstate  uses_of_history  national_origins  Anglo-Saxons  Mill  Sidgwick  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  imperialism-critique  monarchy  hegemony 
june 2016 by dunnettreader
Vincent Citot - Pourquoi les intellectuels n'aiment pas le libéralisme de Raymond Boudon, et quelques problèmes épistémologiques (2005) - Cairn.info
Raymond boudon, Pourquoi les intelectuels n’aiment pas le libéralisme. Odile Jacob, 2004
1 - Le poids du libéralisme sur le marché des idées et le problème du politiquement correct
2 - Questions de méthode et problèmes épistémologiques
Citot Vincent, « Pourquoi les intellectuels n'aiment pas le libéralisme de Raymond Boudon, et quelques problèmes épistémologiques. », Le Philosophoire 1/2005 (n° 24) , p. 124-131
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2005-1-page-124.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.024.0124.
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
political_economy  intellectual_history  neoliberalism  books  reviews  French_intellectuals  downloaded  post-Cold_War  liberalism  sociology_of_knowledge 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
« Lectures. », Mil neuf cent. Revue d'histoire intellectuelle 1/2013 (n° 31) , p. 159-184 - Cairn.info
Titres recensés -- Jacques Julliard, Les gauches françaises, 1762-2012. Histoire, politique et imaginaire, Paris, Flammarion, 2012, 942 p.
Nathalie Richard, Hippolyte Taine. Histoire, psychologie, littérature, Classiques Garnier, 2013, 316 p.
Jean Jaurès, Œuvres, XIII, L’armée nouvelle, Jean-Jacques Becker (ed.), Paris, Fayard, 2013, 574 p.
Olivier Cosson, Préparer la Grande Guerre. L’armée française et la guerre russo-japonaise (1899-1914), Paris, Éd. Les Indes savantes, 2013, 380 p.
Géraldi Leroy, Charles Péguy. L’inclassable, Paris, Armand Colin, 2014, 366 p.
Gabriel Tarde, Sur le sommeil. Ou plutôt sur les rêves, Jacqueline Carroy, Louise Salmon (eds.), Lausanne, Éd. BHMS, 2009, 223 p.
Émile Durkheim, Hobbes a? l’agre?gation. Un cours d’E?mile Durkheim suivi par Marcel Mauss, Paris, Éd. de l’EHESS, coll. « Audiographie », 2011, 64 p.
Michel Murat, Frédéric Worms (eds.), Alain, littérature et philosophie mêlées, Paris, Éd. Rue d’Ulm-Presses de l’École normale supérieure, 2012, 221 p.
Frédéric Audren, Christian Chêne, Nicolas Mathey, Arnaud Vergne (eds.), Raymond Saleilles et au-delà, Paris, Dalloz, coll. « Thèmes
human_rights  representative_institutions  ultramontane  WWII  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  elites  philosophy-French  radicals  laïcité  socialism  France  anarchism  class_conflict  pre-WWI  republicanism  education  reviews  post-WWII  anti-clericalism  French_Revolution-impact  political_history  political_culture  political_press  materialism  political_philosophy  liberalism  democracy  French_intellectuals  French_Revolution  French_lit  social_theory  books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_participation  historiography-19thC  historiography  social_history  education-higher  20thC  Fin-de-Siècle  downloaded  social_sciences  Catholics-France  Bonapartism  justice  rule_if_law  19thC 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
John Gunnell - American Political Science, Liberalism, and the Invention of Political Theory | JSTOR The American Political Science Review (1988)
American Political Science, Liberalism, and the Invention of Political Theory
John G. Gunnell
The American Political Science Review
Vol. 82, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 71-87 -- The contemporary estrangement of political theory from political science is in large measure the product of a quarrel that originated in the challenge to the values of U.S. political science initiated by emigre scholars during the 1940s. The behavioral revolution was in an important respect a conservative rebellion in defense of the values of liberalism and related notions of science, relativism, and historical progress that had traditionally informed the discipline. This controversy in the context of political science fundamentally structured the discourse of academic political theory and the contemporary constitution of the field both as a division of political science and as a wider interdisciplinary enterprise.
political_discourse  political_science  university-contemporary  jstor  liberalism  sociology_of_knowledge  social_sciences-post-WWII  20thC  behaviorism  downloaded  article  political_philosophy  disciplines  intellectual_history 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Cavell and Rawls on the Conversation of Justice: Moral versus Political Perfectionism | Patton | Conversations: The Journal of Cavellian Studies (2014)
Cavell and Rawls on the Conversation of Justice: Moral versus Political Perfectionism
Paul Patton

Abstract

A primary concern of Stanley Cavell’s Carus Lectures is to respond to the question posed in the first sentence of the Introduction: “Is Moral Perfectionism inherently elitist?” By elitist, he means undemocratic. While there are senses in which he would not want to deny that Moral Perfectionism is elitist, and while he admits that there are perfectionisms that do not require democracy, neither of these are Cavell’s concern. Rather, he wants to showcase his preferred version of perfectionism, variously named Moral, Emersonian and Nietzschean perfectionism.
Nietzsche  perfectionism  democracy  perfectibility  Emerson  moral_philosophy  Rawls  downloaded  Cavell  political_philosophy  liberalism 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Pippin - The Unavailability of the Ordinary: Strauss on the Philosophical Fate of Modernity | JSTOR- Political Theory (2003)
Political Theory, Vol. 31, No. 3 (Jun., 2003), pp. 335-358 -- In Natural Right and History Leo Strauss argues for the continuing "relevance " of the classical understanding of natural right. Since this relevance is not a matter of a direct return, or a renewed appreciation that a neglected doctrine is simply true, the meaning of this claim is somewhat elusive. But it is clear enough that the core of Strauss's argument for that relevance is a claim about the relation between human experience and philosophy. Strauss argues that the classical understanding articulates and is continuous with the "lived experience" of engaged participants in political life, the ordinary, and he argues (in a way quite similar to claims in Heidegger) that such an ordinary or everyday point of view has been "lost." The author presents here an interpretation and critique of such a claim. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Strauss  modernity  natural_rights  ancient_philosophy  political_culture  Heidegger  liberalism  liberalism-post-WWII  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Liisi Keedus - Arendt and Strauss as Readers of Hobbes: Liberalism and the Question of "The Proud" | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (April 2012)
Liberalism and the Question of "The Proud": Hannah Arendt and Leo Strauss as Readers of Hobbes -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 2 (April 2012), pp. 319-341 -- huge useful bibliography
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  Hobbes  20thC  Arendt  Strauss  liberalism  political_culture  modernity  democracy  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Quentin Skinner - On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
On the Liberty of the Ancients and the Moderns: A Reply to My Critics -- in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") -- Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 127-146 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-moral_basis  Cambridge_School  Skinner  speech-act  contingency  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  genealogy-method  liberty  liberty-positive  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Bryan Garsten - Liberalism and the Rhetorical Vision of Politics | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (Jan 2012)
in Symposium: On Quentin Skinner, from Method to Politics (conference held for 40 years after "Meaning") Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 1 (January 2012), pp. 83-93 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  rhetoric-political  rhetoric-moral_basis  Cambridge_School  Skinner  speech-act  contingency  concepts  concepts-change  contextualism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Andrew Koppelman - Does Respect Require Antiperfectionism? Gaus on Liberal Neutrality :: SSRN- September 11, 2015
Andrew Koppelman , Northwestern University School of Law -- Harvard Review of Philosophy, Forthcoming -- Gerald Gaus has developed the most sophisticated presentation of the antiperfectionist idea that official neutrality between contested conceptions of the good is demanded by mutual respect among citizens. However, other aspects of his own political theory -- in particular, his demonstration of the legitimacy of social coordination toward common ends -- inadvertently strengthen the case for perfectionism. -- PDF File: 20 -- Keywords: Gerald Gaus, Perfectionism, Liberalism, Political Theory
political_philosophy  liberalism-public_reason  liberalism  perfectionism  perfectibility  Gaus_Gerald  recognition  common_good  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn review of Larry Siedentop's Invention of the Individual" - Did Christianity Create Liberalism? | Boston Review
Very interesting re the (19thC) "French" approach to liberalism -- historicist stressing process, contingency. Contrast with Anglo-Saxon social contract that takes the individual as its (unexamined) premiss, as does economic theory based on satisfying individual preferences etc. LS wrote an important article on the French approach. So Moyn sees LS as working to update and revise Guizot. Problem is LS (and all those claiming Christianity the basis of individual "natural rights") can't explain how the next world focus of Jesus and Paul became a this-world focus with the role of the individual as foundational. Moyn critiques the steps LS takes starting with the moral revolution of Augustine and working through the Middle Ages.
theology  natural_law  France  Instapaper  liberty  medieval_history  political_philosophy  Augustine  Guizot  liberalism  social_theory  historiography-19thC  individualism  medieval_philosophy  reviews  EF-add  social_contract  Constant  books  natural_rights  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  Augustinian  kindle-available  19thC  from instapaper
december 2015 by dunnettreader
Samuel Moyn - Religious freedom between truth and tactic « The Immanent Frame - March 2012
In the last issue of First Things, a self-described coalition of “Catholics and Evangelicals together” defends religious freedom. The coalition includes a number of notable Americans, like Charles Colson and George Weigel, with endorsements from the archbishops of Chicago, New York, and Philadelphia, along with many others. According to the statement, the situation is unexpectedly urgent. After the fall of the Soviet Union, “throughout the world, a new era of religious freedom seemed at hand.” But, now it is blatantly clear that the scourge of intolerance—especially secularist intolerance—persists. -- downloaded pdf to Note
US_politics  2010s  religious_culture  freedom_of_conscience  Catholics-and-politics  Evangelical  culture_wars  persecution  Vatican_II  Papacy  Protestants  Religious_Right  public_sphere  public_opinion  public_policy  Tocqueville  politics-and-religion  Christian_Right  Christianity  Christianity-Islam_conflict  secularism  liberalism-public_reason  liberalism  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Koenraad W. Swart - "Individualism" in the Mid-19thC (1826-1860) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas (1962)
"Individualism" in the Mid-Nineteenth Century (1826-1860), Koenraad W. Swart, Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 23, No. 1 (Jan. - Mar., 1962), pp. 77-90 -- very useful tracing of how many ways it was used, first to attack and then to celebrate -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  individualism  cultural_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  religious_culture  19thC  British_history  France  liberalism  French_Revolution  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  Romanticism  laisser-faire  bibliography  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Charles Larmore - Political Liberalism: Its Motivations and Goals | Academia.edu
In Vo1 (2015), Oxford Studies in Political Philosophy - concerned that its industrial production in university departments and publishing it's losing its links to classical liberalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  political_philosophy  academia  liberalism-19thC  liberalism  liberalism-public_reason  Rawls  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Cédric Rio, review - Pierre Crétois, Le Renversement de l’individualisme possessif: de Hobbes à l’État social Droit de propriété et intérêt collectif - La Vie des idées - 24 août 2015
Recensé : Pierre Crétois, Le Renversement de l’individualisme possessif : de Hobbes à l’État social, Paris, Classiques Garnier, 2014, 356 p.-- Mots-clés : propriété | libéralisme | solidarité | républicanisme -- En France l’idée que la propriété est un droit naturel émerge et triomphe au XVIIIe siècle, sous l’impulsion des physiocrates. C’est une telle conception que le mouvement solidariste critiquera un siècle plus tard afin de promouvoir l’État social. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  French_language  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  18thC  19thC  French_Enlightenment  Physiocrats  Hobbes  Locke-2_Treatises  Rousseau  property  property_rights  individualism  individualism-possessive  republicanism  common_good  solidarity  socialism  socialism-19thC  social_contract  social_movements  political_economy  political_press  economic_theory  liberalism  liberalism-19thC  welfare_state  natural_law  natural_rights  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Special Issue - Michael Oakeshott | Cosmos + Taxis, Vol 1, Issue 3, 2014
Editorial Note - Gene Callahan and Leslie Marsh *-* (1) The Critique of Rationalism and the Defense of Individuality: Oakeshott and Hayek - Chor-Yung Cheung *-* (2) Jane Jacobs’ Critique of Rationalism in Urban Planning - Gene Callahan and Sanford Ikeda *-* (3) Oakeshott on Modernity and the Crisis of Political Legitimacy in Contemporary Western Liberal Democracy - Noël O’sullivan. &-* (4) Oakeshott and the Complex Ecology of the Moral Life - Kevin Williams. *-* (5) Homo Ludens and Civil Association: The Sublime Nature of Michael Oakeshott’s Civil Condition - Thomas J. Cheeseman *-* (6) The Instrumental Idiom in American Politics: The ‘City on the Hill’ as a Spontaneous Order - Corey Abel *-* (7) Dogmatomachy: Ideological Warfare - David D. Corey. *-* Oakeshott on the Rule of Law: A Defense - Stephen Turner -- downloaded pdf to Note
journal  Academia.edu  article  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  political_culture  legitimacy  democracy  liberalism  Oakeshott  Jacobs_Jane  emergence  social_order  rationalist  modernity  Hayek  rule_of_law  Weber  fact-value  civil_society  associations  individualism  ideology  polarization  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Symposium on Jack Russell Weinstein’s "Adam Smith’s Pluralism: Rationality, Education And The Moral Sentiments" | Cosmos + Taxis, Vol2, Issue 3, 2015
Rather than a classic intellectual_history of Adam Smith, Weinstein’s aim is to use Smith to reinvigorate modern liberalism -- Introduction to Symposium - Nathaniel Wolloch *--* Context-dependent Normativity and Universal Rules of Justice - María Alejandra Carrasco. **--** “… but one of the multitude”. Justice, Pluralism and Rationality in Smith and Weinstein… - Lisa Herzog. **--** The Dynamics of Sympathy and the Challenge of Creating New Commonalities - Dionysis Drosos. **--** The “Spectator” and the Impartial Spectator in Adam Smith’s Pluralism - Spiros Tegos **--** Was Adam Smith an Optimist? - Maria Pia Paganelli. **--** The Political Hypotheses of Adam Smith’s Pluralism: A response to my commentators - Jack Russell Weinstein -- downloaded pdf to Note
journal  article  political_philosophy  political_economy  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  liberalism  Smith  justice  pluralism  emergence  social_order  sympathy  empathy  morality-conventional  moral_sentiments  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
John Dunn, ed. - The Economic Limits to Modern Politics (1992) | Cambridge University Press
The central problem of modern government and political action is how to choose and implement effective economic policies. For this reason, the economic considerations of public policy have assumed a more prominent place in contemporary political thought. Despite efforts among political scientists, economists, and sociologists to fathom the complexities of this added dimension, none of these solid sciences offers a satisfying approach to the problem. This volume attempts to display the historical novelty and intellectual importance of this dilemma, to uncover its origins, and to procure a remedy through a clearer and steadier focus. The book's contributors range from historians of ideas to economic theorists, who bring the approach of their own intellectual discipline to bear upon the issue. **--** Introduction, John Dunn *-* 1. The economic limits to modern politics, John Dunn *-* 2. The wealth of one nation and the dynamics of international competition, Istvan Hont *-* 3. The political limits to pre-modern politics, J. G. A. Pocock *-* 4. The economic constraints on political programs, Frank H. Hahn *-* 5. International liberalism reconsidered, Robert O. Keohane *-* 6. Capitalism, socialism, and democracy: compatibilities and contradictions John Dunn. -- ebook Adobe Reader - not clear whether in kindle format -- excerpt (10 ogs Intro) downloaded pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  economic_history  political_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  judgment-political  public_policy  capitalism  competition-interstate  economic_growth  development  raison-d'-état  British_history  British_politics  British_Empire  trade  trade-policy  Great_Divergence  economic_theory  political_culture  economic_culture  macroeconomic_policy  Innovation  innovation-government_policy  collective_action  property_rights  Labor_markets  redistribution  fiscal_policy  fiscal-military_state  Davenant  Smith  social_order  social_democracy  liberalism  elites-political_influence  IR_theory  globalization  international_political_economy  public_finance  public_goods  class_conflict  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Roundtable - Romanticism, Enlightenment, and Counter-Enlightenment | Philoctetes Center - April 17, 2010
, 2:30 PM
Romanticism, Enlightenment, and Counter-Enlightenment

Participants: Akeel Bilgrami, Taylor Carman, Garrett Deckel, Colin Jager, Joel Whitebook Isaiah Berlin introduced the work of a range of philosophers in the German romantic and German idealist tradition to the English-speaking world. His fascination with some of their ideas was accompanied by a concomitant anxiety about them. The anxiety issued from his staunch liberal commitment to the orthodox Enlightenment. Yet, the fascination was an implicit acknowledgement on his part of some of the limitations of the Enlightenment's liberal ideas. This roundtable will look at this underlying tension in Berlin, which many liberals feel to this day. Panelists will probe the role of reason, perception, and emotion in our individual and political psychology, and ask the question of whether or not there is something for liberalism to learn from what Berlin—rightly or wrongly—called the "Counter-Enlightenment." -- see YouTube bookmark for direct link -- video also embedded in program page
video  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Romanticism  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  German_Idealism  liberalism  Berlin_Isaiah  reason  rationality  perception  emotions  reason-passions  political_philosophy  political_culture  social_psychology  moral_psychology  nature  nature-mastery  cognition  prejudice  cognitive_bias  mind  mind-body  philosophical_anthropology 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Daniel McCarthy - Why Liberalism Means Empire | Lead essay / TAC Summer 2014
Outstanding case made for "consrrvative" realist IR position of off-shore balancing - not really "conservative" but he needs to give it that spin for his aufience buy-in -- takes on not just the militarists, neicons and librral intrrventionists but thr "non-liberal" sbtu-interventionists like Kennan and Buchanan - he leaves out the corrosive, anti-liberal democracy effects of globalized, financial capitalism that undermines the narrative of gradualist liberal democratization and achievements in OECD rconomies - as Zingales putscit "save capitalism from the capitalists" beeds to be included with the hegemon's responsibilities along with off-shore balancing - dimensions of power beyond military, which Dan does stress in his sketch of ehy Britain could meet the military challenges until WWI
Pocket  18thc  19thc  20thc  anti-imperialism  balance-of-power  british_empire  british_history  british_politics  civil_rights  cold_war  competition-interstate  cultural_transmission  democracy  empires  entre_deux_guerres  europe  foreign_policy  french_revolution  geopolitics  germany  global  governance  globalization  great_powers  hegemony  hong_kong  human_rights  ideology  imperialism  international_system  ir  ir-history  iraq  japan  liberalism  military-industrial  military_history  napoleon  napoleonic  wars  national_security  national_tale  nationslism  naval_history  neocons  neoliberalism  peace  pinboard  political_culture  politics-and-history  post-wwii  power  rule_of_law  social_science  trade  us  history  us_foreign_policy  us_military  us_politics  uses_of_history  warfare  world  wwi  wwii 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alice Ristroph - Sovereignty and Subversion (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 1029 (2015)
Hobbes’s account of law, like his account of punishment, does not fit well into our existing scholarly categories. (..). He was neither a legal positivist nor a natural law theorist, at least not as we usually use these labels. He adopted neither a retributive nor a consequentialist justification of punishment. Yet his account of human interaction, particularly with respect to law and punishment, captures actual experience better than the more familiar alternatives. Moreover, the space for subversion in Hobbes’s theory may make his account more normatively appealing than it has seemed to modern liberals. (...) 3 questions about Hobbesian theory: What is law? What is its relationship to punishment? And what are the implications of Hobbes’s theory for contemporary efforts to describe law or the relationship of law to punishment? The first (..) Hobbes’s legal theory is still so widely mischaracterized, sometimes even by Hobbes scholars, that it is worth returning to his claims. The second question has received much less attention, perhaps because a right to resist punishment seems so discordant with the authoritarian Hobbes we know, or think we know. And the third question has received still less attention, for contemporary jurisprudence scholarship rarely cites anyone who wrote before Jeremy Bentham and John Austin. I hope to show that, in many instances, Hobbes has been misread; even more importantly, I hope to persuade scholars of jurisprudence that what Hobbes actually said is worthy of their engagement. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  Hobbes  17thC  political_philosophy  social_theory  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  sovereignty  authority  obligation  punishment  resistance  liberalism  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Mark C. Murphy - A Commentary on Ristroph’s “Sovereignty and Subversion” | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 1055 (2015)
She is correct in rejecting the assimilation of Hobbes’s legal theory to Austin’s, and in noting the strands of Hobbes’s view that disqualify him from counting as any sort of legal positivist. And I agree, on the whole, with her characterization of Hobbes’s account of justified punishment, and that this account has its attractions yet produces some puzzles which Hobbes does not fully resolve. My disagreements are with her second-order characterization of Hobbes’s legal theory. I want to discuss two related areas of disagreement. The first disagreement concerns whether we should assess Hobbes’s account of law in terms of the standards of general descriptive jurisprudence: Ristroph denies that it should be; I disagree. The second concerns whether we should take Hobbes’s treatment of the political as explanatorily prior to the legal to show that Hobbes was in some way apart from the natural law tradition in jurisprudence: Ristroph affirms this; I disagree. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  Hobbes  17thC  political_philosophy  social_theory  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  sovereignty  authority  obligation  punishment  resistance  liberalism  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
John Quiggin - John Locke Against Freedom | Jacobin - June 2015
For classical liberals (often called libertarians in the US context), the founding documents of liberalism are John Locke’s Second Treatise on Government and… (.. conclusion) Received ideas change only slowly, and the standard view of Locke as a defender of liberty is likely to persist for years to come. Still, the reassessment is underway, and the outcome is inevitable. Locke was a theoretical advocate of, and a personal participant in, expropriation and enslavement. His classical liberalism offers no guarantee of freedom to anyone except owners of capitalist private property.
Instapaper  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  US_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  Locke-2_Treatises  Locke-religion  tolerance  property  property_rights  Native_Americans  slavery  American_colonies  Founders  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberty  liberty-negative  political_culture  Board_of_Trade  colonialism  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Noah Millman - Was Origen the Caitlyn Jenner of the Transabled? | The American Conservative - June 2015
I’m afraid I’m going to re-enter the fray. Rod Dreher has a piece today wondering whether the next step in our cultural development (or decline) will be the… Another superb piece by Millman illustrating how Dreher's hostility to changing cultural norms gets wrapped in a blanket condemnation of "modernity" (and liberalism, individualism, autonomy, and generally Enlightenment values) yet Dreher is committed to Enlightenment benefits of increased knowledge, and insists on liberalism's commitment to personal religious liberty. So it basically comes down to liberty for me but not for thee, with the Church authority for norm-setting both impervious to scientific and cultural change, and claiming an extension over those who don't recognize the Chyrch's authority. The example of Origen, whose spiritual commitment led to self-castration, and who wasn't condemned by the senior hierarchy (prior to the Church legislating on a range of norms dealing with the body and especially sexuality and gender, which was one reason Origen was never made a saint). Millman also has a lengthy passage from Tolstoy about a priest, sexual tension, spiritual demands and self-mutilation, with Tolstoy's final conclusion that this sort of psychological turmoil wasn’t the praiseworthy attitudes and action of a saint but self-absorbed cintra Christ's teaching. Tl; dr -- Dreher can't have it both ways (or in his case what seems like an ever-growing laundry list of contradictory ways). -- saved to Instapaper
Instapaper  sexuality  gender  gender-and-religion  norms  Early_Christian  theology  declinism  modernity  liberalism  Orthodox_Christianity  authority  individualism  autonomy  culture_wars  culture-American  cultural_change  cultural_authority  psychology  identity  biology  physiology  neuroscience  Tolstoy  religious_experience  religious_culture  religion-established  civil_liberties  bill_of_rights  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
RP Wolff - THE IDEOLOGY OF SPACE CONSCIOUSNESS CONCLUSION - May 2015
Extending Mannheim approach to thinking about different worldviews that organize thought, priorities, values and action - liberal universalism and global capitalism have a similar view of space, where boundaries of communities and especially of nation-states are ignored, porous or viewed as frictions to overcome
social_theory  world_systems  ideology  liberalism  international_system  globalization  liberal_internationalism  IR  historicism  modernity  capitalism  political_economy  political_culture  Mannheim  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
RP Wolff - THE IDEOLOGY OF SPACE CONSCIOUSNESS PART TWO - May 2015
Extending Mannheim approach to thinking about different worldviews that organize thought, priorities, values and action - liberal universalism and global capitalism have a similar view of space, where boundaries of communities and especially of nation-states are ignored, porous or viewed as frictions to overcome
social_theory  world_systems  ideology  liberalism  international_system  globalization  liberal_internationalism  IR  historicism  modernity  capitalism  political_economy  political_culture  Mannheim  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
RP Wolff - THE IDEOLOGY OF SPACE CONSCIOUSNESS PART ONE - May 2015
Extending Mannheim approach to thinking about different worldviews that organize thought, priorities, values and action - liberal universalism and global capitalism have a similar view of space, where boundaries of communities and especially of nation-states are ignored, porous or viewed as frictions to overcome
social_theory  world_systems  ideology  liberalism  international_system  globalization  liberal_internationalism  IR  historicism  modernity  capitalism  political_economy  political_culture  Mannheim  Instapaper  from instapaper
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Jacob T. Levy - Rationalism, Pluralism, and Freedom - Feb 2015 - Oxford University Press
Intermediate groups-- voluntary associations, churches, ethnocultural groups, universities, and more--can both protect threaten individual liberty. The same is true for centralized state action against such groups. Levy argues that, both normatively and historically, liberal political thought rests on a deep tension between a rationalist suspicion of intermediate and local group power, and a pluralism favorable toward intermediate group life, and preserving the bulk of its suspicion for the centralizing state. He studies this tension using tools from the history of political thought, normative political philosophy, law, and social theory. (..) retells the history of liberal thought and practice (..)from the birth of intermediacy in the High Middle Ages to the British Pluralists of the 20thC. (..) restores centrality to (..) ancient constitutionalism and to Montesquieu, (..) social contract theory's contributions to the development of liberal thought have been mistaken for the whole tradition. It discusses the real threats to freedom posed both by local group life and by state centralization, the ways in which those threats aggravate each other.(..) the elements of liberal thought concerned with the threats from each cannot necessarily be combined into a single satisfactory theory of freedom. (..) it must be lived with, not overcome. -- 3 parts and an epilogue Against Synthesis -history in Part 2 -- 4. Antecedents and Foundations -- 5. The Ancient Constitution, the Social Contract, and the Modern State -- 6. Montesquieu and Voltaire, Philosophes and Parlements -- 7. The Age of Revolutions -- 8. Centralization in a Democratic Age: Tocqueville and Mill -- 9. From Liberal Constitutionalism to Pluralism -- only in hardback so far
books  buy  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  liberalism  liberal_democracy  intermediate_groups  pluralism  central_government  liberty  ancient_constitution  social_contract  monarchy-proprietary  limited_monarchy  limited_government  associations  subsidiarity  feudalism  Absolutism  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  Montesquieu  Voltaire  British_politics  France  Ancien_régime 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Stephen Turner - The Method of Antinomies: Oakeshott and Others | Academia.edu
Working paper -- uses Oakeshott, Weber, Schmitt, Chsntal Mouffe as examples -- not rekativists, but de-mytholigizing ideology that supposes if you get eory right you can derive the solution. There’s no "solution" but dynamics of conflict, change etc.
political_philosophy  moral_philosophy.  social_theory  relativism  aporia  paradox  antinomies  Oakeshott  Weber  Schmitt  liberalism  liberalism-public_reason  ideology  conflict  common_good  realism-political  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Emilie Frenkiel - Interview with David A. Bell, Choosing Confucianism: Departing from the Liberal Framework | Sept 2012 - Books & ideas
Tags : liberalism | confucianisme | China -- Recounting his itinerary from research on Communitarianism to the adoption of Confucian values, political philosopher Daniel A. Bell advocates thinking of cities as representing different social values in the modern world. He also sees meritocracy, which is valued in China nowadays as a potential remedy to the flaws of democratic systems. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  liberalism  liberal_democracy  liberalism-republicanism_debates  communitarian  Confucianism  meritocracy  modernity  modernity-emergence  urbanism  pluralism  values  China  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Thomas Grillot & Jean-Claude Monod - Interview with Bruce Ackerman - Reconstructing Citizenship for the 21stC | March 2012 - Books & ideas
Also translated into French -- Tags : liberalism | youth | elections | journalism | Constitution | citizenship | deliberation -- A world-famous legal scholar, Bruce Ackerman wants to reinvigorate citizenship in today’s democracies. Here, he reexamines the intellectual foundations of his work, and some of the pragmatic applications he designed with others. His principle is to always consider how the state intervenes in the autobiography of every man. -- downloaded pdf to Note
political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  liberalism  liberal_democracy  legal_theory  constitutional_law  constitutionalism  government-forms  elections  political_participation  political_culture  governmentality  deliberation-public  state-roles  power  power-asymmetric  downloaded  from instapaper
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Stob, Review: John McGowan, Pragmatist Politics: Making the Case for Liberal Democracy (2012) | KB Journal - 2013
McGowan, John. Pragmatist Politics: Making the Case for Liberal Democracy. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2012. -- Paul Stob, Department of Communication Studies, Vanderbilt University -- John McGowan’s Pragmatist Politics draws upon the pragmatist tradition—primarily the work of William James, John Dewey, and Kenneth Burke—to formulate a liberal democratic politics for the twenty-first century. At least that’s the overt aim of the book. But what may stand out most to readers of KB Journal is how McGowan seems intent on crafting an attitude. In formulating a pragmatist politics, McGowan fails to explicate political programs and initiatives, he disregards the nuts and bolts of democratic negotiation, and he provides no real strategies for building grassroots coalitions. What he does—and what he does admirably—is present readers with a pragmatist attitude that will, he hopes, come to permeate public culture. -- Stob describes how McGowan links rhetoric and political philosophy, especially using Burke's "comic" frame as fitting a pragmatist approach to goals and public participation of liberal democracy -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
books  reviews  political_philosophy  liberalism  liberal_democracy  rhetoric-political  conversation  persuasion  Burke_Kenneth  Dewey  James_William  secularism  symbolic_interaction  symbols-political  symbols-religious  communication  community  individualism  civic_virtue  civic_humanism  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
F.A. Hayek - Individualism and Economic Order - Books | Mises Institute
If you are looking to acquaint yourself with F.A. Hayek's perspective on economic theory — beyond his business cycle and monetary studies of the inter-war years — this is the best source. The collection appeared in 1947, before he moved on toward broader cultural and social investigations. It contains his most profound work on the liberal economic order, and his most penetrating reflections on economic phenomena -- published U of Chicago 1958 -- downloaded pdf to Note
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february 2015 by dunnettreader
Emmanuelle de Champs - Enlightenment and Utility: Bentham in French, Bentham in France (to be released March 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Jeremy Bentham (..) was a seminal figure in the history of modern political thought. This lively monograph presents the numerous French connections of an emblematic British thinker. (..) Placing Bentham's thought in the context of the French-language Enlightenment through to the post-Revolutionary era, (..) the case for a historical study of 'Global Bentham'. Examining previously unpublished sources, she traces the circulation of Bentham's letters, friends, manuscripts, and books in the French-speaking world. (..) transnational intellectual history reveals how utilitarianism, as a doctrine, was both the product of, and a contribution to, French-language political thought at a key time(..). The debates (re) utilitarianism in France cast new light on the making of modern Liberalism. **--** Intro **--** Part I. An Englishman in the Republic of Letters: 1. Languages of Enlightenment *-* 2. Satire and polemics *-* 3. Defining utilitarianism: private connections and correspondence **--** Part II. 'Projet d'un corps de loix complet' and the Reform of Jurisprudence in Europe: 4. The Genesis of Projet *-* 5. Projet in Enlightenment legal thought *-* 6. The politics of legal reform **--** Part III. Reflections for the Revolution in France: 7. Frenchmen and Francophiles: Lord Lansdowne's network *-* 8. British expertise for French legislators *-* 9. Utility, rights and revolution: missed encounters? **--** Part IV. Utile Dulcis? Bentham in Paris, 1802: 10. Dumont's editorship: from the Bibliothèque Britannique to Traités de législation civile et pénale *-* 11. A mixed reception *-* 12. Autumn 1802: Bentham in Paris **--** Part V. Liberty, Utility and Rights (1815–1832): 13. 'For one disciple in this country, I have 50 at least in France' *-* 14. Utilitarian arguments in French politics *-* 15. A Utilitarian moment? French liberals and utilitarianism *-* Epilogue: Bentham in the July Revolution *-* Conclusion -- marketing materials not yet available
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  legal_theory  18thC  19thC  British_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Enlightenment  Bentham  utilitarianism  utility  reform-political  reform-social  reform-legal  reform-economic  jurisprudence  civil_code  Republic_of_Letters  networks-policy  networks-information  Anglo-French  British_foreign_policy  diplomats  diplomacy-environment  francophile  Landsdowne_Marquis_of  faction  British_politics  patrons  patronage  elite_culture  cross-border  cultural_history  cultural_influence  technical_assistance  criminal_justice  liberalism  rights-legal  rights-political  civil_law  civil_liberties  civil_society  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Peace_of_Amiens  Napoleonic_Wars  Restoration-France  bourgeoisie  July_Monarchy  legal_reasoning  positivism-legal 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Biancamaria Fontana - Rethinking the Politics of Commercial Society The Edinburgh Review 1802–1832 (hdbk 1985, pbk & ebook 2008) | Political philosophy | Cambridge University Press
This book explores the sources of modern British liberalism through a study of the Edinburgh Review, the most influential and controversial early nineteenth-century British periodical. Founded by a group of young Scottish intellectuals in 1802, the Review served as a principal channel through which the ideas of the Scottish Enlightenment gained wider currency, and did much to popularize the doctrines of economic and political reform. As Dr Fontana shows in this lucid and keen analysis, the first thirty years in the life of the Review clearly display the new social and economic problems confronting European society in the aftermath of the French Revolution. **--** Introduction *--* 1. Scottish theories of commercial society and the French Revolution *-* 2. Adam Smith's heritage: the Edinburgh reviewers and the Wealth of Nations *-* 3. The definition of political economy: political economy as a social science *-* 4. The Edinburgh reviewers and the Whig party *-* 5. Commercial society and its enemies: the debate on the First Reform Bill *-* Conclusion -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution-impact  civil_society  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  democracy  mass_culture  political_participation  British_politics  Edinburgh_Review  Whigs  Whigs-Radicals  Whigs-grandees  liberalism  Industrial_Revolution  industrialization  international_political_economy  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Napoleonic_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  social_order  reform-political  reform-social  reform-finance  reform-economic  Reform_Act_1832  Parliament  parties  trade-policy  trade-theory  trade-cultural_transmission  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Brad DeLong - My "Sisyphus as Social Democrat: A review of 'John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics', by Richard Parker," ( Grasping Reality...)
One of his series, "Hoisted from the Archives": J. Bradford DeLong (2005), "Sisyphus as Social Democrat: A review of John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics, by Richard Parker," Foreign Affairs May/June 2005. - diwnloaded pdf to iPhone
article  book  review  biography  intellectual_history  20thC  political_economy  economic_sociology  economic_theory  US_economy  US_politics  post-WWII  entre_deux_guerres  Great_Depression  WWII  US_government  US_foreign_policy  Keynesian  institutional_economics  liberalism  social_democracy  Galbraith_JK  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Thomas Pfau and the emergence of the modern individual « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Thomas Pfau’s presentation of modernity in Minding the Modern fails to incorporate both the sociopolitical dimensions of modernity’s emergence and its positive aspects. He sees modernity as the home of the “modern subject” of the Western world, or the “quintessentially modern, solitary individual” in his “palpable melancholy,” both “altogether adrift” and without “interpersonal relations.” (..) a challenge to those whom he sometimes calls the “modern apologists of secular, liberal, Enlightenment society.” -- Pfau draws upon a narrative which might be called the “middle age voluntarism to modern alienation theory.” This has many predecessors in the second half of the 20thC (..). The geopolitical situation in the 1980s and 1990s is one of the important features of the historical context of many of these narratives (..) a variety of intellectual assaults were waged in the Western world against what had become the dominant intellectual paradigm in the West. (..) Over the last 30 years (..) this critical diagnosis of modernity has become more precise; there has been a consolidation of the sources and arguments -- Alasdair MacIntyre, Michael J. Buckley, Charles Taylor, Colin E. Gunton, Stanley Hauerwas, John Milbank, Michael Allen Gillespie, and more recently David B. Hart, Adrian Pabst and Brad S. Gregory. Pfau’s Minding the Modern is a new contribution to this anti-modern diagnosis of contemporary Western culture and the modern individual. (..)some of the arguments can be found in the French Catholic reform theologians of the early 20thC. There were also many German-speaking intellectuals in the 1920s and 1930s who were developing sweeping narratives that cast a dark light on modernity and thus, both implicitly and explicitly, called into question the rationale and legitimacy of the liberal political order. Pfau claims that his book does not provide one of these narratives (..). It does seem to be similar, however, to the classic decline-and-fall narratives. Even the essays at the end of the book about “retrieving the human” are analogous. -- downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  reviews  modernity  modernity-emergence  reform-legal  intellectual_history  medieval_philosophy  theology  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Ockham  Luther  liberalism  self  alienation  18thC  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  19thC  Coleridge  transcendence  ontology  individualism  17thC  English_Civil_War  religious_wars  religious_culture  Hobbes  20thC  21stC  declinism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Pluralism and consensus in the modern Western world vs Brad Gregory's "The Unintended Reformation" attack on "hyperpluralism" « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2013
Gregory's "hyperpluralism" is MacIntyre-eque - there's no longer a shared notion of the summum bonnum. This anti-modernity can't tell the difference between liberal pluralism and the bogeyman of relativism. Peterson's response is one of the better since it accepts the basic frame of the need for some shared values -- "the structuring principles [for political and social life] of modern Western societies are not arbitrary assertions but rather principles that are connected with one another, interwoven with historical developments and representative of human life and ideals." He shows 8 points of "soft consensus" and ..."While it would be possible to claim that these points are not... what Gregory calls the “Life Questions,” [they] rest upon basic values that have correlations with views of the person and conceptions of the good." -- "The entire Western world has agreed (1) to live with a modern democratic political order, (2) to enforce concepts of unalienable human rights, (3) to uphold the rule of law, and (4) to secure the separation of powers. (...) the high view of the individual, and thus the high view of that individual’s opinion, is presumed [...and is also a] 5th point. (...) There are many other values which follow from the high view of the individual (...) they presume the value of freedom.. [which is both...] a presupposition of 3 and 4 and a 6th point. (...) The law is a concrete representation of the norms and regulations that are held to be not only equitable, just, and good, but also reasonable. The importance of reason and rational justification therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the rule of law, but also as [a] 7th point. (...) [The] idea of the separation of powers (...) [presumes] cooperation in the formal execution of power, administration, and management. A high regard for cooperation therefore belongs in the soft consensus as a presupposition of the separation of powers, but also as an 8th point. The most effective cooperation [depends] upon general agreements regarding shared goals and a basic goodwill between the cooperating parties."
21stC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  theology  social_theory  declinism  Thomism-21stC  modernity  intellectual_history  Reformation  common_good  Christendom  Christianity  theocracy  politics-and-religion  liberalism  rule_of_law  separation-of-powers  civil_liberties  human_rights  liberty  liberty-negative  liberalism-public_reason  liberty-positive  welfare_state  MacIntyre  Counter-Reformation  pluralism  relativism  good  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Regina Schwartz - Secularism, belief, and truth « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2011
Triggered by Bilgrami’s paper and Taylor's thoughts on respect of multicultural communities, becomes a meditation on the virtues of open, vigorous debate in endless truth-seeking stimulated by Milton. -- It is because that Truth of how best to live together is a mystery, not fully graspable, knowable, manipulable, after all, that we need to approach the dialogue with the other with full respect—to listen, learn, and evaluate. So I guess mystery turns out not to be so woosie for politics, after all. Another way to say this is that I agree with Taylor’s assessment that we are in an era of reflexivity regarding religion in which belief is always questionable and there are many different positions, that this is a good, the outcome of the Enlightenment and the romantic Counter-Enlightenment, and surely, we need that same reflexivity in our secular beliefs. -- downloaded page as pdf to Note
epistemology-social  religious_belief  multiculturalism  Taylor_Charles  secularism  free_speech  freedom_of_conscience  reflexivity  liberalism  Milton  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Urbinati, Nadia - The context of religious pluralism « The Immanent Frame - 26 Jan. 2012
Akeel Bilgrami’s article, “Secularism: Its Content and Context,” is an important and welcome contribution .... Bilgrami clarifies in a penetrating and lucid way, three fundamental ideas on secularism: first, that it is “a stance to be taken about religion”; second, that it is not an indication of the form of government or the liberal nature of a regime; and third, that the context is a crucial factor in issues concerning the relationship between politics and religion. The first two arguments are intertwined and pertain to the identity and function of secularism, while the latter brings us directly to the role of religion in the public sphere (...) in what follows [I] is propose some specifications and exemplifications that may enrich or complete [Bigrami's analysis]. -- In matters that have a direct impact on the individual freedom of religion and social peace such as the presence of religion in the public sphere, political theorists should pay close attention to the ethical context and the historical tradition of a given society without deducing practical conclusions from an ideal conception of democracy and liberalism. This pragmatic suggestion of going back and forth from the ideal norm to the context is an admission of the fact that a political practice that is liberal in a pluralistic religious environment may turn to be anti-liberal in a mono-religious society. Pluralism is the essential condition within which we should situate the discourse of the role of religions in the public sphere and the issue of secularism. Without pluralism (as a social fact or as an actual plurality of religions, not only a formal declaration of rights) a constitutional democracy has a weaker liberal nature and may generate decisions that are not more liberal or tolerant than those made in a non-constitutional democracy (or in a decent illiberal society, to paraphrase Rawls). -- example of "liberal public square" in a mono-religious society Catholic Thomist positions advocated in Italian artificial insemination debates producing very restrictive legislation of majority religion restricting rights of minority
21stC  political_philosophy  democracy  liberalism  secularism  public_sphere  Rawls  Habermas  sovereignty  sociology_of_religion  politics-and-religion  civil_liberties  minorities  majoritarian  Italy  Catholics  Catholics-and-politics  Thomism-21stC  reproductive_rights  women-rights  democratic_theory  democratization  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Nitzan - Global Capital: Political Economy of Capitalist Power (YorkU, Graduate Seminar, Fall Term, 2014-15) | bnarchives
The seminar has two related goals: substantive and pedagogical. The substantive purpose is to tackle the question of capital head on. The course explores a spectrum of liberal and Marxist theories, ideologies and dogmas – as well as a radical alternative to these views. The argument is developed theoretically, historically and empirically. The first part of the seminar provides a critical overview of political economy, examining its historical emergence, triumph and eventual demise. The second part deals with the two ‘materialistic’ schools of capital – the liberal theory of utility and the Marxist theory of labour time – dissecting their structure, strengths and limitations. The third part brings power back in: it analyses the relation between accumulation and sabotage, studies the institutions of the corporation and the state and introduces a new framework – the capitalist mode of power. The final part offers an alternative approach – the theory of capital as power – and illustrates how this approach can shed light on conflict-ridden processes such as corporate merger, stagflation, imperialism and Middle East wars. Pedagogically, the seminar seeks to prepare students toward conducting their own independent re-search. Students are introduced to various electronic data sources, instructed in different methods of analysis and tutored in developing their empirical research skills. As the seminar progresses, these skills are used both to assess various theories and to develop the students’ own theoretical/empirical research projects. -- Keywords: arms accumulation capital capitalism conflict corporation crisis distribution elite energy finance globalization growth imperialism GPE liberalism Marxism military Mumford national interest neoclassical neoliberalism oil ownership peace power profit ruling class security stagflation state stock market technology TNC Veblen violence war -- syllabus and session handouts downloaded pdf to Note
bibliography  syllabus  capital_as_power  international_political_economy  political_economy  economic_theory  liberalism  neoliberalism  neoclassical_economics  Keynesian  Marxist  capital  capitalism  social_theory  power-asymmetric  globalization  financial_system  financial_regulation  risk-systemic  international_finance  finance_capital  financialization  production  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  inequality  MNCs  corporations  corporate_finance  corporate_ownership  corporate_control_markets  economic_growth  economic_models  imperialism  military  military-industrial_complex  IR_theory  ruling_class  class_conflict  energy  energy-markets  MENA  accumulation  accumulation-differential  capital_markets  public_finance  profit  investment  technology  elite_culture  elites-self-destructive  capitalism-systemic_crisis  Veblen  Mumford  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - How Revolutionary Were the Bourgeois Revolutions? (2012) Kindle Price:$17.60 - 840 pages | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
Includes Scottish late transition from feudalism and a different angle on Scot and English historiography in 17thC re "feudal law", "ancient constitution", James I & VI etc than Pocock's version -- earlier books on 16thC-18thC Scotland look very interesting -- In this panoramic historical analysis, Davidson defends a renovated concept of bourgeois revolution. He shows how our globalized societies of the present are the result of a contested, turbulent history marked by often forceful revolutions directed against old social orders, from the Dutch Revolt to the English and American Civil Wars and beyond. -- Review *--* " What should our conception of a bourgeois revolution be, if it is to enlighten rather than to mislead ? Davidson’s instructive and provocative answer is given through a history both of a set of concepts and of those social settings in which they found application.His book is an impressive contribution both to the history of ideas and to political philosophy.” —ALASDAIR MACINTYRE. *--* “Davidson wends his way through the jagged terrain of a wide range of Marxist writings and debates to distill their lessons in what is unquestionably the most thorough discussion of the subject to date. If the paradox at the heart of the bourgeois revolutions was that the emergence of the modern bourgeois state had little to do with the agency of the bourgeoisie, then Davidson’s study is by far the most nuanced and illuminating discussion of this complex fact.” —JAIRUS BANAJI, Theory as History “[This] is a monumental work. ...easily the most comprehensive account yet of the ‘life and times’ of the concept of ‘bourgeois revolution.’ . . . He has also provided us with a refined set of theoretical tools for understanding the often complex interactions between political revolutions which overturn state institutions and social revolutions which involve a more thoroughgoing transformation of social relations.” —COLIN MOOERS, The Making of Bourgeois Europe
books  kindle-available  buy  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  political_history  social_history  intellectual_history  social_order  Europe-Early_Modern  revolutions  bourgeoisie  Marxist  Dutch_Revolt  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  1707_Union  Jacobites  1745_rebellion  American_Revolution  French_Revolution  1848_revolutions  German_unification  Italian_unification  Russian_revolution  class_conflict  feudalism  ancient_constitution  aristocracy  Ancien_régime  liberalism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  US_Civil_War  political_culture  political_economy  capitalism 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
March 2011: The Rise and Fall of Neoconservatism - C. Bradley Thompson, Lead Essay | Cato Unbound
Lead Essay -- Neoconservatism Unmasked by C. Bradley Thompson -- Neoconservative intellectuals often describe themselves as having a particular mode of thinking — maybe even just a “mood.” C. Bradley Thompson argues that neoconservatism is much more than that. Its key philosophical inspiration of comes from Irving Kristol, and particularly from Kristol’s engagement with the philosopher Leo Strauss. Thompson argues that, under Straussian influence, neoconservatives champion the rule of a philosophically cunning elite over a population that will never be able to understand their intellectual masters. Instead, the populace is steered toward self-sacrifice, war, and nationalism — as well as a set of religious and moral beliefs that the elites in no way share. Such a doctrine, Thompson charges, points disturbingly toward fascism.
intellectual_history  political_philosophy  20thC  entre_deux_guerres  post-WWII  Germany  Nazis  fascism  liberalism  Strauss  Straussians  neoconservatism  US_politics  Plato-Republic  elites  esotericism  Heidegger  US_history  democracy  relativism  politics-and-religion  nihilism  mass_culture  political_participation  propaganda 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark S. Weiner - Imagining the Rule of Law in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Liberal Society and the Dialectic of the Clan | Academia.edu
In this essay, I provide a historical and theoretical framework for understanding the imaginative relation between the liberal rule of law and the kin-based form of socio-legal organization I call ‘the rule of the clan’ – a classic example of law created ‘from below’. I believe that a culturalist disciplinary perspective reveals that the modern liberal state and its more centralized rule of law always stand in an ironic, dialectical relation to the rule of the clan as a legal form. Liberal society nurtures itself through an anti-liberal utopian imaginary. This article provides an intellectual history backdrop for theorizing that dialectical relationship by examining two contrasting ways in which 19thC British intellectuals imagined the rule of law. Following the work of Charles Taylor and, more specifically in the legal field, Paul Kahn, my goal is to depict a social imaginary of modern liberalism that has been neglected within contemporary liberal theory – and, in doing so, provide a way to appreciate the cultural foundations of liberal legality. The article considers the stories that nineteenth-century British intellectuals told about the relation between the rule of law and the rule of the clan as a way to think about the rule of law today. It thus tacks between three different shores: the world of legal pluralism (the rule of the clan), the world of 19thC British analysis of the rule of the clan and the contemporary relation between culture and modern liberal society. Keywords: clan, rule of law, Albert Venn Dicey, Walter Scott, legal memory
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  19thC  British_history  British_politics  memory-group  rule_of_law  clans  kinship  liberalism  modernity  Scott_Sir_Walter  English_constitution  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Liberty Matters Nos. 1-10 (Jan. 2013 – July 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
David M. Hart, The Collected Liberty Matters: Nos. 1-10 (Jan. 2013 – July 2014), ed. David M. Hart and Sheldon Richman (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2014). 08/23/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2629> -- This volume is a collection of the first ten “Liberty Matters” online discussion forums which began in January 2013 and have appeared every two months since. The discussions have focused on authors whose work is well represented in the Online Library of Liberty. A leading scholar is asked to write an interpretative essay about a chosen author, to which other invited scholars respond in a formal essay which is then followed by a free form discussion over the ensuing month. The topics have included “John Locke on Property”, “James Buchanan: An Assessment”, “Gustave de Molinari’s Legacy for Liberty”, “Bastiat and Political Economy”, “George Smith on the System of Liberty”, “Arthur Seldon and the Institute of Economic Affairs”, “Ludwig von Mises’s The Theory of Money and Credit at 101”, “Hugo Grotius on War and the State”, “Tocqueville’s New Science of Politics Revisited”, and “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas”.
books  etexts  downloaded  political_philosophy  political_economy  intellectual_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  liberalism  liberty  IR_theory  Grotius  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  Mises  Buchanan  public_choice  Tocqueville  Bastiat  McCloskey  virtue_ethics  bourgeoisie  property  property_rights  libertarianism  liberty-negative  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
KATRINA FORRESTER -- CITIZENSHIP, WAR, AND THE ORIGINS OF INTERNATIONAL ETHICS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, 1960–1975 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 773-801. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
KATRINA FORRESTER - St John's College, Cambridge -- This article examines a series of debates about civil disobedience, conscription, and the justice of war that took place among American liberal philosophers, lawyers, and activists during the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. It argues that these debates fundamentally reshaped American political philosophy, by shifting the focus from the welfare state to the realm of international politics. In order to chart this transition from the domestic to the international, this article focuses on the writings of two influential political theorists, John Rawls and Michael Walzer. The turn to international politics in American political philosophy has its origins, in part, in their arguments about domestic citizenship. In tracing these origins, this article situates academic philosophical arguments alongside debates among the American public at large. It offers a first account of the history of analytical political philosophy during the 1960s and 1970s, and argues that the role played by the Vietnam War in this history, though underappreciated, is significant. -* I would like to thank Duncan Bell, Kenzie Bok, Christopher Brooke, Adam Lebowitz, Peter Mandler, Jamie Martin, Samuel Moyn, Andrew Preston, David Runciman, Tim Shenk, Brandon Terry, Mira Siegelberg, Joshua Specht, and two anonymous reviewers for their comments
article  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  20thC  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  post-WWII  Vietnam_War  citizenship  civil_liberties  IR-liberalism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  liberalism  Rawls  Walzer  power  power-asymmetric  justice  welfare_state  just_war  moral_philosophy  US_government  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: Ian Ward - Quentin Skinner, Hobbes and Republican Liberty | JSTOR: Perspectives on Politics, Vol. 8, No. 3 (September 2010), pp. 948-949
Overview of debates re different types of liberty, what relations between liberalism and republicanism, etc in both intellectual_history and political_philosophy in the decades after Skinner's Foundations in 1978. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  bookshelf  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  17thC  18thC  Hobbes  social_contract  liberty  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberalism  liberty-positive  liberty-negative  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  limited_monarchy  civic_virtue  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
JON GARTHOFF - LEGITIMACY IS NOT AUTHORITY | JSTOR: Law and Philosophy, Vol. 29, No. 6 (November 2010), pp. 669-694
The two leading traditions of theorizing about democratic legitimacy are liberalism and deliberative democracy. Liberals typically claim that legitimacy consists in the consent of the governed, while deliberative democrats typically claim that legitimacy consists in the soundness of political procedures. Despite this difference, both traditions see the need for legitimacy as arising from the coercive enforcement of law and regard legitimacy as necessary for law to have normative authority. While I endorse the broad aims of these two traditions, I believe they both misunderstand the nature of legitimacy. In this essay I argue that the legitimacy of a law is neither necessary nor sufficient for its normative authority, and I argue further that the need for legitimacy in law arises regardless of whether the law is coercively enforced. I thus articulate a new understanding of the legitimacy and authority of law. -- didn't download -- bibliography heavily classic modern and contemporary philosophers
article  jstor  social_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  institutions  authority  legitimacy  legal_culture  legal_validity  liberalism  social_contract  consent  reasons  enforcement  deliberation-public  Habermas  democracy  norms  normativity  obligation  Enlightenment  Locke  Mill  Rawls  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Scott D. Gerber, review essay - The Republican Revival in American Constitutional Theory | JSTOR: Political Research Quarterly, Vol. 47, No. 4 (Dec., 1994), pp. 985-997
Reviewed work(s): We the People: Foundations by Bruce A. Ackerman; Traces of Self-Government by Frank I. Michelman; Laws Republic; The Partial Constitution by Cass R. Sunstein - 1980s interest in classical republicanism, citizen participation and common good and how to reconcile with a liberalism of private interests and rights -- all 3 authors criticized for (1) excessive reliance on the "least dialogic" institution, the judiciary, as protector an/or promoter of the republican dimension of "liberal republicanism" and (2) a selective misreading of the Founders -- didn't download
article  review  jstor  US_constitution  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  US_politics  judiciary  judicial_review  natural_rights  property_rights  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism-republicanism_debates  liberalism  legal_history  legal_theory  Congress  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Socioeconomic Rights and Theories of Justice (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-79 -- This paper considers the relation between theories of justice (like John Rawls’s theory) and theories of socio-economic rights. In different ways, these two kinds of theory address much the same subject-matter. But they are quite strikingly different in format and texture. Theories of socio-economic rights defend particular line-item requirements: a right to this or that good or opportunity (e.g., housing, health care, education, social security). Theories of justice tend to involve a more integrated normative account of a society’s basic structure (though they differ considerably among themselves in their structure). So how exactly should we think about their relation? The basic claim of the paper is that we should strive to bring these two into closer relation with one another, since it is only in the context of a theory of justice that we can properly assesses the competition that arises between claims of socio-economic right and other claims on public and private resources. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 31 -- Keywords: Nozick, Rawls, justice, human rights, rights, scarcity, socioeconomic rights
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  liberalism  libertarianism  social_order  norms  moral_economy  poverty  human_rights  inequality  Rawls  Nozick  property  common_good  commons  capitalism  political_economy  justice  power-asymmetric 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Decline of Natural Right [chapter] (2009) :: SSRN in THE CAMBRIDGE HISTORY OF NINETEENTH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY, Allen Wood and Songsuk Susan Hahn, eds., Cambridge University Press
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-38 -- What happened to the doctrine of natural right in the 19thC? We know that it flourished in the 17thC and 18thC. We know that something like it - the doctrine of human rights and new forms of social contract theory - flourished again in the second half of the 20thC and continues to flourish in the 21stC. In between there was a period of decline and hibernation - ... in which to invoke natural right was always to invite intellectual ridicule and accusations of political irresponsibility. Thus article asks: How far can the decline of natural right in the 19thC be attributed to the reaction against the revolution in France? How far it was the effect of independent streams of thought, like positivism and historicism? Why was radical thought so ambivalent about natural right throughout the 19thC, and why was socialist thought in particular inclined to turn its back on it? As a framework for thought, natural right suffered a radical decline in the social and political sciences. But things were not so clear in jurisprudence, and natural right lived on to a much riper old age in the writings of some prominent economists. What is it about this theory that allowed it to survive in these environments, when so much of the rest of intellectual endeavor in the 19thC was toxic or inhospitable to it. Finally, I shall ask how far American thought represents an exception to all of this. Why and to what extent did the doctrine survive as a way of thinking in the United States, long after it had lost its credibility elsewhere. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  philosophy_of_law  philosophy_of_social_science  natural_law  natural_rights  human_rights  counter-revolution  historicism  positivism  legal_theory  nationalism  national_interest  conservatism  socialism  social_contract  relativism  revolutions  1848_revolutions  French_Revolution  anticlerical  Bentham  Burke  Hume  Jefferson  Kant  Locke  Marx  Mill  Savigny  Spencer_Herbert  George_Henry  US_society  American_exceptionalism  liberalism  social_theory  social_sciences  Social_Darwinism  social_order  mass_culture  political_participation  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Image of God: Rights, Reason, and Order (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-85 -- The idea that humans are created in the image of God is often cited as a foundation for human rights theory. In this paper, this use of imago dei is surveyed, and while the paper is basically favorable to this foundation, it draws attention to some difficulties (both theological and practical) that using imago dei as a foundation for human rights may involve. Also it explores the suggestion that the image of God idea may be more apt as a foundation for some rights rather than others. Its use in relation to political rights is specifically explored. The moral of the discussion is that foundations do make a difference. We should not expect that, if we simply nail this idea onto the underside of a body of human rights theory as a foundation, everything in the theory will remain as it is. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 21 -- Keywords: death penalty, foundationalism, human rights, image of God, political liberalism, political rights, religion, rights, secularism
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  imago_dei  foundationalism  human_rights  liberalism  rights-political  secularism  humanism  natural_rights  universalism  morality-Christian  morality-divine_command  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Comte Destutt de Tracy A Commentary and Review of Montesquieu’s ’Spirit of Laws’ (and comments by Condorcet and Helvetius) (trans. Thomas Jefferson, 1811- Online Library of Liberty
Antoine Louis Claude, Comte Destutt de Tracy, A Commentary and Review of Montesquieu’s ’Spirit of Laws’: To which are annexed, Observations on the Thirty First Book by the late M. Condorcet; and Two Letters of Helvetius, on the Merits of the same Work, trans. Thomas Jefferson (Philadelphia: William Duane, 1811). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/960> -- One of two books by the French liberal Destutt de Tracy which were translated and published by Thomas Jefferson A COMMENTARY AND REVIEW OF MONTESQUIEU'S 'SPIRIT OF LAWS' TO WHICH ARE ANNEXED, OBSERVATIONS ON THE THIRTY-FIRST BOOK, BY THE LATE M. CONDORCET, AND TWO LETTERS OF HELVETIUS, ON THE MERITS OF THE SAME WORKPREPARED FOR PRESS FROM THE ORIGINAL MANUSCRIPT, IN THE HANDS OF THE PUBLISHER -- downloaded French version
books  etexts  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  France  French_Enlightenment  Montesquieu  Condorcet  Helvetius  Jefferson  liberalism  French_politics  Ancien_régime  comparative_history  government-forms  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  human_nature  monarchy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Comte Destutt de Tracy - Commentaire sur l’Esprit des Lois de Montesquieu [1817] - Online Library of Liberty
Antoine Louis Claude, Comte Destutt de Tracy, Commentaire sur l’Esprit des Lois de Montesquieu; Édition entièrement conforme à celle publiée à Liége en 1817 (Paris: Delaunay, 1819). 07/16/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/968> -- A French version of Destutt de Tracy’s extended commentary on Montesquieu which so impressed Jefferson that he translated it himself. (English translation available on Liberty Fund site) -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  France  social_theory  social_sciences  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  government-forms  Montesquieu  liberalism  Restoration-France  political_press  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters Forum: John Locke on Property (January, 2013) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Eric Mack discusses John Locke’s theory of property to which Jan Narveson, Peter Vallentyne, and Michael Zuckert respond in a series of essays and comments. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  intellectual_history  17thC  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  political_economy  Locke  Locke-2_Treatises  property  property_rights  social_contract  natural_law  natural_rights  state-of-nature  labor  landowners  landed_interest  lower_orders  reformation_of_manners  mass_culture  political_participation  popular_politics  popular_culture  public_disorder  public_goods  Native_Americans  colonialism  development  common_good  commons  liberalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters Forum: Tocqueville’s New Science of Politics Revisited (May 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Aurelian Craiutu argues that Tocqueville was not just an observer of democracy in America but also a theorist of democracy who wanted to create “a new science of politics” suitable to the new world which was beginning to take shape at that time. Craiutu points out four dimensions of Tocqueville’s new science of politics that might help us better understand his thinking. The first is that Tocqueville’s new science of politics is fundamentally cross-disciplinary, at the intersection of political science, sociology, anthropology, history, and philosophy. He then goes on to discuss the other dimensions such as its comparative, normative, and political dimensions. He concludes that his works must therefore be seen as belonging to a larger French tradition of political engagement and political rhetoric in which the writer enters into a subtle and complex pedagogical relationship with his audience, seeking to convince and inspire his readers to political action. This thesis is discussed by Daniel J. Mahoney of Assumption College, Filippo Sabetti of McGill University, and Jeremy R. Jennings of King’s College London. -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  France  social_theory  social_sciences  political_philosophy  political_culture  liberalism  republicanism  human_nature  political_science  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-political  audience  comparative_history  historical_sociology  US_society  US_politics  social_order  historical_change  Tocqueville  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Liberty Matters Forum: George H. Smith and “The System of Liberty” (September, 2013) - Online Library of Liberty
This online discussion is part of the series “Liberty Matters: A Forum for the Discussion of Matters pertaining to Liberty.” Jason Brennan, David Gordon, and Ralph Raico discuss with George Smith his new book The System of Liberty: Themes in the History of Classical Liberalism (CUP 2013). Smith describes how he came to write the book, the works of the history of political thought which inspired him, and the methodology he uses in approaching the history of ideas. He demonstrates his approach with a brief discussion of one of the key ideas he has identified in the history of classical liberal thought, namely, the idea of “inalienable rights.” -- downloaded ebook to Note
etexts  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  moral_philosophy  liberalism  18thC  19thC  historiography  natural_rights  liberty  liberty-negative  liberty-positive  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Forum - “Deirdre McCloskey and Economists’ Ideas about Ideas” (July, 2014) - Online Library of Liberty
Deirdre McClosky is over the halfway point of her 4 volume work on The Bourgeois Era. Two volumes have already appeared, Bourgeois Virtues (2006) and Bourgeois Dignity (2010), and a third is close to appearing [2015]. This Liberty Matters online discussion will assess her progress to date with a Lead Essay by Don Boudreaux and comments by Joel Mokyr and John Nye, and replies to her critics by Deirdre McCloskey. The key issue is to try to explain why “the Great Enrichment” of the past 150 years occurred in northern and western Europe rather than elsewhere, and why sometime in the middle of the 18th century. Other theories have attributed it to the presence of natural resources, the existence of private property and the rule of law, and the right legal and political institutions. McCloskey’s thesis is that a fundamental change in ideas took place which raised the “dignity” of economic activity in the eyes of people to the point where they felt no inhibition in pursuing these activities which improved the situation of both themselves and the customers who bought their products and services.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  economic_history  economic_growth  Medieval  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  Great_Divergence  British_history  Scientific_Revolution  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Industrial_Revolution  bourgeoisie  political_economy  France  Germany  Prussia  China  development  institutional_economics  North-Weingast  legal_history  property  property_rights  commerce  trade  trading_companies  free_trade  improvement  technology  Innovation  agriculture  energy  natural_capital  nature-mastery  transport  capitalism  colonialism  industry  industrialization  social_order  Great_Chain_of_Being  consumers  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  equality  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  liberalism  incentives  microeconomics  historical_sociology  historical_change  social_theory  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jesse R. Harrington and Michele J. Gelfand - Tightness–looseness across the 50 united states | PNAS | Mobile
Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD -- This research demonstrates wide variation in tightness–looseness (the strength of punishment and degree of latitude/permissiveness) at the state level in the United States, as well as its association with a variety of ecological and historical factors, psychological characteristics, and state-level outcomes. Consistent with theory and past research, ecological and man-made threats—such as a higher incidence of natural disasters, greater disease prevalence, fewer natural resources, and greater degree of external threat—predicted increased tightness at the state level. Tightness is also associated with higher trait conscientiousness and lower trait openness, as well as a wide array of outcomes at the state level. Compared with loose states, tight states have higher levels of social stability, including lowered drug and alcohol use, lower rates of homelessness, and lower social disorganization. However, tight states also have higher incarceration rates, greater discrimination and inequality, lower creativity, and lower happiness relative to loose states. In all, tightness–looseness provides a parsimonious explanation of the wide variation we see across the 50 states of the United States of America. -- downloaded pdf to Note
culture  culture-American  norms  inequality  discrimination  US_politics  conservatism  liberalism  crime  punishment  deviance  tolerance  social_order  ecology  social_psychology  US_society  creativity  Innovation  happiness  hierarchy  culture_wars  culture-tightness  culture-looseness  prisons  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
James Fitzjames Stephen, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, ed. Stuart D. Warner (LF ed. 1993) - Online Library of Liberty
James Fitzjames Stephen, Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, ed. Stuart D. Warner (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1993). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/572> -- The Liberty Fund edition of this work, published 1873. Impugning John Stuart Mill’s famous treatise, On Liberty, Stephen criticized Mill for turning abstract doctrines of the French Revolution into “the creed of a religion.” Only the constraints of morality and law make liberty possible, warned Stephen, and attempts to impose unlimited freedom, material equality, and an indiscriminate love of humanity will lead inevitably to coercion and tyranny. -- he also attacks Mill on subordination of women (he's of course for it as being a natural hierarchy, Virginia must have been proud of her uncle) and Utilitarianism, though Stephen himself was a utilitarian. -- see also short bibliography re Victorian intelligentsia
books  etexts  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_history  human_nature  Stephen_Leslie  Victorian  Mill  utilitarianism  women-rights  hierarchy  social_order  liberalism  democracy  mass_culture  political_participation  liberty  equality  communitarian  individualism  laisser-faire 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
A Historical Sketch of Liberty and Equality (LF ed.) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, A Historical Sketch of Liberty and Equality, as Ideals of English Political Philosophy from the Time of Hobbes to the Time of Coleridge (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/870 -- In 1875, at only twenty-five years of age, Maitland, in pursuit of a fellowship in Cambridge University, submitted a this remarkable work. He went on to become one of greatest legal historians of his time. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  English_constitution  British_history  British_politics  Maitland  legal_history  legal_culture  liberty  equality  liberalism  English_Civil_War  Glorious_Revolution  French_Revolution  Hobbes  Coleridge  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
William Paley, The Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy, ed. D.L. Le Mahieu - Online Library of Liberty
William Paley, The Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy, Foreword by D.L. Le Mahieu (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2002). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/703> -- This classic work by William Paley was one of the most popular books in England and America in the early nineteenth century. Its significance lies in the fact that it marks an important point at which eighteenth century “whiggism” began to be transformed into nineteenth century “liberalism.”
books  etexts  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  British_history  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  human_nature  political_philosophy  political_culture  Whigs  liberalism  Paley  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Roscoe Pound, The Ideal Element in Law [1948], ed. Stephen Presser - Online Library of Liberty
Roscoe Pound, The Ideal Element in Law, ed. Stephen Presser (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 2002). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/671> Roscoe Pound, former dean of Harvard Law School, delivered a series of lectures at the University of Calcutta in 1948. In these lectures, he criticized virtually every modern mode of interpreting the law because he believed the administration of justice had lost its grounding and recourse to enduring ideals. Now published in the U.S. for the first time, Pound’s lectures are collected in Liberty Fund’s The Ideal Element in Law, Pound’s most important contribution to the relationship between law and liberty. The Ideal Element in Law was a radical book for its time and is just as meaningful today as when Pound’s lectures were first delivered. Pound’s view of the welfare state as a means of expanding government power over the individual speaks to the front-page issues of the new millennium as clearly as it did to America in the mid-twentieth century. Pound argues that the theme of justice grounded in enduring ideals is critical for America. He views American courts as relying on sociological theories, political ends, or other objectives, and in so doing, divorcing the practice of law from the rule of law and the rule of law from the enduring ideal of law itself. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Higley - Democratic Elitism and Western Political Thought [2009] | JSTOR: Historical Social Research / Historische Sozialforschung, Vol. 37, No. 1 (139) (2012), pp. 351-366
Many political thinkers have viewed democratic elitism as closing a democratic road they believe is or should be open-ended. Their view of democratic possibilities reflects the auspicious circumstances of Western societies during the past several centuries and especially since World War II. However, it involves a conflation of liberal and democratic values. I examine why and how this has occurred, and I argue that liberal and democratic values must be more clearly separated in today's dangerous world. In step with Schumpeter, democracy must be regarded as a method or instrumental value that in some but by no means all circumstances promotes the ultimate liberal value of actively individualistic free people. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Christian Nadeau, review essay - Blaise Bachofen (dir.), Le libéralisme au miroir du droit. L’État, la personne, la propriété - Philosophiques v36 n1 2009, p. 249-253 | Érudit 
Christian Nadeau - Université de Montréal -- Ces auteurs, pour la plupart spécialistes de philosophie politique moderne, se sont penchés sur des notions fondamentales du libéralisme en les situant dans leur contexte théorique d’émergence. Sont ainsi passés au crible de l’analyse philosophique les oeuvres de Locke, Hume, Montesquieu, Bentham, Constant et Tocqueville, mais aussi, celles des auteurs associés au conservatisme, comme Burke ou Bonald. Dans son introduction, Blaise Bachofen explique les raisons pour lesquelles les textes rassemblés dans ce recueil se recoupent sur la notion de libéralisme normatif, et plus précisément de libéralisme juridique. La norme de droit propre au libéralisme permet en effet de rendre compte à la fois de sa dimension politique et de sa dimension économique. L’égal traitement de droit contient en lui-même les motivations morales des principes fondamentaux du libéralisme. -- Trois grandes notions ont été retenues pour expliciter le paradigme du libéralisme juridique : L’État, comme lieu des échanges et des protections individuelles ; la personne, comme sujet du droit et de la liberté ; la propriété, comme notion canonique du rapport de l’individu à lui-même et aux objets qu’il peut légitimement faire siens. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Dale Van Kley, review essay, Where the Rot Started? - Brad S. Gregory, The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society - | Books and Culture
Excellent essay -- Gregory places almost all blame on the Protestants for the disunity of Christendom, marginalization of religious institutions and thought, and horrors of modern age, including moral relativism and global warming. Like Gillespie, puzzling stress on Dun Scotus ("univocal being") and William of Ockham (nominalism) for (enabling? producing?) a cosmos in which scientific inquiry could dispense with God. Gregory omits a number of factors on the Catholic side (beyond the Lutheran Reformation itself that the Papacy might have handled via reforms instead of confrontation and denial of fallibility). Van Kley's list of factors (especially French) that Gregory omits -- (1) splits in Catholicism throughout middle ages, e.g. frequent appearance of latent heresies if reformers couldn't get a new order founded; (2) Papal alliance with secular rulers to stamp out conciliar movement and reinforce papal infallibility - made compromise with Luther etc impossible and still inhibits any meaningful ecumenism; (3) Counter-Reformation shift from assessing theological grounds of specific doctrines to asserting absolute unchallengable authority based on external marks (as defined by Catholics) of the true church - a style of argument that wasn't going to survive sola scriptura, new science, Enlightenment etc; (4) Papal overreaction that stamped out Gallican and liberal Catholicism, which in turn stimulated anticlericalism and anti-regime sentiments from both left and right, thereby reducing the flexibility of the Ancien Regime to address social and economic problems or reform institutions; (5) a counter-revolutionary anti-intellectual unholy alliance between Papacy and Jansénistes that produced the uncompromising radicalism of laïcité. And that's not all Van Kley covers.
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
Matthew Milliner, review essay - Lenten Reading - Ephraim Radner, A Brutal Unity: The Spiritual Politics of the Christian Church | Books and Culture 2013
Radner, a Protestant, [argues] that something in our modern world has gone wrong. However, he places the blame less on an elusive pattern of secularization (Taylor) or on Protestant fragmentation (Gregory) than on the much wider phenomenon of Christian disunity... Christian disunity is what gave birth to—or rather, miscarried—the liberal democratic state. These are massive claims, and Radner marshals the erudition... A Brutal Unity is ..an "eristology," which Radner defines as "the study of hostility in its disordering forms and forces." -- Radner [opens with a] polemic against Wm Cavanaugh's The Myth of Religious Violence, [which] unjustifiably absolves Christians from their share in the violence of the liberal state. ...the nations as we know them arose from the inability of Christians to refrain from mutual murder. Radner marches his readers deep into the Rwandan genocide and the Holocaust.... "[Nazi death squads] were Protestants and Catholics both." To suggest otherwise—whether to exonerate Pope Pius XII or to overemphasize the role of Bonhoeffer—is to succumb to "hallucinogenic fantasy." "The dead bodies, as it were, are already gathered by the time churches admit to complicity in their murder." Radner explores Catholic and Protestant .. attempts to deny the reality of Christian disunity by carving out an inviolable space of "the Church as such"... The saving of the church from her own sins by concocting an invisible or elusive sanctity is, admittedly, a traditional theological move, but... were this approach employed Christologically, it would be plainly Gnostic. - Radner [makes] the villain of his story Ephiphanius of Salamis (d. 403), who listed heresies and distanced the church from her enemies, especially the Jews. ?..inaugurated the "Epiphanian paradigm" and its program of exclusionary violence...the church's "brutal unity." Providentialism and proceduralism are the [church's] blinders... The former is the notion that God was somehow at work in church councils, however violent; the latter is the idea that somehow bureaucratic decisions and parliamentary process betray the hand of God. We should, Radner believes, trust neither.
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
David Zaret - Religion and the Rise of Liberal-Democratic Ideology in 17th-Century England | JSTOR: American Sociological Review, Vol. 54, No. 2 (Apr., 1989), pp. 163-179
In classical and contemporary sociology, key elements of liberal-democratic ideology are seen as secular extensions of Protestant ideas. This case study provides a different analysis that emphasizes the problem of religious conflict and radicalism in early liberal-democratic ideology. Proponents of the new ideology rejected key tenets of their Puritan heritage, adopting deistic beliefs that legitimated pluralism and tolerance and opposed the older Puritan ideal of godly politics. Building on recent work in the sociology of culture, the paper outlines an analytic strategy for explaining change in ideological systems. Ideological change emerges out of the interaction of contextual pressures and intellectual precedents, as a collective response by ideological innovators to problems of authority. The analysis in this study shows how historical events can form an episodic context which structures this problem of authority. -- downloaded pdf to Note
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june 2014 by dunnettreader
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