dunnettreader + legal_system   121

Lords of Misrule | Matt Stoller - The Baffler - Sept 2017
In 1937, future Supreme Court Justice Robert Jackson gave a toast at the New York State Bar Association on the civic responsibilities of the legal profession.…
Evernote  legal_culture  corporate_law  legal_system  US_politics  US_legal_system  US_government  white-collar_crime  criminal_justice  DOJ  fraud  financial_crisis  financial_regulation  SEC  antitrust  Obama_administration  accountability  from instapaper
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Paolo Malanima - Serfdom in Eastern Europe after the Revisions (2013), in S. Cavaciocchi (ed.), Serfdom and Slavery in the European Economy 11th-18th Centuries
Serfdom in Eastern Europe after the Revisions, in S. Cavaciocchi (ed.), Serfdom and Slavery in the European Economy 11th- 18th Centuries, Firenze, Firenze University Press, 2014, II, pp. 677-88. - Multi-day conference - pdf of the paper contains schedule and Table of Contents - Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
wages  social_order  legal_system  agriculture-surplus  downloaded  Eastern_Europe  labor  jurisdiction  elite_culture  prices  agriculture  nobility  Black_Death  agriculture-productivity  landowners  medieval_history  property_rights  peasants  Europe-Early_Modern  Western_Europe  conference  serfs  agriculture-markets  dispute_resolution  rural  economic_history  access_to_courts  feudalism  contract_law  Labor_markets  tenants  social_history  improvement  food  chapter  political_economy 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
RB Outhwaite - The Rise and Fall of the English Ecclesiastical Courts, 1500–1860 (2007) | Cambridge University Press
The first history of ecclesiastical jurisdiction in England that covers the period up to the removal of principal subjects inherited from the Middle Ages. Probate, marriage and divorce, tithes, defamation, and disciplinary prosecutions involving the laity are all covered. All disappeared from the church's courts during the mid-nineteenth century, and were taken over by the royal courts. The book traces the steps and reasons - large and small - by which this occurred.
Downloaded 1st 10 pgs Ch 1 via Air
1. The ecclesiastical courts: structures and procedures
2. The business of the courts, 1500–1640
3. Tithe causes
4. Wills and testamentary causes
5. Defamation
6. Matrimonial litigation and marriage licenses
7. Office causes
8. The roots of expansion and critical voices
9. Charting decline, 1640–1830
10. Explaining decline
11. The Bills of 1733–1734
12. Snips and repairs: small steps to reform, 1753–1813
13. Royal commissions and early fruits, 1815–1832
14. Reform frustrated
15. Reforms thick and fast, 1854–1860.
books  downloaded  legal_history  church_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  Church_of_England  legal_system  church_courts  religion-established  family  marriage  jurisprudence  jurisdiction  inheritance  property  trusts  dispute_resolution  reform-social  reform-legal  morality-Christian  local_government  local_politics  discipline  punishment  authority  hierarchy  governing_class  governance-church  ecclesiology 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
David Chan Smith -Sir Edward Coke and the Reformation of the Laws: Religion, Politics and Jurisprudence, 1578–1616 (2014) | Cambridge University Press
Throughout his early career, Sir Edward Coke joined many of his contemporaries in his concern about the uncertainty of the common law. Coke attributed this uncertainty to the ignorance and entrepreneurship of practitioners, litigants, and other users of legal power whose actions eroded confidence in the law. Working to limit their behaviours, Coke also simultaneously sought to strengthen royal authority and the Reformation settlement. Yet the tensions in his thought led him into conflict with James I, who had accepted many of the criticisms of the common law. Sir Edward Coke and the Reformation of the Laws reframes the origins of Coke's legal thought within the context of law reform and provides a new interpretation of his early career, the development of his legal thought, and the path from royalism to opposition in the turbulent decades leading up to the English civil wars.
-- Offers a new perspective on early seventeenth-century legal thought which will appeal to those interested in the evolution of Anglo-Atlantic constitutional thought
-- Revises the traditional view of a major thinker who is often cited and discussed in both scholarly literature and contemporary judicial decisions
-- Illustrates the importance of confidence in legal and political institutions during a period of contemporary debate about public institutions
Intro not in kindle sample - downloaded excerpt via Air
books  downloaded  kindle-available  legal_history  political_history  British_history  16thC  17thC  judiciary  litigation  legal_system  legal_culture  Coke_Sir_Edward  common_law  church_courts  James_I  royal_authority  prerogative  reform-legal  jurisdiction  institutional_change 
september 2016 by dunnettreader
(107) NOW Published: How Hume
How Hume and Kant Reconstruct Natural Law: Justifying Strict Objectivity  without Debating Moral Realism, Clarendon Press (2016)
Front matter including both overview TOC and very detailed TOC plus introductory chapter -- He explains in the intro how both Hume and Kant (via Rousseau) pursued "moral constructivist" approaches using a (modified) "natural law" framework - after Hume had successfully attacked weaknesses in traditional approach to natural law. Notes that "justice" traditionally one of the 2 branches of moral philosophy (the other ethics). He's especially concerned with failure of "business ethics " as cause of financial crisis and Great Recession - but "business ethics" meaningless without a framework of "Justice." His target audience includes lawyers and legal/jurisprudence students and scholars - he thinks legal positivism and legal realism has run out of steam. He returns to accountancy standards in final chapter. -- pdf is the same material as kindle sample -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
books  legal_system  constructivism  morality-objective  justice  legal_theory  norms  accountability  legal_realism  18thC  norms-business  downloaded  moral_sentiments  moral_economy  jurisprudence  morality-conventional  legal_positivism  accounting  moral_realism  moral_psychology  Hume  kindle-available  natural_law  moral_philosophy  morality  Kant 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Dennis R. Klinck - Lord Nottingham and the Conscience of Equity (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas,Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 123-147 -- in an "age of conscience", Heneage Finch attempts to regularize the administration of equity so that the "conscience" of the court wouldn't be simply arbitrary according to the personal biases of the judge -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  17thC  Restoration  legal_history  legal_system  legal_remedies  equity  judiciary  British_history  common_law  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Miriam Sapiro - Transatlantic trade and investment negotiations: Reaching a consensus on ISDS | Brookings Institution - October 2015
Two steps can accelerate this process. First, US and EU negotiating teams should reach agreement on a number of key principles ** There should be a neutral forum for adjudication, independent of the potential for bias inherent in a host state’s legal system.** An arbitration tribunal should operate under established principles of international law with consistency and predictability. ** The arbitrators should be beyond reproach in terms of independence, impartiality, and integrity. ** The tribunal should have the authority to dismiss frivolous and other non-meritorious claims early in the process. ** The proceedings should be transparent and open to the public. ** An option for annulment, and possibly appeal, should be considered. Second, (..) the US and the EU should appoint a senior group of experts to review in detail several of the more provocative proposals that have been put forward by the EU—such as creating an appellate mechanism for TTIP or, more broadly, an international ISDS court. This should be a broad group of experts representing a range of academic, legal, business, public interest, and other expertise, and reflecting deep knowledge of international investment law, arbitration rules, and judicial and regulatory decision-making. To build greater public support, the group should include voices that support modifications as well as oppose them, in an effort to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the various options, and to identify consensus where possible. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  trade-agreements  ISDS  EU  EU_governance  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  transparency  public_goods  investment-bilateral_treaties  investment  FDI  regulation  regulation-enforcement  regulation-costs  regulation-harmonization  environment  public_health  legal_remedies  legal_system  arbitration  international_law  international_political_economy  appellate_review  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Lee Anne Fennell, Richard H. McAdams, eds. - Fairness in Law and Economics: Introduction :: SSRN - (Edward Elgar 2013)
Lee Anne Fennell and Richard H. McAdams, both University of Chicago Law School -- University of Chicago Coase-Sandor Institute for Law & Economics Research Paper No. 704 -- This introduction, prepared for an edited volume, offers some observations on the importance — indeed, inescapability — of fairness concerns in law and economics. The relationship between fairness and the economic concept of efficiency is usually cast as an adversarial one. Rational choice economics typically describes human behavior as motivated by simple self-interest, rather than by concerns of morality, justice, or fairness. But we have found that the connections between concepts of fairness and the economic analysis of law are robust and diverse. After discussing some of these linkages, we describe the organization and content of the volume we have compiled. In it, economics engages with fairness, challenging the idea that the two concepts are alien to each other. -- PDF File: 18 -- Keywords: fairness, law and economics -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  books  SSRN  law-and-economics  behavioral_economics  game_theory  rational_choice  rationality-economics  fairness  efficiency  welfare_economics  self-interest  altruism  microeconomics  policymaking  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  utility  status_quo_bias  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicola Lacey - Jurisprudence, History, and the Institutional Quality of Law (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 919 (2015)
A cri de coeur for putting legal theory and history back together with social theory and empirical social sciences,. -- In the early part of my career, legal history and the history of legal ideas were closed books to me, as I made my way in a field of criminal law scholarship dominated by doctrinal scholarship and by concept-focused philosophical analysis of the foundations of criminal law. These 2 very different paradigms have 1 big thing in common: They tend to proceed as if the main intellectual task is to unearth the deep logic of existing legal doctrines, not infrequently going so far as to read them back onto history, as if things could never have been other than they are. (..)I have increasingly found myself turning to historical resources (1) [to examine] the contingency of particular legal arrangements, and (2) ...to develop causal and other theses about the dynamics which shape them and hence about the role and quality of criminal law as a form of power in modern societies. So, in a sense, I have been using history in support of an analysis driven primarily by the social sciences. (..) it is no accident that all of the great social theorists, from Marx to Foucault via Weber, Durkheim, and Elias, ..have incorporated significant historical elements into their interpretations .... Indeed, without the diachronic perspective provided by history (or the perspective offered by comparative study) we could have no critical purchase on social theory’s characterizations of or causal hypotheses about the dynamics of social systems. Hence, (...) my boundless gratitude to the historians whose meticulous research makes this sort of interpretive social theory possible). -- Lacey is not over-dramatizing -- see the "commentary" from a "legal philosopher" who believes the normative basis of criminal responsibility can be investigated as timeless "moral truths". -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  social_theory  historical_sociology  historical_change  institutions  institutional_change  philosophy_of_law  philosophical_anthropology  philosophy_of_social_science  jurisprudence  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  concepts  morality-conventional  morality-objective  criminal_justice  responsibility  mind  human_nature  norms  power-asymmetric  power-symbolic  power  Neoplatonism  neo-Kantian  a_priori  historiography  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  moral_philosophy  evidence  mental_health  social_order  epistemology  epistemology-moral  change-social  change-intellectual  comparative_law  comparative_anthropology  civil_liberties  women-rights  women-property  rights-legal  rights-political  access_to_services  discrimination  legal_culture  legal_system  legal_reasoning  Foucault  Marx  Weber  Durkheim  metaethics  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Frederick Schauer - The Path-Dependence of Legal Positivism (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 957 (2015)
My aim in this Article is to focus on the history of thinking about law in the context of 3 topics (..) to show that the continuous development of the theory of legal positivism, however useful it may have been or may still be, has possibly caused us to ignore other aspects of what was originally part of the positivist picture. (..)The first of these dimensions is the relationship between legal theory and legal reform. (..) that an account of the nature of law might be developed not simply as an aid to understanding or accurate description, but instead as a way of facilitating reform of law itself or reform of how a society understands the idea of law. Second, legal positivism, at the time of its late 19thC (or perhaps even earlier) origins, was focused on the importance of coercion, force, and sanctions as central components of law. But as with the creation of legal theories for the purpose of legal reform, this emphasis on the coercive side of law has also been banished to a kind of jurisprudential purgatory, for reasons and with consequences that deserve further examination. The third lost element of earlier versions of legal positivism is its focus on judicial decision making and the role of judges. Modern legal positivists, for whom 1961 is all too often the beginning of useful thought about the nature of law, do not, with few exceptions, consider theories of judicial decision making to be a necessary or even important part of the positivist perspective. But it was not always so. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  political_philosophy  legal_reform  institutional_change  institutions  judiciary  judicial_review  law_enforcement  criminal_justice  punishment  coercion  authority  obligation  policymaking  political_change  social_theory  social_sciences  positivism-legal  positive_law  positivism  justice  Study_and_Uses  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
David Luban - Time-Mindedness and Jurisprudence: A Commentary on Postema's "Jurisprudence, the Sociable Science" | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 903 (2015)
Postema offers two general programmatic suggestions for jurisprudence besides greater historical consciousness: sociability and synechism. Sociability, has two dimensions. First, it means interdisciplinarity—a continual dialogue with the study of legal phenomena by the sciences, humanities, and even theology. Second, it means embedding jurisprudence in general philosophy, ... [Sellars]: “not only ‘cabbages and kings’, but numbers and duties, possibilities and finger snaps, aesthetic experience and death.” Synechism is a less familiar idea, drawn from the philosophy of C.S. Peirce. It is the commitment to seek continuity among phenomena. Peirce was metaphysically committed to the existence of actual continua everywhere in nature, history, and human psychology. So synechism will impose a certain demand on all systematic studies, namely discerning those continua.(..) a certain kind of historiography: The historian’s job is to unearth continuities between past and present rather than studying ruptures. This, it seems to me, is a contestable commitment that rules out a great deal of important historical work. Peirce understood synechism to imply that ideas are intrinsically temporal and historical phenomena. Although Postema does not endorse this general thesis, he does argue for a special case of it, namely that law is “intrinsically temporal.” This conclusion is central to his argument against the possibility of time-slice legal systems. It, too, is contestable; but, I shall suggest, Postema can reach his conclusion on grounds other than synechism, and I agree with him about law’s intrinsic temporality. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  pragmatism  historiography  historical_change  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  analytical_philosophy  legal_history  continuity  change-social  change-intellectual  intellectual_history  Peirce  social_sciences  legal_culture  legal_realism  philosophy_of_history  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Can There Be a Democratic Jurisprudence? :: SSRN - Nov 2008
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 08-35 -- General jurisprudence purports to consider law in general. But to break out of the arid abstractions of analytic legal philosophy, it may be worth also giving some jurisprudential consideration to the distinctive features of law in the context of a particular kind of political system. This paper considers the jurisprudence of law in a modern democracy. It explores a suggestion (made by Ronald Dworkin and others) that legal positivism might be a theory particularly apt for a democracy. And it explores the meaning and significance for democratic political theory of ideas like the generality of law, the separation of law and morality, the sources thesis, and law's public orientation. At the very end, the paper also considers Jean-Jacques Rousseau's view that the word "law" should be confined to measures that are applicable to all, made by all, and enacted in the spirit of a general will. -- Pages in PDF File: 5 -- Keywords: analytic legal philosophy, democracy, Hart, jurisprudence, legal positivism, Rousseau, separation of law and morality, sources of law -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  political_philosophy  government-forms  democracy  positivism-legal  analytical_philosophy  Hart  general_will  moral_philosophy  Dworkin  lawmaker  politics-and-religion  legal_reasoning  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Frank Pasquale - Four Futures of Legal Automation | Balkinization: June 2015
http://balkin.blogspot.com/2015/06/four-futures-of-legal-automation.html -- overview of new article dealing with different scenarios for "disruption" promised by "innovators" and venture capitalists, which is likely to take the new fashion of arbitraging "inefficiencies" without any thoughts as to consequences for unraveling the "logic" of the current systems of legal services, re both content and access -- Instapaper has a number of links -- also downloaded pdf to Note
Instapaper  article  legal_system  legal_culture  automation  Innovation  technology  access_to_services  corporate_law  criminal_justice  family_law  property_rights  rights-legal  contracts  links  downloaded  from instapaper
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron -Judicial Review and Judicial Supremacy (Nov 2014) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-57 -- This paper attempts to identify a particular constitutional evil -- namely, judicial supremacy -- and to distinguish the objection to judicial supremacy from the broader case that can be made against judicial review. Even if one supports judicial review, one ought to have misgivings about the prospect of judicial supremacy. The paper associates judicial supremacy with three distinct tendencies in constitutional politics: (1) the temptation of courts to develop and pursue a general program (of policy and principle of their own) rather than just to intervene on a piecemeal basis; (2) the tendency of the highest court to become not only supreme but sovereign, by taking on a position of something like broad sovereignty within the constitutional scheme (thus confirming Thomas Hobbes in his conviction that the rule of law cannot be applied at the highest level of political authority in a state because any attempt to apply it just replicates sovereignty at a higher level)); (3) the tendency of courts to portray themselves as entitled to "speak before all others" for those who made the constitution, to take on the mantle of pouvoir constituant and to amend or change the understanding of the constitution when that is deemed necessary. -- Pages in PDF File: 44 -- Keywords: constitutions, Hobbes, judicial review, judicial supremacy, judges, judiciary, popular constitutionalism, rule of law, Sieyes, sovereignty -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  political_philosophy  government-forms  Hobbes  Sieyes  sovereignty  authority  democracy  accountability  constitutions  constitutionalism  judicial_review  judiciary  conflict  public_policy  public_opinion  change-social  political_change  policymaking  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Rule of Law in Public Law (September 2014) :: SSRN - Cambridge Companion to Public Law, Forthcoming
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-40 -- This paper explores the possibility of a conception of the rule of law that is oriented specifically to public law. It is not a conception of the rule of law that privileges private law rights (like rights of property) nor is it an abstract or anodyne conception that is supposed to apply to all areas of governance indiscriminately. Instead this is an account of the rule of law that takes the mission of public administration seriously and seeks to establish it on a footing of legality rather than managerialism, while at the same time acknowledging that sometimes private interests have to give way to the interests of the public. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 19 -- Keywords: Dicey, discretion, public law, public administration, rule of law -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  public_law  administrative_law  rule_of_law  discretion  managerialism  public_interest  public_goods  rights-legal  constitutional_law  property_rights  property-confiscations  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Public Rule of Law (keynote address) :: SSRN September 2014
Inaugural Conference of International Society for Public Law, June 2014 -- NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-41 -- This paper was delivered as the keynote address at the inaugural conference of the International Society for Public Law, in the Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, on 26 June, 2014. It develops an understanding of public law that takes seriously both the idea of public governance and the idea of individual parties as members of the public. And it outlines an understanding of the rule of law that matches these public-spirited conceptions. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 22 -- Keywords: private property, public administration, public law, republicanism, rule of law -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  common_good  public_law  public_goods  government-roles  administrative_law  administrative_agencies  government_agencies  property  property_rights  republicanism  rule_of_law  political_participation  governance  downloaded 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Katia Weidenfeld, review - Absolutism and Its Judges - Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice. France (XIIIe-XXe siècle). Vol.1: L’idéologie de la magistrature ancienne | January 2010 Books & ideas
Reviewed: Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice. France (XIIIe-XXe siècle). Vol.1: L’idéologie de la magistrature ancienne, Gallimard, NRF, Paris, nov. 2009. 326 pp., 22 euros. -- Translated by Arthur Goldhammer with the support of the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme -- Jacques Krynen shows, in an excellent overview, that judicial power was not a recent invention: in the Old Regime, high court judges already claimed a share of royal power. This erudite yet accessible book thus revises the myth of absolutism. What about other magistrates and lawyers? -- review of Volume 2 (1789-2010) hasn't been translated -- downloaded both pdfs to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  France  political_history  legal_system  legal_history  judiciary  political_order  Ancien_régime  monarchy  Absolutism  separation-of-powers  Parlement  lawyers  lawmaker  judicial_review  government-forms  government_officials  justice  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Katia Weidenfeld, review -- Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice, France XIIIe-XXe siècle. Tome 2 : L’emprise contemporaine des juges (1789-2011) | Sept 2012 - La Vie des idées
Recensé : Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice, France XIIIe-XXe siècle. Tome 2 : L’emprise contemporaine des juges, Paris, Gallimard, 2012, 432 p., 26 €. -- -- Poursuivant la fresque entreprise dans le premier tome, Jacques Krynen nous invite, avec ce deuxième tome de l’État de justice, à parcourir l’histoire judiciaire de la France pendant la période contemporaine (1789-2011). -- She also reviewed the first volume which covers the high magistrates relation with the monarchy in the Ancien Régime (translated into English by Arthur Goldhammer) -- downloaded both pdfs to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  France  political_history  legal_system  legal_history  judiciary  political_order  Ancien_régime  monarchy  separation-of-powers  Parlement  lawyers  lawmaker  judicial_review  government-forms  government_officials  justice  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Secured Transactions Reform in the Anericas | Institute of the Americas
Diwnloaded to iPhone report of conference co-sponsored by Institute of the Americas and IFC in 2013 -- url is for general page dealing with STR program -- Secured Transactions Reform in Latin America and the Caribbean 2013 - What is one of the single largest barriers to growth for SMEs in the developing world? The lack of access to finance at reasonable rates in the formal banking market. Access to credit promotes productive capacity, competitiveness, job creation and ultimately poverty alleviation
website  paper  downloaded  financial_innovation  access_to_finance  financial_sector_development  Latin_America  SMEs  securitization  banking  legal_system  reform-legal  credit  collateral 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Marc BELISSA - REPENSER L'ORDRE EUROPÉEN (1795-1802). DE LA SOCIÉTÉ DES ROIS AUX DROITS DES NATIONS | JSTOR: Annales historiques de la Révolution française, No. 343 (Janvier/Mars 2006), pp. 163-166
Brief summary of thesis defended 2005, l'Université Paris I Sorbonne - surprise, surprise, Lucien Bély on his committee with the notion of the 18thC as the last stage of the société des princes and the French Revolution forcing the end of the dynastic wars -- though focus is on the period of the Directoire and Napoleon up through Amiens, he places it in the context of the European dynastic system as structured by the Peace of Utrecht -- highlights an interdisciplinary approach -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  thesis  18thC  1790s  1800s  Europe  Europe-19thC  balance_of_power  French_Revolution  IR  IR_theory  Westphalia  sovereignty  dynasties  nation-state  diplomatic_history  political_culture  counter-revolution  Jacobins  republicanism  Europe-federalism  Peace_of_Utrecht  société_des_princes  national_interest  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  France  French_politics  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Directoire  monarchy  social_order  legal_system  international_law  international_system  natural_law  citizenship  subjects  property  elites  political_economy  economic_culture  political_participation  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
- DAVID LEWIS JONES - British Parliaments and Assemblies: A Bibliography of Printed Materials (2009) Parliamentary History - Wiley Online Library
Each section a pdf downloaded to Note - combined, c 25,000 entries *--* Section 1: Preface, Introduction, The Westminster Parliament 1-4005. **--** Section 2: The Medieval Parliament 4006-4728 **--** Section 3: Tudor Parliaments 4729-5064 **--* Section 4: Stuart Parliaments 5063-6805 **--** Section 5: The Unreformed Parliament 1714-1832 6806-9589. **--** Section 6: The Reformed Parliament 1832-1918 9590-15067 **--** Section 7: Parliament 1918-2009 15068-21582. **--** Section 8: The Judicial House of Lords 21583-21835. -- The Palace of Westminster 21836-22457. -- The Irish Parliament 22458-23264 -- The Scottish Parliament (to 1707) 23265-23482 -- The New Devolved Assemblies 23483-23686 -- The Scottish Parliament (1999-) 23687-24251 -- Northern Ireland 24252-24563 -- The National Assembly for Wales 24537-24963 -- Minor Assemblies
bibliography  historiography  Medieval  medieval_history  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_culture  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_history  politics-and-religion  political_participation  political_press  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  British_history  British_politics  Britain  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  English_constitution  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  monarchical_republic  limited_monarchy  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  House_of_Commons  House_of_Lords  sovereignty  government-forms  governing_class  government_finance  government_officials  Scotland  Ireland  Ireland-English_exploitation  elites  elite_culture  common_law  rule_of_law  1690s  1700s  1707_Union  1680s  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  English_Civil_War  Three_Kingdoms  composite_monarchies  Absolutism  ancient_constitution  religion-established  Church_of_England  Reformation  reform-legal  reform-political  elections  franchise  state-building  opposition  parties  pa 
december 2014 by dunnettreader
Recommended Reading Lists | A Common Word Between Us and You
More often than not, one’s understanding of a religion comes from sources which are either prejudiced or which do not have an authentic understanding of the religion. To really understand a religion, one must be able to view it as its adherents do. One should be able to enter the particular world-view of the religion and see through its eyes. This will enable us to understand the particular values, attitudes and behaviors that the particular religion recommends for its followers. It is in this light that a number of prominent Muslim and Christian scholars have kindly compiled recommended reading lists. Some of the reading lists have been compiled according to levels, others according to categories, while others remain as one list. It is hoped these lists will serve as a guide, lighting the way to a better understanding of each others Tradition. **--** Muslim Scholars -- Prof. Seyyed Hossein Nasr. -- Sheikh Ali Goma’a. -- Prof. Timothy Winter -- Dr. Joseph Lumbard. **--** Christian Scholars -- Dr. Mirolslav Volf -- Reverend William Sachs -- Dr Nicholas Adams -- Roland Schatz -- downloaded pdfs to Note
comparative_religion  religious_history  religious_culture  theology  Christianity  Islam  Islamic_civilization  Islam-Greek_philosophy  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Daniel Woolf, review - Ken MacMillan, Sovereignty and Possession in the English New World: The Legal Foundations of Empire, 1576-1640 (2006) | JSTOR: The International History Review, Vol. 29, No. 3 (Sep., 2007), pp. 598-600
Cambridge University Press -- Looks well done - Woolf gives high marks for linking the interest of various players, including monarchs, with shifting ideologies and challenges of articulating a legal system that made sense with English ambitions, relations with other European colonial enterprises, and England's peculiar legal framework and its interactions with government - e.g. why the most elaborated jurisprudence, the Spanish, didn't fit with Fortescue commonwealth style thought and ticklish question of "conquest" -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  find  political_history  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  political_philosophy  international_law  16thC  17thC  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  colonialism  British_politics  British_history  trading_companies  balance_of_power  maritime_history  common_law  Roman_law  dominion  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean-Philippe Genet - La genèse de l'État moderne: Culture et société politique en Angleterre (2003) | Livres -- Amazon.fr
La genèse de l'État moderne est le fruit d'une lente évolution à partir de la seconde moitié du XIIIe siècle, qui a d'abord affecté les monarchies féodales d'Occident : il y a quelques années, elle a fait l'objet d'études systématiques de nombreux historiens en Europe, grâce au CNRS et à la Fondation européenne de la Science. Le présent ouvrage est une étude de cas, consacrée à l'Angleterre, à bien des égards la plus précoce et la plus cohérente des constructions politiques médiévales qui, paradoxalement, est peu étudiée par les historiens français. On y retrouve le primat de la guerre et de la fiscalité dans la dynamique de la genèse de l'État moderne, ainsi que la mise en place d'un système judiciaire garantissant la reproduction de la classe dominante dans des conditions satisfaisantes. Mais l'ouvrage permet surtout de relever et d'articuler la corrélation entre le développement et la vitalité de la société politique, dont l'existence est une condition sine qua non pour l'État moderne, et la mutation de la culture et du système de communication médiéval, tant au niveau des médias et de la langue qu'à celui des types de textes produits. Par l'analyse de plus de 2200 bio-bibliographies d'" auteurs " actifs dans les domaines de l'histoire et du politique, et au moyen d'une théorie des champs de production textuelle, se dégage ce qu'a été l'idéologie spécifique du féodalisme d'État. Alors naissent progressivement les catégories modernes du politique, ainsi que la notion d'une société politique " nationale " -- Recommended in Penguin history of England bibliographies
books  amazon.fr  British_history  British_politics  medieval_history  13thC  14thC  15thC  nation-state  national_ID  political_culture  feudalism  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  judiciary  historiography  political_sociology  military_history  state-building  political_economy  elites  elite_culture  monarchy  taxes  fiscal-military_state  nobility 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard Lachmann - States and Power (PPSS - Polity Political Sociology series) - 249 pages (2013) | Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.
States over the past 500 years have become the dominant institutions throughout the world, exercising vast and varied authority over the economic well-being, health, welfare, and very lives of their citizens. This concise and engaging book explains how power became centralized in states at the expense of the myriad of other polities that had battled one another over previous millennia. Richard Lachmann traces the contested and historically contingent struggles by which subjects began to see themselves as citizens of nations and came to associate their interests and identities with states. He explains why the civil rights and benefits they achieved, and the taxes and military service they in turn rendered to their nations, varied so much. Looking forward, Lachmann examines the future in store for states: will they gain or lose strength as they are buffeted by globalization, terrorism, economic crisis, and environmental disaster? This stimulating book offers a comprehensive evaluation of the social science literature that addresses these issues, and situates the state at the center of the world history of capitalism, nationalism, and democracy. It will be essential reading for scholars and students across the social and political sciences. -- reviews all the main theoretical approaches to rise of the nation-state, state-building, and various speculations on the demise or transformation of the state in the era of globalization and transnational actors and issues. -- looks extremely helpful, if for nothing than the lit review and bibliography
books  kindle-available  buy  historical_sociology  political_sociology  nation-state  nationalism  national_ID  citizenship  legitimacy  Europe-Early_Modern  colonialism  imperialism  IR_theory  capitalism  mercantilism  military_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  empires  empire-and_business  legal_system  international_law  international_political_economy  global_governance  globalization  elites  elite_culture  MNCs  international_organizations  international_system  power  IR-domestic_politics  terrorism  Internet  democracy  rule_of_law  civil_society  civil_liberties  social_theory  national_interest  refugees 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - The Origins Of Scottish Nationhood (Pluto Critical History Series) (2000) 144 pages | pbk (9780745316086): : Books amazon.com
The traditional view of the Scottish nation holds that it first arose during the Wars of Independence from England in the 13thC & 14thC. Although Scotland was absorbed into Britain in 1707, Scottish identity is supposed to have remained alive through separate institutions of religion, education, and the legal system. Davidson argues otherwise. The Scottish nation did not exist before 1707. The Scottish national consciousness we know today was not preserved by institutions carried over from the pre-Union period, but arose after and as a result of the Union, for only then were the material obstacles to nationhood – most importantly the Highland/Lowland divide – overcome. This Scottish nation was constructed simultaneously with and as part of the British nation, and the 18thC Scottish bourgeoisie were at the forefront of constructing both. The majority of Scots entered the Industrial Revolution with a dual national consciousness, but only one nationalism, which was British. The Scottish nationalism which arose in Scotland during the 20thC is therefore not a revival of a pre-Union nationalism after 300 years, but an entirely new formation. -- Customer review - Davidson refutes Linda Colley's idealist thesis that Protestantism, Francophobia, monarchism and empire formed the British nation. The first three of these were ideas, present, yes, but not formative. Empire was external to Britain, and so it was never part of people's experience of becoming British or Scottish. Scotland was a full partner, not a junior partner in the British (not English) Empire, unlike Ireland. The experience of becoming the workshop of the world formed Britain as a nation, creating our culture and identity. Industry, making things, and organising in our Britain-wide trade unions (which Davidson barely mentions) made us British. -- not on kindle
books  amazon.com  find17thC  18thC  Scotland  British_history  1707_Union  national_ID  nationalism  bourgeoisie  Industrial_Revolution  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Anglo-Irish_constitution  colonialism  imperialism  history_of_England  Kirk  legal_system  Highlands-Scotland  Lowland-Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Britannia 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Khan, B. - An Economic History of Copyright in Europe and the United States | EH.Net Encyclopedia, edited by Robert Whaples. March 16, 2008
The US created a utilitarian market-based model of intellectual property grants which created incentives for invention, with the primary objective of increasing social welfare and protecting the public domain. The checks and balances of interest group lobbies, the legislature and the judiciary worked effectively as long as each institution was relatively well-matched in terms of size and influence. However, a number of scholars are concerned that the political influence of corporate interests, the vast number of uncoordinated users over whom the social costs are spread, and international harmonization of laws have upset these counterchecks, leading to over-enforcement at both the private and public levels. International harmonization with European doctrines introduced significant distortions in the fundamental principles of US copyright and its democratic provisions. One of the most significant of these changes was also one of the least debated: compliance with the precepts of the Berne Convention accorded automatic copyright protection to all creations on their fixation in tangible form. This rule reversed the relationship between copyright and the public domain that the US Constitution stipulated. According to original US copyright doctrines, the public domain was the default, and copyright a limited exemption to the public domain; after the alignment with Berne, copyright became the default, and the rights of the public and of the public domain now merely comprise a limited exception to the primacy of copyright. The pervasive uncertainty that characterizes the intellectual property arena today leads risk-averse individuals and educational institutions to err on the side of abandoning their right to free access rather than invite challenges and costly litigation. Many commentators are also concerned about other dimensions of the globalization of intellectual property rights, such as the movement to emulate European grants of property rights in databases, which has the potential to inhibit diffusion and learning.
article  economic_history  publishing  property  property_rights  legal_history  legal_system  IP  regulation-harmonization  natural_rights  natural_law  copyright  patents  US_constitution  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  international_law  France  French_Revolution  censorship  British_history  authors  artists  playwrights  democracy  knowledge_economy  Internet  globalization  global_economy  digital_humanities  transparency  open_access  scientific_culture  science-public  education  R&D  education-higher  common_law  civil_code  civil_society  civic_humanism  US_legal_system 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Commission ISDS reform plan is an echo chamber of business views | Corporate Europe Observatory
In the face of fierce opposition to its plan to enshrine far-reaching rights for foreign investors in the EU-US trade deal, the Commission is trying to appease the critics with a ‘reform’ agenda for investor-state arbitration. The reforms are remarkable in line with the big business lobby agenda. -- 4 page chart comparing business group positions, EC lingo and Corporate Europe's comments on each position -- downloaded pdf to Note
investor-State_disputes  dispute_resolution  arbitration  global_governance  comparative_law  legal_system  EU-law  Transatlantic_Trade_and_InvestmentPartnership  trade-agreements  trade-policy  EU_governance  EU-foreign_policy  MNCs  civil_society  FDI  big_business  power-asymmetric  regulation-harmonization  downloaded 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Katharina Pistor: Creating A Legal Foundation For Finance | The Institute for New Economic Thinking
Katharina Pistor, a grantee of the Institute for New Economic Thinking, professor at Columbia University Law School, and the director of Columbia’s Center on Global Legal Transformation, is developing a Legal Theory of Finance.
In this interview, Pistor focuses in particular on the paradoxical relationship between law and finance. On the one hand, finance needs law to provide credibility. After all, financial assets are contracts, the value of which depends on their legal validation. But on the other hand, changing conditions in the financial world over time necessitate flexibility in law. An overly rigid legal system can render regulation irrelevant if financial innovation ultimately surpasses laws designed for another era. In a worst-case scenario, legal rigidity also can play a role in causing a financial accident. In the United States, the Dodd-Frank legislation represents one response to this challenge. In Europe, the melding of finance and the law is even more complex because policy makers, regulators, and legislators are dealing with 17 different nations, all of which operate with a common currency but in a series of different national jurisdictions with vastly different legal traditions and precedents.
The tension in Europe has become particularly acute in relation to some of the unconventional measures undertaken by the European Central Bank in response to the existential threat to the euro itself - have come under challenge in Germany’s Constitutional Court. Can a national constitutional court effectively invalidate an entire program undertaken by a supranational central bank, which ostensibly is responsible for a common monetary policy? This is one of the issues that Professor Pistor discusses in the exchange below.
video  legal_theory  legal_system  financial_system  financial_regulation  law-and-finance  property_rights  contracts  debt  central_banks  Eurozone  monetary_policy  money  capital_markets  banking  international_political_economy  international_law  international_finance  international_monetary_system 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Zephyr Teachout, Lina Khan - Market Structure and Political Law: A Taxonomy of Power :: SSRN September 7, 2014
Zephyr Teachout, Fordham University School of Law -- Lina Khan, Yale University - Law School -- Duke Journal of Constitutional Law & Public Policy, Forthcoming. **--** The goal of this Article is to create a way of seeing how market structure is innately political. It provides a taxonomy of ways in which large companies frequently exercise powers that possess the character of governance. Broadly, these exercises of power map onto three bodies of activity we generally assign to government: to set policy, to regulate markets, and to tax. We add a fourth category — which we call "dominance," after Brandeis — as a kind of catchall describing the other political impacts. The activities we outline will not always fit neatly into these categories, nor do all companies engage in all of these levels of power — that is not the point. The point is that Bank of America and Exxon govern our lives in a way that, say, the local ice cream store in your hometown does not. Explicitly understanding the power these companies wield as a form of political power expands the range of legal tools we should consider when setting policy around them. - Number of Pages in PDF File: 38 - Keywords: antitrust
paper  SSRN  political_economy  economic_culture  big_business  antitrust  regulation  power-asymmetric  legal_system  consumers  governance  governmentality  corporate_citizenship  consumer_protection  concentration-industry  dispute_resolution  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephan W. Schill - The Sixth Path: Reforming Investment Law from Within :: SSRN June 4, 2014
Max Planck Institute for International Law -- Fourth Biennial Global Conference of the Society of International Economic Law (SIEL) Working Paper No. 2014/02. *--* In reaction to a summary of five different paths for investment law reform made by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development in June 2013, which focused on institutional reforms of investor-State dispute settlement, the present paper sketches out a sixth path for investment law reform that is based on a system-internal reconceptualization of investor-State arbitration as a form of public law-based judicial review. It can be reformed, the paper argues, by arbitrators and parties making increasing use of comparative public law methodology that allows them to draw on the experience of more sophisticated systems of public law adjudication at the national and international level without the need for institutional reform to investor-State arbitration. First, the paper points out the benefits of the existing system of investor-State arbitration, in order to show that investor-State arbitration is an institution worth reforming from within. Second, the paper lays out the basic framework to reconceptualize investment law as a system of public law and governance and point out shortcomings in the currently prevailing approaches to understanding investor-State arbitration. Third, the paper indicates the methodological consequences of a reconceptualization of investor-State arbitration as a public law system of governance, namely the need for arbitrators to make increased use of comparative public law in resolving disputes. Finally, the paper shows how public law ideas and comparative public law methodology can be brought into investment arbitration in its present form and why arbitrators have an interest in conforming to these standards even without fundamental institutional reform. - Number of Pages in PDF File: 25 - Keywords: investment treaties, international investment law, investor-state arbitration, investment law - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  international_law  international_economics  law-and-economics  international_political_economy  international_finance  capital_markets  investment  sovereign_debt  investor-State_disputes  FDI  dispute_resolution  arbitration  global_governance  comparative_law  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_reasoning  reform-legal  treaties  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Graber, review - Danielle Citron, Hate Crimes in Cyberspace -- Balkinization - September 2014
Citron‘s HCiC redefines as criminal behavior the repeated threats, insults, and gross violations of basic privacy norms on the internet that too many people, police in particular, regard as juvenile behavior. ...a pathbreaking study of how cultural tolerance of bullying and harassment on the internet is threatening to turn the most important contemporary forum for ideas into masculine Wild West where respect and common decency are signs of weakness rather than basic norms of conduct. HciC offers a remarkably thorough survey of the depressing state of the internet for women. The first chapters detail how women are repeatedly attacked on the internet, ... Harassment and bullying have the same impact on the internet as elsewhere. Women participate less in cyberspace, they become more generally fearful, and they lose employment and other opportunities when persons attempt to research their background in cyberspace. The second set of chapters detail problems with present efforts to stop hate crimes on the internet. The first problem is .. anonymity makes attackers difficult to identify. The second are police attitudes. Finally, laws regulating bullying, harassment and stalking were not drafted with the internet in mind. -- The last set of chapters focus on legal and social solutions to the problem of hate crimes on the internet. -- HCiC has the same ambitions as Sexual Harassment of Working Women, but its different is for more successful. McKinnon has always believed Americans need theory to understand what is wrong with sexual harassment. Citron’s assumption is that all Americans need is common sense - people should not urge that women be murdered and raped, post nude photographs of ex-girl friends on revenge porn sites, or spread malicious gossip. -- The debate over HCiC will focus on the First Amendment rights of cyberbullies, but ...the book defines constitutional rights too broadly rather than too narrowly. HciC endorses a populist understanding of the internet in which “All information should be free.” ... why Citron struggles drawing boundaries between posting nude pictures of ex-girlfriends on revenge porn websites and posting other information about ex-girlfriends on various websites that may be constitutionally protected.
books  reviews  Internet  legal_system  legal_theory  privacy  women-rights  free_speech  reform-legal  reform-social  feminism  violence 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Leo E. Strine , Nicholas Walter - Conservative Collision Course?: The Tension between Conservative Corporate Law Theory and Citizens United (Cornell Law Review, Forthcoming) - August 1, 2014 :: SSRN
Leo E. Strine Jr. - Supreme Court of Delaware; Harvard Law School; University of Pennsylvania Law School -- Nicholas Walter, Yale University -- Harvard Law School John M. Olin Center Discussion Paper No. 788 -- One important aspect of Citizens United has been overlooked: the tension between the conservative majority’s view of for-profit corporations, and the theory of for-profit corporations embraced by conservative thinkers. This article explores the tension between these conservative schools of thought and shows that Citizens United may unwittingly strengthen the arguments of conservative corporate theory’s principal rival. Citizens United posits that stockholders of for-profit corporations can constrain corporate political spending and that corporations can legitimately engage in political spending. Conservative corporate theory is premised on the contrary assumptions that stockholders are poorly-positioned to monitor corporate managers for even their fidelity to a profit maximization principle, and that corporate managers have no legitimate ability to reconcile stockholders’ diverse political views. Because stockholders invest in for-profit corporations for financial gain, and not to express political or moral values, conservative corporate theory argues that corporate managers should focus solely on stockholder wealth maximization and non-stockholder constituencies and society should rely upon government regulation to protect against corporate overreaching. Conservative corporate theory’s recognition that corporations lack legitimacy in this area has been strengthened by market developments that Citizens United slighted: that most humans invest in the equity markets through mutual funds under section 401(k) plans, cannot exit these investments as a practical matter, and lack any rational ability to influence how corporations spend in the political process. -- Keywords: Corporate governance, political spending, Citizens United, conservative corporate theory, regulatory externalities, lobbying, profit maximization, constitutional law, election law, labor law
article  SSRN  SCOTUS  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  corporate_law  corporate_governance  principal-agent  management  shareholders  shareholder_value  campaign_finance  lobbying  elections  labor_law  US_constitution  constitutional_law  public_policy  interest_groups  oligarchy  rent-seeking  investors  savings  capitalism  capital_markets  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Francis Joseph Mootz - Hermeneutics and Law (June 30, 2014) in The Blackwell Companion to Hermeneutics (Eds. Naill Keane and Chris Lawn, 2015) :: SSRN
University of the Pacific - McGeorge School of Law -- This chapter will appear in a forthcoming book on hermeneutics. After providing a hermeneutical phenomenology of legal practice that locates legal interpretation at the center of the rule of law, the chapter considers three important hermeneutical themes: (1) the critical distinction between a legal historian writing aboout a law in the past and a judge deciding a case according to the law; (2) the reinvigoration of the natural law tradition against the reductive characteristics of legal positivism by construing human nature as hermeneutical; and. (3) the role of philosophical hermeneutics in grounding critical legal theory rather than serving as a quiescent acceptance of the status quo, as elaborated by reconsidering the famous exchanges between Gadamer, Ricoeur and Habermas. -- I argue that these three important themes are sufficient to underwrite Gadamer's famous assertion that legal practice has exemplary status for hermeneutical theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  historiography  lit_crit  critical_theory  legal_reasoning  judiciary  precedent  hermeneutics  natural_law  positivism-legal  legal_realism  rhetoric-writing  human_nature  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  Gadamer  Habermas  Ricoeur  Heidegger  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
James L. Gibson, Milton Lodge, Ben Woodson - Legitimacy, Losing, But Accepting: A Test of Positivity Theory and the Effects of Judicial Symbols (March 23, 2014) :: SSRN
James L. Gibson, Washington University in Saint Louis - Dept of Political Science - Milton Lodge, State University of New York (SUNY) - Dept of Political Science - Ben Woodson, Stony Brook -- How is it that the U.S. Supreme Court is capable of getting most citizens to accept rulings with which they disagree? This analysis addresses the role of the symbols of judicial authority and legitimacy – the robe, the gavel, the cathedral-like court building – in contributing to this willingness of ordinary people to acquiesce to disagreeable court decisions. Using an experimental design and a nationally representative sample, we show that exposure to judicial symbols (1) strengthens the link between institutional support and acquiescence among those with relatively low prior awareness of the Supreme Court; (2) has differing effects depending upon levels of pre-existing institutional support; and (3) severs the link between disappointment with a disagreeable Court decision and willingness to challenge the ruling. Since symbols influence citizens in ways that reinforce the legitimacy of courts, the connection between institutional attitudes and acquiescence posited by Legitimacy Theory is both supported and explained. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  social_theory  political_science  democracy  legitimacy  legal_system  legal_culture  political_culture  power-symbolic  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen Paskey - The Law is Made of Stories: Erasing the False Dichotomy between Stories and Legal Rules (May 30, 2014) :: SSRN
SUNY Buffalo Law School -- Legal Comm. & Rhetoric: JALWD, vol. 11 (Fall 2014, Forthcoming) - SUNY Buffalo Legal Studies Research Paper No. 2014-031 -- When lawyers think of legal analysis, they think chiefly of logic and reason. Stories are secondary. As Michael Smith explains, our legal system “is not founded on narrative reasoning” but on “a commitment to the rule of law.” The article suggests that this dichotomy between “rule-based reasoning” and “narrative reasoning” is false, and that narrative and stories are central to legal reasoning, including rule-based reasoning. In doing so, the article uses literary narrative theory to show that every governing legal rule has the structure of a “stock story”: the elements of the rule correspond to elements of a story. It follows that lawyers do not rely on stories simply because they are persuasive. They do so because a story is literally embedded in the structure of governing rules, and those rules can be satisfied only by telling a story. Thus, many analytical moves we label “rule-based reasoning” can be understood as a type of narrative reasoning, in which a client’s story is compared to and contrasted with the stock story embedded in the rule. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  narrative  legal_reasoning  logic  precedent  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Hector Lewis MacQueen - Scots and English Law c.1603: Uniting or Dividing Kingdoms? (April 24, 2014) :: SSRN
University of Edinburgh - School of Law - Research Paper No. 2014/15 -- A brief discussion of how Scots and English lawyers saw their respective laws and legal systems at the time of the Union of the Crowns, when the prospect of a union of laws was also put before them. Number of Pages in PDF File: 10 -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_history  legal_system  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Scotland  Anglo-Scot  James_I  common_law  civil_law  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark S. Weiner - Imagining the Rule of Law in Nineteenth-Century Britain: Liberal Society and the Dialectic of the Clan | Academia.edu
In this essay, I provide a historical and theoretical framework for understanding the imaginative relation between the liberal rule of law and the kin-based form of socio-legal organization I call ‘the rule of the clan’ – a classic example of law created ‘from below’. I believe that a culturalist disciplinary perspective reveals that the modern liberal state and its more centralized rule of law always stand in an ironic, dialectical relation to the rule of the clan as a legal form. Liberal society nurtures itself through an anti-liberal utopian imaginary. This article provides an intellectual history backdrop for theorizing that dialectical relationship by examining two contrasting ways in which 19thC British intellectuals imagined the rule of law. Following the work of Charles Taylor and, more specifically in the legal field, Paul Kahn, my goal is to depict a social imaginary of modern liberalism that has been neglected within contemporary liberal theory – and, in doing so, provide a way to appreciate the cultural foundations of liberal legality. The article considers the stories that nineteenth-century British intellectuals told about the relation between the rule of law and the rule of the clan as a way to think about the rule of law today. It thus tacks between three different shores: the world of legal pluralism (the rule of the clan), the world of 19thC British analysis of the rule of the clan and the contemporary relation between culture and modern liberal society. Keywords: clan, rule of law, Albert Venn Dicey, Walter Scott, legal memory
article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  19thC  British_history  British_politics  memory-group  rule_of_law  clans  kinship  liberalism  modernity  Scott_Sir_Walter  English_constitution  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard J. Ross, Philip J. Stern - Reconstructing Early Modern Notions of Legal Pluralism in "Legal Pluralism and Empires, 1500-1850", ed. Lauren Benton and Richard J. Ross (2013) :: SSRN
Richard J. Ross, U. of Illinois College of Law; U. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Dept of History - Philip J. Stern, Duke History Dept -- Legal pluralism occurs when two or more legal orders exert control within a given territory or over a particular social group and yet are not part of a single hierarchical “system” under a coordinating authority. Most historical scholarship on legal pluralism concentrates on its shifting structures in local contexts and on its political and economic implications. By contrast, our essay probes historical actors’ uses of political and religious thought to justify or undermine plural legal regimes in the late 16thC through early 18thC. Historians of early modern political thought preoccupied with the rise of the modern state have lavished attention on ‘centralizing’ discourses, particularly theorists such as Bodin, Hobbes, and Pufendorf represented as champions of sovereignty. Against this tendency, we emphasize how ideological support for plural legal orders could be found in a wide range of intellectual projects. These ranged from debates over the right of resistance and the divine right of rulers, through historical work on the ancient Jewish commonwealth and theological disputes over which precepts “bound conscience,” and finally to writings on political economy and the place of family. -- The central ambition of our article is to provide an alternative historical genealogy for legal scholars of pluralism. Workaday legal pluralism did not struggle against a predominantly hostile intellectual climate. Many discourses supported pluralism. And the most emphatic theorists of a powerful singular sovereign were often responding to intellectual projects that valorized pluralism.
article  books  SSRN  intellectual_history-distorted  legal_history  legal_system  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  nation-state  centralization  central_government  sovereignty  territory  pluralism-legal  pluralism  custom  customary_law  family  state-building  political_economy  political_culture  religious_history  religious_culture  politics-and-religion  law-and-religion  canon_law  church_history  church_courts  Bodin  Hobbes  Pufendorf  natural_law  colonialism  empires  commonwealth  Hebrew_commonwealth  resistance_theory  divine_right  monarchy  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  theology  casuistry  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Historical Background - Reformation of Manners Campaigns - London Lives
Contents - The First Societies, 1690-1738 *--* 1757-63 Society *--* Opposition to Informers and Reforming Constables. *--* Legal Opposition. *--* The Proclamation Society, 1787. *--* Exemplary Lives. *--* Introductory Reading & Footnotes. -- Largely reliant on private prosecutions, the early modern criminal justice system did not facilitate the prosecution of large numbers of victimless offences such as immorality and irreligion. But despite increasing religious toleration, England in the 18thC remained a strongly Protestant country, and many people were offended by public displays of sin, not least because it was thought that such conduct led sinners down a slippery slope of increasingly criminal conduct which would lead inevitably to the gallows. The 18thC was the first great age of voluntary societies, and concerns about vice led to the formation, over the course of the century, of successive societies which aimed to suppress immorality. While members sought to promote reform through persuasion, in sermons and through the distribution of printed literature, they saw the need for coercion as well. With the Church Courts in decline, the reformers turned to the criminal justice system. Their methods attracted significant opposition, however, and the reformers frequently found themselves at the receiving end of often vexatious litigation aimed at undermining their activities. Ultimately, attempts to use the law to promote a reformation of manners were frustrated by a combination of both legal and popular opposition. The records included in this website provide evidence of both the reformers' activities and the opposition they engender.
website  18thC  British_history  British_politics  reformation_of_manners  1690s  legal_system  judiciary  crime  criminal_justice  gin_craze  Parliament  Church_of_England  church_courts  lower_orders  London  police  parish  litigation  evidence  immorality  prostitution  local_government  religious_lit  social_history  cultural_history  bibliography  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron Who Needs Rules of Recognition? by :: SSRN in THE RULE OF RECOGNITION AND THE U.S. CONSTITUTION, Matthew Adler and Kenneth Himma, eds., Oxford University Press, 2009
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 09-21 -- I argue against the idea (made popular by H.L.A. Hart) that the key to a legal system is its "rule of recognition." I argue that much of the work allegedly done by a rule of recognition is either done by a different kind of secondary rule (what Hart called "a rule of change") or it is not done at all (and doesn't have to be done). A rule of change tells us the procedures that must be followed and the substantive conditions that must be satisfied if law is to be changed legislatively; and a judge "recognizes" changes simply by using this checklist. In common law, there is no clear rule of change (because we are profoundly ambivalent about judicial lawmaking). But we get by without one, and without a determinate rule of recognition that would tell us precisely how to infer rules from precedents. It is quite liberating, really, to abandon the idea of a rule of recognition. Apart from anything else, it relieves us from having to participate in endless debates about whether the US Constitution is (or contains) a rule of recognition for American law. The Constitution contains rules of change; that's what matters. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 28 -- Keywords: certainty, closure, common law, constitution, grundnorm, H.L.A. Hart, Hans Kelsen, Jeremy Bentham, jurisprudence, legal positivism, rule of change, rule of recognition -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  legal_system  sociology_of_law  legal_validity  constitutionalism  positivism-legal  common_law  change-social  institutional_change  legislation  judiciary  precedent  judicial_review  foundationalism  US_constitution  Bentham  Hart  Kelsen  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Scott J. Shapiro - What is the Rule of Recognition (and Does it Exist)? [chapter] :: SSRN in THE RULE OF RECOGNITION AND THE U.S. CONSTITUTION, Matthew Adler, Kenneth Himma, eds., Oxford University Press, 2009
Yale Law School, Public Law Working Paper No. 184 -- One of the principal lessons of The Concept of Law is that legal systems are not only comprised of rules, but also founded on them ....we cannot account for the way we talk and think about the law - as an institution which persists over time, imposes duties and confers powers, enjoys supremacy over other kinds of practices, resolves doubts and disagreements about what is to be done in a community and so on - without supposing that it is regulated by what he called the secondary rules of recognition, change and adjudication. -- In Part 1 I try to state Hart's doctrine of the rule of recognition with some precision. -- I also explore in this part whether the US Constitution can be considered the Hartian rule of recognition for the US legal system. In Part 2 I attempt to detail the many roles that the rule of recognition plays within Hart's theory of law. -- In Part 3 I examine three important challenges to Hart's doctrine: 1) the rule is under- and over-inclusive; 2) Hart cannot explain how social practices are capable of generating rules that confer powers and impose duties and hence cannot account for the normativity of law; 3) Hart cannot explain how disagreements about the criteria of legal validity that occur within actual legal systems are possible. In Parts 4 & 5, I address these objections. ...athough Hart's particular account of the rule of recognition is flawed, a related notion should be substituted - roughly, to treat the rule of recognition as a shared plan which sets out the constitutional order of a legal system. As I try to show, understanding the rule of recognition in this new way allows the legal positivist to overcome the challenges lodged against Hart's version while still retaining the power of the original idea. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  books  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  social_theory  social_order  political_order  change-social  institutions  constitutions  constitutional_law  constitutionalism  normativity  norms  obligation  institutional_change  positivism-legal  Hart  Dworkin  Raz  Finnis  US_constitution  conflict_of_laws  natural_law  legal_validity  legal_realism  sociology_of_law  community  planning  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Oona A. Hathaway, Scott J. Shapiro - Outcasting: Enforcement in Domestic and International Law :: SSRN - Yale Law Journal, Vol. 121, No. 2, p. 252, 2011
Yale Law School, Public Law Working Paper No. 240 -- This Article offers a new way to understand the enforcement of domestic and international law that we call “outcasting.” Unlike the distinctive method that modern states use to enforce their law, outcasting is nonviolent: it does not rely on bureaucratic organizations, such as police or militia, that employ physical force to maintain order. Instead, outcasting involves denying the disobedient the benefits of social cooperation and membership. Law enforcement through outcasting in domestic law can be found throughout history - from medieval Iceland and classic canon law to modern-day public law. And it is ubiquitous in modern international law, from the World Trade Organization to the Universal Postal Union to the Montreal Protocol. Across radically different subject areas, international legal institutions use others (usually states) to enforce their rules and typically deploy outcasting rather than physical force. Seeing outcasting as a form of law enforcement not only helps us recognize that the traditional critique of international law - that it is not enforced and is therefore both ineffective and not real law - is based on a limited and inaccurate understanding of law enforcement. It also allows us to understand more fully when and how international law matters. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 98 -- Keywords: international law, treaties, World Trade Organization, Enforcement, jurisprudence
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  international_system  international_law  international_organizations  treaties  enforcement  exclusion  excommunication  cooperation  punishment  sanctions  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - A Religious View of the Foundations of International Law (2011) :: SSRN - Charles E. Test Lectures in the James Madison Program at Princeton University
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-29 -- Lecture 1 begins from a specifically Christian point of view, though it also addresses the difficulties of sustaining a viewpoint of this kind in a multi-faith and indeed increasingly secular world. Lecture 2 considers nationhood, sovereignty, and the basis for the division of the world into separate political communities. A religious approach to international order will endorse the position of most modern international jurists that sovereign independence is not to be made into an idol or a fetish, and that the tasks of order and peace in the world are not to be conceived as optional for sovereigns. But sovereigns also have their own mission, ordering particular communities of men and women. Lecture 3 considers the rival claims of natural law and positivism regarding sources of international law. The most telling part of natural law jurisprudence from Aquinas to Finnis has always been its insistence on the specific human need for positive law. This holds true in the international realm as much as in any realm of human order - perhaps more so, because law has to do its work unsupported by the overwhelming power of a particular state. Lecture 3 addresses, from a religious point of view, the sources of law in the international realm: treaty, convention, custom, precedent, and jurisprudence. It will focus particularly on the sanctification of treaties. -- No of Pages : 73 -- Keywords: customary international law, international law, ius cogens, nationalism, natural law, positivism, public reason, religion, self-determination, sovereignty, treaties -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  international_law  natural_law  positivism-legal  IR  IR_theory  diplomacy  international_organizations  legal_system  international_system  sovereignty  nation-state  nationalism  public_sphere  liberalism-public_reason  deliberation-public  decision_theory  customary_law  self-determination  national_interest  national_security  responsibility_to_protect  treaties  universalism  precedent  conflict_of_laws  dispute_resolution  human_rights  community  trust  alliances  politics-and-religion  jurisprudence  jurisdiction  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Jurisprudence for Hedgehogs (2013) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 13-45 -- The aims of this essay are, first, to present the jurisprudential position that Ronald Dworkin set out in his penultimate book, Justice for Hedgehogs (2011); and, secondly, to elaborate it a little further than Dworkin himself was able to. The position is a distinctive and interesting one. Although Professor Dworkin argued in all his earlier work that moral facts (about rights and justice) were among the truth conditions of legal propositions, now in Justice for Hedgehogs he argued that law is itself a branch of morality. This is a bolder and more radical claim and it requires some quite careful exposition to see how it might be made plausible. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 32. -- Keywords: Dworkin, law, legislation, morality, natural law, positivism, Raz, separation thesis -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  moral_philosophy  natural_law  positivism-legal  legislation  legal_validity  Raz  Dworkin  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Accountability: Fundamental to Democracy (2014, updated March 2015) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 14-13 -- This paper defends a new and aggressive version of the agency model of accountability. It argues that officials and representatives in a democracy have an obligation to make available to citizens full information about what they have been doing. It is not permissible for them to sit back and see if the citizens can find out for themselves what they have been doing, any more than such a posture would be admissible in a commercial agent such as a realtor or an accountant. The paper also does several other things: (1) it develops a contrast between agent-accountability and forensic-accountability; (2) it distinguishes between political uses of "agency" and political uses of "trust" in political theory; (3) it develops a layered account of the principals in the democratic relation of agent-accountability, rejecting the reidentification of "the people"; (4) it develops an account of the relation between accountability and elections, emphasizing that elections play an important role in the fair settlement among principals as to how they should deal with their agents; (5) it shows that Burkeian representation is not incompatible with agent-accountability; and (6) it uses the notion of agent-accountability to illuminate the distinction between non-democratic and democratic republics. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 32 -- Keywords: accountability, agency, Burke, democracy, elections, representation, republic, transparency, trust
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  constitutionalism  democracy  accountability  transparency  agents  representative_institutions  common_good  national_interest  elections  fiduciaries  trust  trusts  government-forms  governing_class  government_officials  office  Burke  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - International Law: 'A Relatively Small and Unimportant' Part of Jurisprudence? (2013) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 13-56 This paper evaluates and criticizes the account of international law given in Chapter Ten of H.L.A. Hart's book, The Concept of Law. Hart's account offers a few insights -- particularly on the relation between law and sanctions. But his account of international law is moistly quite impoverished. His observations about the absence of secondary rules (rules of change, adjudication, and recognition ) in international law are quite unjustified. His exaggeration of the difference between international law and municipal legal systems is so grotesquely exaggerated, as to deprive the former account of almost all its utility in jurisprudence. What is worse, his dismissive and misconceived account of international law has tended to drive practitioners of analytic legal philosophy away form addressing this important area of jurisprudence. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 17 -- Keywords: gnereal jurisprudence, Hart, international law, primitive legal system, rule of recognition, sanctions, secondary rules, treaties -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  international_system  international_law  sanctions  enforcement  change-social  diplomacy  treaties  international_organizations  sovereignty  institutions  continuity  legal_validity  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Does ‘Equal Moral Status’ Add Anything to Right Reason? (2011) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 11-52 -- This paper explores the possibility that the principle of basic equality might be explicated by reference to the idea that humans constitute a "single-status" community. It explores some difficulties with the idea of status in its original legal habitat. These difficulties include skepticism about status fostered by John Austin and others. The paper attempts to answer this skepticism, and it concludes (along with Jeremy Bentham, who in this respect disagreed with his disciple) that once one takes a dynamic view of a legal system, the idea of legal status is not an eliminable idea. The paper then examines the distinction between what I call "sortal-status" and "condition-status." Sortal status works from the idea that law recognizes different kinds of human being: racist and sexist legal systems are characterized by sortal-status concepts. Condition-status recognizes that persons may get into various scrapes, situations, conditions, and vicissitudes, or pass through certain stages, that are marked by status distinctions. (These include infancy, alienage, felony, bankruptcy, matriage, military service etc.) Once one makes this distinction, then the idea of a single (sortal) status society becomes a promising vehicle for expressing ideas about moral equality. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 19 -- Keywords: Austin, Bentham, equality, legal system, racial discrimination, sex discrimination, status
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  social_theory  equality  status  discrimination  social_order  civil_society  civil_liberties  Bentham  Austin_John  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Scott J. Shapiro - What is the Internal Point of View? (2006 working paper) :: SSRN
In "The Concept of Law," Hart showed that sanction-centered accounts of every stripe ignored an essential feature of law. This feature he termed the internal point of view. Seen from the internal point of view, the law is not simply sanction-threatening, directing, or predicting, but rather obligation-imposing. Though the internal point of view is perhaps Hart's greatest contribution to jurisprudential theory, this concept is also often and easily misunderstood. This is unfortunate, not only because these misreadings distort Hart's theory, but, more importantly, because they prevent us from appreciating the true infirmities of sanction-centered theories and the compelling reasons why they ought to be rejected. -- The internal point of view is the practical attitude of rule-acceptance - it does not imply that people who accept the rules accept their moral legitimacy, only that they are disposed to guide and evaluate conduct in accordance with the rules. The internal point of view plays four roles in Hart's theory: (1) it specifies a particular type of motivation that someone may take towards to the law; (2) it constitutes one of the main existence conditions for social and legal rules; (3) it accounts for the intelligibility of legal practice and discourse; (4) it provides a naturalistically acceptable semantics for legal statements. Finally, sanction-centered theories are unacceptable for three reasons: (1) they are myopic in that they ignore one of the motivations that people might have for obeying the law; (2) they are unable to account for the existence of legal systems; (3) they cannot account for the intelligibility of legal practice and discourse. --
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  intellectual_history-distorted  20thC  21stC  Hart  positivism-legal  sociology_of_law  legal_system  norms  normativity  obligation  moral_psychology  morality-conventional  moral_sentiments  punishment  reasons-internalism  reasons-externalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - The Demarcation Problem in Jurisprudence: A New Case for Skepticism :: SSRN - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Vol. 32, No. 1, Spring 2012
Legal philosophers have been preoccupied with specifying the differences between two systems of normative guidance - law and morality. Positivists such as Kelsen, Hart, and Raz propose a solution to this “Demarcation Problem” according to which the legal validity of a norm can not depend on its being morally valid, either in all or at least some possible legal systems. The proposed analysis purports to specify the essential and necessary features of law.... Yet the concept of law is an “artifact concept,” that is, a concept that picks out a phenomenon that owes its existence to human activities. Artifact concepts, even simple ones like “chair,” are notoriously resistant to analyses in terms of their essential attributes, precisely because they are hostage to human ends and purposes, and also can not be individuated by their natural properties. 20th-century philosophy of science dealt with a kindred Demarcation Problem: ...how to demarcate science from pseudo-science or nonsense. -- they sought to identify the essential properties of a human artifact (namely, science). They failed, and spectacularly so, which led some philosopher to wonder, “Why does solving the Demarcation Problem matter?” This essay develops the lessons for legal philosophy -- lest we want to become embroiled in pointless Fullerian speculations about the effects of jurisprudential doctrines on behavior, it is time to abandon the Demarcation Problem in jurisprudence. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  20thC  21stC  Logical_Positivism  linguistic_turn  concepts  analytical_philosophy  essentialism  natural_kinds  modal_logic  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  legal_system  positivism-legal  psychologism  natural_law  epistemology-social  epistemology-moral  Carnap  Hempel  Popper  Fuller  Hart  Kelsen  Raz  Finnis  normativity  moral_sentiments  reason-passions  reasons-internalism  reasons-externalism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Naturalized Jurisprudence and American Legal Realism Revisited (2011 book symposium) :: SSRN - Law and Philosophy, 2011
U of Chicago, Public Law Working Paper No. 352 -- This is my reply to critics in a symposium issue of the journal Law & Philosophy (2011) devoted to my 2007 book NATURALIZING JURISPRUDENCE: AMERICAN LEGAL REALISM AND NATURALISM IN LEGAL PHILOSOPHY. The critics to whom I respond are: Julie Dickson (Oxford University), Michael Steven Green (College of William & Mary), and Mark Greenberg (University of California, Los Angeles). -- Keywords: legal realism, naturalism, jurisprudence, methodology -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_realism  positivism-legal  naturalism  methodology  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - American Legal Realism (2002) :: SSRN
Heavily cited -- U of Texas Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 42 -- This essay sets out the main elements of the revisionary and philosophical interpretation of the jurisprudence of American Legal Realism that I have developed in a series of articles over the last decade. This reading emphasizes the commitment of all the Realists to a core descriptive claim about adjudication (judges respond primarily to the underlying facts of the cases, rather than to legal rules and reasons); shows how the Realists divide in to two camps over the correct interpretation of this "core" claim (the Idiosncyrasy Wing of Frank, and the Sociological Wing of Llewellyn, Oliphant, Moore, Green, and the vast majority of Realists); demonstrates the connection of the Sociological Wing of Realism to the Realist project of law reform, including the work of the American Law Institute; examines and distinguishes the Realist arguments for the indeterminacy of law from Critical Legal Studies arguments; and shows how the Realists lay the foundation for the program of a "naturalized" jurisprudence, in opposition to the dominant "conceptual" jurisprudence of Anglophone legal philosophy. The revisionary reading also debunks certain popular myths about Legal Realism, like the following: the Realists believed "what the judge ate for breakfast determines the decision"; a critique of the public/private distinction was a central part of Realist jurisprudence; and the Realists were committed to an incoherent form of rule-skepticism. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_realism  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  sociology_of_law  reform-legal  naturalism  concepts  analytical_philosophy  Anglo-American  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Leiter - Marx, Law, Ideology, Legal Positivism (2014) :: SSRN
This essay -- for the UVA conference on "Jurisprudence and History" -- offers an account of Marx’s theory of history and his claim that law (and morality) are "ideological," and then asks what theory of law is adequate to explain the way the Marxist theory understands law in both its ideological and non-ideological senses. In Marx's theory we need to be able to say what law is in three contexts: (1) there are the laws that constitute the relations of production, i.e., the scheme of property rights in the existing forces of production; (2) there are the laws (and associated legal beliefs, e.g., "you are entitled to equal protection of the law") that are superstructural and ideological in the pejorative sense; and (3) there are the laws that are non-ideological and superstructural because they characterize the legal relations of a non-class-based, i.e., a communist, society. I explain these different senses of law in Marx's theory and then argue that legal positivism, unlike other views about the nature of law, gives us a sensible explanation of law for purposes of the Marxist theory of historical change. That fact, in turn, gives us another data point in favor of positivism as the only serious explanation of the concept of law. -- Keywords: Iegal positivism, Marx, Hart, Dworkin Finnis, ideology -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  social_theory  historiography  historical_sociology  historiography-19thC  historiography-Marxist  historical_change  legal_history  legal_system  ideology  property  property_rights  positivism-legal  Marx  Hart  Dworkin  Finnis  natural_law  natural_rights  rights-legal  legal_culture  legal_realism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England in Four Books, vol. 2 of 2 (Books 3 & 4) (1893 ed with selected notes from prior editors ) - Online Library of Liberty
Sir William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England in Four Books. Notes selected from the editions of Archibold, Christian, Coleridge, Chitty, Stewart, Kerr, and others, Barron Field’s Analysis, and Additional Notes, and a Life of the Author by George Sharswood. In Two Volumes. (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Co., 1893). 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2142> -- A two volume edition of the classic work on English law by Blackstone. This edition is interesting because it includes the commentaries of at least 5 previous editors of Blackstone’s work along with additional notes by Sharswood, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Vol. 2 contains Book III on Private Wrongs, and Book IV on Pubic Wrongs. -- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  common_law  British_history  18thC  legal_system  legal_history  legal_reasoning 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 3 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 3. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/873> -- Vol. 3 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including many essays on aspects of medieval law and some biographical essays. Includes trusts and corporations, canon law, miscellaneous bits on Elizabethan period, especially relations with Papacy-- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  medieval_history  legal_history  legal_system  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  Elizabeth  Reformation  canon_law  Papacy  Papacy-English_relations  Church_of_England  Wales  property  property-confiscations  corporations  corporate_law  trusts  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England in Four Books, vol. 1 of 2 ( Books 1 & 2) (1893 ed with selected notes from prior editors) - Online Library of Liberty
Sir William Blackstone, Commentaries on the Laws of England in Four Books. Notes selected from the editions of Archibold, Christian, Coleridge, Chitty, Stewart, Kerr, and others, Barron Field’s Analysis, and Additional Notes, and a Life of the Author by George Sharswood. In Two Volumes. (Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Co., 1893). Vol. 1 – Books I & II. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2140> -- A two volume edition of the classic work on English law by Blackstone. This edition is interesting because it includes the commentaries of at least 5 previous editors of Blackstone’s work along with additional notes by Sharswood, the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. Vol. 1 contains the Introduction to the Study of the Laws of England, Book I Of the Rights of Persons, and Book II The Rights of Things. -- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  18thC  19thC  British_history  English_constitution  common_law  judiciary  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  Blackstone  property  property_rights  rights-legal  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, vol. 1 of 3 (1911) - Online Library of Liberty
Frederic William Maitland, The Collected Papers of Frederic William Maitland, ed. H.A.L. Fisher (Cambridge University Press, 1911). 3 Vols. Vol. 1. 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/871> -- Vol. 1 of a three volume collection of the shorter works of the great English legal historian, including in vol. 1 his “Historical Sketch of Liberty and Equality”, an essay on Herbert Spencer, and essays on aspects of medieval law -- downloaded mobi version of book scan OCR
books  etexts  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  common_law  medieval_history  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  feudalism  English_constitution  property  contracts  torts  judiciary  Spencer_Herbert  Victorian  British_history  12thC  13thC  14thC  15thC 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Albert Venn Dicey, Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution (LF ed. 1982, Roger E. Michener ed) - Online Library of Liberty
Albert Venn Dicey, Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution, ed. Roger E. Michener (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1982). 07/17/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1714> -- Liberty Fund’s edition of Dicey’s most famous work on English constitutional law in which he defended the idea of the sovereignty of parliament under an independent judiciary and the rule of law. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  legal_history  legal_system  political_philosophy  English_constitution  Parliamentary_supremacy  judicial_review  rule_of_law  constitutionalism  government-forms  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Separation of Powers or Division of Power? (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-20 - April 24, 2012 -- The rationale of the separation of powers is often elided with the rationale of checks and balances and with the rationale of the dispersal of power generally in a constitutional system. This paper however focuses resolutely on the functional sepaartion of powers in what MJC Vile called its "pure form". Rexeamining the theories of Locke, Montesquieu, and Madison, the paper seeks to recover (amidst all their tautologies and evasions) a genuine case in favor of this principle. The paper argues that the rationale of the separation of powers is closely related to that of the rule of law: it is partly a matter of the distinct integrity of each of the separated institutions (courts, legislature, and administration). But above all, it is a matter of articulated governance (as contrasted with compressed undifferentiated exercises of power). -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 34 -- Keywords: constitutionalism, constitutions, courts, legislature, Madison, Montesquieu, rule of law, separation of powers -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  legal_system  legal_history  English_constitution  US_constitution  17thC  18thC  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  government-forms  mixed_government  judiciary  judicial_review  legislature  executive  sovereignty  Locke-2_Treatises  Montesquieu  Madison  constitutionalism  limited_monarchy  limited_government  Parliamentary_supremacy  rule_of_law  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Constitutionalism: A Skeptical View (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-87 - May 1, 2012 -- This paper examines the ideology that goes by the name of "constitutionalism." The first part of the paper considers the significance of "written constitutions" The second part of the paper casts a skeptical eye at conceptions of constitutionalisim that emphasize "limited" government. Once "limited government" is contrasted carefully with "restrained government" (restraints upon specific actions by government) and with "controlled government" (e.g. insistence upon democratic control), we see that the association of constitutionalism with general limitations on the scope of government ought to make it a much more controversial ideal than the general anodyne acceptance of the term "constitutionalism" might lead us to expect. Finally, the anti-democratic implications of constitutionalism are explored. The paper argues that, by insisting on limited government, constitutionalism downplays the important role that constitutions have to perform in the modern world in establishing and securing specifically democratic authority. -- Keywords: authority, constitution, constitutionalism, constitutional law, democracy, judicial review, limited government, rights, written constitution
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  constitutionalism  government-forms  democracy  judicial_review  constitutional_law  authority  legitimacy  political_participation  rights-legal  natural_rights  limited_government  accountability  constitutions  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - Raz on Necessity (last revised 2009 ) :: SSRN - Law and Philosophy, vol. 22, pp. 537-559 (2003)
The article uses Joseph Raz's work as the starting point for a general discussion of the role of necessity and essence in jurisprudence. Analytical legal theorists commonly assert (or assume) that they are offering conceptual truths, claims regarding attributes necessarily true of all legal systems. Is it tenable to speak about necessary truths with a humanly created institution like law? Upon closer investigation, the use of necessary truths in writers like Raz and Jules Coleman clearly differs from the way such terms are used in classical metaphysics, and even in contemporary discussions of natural kind terms. Nonetheless, theorists making conceptual statements regarding law are making significant and ambitious claims that need to be defended - for example, against naturalists like Brian Leiter, who doubt the value of conceptual analysis, and normative theorists like Stephen Perry, who argue that assertions about the nature of law require value-laden moral and political choices between tenable alternatives. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  analytical_philosophy  concepts  metaphysics  modal_logic  possible_worlds  universalism  universals  natural_kinds  natural_law  moral_philosophy  morality-objective  morality-conventional  normativity  essence  naturalism  legal_realism  philosophy_of_language  Raz  positivism-legal  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - H.L.A. Hart and the Hermeneutic Turn in Legal Theory :: SSRN - Southern Methodist University Law Review, Vol. 52, pp. 167-199, 1999
Modern legal positivism developed in response to a belief in the possibility and the value of having a quasi-scientific descriptive theory of law. In recent decades, legal positivism has moved in a different direction, due to the influence of H.L.A. Hart's work, which introduced hermeneutic elements into legal positivism. This article examines the hermeneutic turn in legal theory, and its implication for legal positivism in particular, and analytical jurisprudence in general. Some critics have argued that the hermeneutic element introduced by Hart undermines the possibility of having a purely descriptive theory of law, or even that it undermines the ability of theorists to criticize the legal systems they are studying. These possibilities are considered, in the course of evaluating the views of Joseph Raz, John Finnis, Stephen Perry, H. Hamner Hill, and others. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  intellectual_history  20thC  positivism-legal  hermeneutics  social_theory  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_law  Hart  Raz  natural_law  moral_philosophy  legal_system  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - Contract Rights and Remedies, and the Divergence between Law and Morality (last revised 2011) :: SSRN - Ratio Juris, Vol. 21, No. 2, pp. 194-211, June 2008
There is an ongoing debate in the philosophical and jurisprudential literature regarding the nature and possibility of Contract theory. On one hand are those who argue (or assume) that there is, or should be, a single, general, universal theory of Contract Law, one applicable to all jurisdictions and all times. On the other hand are those who assert that Contract theory should be localized to particular times and places, perhaps even with different theories for different types of agreements. This article considers one facet of this debate: evaluating the relevance of the fact that the remedies available for breach of contract can vary significantly from one jurisdiction to another. This wide variation in remedies for breach of a (contractual) promise is one central difference between promises in morality and enforceable agreements in law. The article asserts that variation of remedies strongly supports the conclusion that there is (and can be) no general, universal theory of Contract Law. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  moral_philosophy  morality-conventional  morality-objective  natural_law  contracts  constructivism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - On the Dividing Line between Natural Law Theory and Legal Positivism :: SSRN - Notre Dame Law Review, Vol. 75, No. 5, Aug. 2000
The nature and location of the disagreement(s) between legal positivism and natural law theory has often been unclear, in large part because of the way each approach has been misunderstood by advocates for the other side. Many commentators assume that the two approaches disagree about whether immoral rules can have the status of law, but there is little evidence to support this view. Natural law theorists from Aquinas to Finnis have allowed that immoral rules are law (can have legal status), only that they are not law in its fullest sense (because such laws do not create moral obligations to obey them). The article concludes that the debate between natural law and legal positivism is joined elsewhere: regarding the meta-theoretical question of whether it is possible and valuable to have a morally neutral theory of law. Legal positivists advocate morally neutral theories, while natural law theorists like Finnis expressly or implicitly argue for a pervasively moral-evaluative theory of law, arguing that one can only understand a reason-giving practice like law against the background of what it would mean to give a good (legitimate, moral-obligation-creating) reason for action. A variation of the same argument is that one can only understand law within a (teleological) theory that gives a place for the moral ideal (justice) to which law strives. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_history  intellectual_history  natural_law  positivism-legal  positive_law  Aquinas  moral_philosophy  values  obligation  reasons  reasons-externalism  action-theory  justice  legitimacy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Natural Law Theory: The Modern Tradition by Brian Bix :: SSRN
Posted 1999 - chapter in OXFORD HANDBOOK OF JURISPRUDENCE AND PHILOSOPHY OF LAW, Jules L. Coleman & Scott Shapiro, eds., Oxford University Press, 2002 -- The works of contemporary Natural Law theorists, including Lon Fuller, Michael Moore, Ronald Dworkin, and John Finnis, are discussed critically and their views are placed within the context of a tradition thousands of years old. In the summary of the broader context, the paper considers the connections and relationships between natural law theory and nature, God, natural rights, law, and legal positivism. The article also includes an extensive (but not exhaustive) bibliography. -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  books  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_history  intellectual_history  religious_history  ancient_philosophy  medieval_philosophy  Aquinas  moral_philosophy  natural_law  natural_rights  positivism-legal  positive_law  obligation  divine_command  sociology_of_law  nature  natural_religion  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - Legal Positivism (posted 2003) :: SSRN - BLACKWELL GUIDE TO THE PHILOSOPHY OF LAW AND LEGAL THEORY, Martin P. Golding & William A. Edmundson, eds., Blackwell, 2005
This article tries to present the jurisprudential school of thought, legal positivism, within a larger context than is usual in contemporary English-language discussions of that approach: (1) showing the intellectual and political contexts in which the movement began; (2) emphasizing the variety of theories that fit under that label (e.g., how the Kelsenian tradition varies significantly from the Hartian tradition); and (3) discussing how the future development of legal positivism will depend on its discussion of wider theoretical issues (e.g., the proper approach to social theory, and the use of conceptual analysis in philosophy). The article also summarizes the main criticisms of legal positivism, and gives an overview of the internal debate of inclusive legal positivism versus exclusive legal positivism. Note: This is a description of the paper and not the actual abstract -- downloaded pdf to Note
chapter  books  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  Germany  Anglo-American  positivism-legal  Kelsen  Hart  social_theory  sociology_of_law  analytical_philosophy  concepts  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Michael Steven Green - Hans Kelsen and the Logic of Legal Systems :: SSRN 53 Alabama Law Review 365-413 (2003)
Hans Kelsen's formalism and Kantianism have been barriers to an appreciation of his work in the US. This article offers a sympathetic reading of Kelsen's approach in legal theory by drawing analogies between it and the writings of Gottlob Frege. For Frege, the subject matter of logic is the necessary relations between linguistic meanings. These relations can be seen as necessary only on the assumption that linguistic meanings are abstract objects that cannot be reduced to anything empirical. For this reason Frege rejected psychologism in logic. Like many other late-19thC anti-psychologists, Frege offered a Neo-Kantian account of how non-empirical knowledge of meanings is possible. Analogously, Kelsen argued that legal meanings are abstract objects. Kelsen proposed an analysis of the necessary relations between legal meanings - a logic of legal systems - that is similar to the Fregean logician's account of language. Kelsen offered a Neo-Kantian account of how knowledge of legal meanings is possible. Although I do not undertake to defend the details of Kelsen's approach, I hope to make his third way between empiricist and natural law theories approaches in jurisprudence more understandable and attractive to American audiences. -- Keywords: Hans Kelsen, Kant, Frege, Neo-Kantianism, logic, legal systems, jurisprudence, philosophy of law - Green now says he's happy with most of the paper except the 1st part dealing with Frege -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  19thC  20thC  intellectual_history  Germany  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  neo-Kantian  logic  Frege  meaning  philosophy_of_language  natural_law  psychologism  empiricism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Selected Writings of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard, vol. III of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 3. 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/913> -- Vol. 3 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains Coke’s speech in Parliament (inlcuding the Petiton of Right), a number of official acts related to Coke’s career, and other matters. -- also extensive bibliography, including on people and events, relevant to Coke’s career and thought -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Coke  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  Anglo-Saxons  ancient_constitution  common_law  English_constitution  Parliament  monarchy  judiciary  Absolutism  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Petition_of_Right  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Selected Writings of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard, Vol. 2 of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 2. 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/912> -- Vol. 2 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains Coke’s Speech at Norwich, excerpts from the small treatises, and excerpts from the 4 parts of the Institutes. - includes Coke on Littleton, topics such as heresy and treason -- downloaded pdf to Note
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july 2014 by dunnettreader
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern [1947] - Online Library of Liberty
Charles Howard McIlwain, Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2008). 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2145> -- Constitutionalism: Ancient and Modern explores the very roots of liberty by examining the development of modern constitutionalism from its ancient and medieval origins. Derived from a series of lectures delivered by Charles Howard McIlwain at Cornell University in the 1938–39 academic year, these lectures provide a useful introduction to the development of modern constitutional forms. -- Introduction states the "problem" beginning with Bolingbroke's definition of the Septennial Act and Whig abandonment of Revolution Principles, and Burke, Paine, arbitrary government and written constitutions. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  political_philosophy  political_history  political_culture  government-forms  constitutionalism  English_constitution  US_constitution  French_Revolution  American_Revolution  legal_system  legal_history  legal_theory  judiciary  checks-and-balances  separation-of-powers  Absolutism  representative_institutions  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  medieval_history  feudalism  monarchy  limited_monarchy  resistance_theory  social_contract  public_opinion  political_participation  reform-political  reform-legal  Bolingbroke  Revolution_Principles  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-opposition  Burke  Paine  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Cesare Bonesana di Beccaria, An Essay on Crimes and Punishments... With a Commentary by M. de Voltaire - Online Library of Liberty
Cesare Bonesana di Beccaria, An Essay on Crimes and Punishments. By the Marquis Beccaria of Milan. With a Commentary by M. de Voltaire. A New Edition Corrected. (Albany: W.C. Little & Co., 1872). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2193> -- An extremely influential Enlightenment treatise on legal reform in which Beccaria advocates the ending of torture and the death penalty. The book also contains a lengthy commentary by Voltaire which is an indication of high highly French enlightened thinkers regarded the work.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Beccaria  Voltaire  crime  criminal_justice  punishment  torture  capital_punishment  treason  heresy  tolerance  authority  church_courts  legal_history  legal_system  Absolutism  authoritarian  tyranny  reform-political  reform-legal  social_sciences  social_order  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Association of American Law Schools, Select Essays in Anglo-American Legal History, 3 vols. (1907-09) - Online Library of Liberty
Committee of the Association of American Law Schools, Select Essays in Anglo-American Legal History, by various authors, compiled and edited by a committee of the Association of American Law Schools, in three volumes (Boston: Little, Brown, and Company, 1907-09). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2080> -- A massive three volume collection of essays by leading American and English legal experts which surveys the entire body of Anglo-American law.
books  etexts  legal_history  legal_theory  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  legal_system  lawyers  judiciary  legislation  constitutionalism  US_constitution  US_legal_system  English_constitution  common_law  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard - 3 vols. set (2003) - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). 3 vols. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1884> -- A 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. Vol. 1 contains a long introduction by the editor and 13 parts of the Reports [downloaded to Note]. Vol. 2 contains Coke’s Speech at Norwich, exerpts from the small treatises, and exerpts from the 4 parts of the Institutes. Vol. 3 contains Coke’s speech in Parliament (inlcuding the Petiton of Right), a number of official acts related to Coke’s career, and other matters.
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  James_I  Charles_I  Parliament  prerogative  common_law  commonwealth  taxes  ancient_constitution  lawyers  judiciary  legal_history  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_culture  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (2003) Vol. I of 3 - Online Library of Liberty
Sir Edward Coke, The Selected Writings and Speeches of Sir Edward Coke, ed. Steve Sheppard (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2003). Vol. 1. 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/911> -- Vol. 1 of a 3 vol. set of The Selected Writings. This volume contains a long introduction by the editor and 13 parts of the Reports. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Medieval  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  English_constitution  legal_history  legal_system  legal_culture  common_law  ancient_constitution  Parliament  monarchy  commonwealth  legislation  judiciary  civil_liberties  property  property_rights  James_I  Charles_I  taxes  prerogative  Magna_Carta  lawyers  equity  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
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