dunnettreader + justice   50

Jeffrey Edward Green - Rawls and the Forgotten Figure of the Most Advantaged: In Defense of Reasonable Envy toward the Superrich (2013) | American Political Science Review on JSTOR
This article aims to correct the widespread imbalance in contemporary liberal thought, which makes explicit appeal to the "least advantaged" without parallel attention to the "most advantaged" as a distinct group in need of regulatory attention. Rawls's influential theory of justice is perhaps the paradigmatic instance of this imbalance, but I show how a Rawlsian framework nonetheless provides three justifications for why implementers of liberal justice—above all, legislators—should regulate the economic prospects of a polity's richest citizens: as a heuristic device for ensuring that a system of inequalities not reach a level at which inequalities cease being mutually advantageous, as protection against excessive inequalities threatening civic liberty, and as redress for a liberal society's inability to fully realize fair equality of opportunity with regard to education and politics. Against the objection that such arguments amount to a defense of envy, insofar as they support policies that in certain instances impose economic costs on the most advantaged with negative or neutral economic impact on the rest of society, I attend to Rawls's often overlooked distinction between irrational and reasonable forms of envy, showing that any envy involved in the proposed regulation of the most advantaged falls within this latter category. - downloaded via iphone to dbox
politics-and-money  political_participation  inequality-wealth  regulatory_capture  political_philosophy  political_culture  tax_havens  Early_Republic  inequality  estate_tax  intellectual_history  inheritance  republicanism  Plato-Republic  elites-political_influence  Jefferson  Harrington  crony_capitalism  Europe-Early_Modern  fairness  article  Aristotle  social_capital  social_theory  Rawls  social_democracy  Machiavelli  Plato  inequality-opportunity  jstor  bibliography  ancient_Rome  regulation  justice  liberalism  egalitarian  regulatory_avoidance  interest_groups  legitimacy  deliberative_democracy  political_history  class_conflict  downloaded  education-elites  social_order  elites-self-destructive  Roman_Republic  ancient_Greece  republics-Ancient_v_Modern 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Maximillian Kasy - Empirical Research on Economic Inequality -- AN OPEN ONLINE TEXTBOOK
AN OPEN ONLINE TEXTBOOK BY MAXIMILIAN KASY -- Welcome to
Empirical Research on Economic Inequality -- This textbook developed out of a class I taught at Harvard, and subsequently at IHS Wien and at the University of Zurich. The purpose of this textbook is twofold. First, to teach you about economic inequality, some of its causes, and how it is affected by policy. Second, to teach you econometric methods that have been used in the literature on economic inequality, so as to help you conduct your own research on these topics.
website  etexts  inequality  inequality-wealth  inequality-opportunity  inequality-global  econometrics  economic_sociology  justice  discrimination  distribution-income  distribution-wealth  gender  racism  1-percent  labor  unions  diversity 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
(107) NOW Published: How Hume
How Hume and Kant Reconstruct Natural Law: Justifying Strict Objectivity  without Debating Moral Realism, Clarendon Press (2016)
Front matter including both overview TOC and very detailed TOC plus introductory chapter -- He explains in the intro how both Hume and Kant (via Rousseau) pursued "moral constructivist" approaches using a (modified) "natural law" framework - after Hume had successfully attacked weaknesses in traditional approach to natural law. Notes that "justice" traditionally one of the 2 branches of moral philosophy (the other ethics). He's especially concerned with failure of "business ethics " as cause of financial crisis and Great Recession - but "business ethics" meaningless without a framework of "Justice." His target audience includes lawyers and legal/jurisprudence students and scholars - he thinks legal positivism and legal realism has run out of steam. He returns to accountancy standards in final chapter. -- pdf is the same material as kindle sample -- downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
books  legal_system  constructivism  morality-objective  justice  legal_theory  norms  accountability  legal_realism  18thC  norms-business  downloaded  moral_sentiments  moral_economy  jurisprudence  morality-conventional  legal_positivism  accounting  moral_realism  moral_psychology  Hume  kindle-available  natural_law  moral_philosophy  morality  Kant 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Poul F. Kjaer - The Function of Justification in Transnational Governance (2015) | Academia.edu
WZB Berlin Social Science Center Discussion Papers, SP IV 2015-808, 2015 - Developing a sociological informed social theory perspective, this article asks the question why social praxis’ of justification has moved to the centre-stage within the debate on transnational ordering. In contrast to perspectives which see the relationship between national and transnational forms or ordering as characterised by a zero-sum game, the coevolutionary and mutually reinforcing relationship between national and transnational forms of ordering is emphasised. It is, moreover, argued that this complementarity can be traced back to the fundamentally different function and position of national and transnational forms of ordering in world society. The widespread attempt to analyse transnational developments on the basis of concepts of law and the political which emerged in national contexts are therefore seen as problematic. Instead context adequate concepts of transnational law and politics are needed. It is on this background, that a discourse on justification has emerged in relation to transnational settings. Transnational justificatory praxis’ can be understood as functional equivalents to democracy in transnational settings in so far as both can be understood as reflexivity increasing instruments. The central difference is, however, that democratic frameworks implies an ex ante form of the political in contrast to the ex post emphasis of justificatory praxis’. In addition, law gains a central role as the framework through which justificatory praxis’ are structured in transnational settings. - downloaded pdf to Note
paper  Academia.edu  downloaded  sociology_of_law  political_sociology  nation-state  transnational_power  transnational_law  nation-state_decline  state-transnatiinal_relations  supranational_institutions  legitimacy  legitimacy-international  justice  democracy_deficit  political_participation  IR_theory  IR-domestic_politics  global_governance  regulation-harmonization  regulatory_avoidance  civil_society  NGOs  government-forms  government-roles  international_law  international_political_economy  MNCs 
may 2016 by dunnettreader
Spencer J. Pack, Eric Schliesser - Smith's Humean Criticism of Hume's Account of the Origin of Justice (2006) | Project MUSE
From: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Volume 44, Number 1, January 2006 pp. 47-63 | 10.1353/hph.2006.0004 *--* It is argued that Adam Smith criticizes David Hume's account of the origin of and continuing adherence to the rule of law for being not sufficiently Humean. ["Humean" is used for his tendency to use proto-evolutionary explanations of social phenomena in terms of psychological and material factors acting on individuals rather than rationalistic explanations] Hume explained that adherence to the rule of law originated in the self-interest to restrain self-interest. [Treatise 3.2.2,13-14, 316] [Smith says Hume's account is "too refined - TMS II, ii.3.5 ] According to Smith, Hume does not pay enough attention to the "unsocial" passion of resentment and the passion of admiration, which have their source in the imagination. Smith's offers a more naturalistic and evolutionary account [more Humean than Hume] of the psychological pre-conditions of the establishment and morality of justice. Yet, Smith's account also makes room for a thin conception of Lockean natural right to property, while rejecting the contractualist and rationalistic elements in Locke. It emerges that Smith severs the intimate connection that Hobbes and Hume made between justice and property. - paywall
article  paywall  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  human_nature  18thC  Smith  Hume  justice  passions  imagination  resentment  property  property_rights  self-interest  Hobbes  self-protection  Locke-2_Treatises  natural_law  natural_rights 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
« Lectures. », Mil neuf cent. Revue d'histoire intellectuelle 1/2013 (n° 31) , p. 159-184 - Cairn.info
Titres recensés -- Jacques Julliard, Les gauches françaises, 1762-2012. Histoire, politique et imaginaire, Paris, Flammarion, 2012, 942 p.
Nathalie Richard, Hippolyte Taine. Histoire, psychologie, littérature, Classiques Garnier, 2013, 316 p.
Jean Jaurès, Œuvres, XIII, L’armée nouvelle, Jean-Jacques Becker (ed.), Paris, Fayard, 2013, 574 p.
Olivier Cosson, Préparer la Grande Guerre. L’armée française et la guerre russo-japonaise (1899-1914), Paris, Éd. Les Indes savantes, 2013, 380 p.
Géraldi Leroy, Charles Péguy. L’inclassable, Paris, Armand Colin, 2014, 366 p.
Gabriel Tarde, Sur le sommeil. Ou plutôt sur les rêves, Jacqueline Carroy, Louise Salmon (eds.), Lausanne, Éd. BHMS, 2009, 223 p.
Émile Durkheim, Hobbes a? l’agre?gation. Un cours d’E?mile Durkheim suivi par Marcel Mauss, Paris, Éd. de l’EHESS, coll. « Audiographie », 2011, 64 p.
Michel Murat, Frédéric Worms (eds.), Alain, littérature et philosophie mêlées, Paris, Éd. Rue d’Ulm-Presses de l’École normale supérieure, 2012, 221 p.
Frédéric Audren, Christian Chêne, Nicolas Mathey, Arnaud Vergne (eds.), Raymond Saleilles et au-delà, Paris, Dalloz, coll. « Thèmes
human_rights  representative_institutions  ultramontane  WWII  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  WWI  entre_deux_guerres  elites  philosophy-French  radicals  laïcité  socialism  France  anarchism  class_conflict  pre-WWI  republicanism  education  reviews  post-WWII  anti-clericalism  French_Revolution-impact  political_history  political_culture  political_press  materialism  political_philosophy  liberalism  democracy  French_intellectuals  French_Revolution  French_lit  social_theory  books  intellectual_history  cultural_history  political_participation  historiography-19thC  historiography  social_history  education-higher  20thC  Fin-de-Siècle  downloaded  social_sciences  Catholics-France  Bonapartism  justice  rule_if_law  19thC 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Victoria Kahn - Job's Complaint in "Paradise Regained" (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Fall, 2009), pp. 625-660 - reading Milton’s commitment to separation of church and state, against a renewal of an integrated political theology, as also a message for the individual's relation with approaching the reading of scripture -- looks like a link between her work on Milton in Wayward Contracts and her vocal program against reading imperatives of a political theology back into secularization history -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  politics-and-religion  politics-and-literature  English_lit  17thC  Milton  Restoration  Church_of_England  religion-established  religious_culture  religious_belief  Bible-as-literature  Job  New_Testament  theodicy  justice  justification  Satan  political-theology  secularism  freedom_of_conscience  temptation  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Symposium on Jack Russell Weinstein’s "Adam Smith’s Pluralism: Rationality, Education And The Moral Sentiments" | Cosmos + Taxis, Vol2, Issue 3, 2015
Rather than a classic intellectual_history of Adam Smith, Weinstein’s aim is to use Smith to reinvigorate modern liberalism -- Introduction to Symposium - Nathaniel Wolloch *--* Context-dependent Normativity and Universal Rules of Justice - María Alejandra Carrasco. **--** “… but one of the multitude”. Justice, Pluralism and Rationality in Smith and Weinstein… - Lisa Herzog. **--** The Dynamics of Sympathy and the Challenge of Creating New Commonalities - Dionysis Drosos. **--** The “Spectator” and the Impartial Spectator in Adam Smith’s Pluralism - Spiros Tegos **--** Was Adam Smith an Optimist? - Maria Pia Paganelli. **--** The Political Hypotheses of Adam Smith’s Pluralism: A response to my commentators - Jack Russell Weinstein -- downloaded pdf to Note
journal  article  political_philosophy  political_economy  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  liberalism  Smith  justice  pluralism  emergence  social_order  sympathy  empathy  morality-conventional  moral_sentiments  downloaded 
august 2015 by dunnettreader
Florent Guénard & Hélène Landemore - Entretien avec Jon Elster - La Vie des idées - 2 juillet 2008.
Florent Guénard & Hélène Landemore , « Le tirage au sort, plus juste que le choix rationnel. Entretien avec Jon Elster », La Vie des idées, 2 juillet 2008. -- Video - transcript downloaded as pdf to Note
social_theory  social_sciences  social_sciences-post-WWII  French_moralists  17thC  Tocqueville  rational_choice  rationality-economics  justice  justice-retributive  fairness  Elster  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Forum - Samuel Moyn's "Christian human rights" - overview page | The Immanent Frame
In 2010, Samuel Moyn published The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History, which offered an alternative historical explanation for the origins of human rights. He rejected narratives that viewed human rights as a long-term historical product of the Judeo-Christian tradition, The French Revolution, or Enlightenment rationalism, arguing that human rights as it is now understood began to emerge only during the 1970s. Prior to this, according to Moyn, rights were connected to the nation-state and had nothing to do with an international standard of morality or justice. In addressing critiques of The Last Utopia, Moyn has given considerable attention to the relationship between human rights and religion, conceding that there is, undoubtedly, a relationship between Christianity—Catholicism in particular—and human rights, but arguing that the “death of Christian Europe” by the 1960s “forced a complete reinvention of the meaning of human rights embedded in European identity both formally and really since the war”. Contributors offer their thoughts on Moyn’s article “Personalism, Community, and the Origins of Human Rights,” which became a central focus (see excerpt) in his forthcoming book, Christian Human Rights (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015). Contributors also respond to “Christian Human Rights,” the introductory essay written for this series. -- downloaded pdfs but their footnotes and links don't work, so collected them in Evernote them
books  intellectual_history  narrative-contested  bad_history  intellectual_history-distorted  religious_history  church_history  moral_philosophy  theology  human_rights  natural_rights  medieval_philosophy  Europe-Medieval  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Enlightenment-ongoing  French_Revolution  IR  Europe  20thC  WWI  WWII  entre_deux_guerres  post-Cold_War  post-colonial  nation-state  genocide  Holocaust  UN  international_law  natural_law  law_of_nations  law_of_the_sea  justice  jurisprudence  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  political_culture  democracy  equality  liberty  Christendom  Judeo-Christian  links  Evernote 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
POPE PAUL VI - Populorum Progressio (March 26, 1967) - ENCYCLICAL ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF PEOPLES | Vatican
The progressive development of peoples is an object of deep interest and concern to the Church. This is particularly true in the case of those peoples who are trying to escape the ravages of hunger, poverty, endemic disease and ignorance; of those who are seeking a larger share in the benefits of civilization and a more active improvement of their human qualities; of those who are consciously striving for fuller growth. -- downloaded pdf to Note
religious_history  20thC  post-WWII  Catholics  Papacy  Vatican_II  religious_belief  religious_culture  social_thought  social_problem  social_theory  modernity  poverty  inequality  justice  development  progress  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Frederick Schauer - The Path-Dependence of Legal Positivism (Symposium - Jurisprudence and (Its) History) | Virginia Law Review - 101 Va. L. Rev. 957 (2015)
My aim in this Article is to focus on the history of thinking about law in the context of 3 topics (..) to show that the continuous development of the theory of legal positivism, however useful it may have been or may still be, has possibly caused us to ignore other aspects of what was originally part of the positivist picture. (..)The first of these dimensions is the relationship between legal theory and legal reform. (..) that an account of the nature of law might be developed not simply as an aid to understanding or accurate description, but instead as a way of facilitating reform of law itself or reform of how a society understands the idea of law. Second, legal positivism, at the time of its late 19thC (or perhaps even earlier) origins, was focused on the importance of coercion, force, and sanctions as central components of law. But as with the creation of legal theories for the purpose of legal reform, this emphasis on the coercive side of law has also been banished to a kind of jurisprudential purgatory, for reasons and with consequences that deserve further examination. The third lost element of earlier versions of legal positivism is its focus on judicial decision making and the role of judges. Modern legal positivists, for whom 1961 is all too often the beginning of useful thought about the nature of law, do not, with few exceptions, consider theories of judicial decision making to be a necessary or even important part of the positivist perspective. But it was not always so. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  legal_theory  legal_system  political_philosophy  legal_reform  institutional_change  institutions  judiciary  judicial_review  law_enforcement  criminal_justice  punishment  coercion  authority  obligation  policymaking  political_change  social_theory  social_sciences  positivism-legal  positive_law  positivism  justice  Study_and_Uses  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Lisa Herzog Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel, and Political Theory (OUP 2013) | The Book Depository
Inventing the Market: Smith, Hegel, and Political Theory analyses the constructions of the market in the thought of Adam Smith and Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel and discusses their relevance for contemporary political philosophy. Combining the history of ideas with systematic analysis, it contrasts Smith's view of the market as a benevolently designed 'contrivance of nature' with Hegel's view of the market as a 'relic of the state of nature.' The differences in their views of the market are then connected to four central themes of political philosophy: identity, justice, freedom, and history. The conceptualization of the labour market as an exchange of human capital or as a locus for the development of a professional identity has an impact on how one conceptualizes the relation between individual and community. Comparing Smith's and Hegel's views of the market also helps to understand how social justice can be realized through or against markets, and under what conditions it makes sense to apply a notion of desert to labour market outcomes. For both authors, markets are not only spaces of negative liberty, but are connected to other aspects of liberty, such as individual autonomy and political self-government, in subtle and complex ways. Seeing Smith's and Hegel's account of the market as historical accounts, however, reminds us that markets are no a-historical phenomena, but depend on cultural and social preconditions and on the theories that are used to describe them. The book as a whole argues for becoming more conscious of the pictures of the market that have shaped our understanding, which can open up the possibility of alternative pictures and alternative realities. -- see 3AM interview April 2015
books  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  Smith  Hegel  political_philosophy  political_economy  economic_history  economic_theory  economic_sociology  economic_culture  social_theory  liberty  liberty-negative  autonomy  labor  Labor_markets  social_order  justice  identity  self-government  self-development  self-interest  self-fashioning  state-of-nature  Providence  invisible_hand 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Katia Weidenfeld, review - Absolutism and Its Judges - Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice. France (XIIIe-XXe siècle). Vol.1: L’idéologie de la magistrature ancienne | January 2010 Books & ideas
Reviewed: Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice. France (XIIIe-XXe siècle). Vol.1: L’idéologie de la magistrature ancienne, Gallimard, NRF, Paris, nov. 2009. 326 pp., 22 euros. -- Translated by Arthur Goldhammer with the support of the Fondation Maison des Sciences de l’Homme -- Jacques Krynen shows, in an excellent overview, that judicial power was not a recent invention: in the Old Regime, high court judges already claimed a share of royal power. This erudite yet accessible book thus revises the myth of absolutism. What about other magistrates and lawyers? -- review of Volume 2 (1789-2010) hasn't been translated -- downloaded both pdfs to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  France  political_history  legal_system  legal_history  judiciary  political_order  Ancien_régime  monarchy  Absolutism  separation-of-powers  Parlement  lawyers  lawmaker  judicial_review  government-forms  government_officials  justice  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Katia Weidenfeld, review -- Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice, France XIIIe-XXe siècle. Tome 2 : L’emprise contemporaine des juges (1789-2011) | Sept 2012 - La Vie des idées
Recensé : Jacques Krynen, L’État de justice, France XIIIe-XXe siècle. Tome 2 : L’emprise contemporaine des juges, Paris, Gallimard, 2012, 432 p., 26 €. -- -- Poursuivant la fresque entreprise dans le premier tome, Jacques Krynen nous invite, avec ce deuxième tome de l’État de justice, à parcourir l’histoire judiciaire de la France pendant la période contemporaine (1789-2011). -- She also reviewed the first volume which covers the high magistrates relation with the monarchy in the Ancien Régime (translated into English by Arthur Goldhammer) -- downloaded both pdfs to Note
books  reviews  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  France  political_history  legal_system  legal_history  judiciary  political_order  Ancien_régime  monarchy  separation-of-powers  Parlement  lawyers  lawmaker  judicial_review  government-forms  government_officials  justice  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Roger Cotterrell - Why Jurisprudence Is Not Legal Philosophy :: SSRN - January 24, 2014
Via Brian Tamanaha -- Roger Cotterrell, Queen Mary University of London, School of Law -- Jurisprudence, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2014, Forthcoming - Queen Mary School of Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 169/2014 -- The aim of this paper is to describe and defend jurisprudence as an enterprise of theorising about law that is distinct from what is now understood as legal philosophy in the Anglophone world. Jurisprudence must draw on legal philosophy but also from many other resources. It should be an open quest for juristically (rather than philosophically) significant insights about law. Its purpose is to inform and guide the juristic task of making organised social regulation a valuable practice, rooted and effective in the specific contexts and historical conditions in which it exists but also aimed at serving demands for justice and security through regulation, as these perennial values are understood in their time and place, and as they might be further clarified and reconciled as legal ideals. - Number of Pages: 18 -- Keywords: Jurisprudence; legal philosophy; contemporary legal positivism; universalism; legal naturalism; law in context; socio-legal perspectives; bricolage; jurists. -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  jurisprudence  judiciary  legal_theory  legal_culture  justice  legal_realism  legal_reasoning  universalism  natural_law  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Mike Konczal, review essay - Selling Fast: Public Goods, Profits, and State Legitimacy | Boston Review - November 10, 2014
Nicholas R. Parrillo, Against the Profit Motive: The Salary Revolution in American Government, 1780–1940, Yale University Press, $55 (paper) -- Dana Goldstein, The Teacher Wars: A History of America’s Most Embattled Profession, Doubleday, $26.95 (cloth) -- Radley Balko, Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forces, PublicAffairs, $17.99 (paper) -- Adam Smith was not the first, but he was certainly one of the most eloquent defenders of justice delivered according to the profit motive (..)since courts could charge fees for conducting a trial, each court would endeavor, “by superior dispatch and impartiality, to draw to itself as many causes as it could.” Competition meant a judge would try “to give, in his own court, the speediest and most effectual remedy which the law would admit, for every sort of injustice.” Left unsaid is what this system does to those who can’t afford to pay up. Our government is being remade in this mold—the mold of a business. The past thirty years have seen massive, outright privatization of government services. Meanwhile the logic of business, competition, and the profit motive has been introduced into what remains. But for those with a long enough historical memory, this is nothing new. Through the first half of our country’s history, public officials were paid according to the profit motive, and it was only through the failures of that system that a fragile accountability was put into place during the Progressive Era. One of the key sources of this accountability was the establishment of salaries for public officials who previously had been paid on commission.
books  reviews  kindle-available  US_government  US_society  governance  legitimacy  accountability  inequality  justice  privatization  US_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  competition  profit  Gilded_Age  Progressive_Era  civil_society  civil_liberties  US_constitution  Evernote  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas R. Wells, “Recovering Adam Smith’s ethical economics”| real-world economics review, issue no. 68, 21 August 2014, pp. 90-97 | Real-World Economics Review Blog
Justice was thus central to Smith’s critique of the crony capitalism of his time, and to his alternative proposal of a “system of natural liberty” characterised both by a level playing field (the responsibility of political institutions) and a commitment to “fair play” (the moral responsibility of economic actors). The quotation above is often taken to indicate Smith’s rejection of the interests of the poor by ruling out the kind of redistributive policies found in a modern welfare state as akin to a referee changing the results of a game to favour one “team” over another. Yet that misses Smith’s commitment to procedural fairness, which introduces a concern that the rules of the game—the institutional arrangements that decide who should get what share of the gains of economic activity—should themselves be fair. If a country’s economy creates great wealth but the share going to the workers versus the owners of capital is kept artificially low by unfair institutions—such as restrictions on workers’ ability to bargain (WN I.viii.13)—that is a gross injustice which keeps the country less prosperous than it ought to be. Smith thus appears a more radical critic of the structural origins of economic inequality than many today on the political left. In Smith’s time no less than in our own, a political commitment to a free society and a free economy does not imply that we should simply accept our existing socio-economic institutional arrangements (cf Grusky 2012). On the contrary, it implies rigorous scrutiny and reform.
article  intellectual_history  political_economy  Smith  busisness-ethics  justice  Labor_markets  rent-seeking  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
KATRINA FORRESTER -- CITIZENSHIP, WAR, AND THE ORIGINS OF INTERNATIONAL ETHICS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, 1960–1975 (2014). | The Historical Journal, 57, pp 773-801. - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
KATRINA FORRESTER - St John's College, Cambridge -- This article examines a series of debates about civil disobedience, conscription, and the justice of war that took place among American liberal philosophers, lawyers, and activists during the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War. It argues that these debates fundamentally reshaped American political philosophy, by shifting the focus from the welfare state to the realm of international politics. In order to chart this transition from the domestic to the international, this article focuses on the writings of two influential political theorists, John Rawls and Michael Walzer. The turn to international politics in American political philosophy has its origins, in part, in their arguments about domestic citizenship. In tracing these origins, this article situates academic philosophical arguments alongside debates among the American public at large. It offers a first account of the history of analytical political philosophy during the 1960s and 1970s, and argues that the role played by the Vietnam War in this history, though underappreciated, is significant. -* I would like to thank Duncan Bell, Kenzie Bok, Christopher Brooke, Adam Lebowitz, Peter Mandler, Jamie Martin, Samuel Moyn, Andrew Preston, David Runciman, Tim Shenk, Brandon Terry, Mira Siegelberg, Joshua Specht, and two anonymous reviewers for their comments
article  paywall  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  analytical_philosophy  20thC  US_politics  US_foreign_policy  post-WWII  Vietnam_War  citizenship  civil_liberties  IR-liberalism  IR-domestic_politics  IR_theory  liberalism  Rawls  Walzer  power  power-asymmetric  justice  welfare_state  just_war  moral_philosophy  US_government  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
"Toward a Radical Integral Humanism: MacIntyre’s Continuing Marxism" by Jeffery L. Nicholas
Jeffery L. Nicholas, Providence College -- I argue that we must read Alasdair MacIntyre’s mature work through a Marxist lens. I begin by discussing his argument that we must choose which God to worship on principles of justice, which, it turns out, are ones given to us by God. I contend that this argument entails that we must see MacIntyre’s early Marxist commitments as given to him by God, and, therefore, that he has never abandoned them in his turn to Thomistic-Aristotelianism. I examine his reading of Marx, with its emphasis on the concept of alienation as a Christian concept, and explain how this reading differs from the dominant scientific-determinist reading of Marx. This examination then leads to a discussion of why MacIntyre abandoned both Marxism and Christianity in 1968. Finally, I turn to his more recent writing on Marx. I contend that if we view them through his argument about the principles of justice and which God to worship, we see MacIntyre’s mature philosophy as more Marxist than most people, perhaps even MacIntyre himself, would allow. -- Jeffery L. Nicholas. "Toward a Radical Integral Humanism: MacIntyre’s Continuing Marxism" Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia (2014): 223-241. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  modernity  cultural_critique  humanism  Marxist  MacIntyre  human_nature  Thomism  Aristotelian  virtue_ethics  justice  natural_law  divine_command  human_rights  self-interest-cultural_basis  self  alienation  moral_psychology  social_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
"CORRECTIVE JUSTICE AND THE REVIVAL OF JUDICIAL VIRTUE" by Mark C. Modak-Truran
Mark C. Modak-Truran, Mississippi College School of Law -- Aristotle's discussion of corrective justice has been generally thought to mark the beginning of the philosophical examination of tort law. Many scholars also consider corrective justice, of one form or another, the main normative alternative to the economic analysis of law. Most discussions of Aristotle’s conception of corrective justice in the law review literature, however, have failed to account for the established reading of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics as proposing a teleological form of ethics. Accordingly, Corrective Justice and the Revival of Judicial Virtue argues for a teleological interpretation of Aristotle's conception of corrective justice. The teleological conception of corrective justice does not attempt to analyze corrective justice merely as a formal (Weinrib), substantive (Wright), or political (Heyman) conception of equality or freedom that can be applied by technical reason to various circumstances. Rather, it maintains that corrective justice is a moral virtue of the judge that cannot be fully understood without specifying its relationship to practical wisdom and the telos of the good life. Under this reading, Aristotle’s conception of corrective justice specifies a method of judicial decision making whereby only the practically wise (i.e., morally virtuous) judge can know the content of corrective justice in all cases. Judging requires moral virtue not technical, philosophical or legal, expertise. Consequently, this article advocates a revival of Aristotle’s notion that judicial virtue requires moral virtue. -- Mark C. Modak-Truran. "CORRECTIVE JUSTICE AND THE REVIVAL OF JUDICIAL VIRTUE" Yale Journal of Law and the Humanities 12.2 (2000): 249-298. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  philosophy_of_law  moral_philosophy  Aristotle  virtue_ethics  phronesis  eudaimonia  justice  torts  law-and-economics  civic_virtue  judiciary  juddgment-moral  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-political  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Socioeconomic Rights and Theories of Justice (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-79 -- This paper considers the relation between theories of justice (like John Rawls’s theory) and theories of socio-economic rights. In different ways, these two kinds of theory address much the same subject-matter. But they are quite strikingly different in format and texture. Theories of socio-economic rights defend particular line-item requirements: a right to this or that good or opportunity (e.g., housing, health care, education, social security). Theories of justice tend to involve a more integrated normative account of a society’s basic structure (though they differ considerably among themselves in their structure). So how exactly should we think about their relation? The basic claim of the paper is that we should strive to bring these two into closer relation with one another, since it is only in the context of a theory of justice that we can properly assesses the competition that arises between claims of socio-economic right and other claims on public and private resources. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 31 -- Keywords: Nozick, Rawls, justice, human rights, rights, scarcity, socioeconomic rights
paper  SSRN  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  philosophy_of_law  liberalism  libertarianism  social_order  norms  moral_economy  poverty  human_rights  inequality  Rawls  Nozick  property  common_good  commons  capitalism  political_economy  justice  power-asymmetric 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - Political Political Theory: An Oxford Inaugural Lecture (2012) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 12-26 -- "Inaugural Lecture" for the Chichele Professorship of Social and Political Theory. -- Political theorists study (1) political virtue, (2) political processes and institutions, and (3) political ideals (like justice, liberty, and equality). Since the time of Hume, Madison, and Kant, it has been thought that (2) is more important than (1), because maybe we can set up institutions that work for the general good whatever the state of virtue of the people... But in the revival of political philosophy heralded by Rawls in 1971, there has been great emphasis on (3) and not nearly enough on (2)... particularly in the UK. Chichele chair -holders G.A. Cohen and Isaiah Berlin focused almost exclusively on (3) -- with Berlin announcing that political philosophy was really just the study of "the ends of life." -- I argue for a reorientation of political theory teaching and scholarship back towards institutions -- particularly the normative evaluation of the political process and the exploration of institutional principles like democracy, representation, bicameralism, the rule of law, the separation of powers, federalism and so on. ..these issues should not be left to empirical or comparative politcial science, because they raise important and complex questions of evaluation that may be sold short by the pragmatic and consequentialist emphasis of empirical and comparative work. But political theory should respect the empirical study of institutions more than it does, and it should dovetail the normative and evaluative work that political theory involves with the understanding of institutions, processes, and practices that political science generates. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  political_philosophy  political_science  human_nature  social_theory  institutions  government-forms  governmentality  constitutions  constitutionalism  constitutional_law  institution-building  institutional_change  political_change  political_participation  political_culture  Arendt  Berlin_Isaiah  Hume  Hume-politics  Hume-historian  comparative_history  political_order  legitimacy  democracy  separation-of-powers  checks-and-balances  legislature  executive  judicial_review  justice  civic_virtue  dignity  egalitarian  rule_of_law  citizenship  education-civic  federalism  social_process  socialization  civil_liberties  Founders  Madison  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - On the Dividing Line between Natural Law Theory and Legal Positivism :: SSRN - Notre Dame Law Review, Vol. 75, No. 5, Aug. 2000
The nature and location of the disagreement(s) between legal positivism and natural law theory has often been unclear, in large part because of the way each approach has been misunderstood by advocates for the other side. Many commentators assume that the two approaches disagree about whether immoral rules can have the status of law, but there is little evidence to support this view. Natural law theorists from Aquinas to Finnis have allowed that immoral rules are law (can have legal status), only that they are not law in its fullest sense (because such laws do not create moral obligations to obey them). The article concludes that the debate between natural law and legal positivism is joined elsewhere: regarding the meta-theoretical question of whether it is possible and valuable to have a morally neutral theory of law. Legal positivists advocate morally neutral theories, while natural law theorists like Finnis expressly or implicitly argue for a pervasively moral-evaluative theory of law, arguing that one can only understand a reason-giving practice like law against the background of what it would mean to give a good (legitimate, moral-obligation-creating) reason for action. A variation of the same argument is that one can only understand law within a (teleological) theory that gives a place for the moral ideal (justice) to which law strives. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  legal_system  legal_theory  legal_history  intellectual_history  natural_law  positivism-legal  positive_law  Aquinas  moral_philosophy  values  obligation  reasons  reasons-externalism  action-theory  justice  legitimacy  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Brian Bix - Robert Alexy's Radbruch Formula, and the Nature of Legal Theory (2006) :: SSRN
Rechtstheorie, Vol. 37, pp. 139-149, 2006 -- Minnesota Legal Studies Research Paper 06-13 -- Gustav Radbruch is well known for a formula that addresses the conflict of positive law and justice, a formula discussed in the context of the consideration of Nazi laws by the courts in the post-War German Federal Republic, and East German laws in the post-unification German courts. More recently, Robert Alexy has defended a version of Radbruch's formula, offering arguments for it that are different from and more sophisticated than those that were adduced by Radbruch himself. Alexy also placed Radbruch's formula within a larger context of conceptual analysis and theories about the nature of law. Both Radbruch and Alexy claim that their positions are incompatible with legal positivism, and therefore count as a rejection (and perhaps, refutation) of it. This paper, presented at a Conference on the work of Gustav Radbruch, looks at Radbruch's formula and Alexy's version of it. It focuses not so much on the merit of the Radbruch-Alexy formula, as on its proper characterization, and its appropriate placement within the larger context of legal philosophy. The particular focus is the methodological question of what Radbruch and Alexy's formulations - and their strengths and weaknesses - can show us about the nature of theorizing about law. -- Keywords: Robert Alexy, Gustav Radbruch, legal positivism, natural law theory, nature of law, conceptual theories, unjust laws -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  intellectual_history  20thC  post-WWII  Germany  social_sciences-post-WWII  Nazis  analytical_philosophy  concepts  natural_law  moral_philosophy  positivism-legal  sociology_of_law  justice  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Lord Kames, Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion [1779], ed. Mary Catherine Moran - Online Library of Liberty
Henry Home, Lord Kames, Essays on the Principles of Morality and Natural Religion, Corrected and Improved, in a Third Edition. Several Essays Added Concerning the Proof of a Deity, Edited and with an Introduction by Mary Catherine Moran (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2005). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1352> -- The Essays is commonly considered Kames’s most important philosophical work. In the first part, he sets forth the principles and foundations of morality and justice, attacking Hume’s moral skepticism and addressing the controversial issue of the freedom of human will. In the second part, Kames focuses on questions of metaphysics and epistemology to offer a natural theology in which the authority of the external senses is an important basis for belief in the Deity. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Kames  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  free_will  metaphysics  epistemology  epistemology-moral  scepticism  justice  virtue  Hume-ethics  natural_religion  empiricism  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Ryan Patrick Hanley - Enlightened Nation Building: The "Science of the Legislator" in Adam Smith and Rousseau | JSTOR: American Journal of Political Science, Vol. 52, No. 2 (Apr., 2008), pp. 219-234
Rousseau is famous as an advocate of the politics of "denaturing." But attention to his conception of the "science of the legislator," as developed in the Geneva Manuscript and his writings on Poland and Corsica, reveals a more moderate approach to statecraft. Here Rousseau claims that legislative science requires tempering commitment to principles of political right with sensitivity to actual political conditions-a claim that importantly and unexpectedly parallels the better known account of the science of the legislator developed by Adam Smith. In comparing these conceptions, this article draws three conclusions: first, Smith's and Rousseau's shared moderation reveals their common commitment to accommodating the passions and prejudices of modernity; second, their fundamental difference concerns not practical legislative methods but rather differing conceptions of natural justice and political right; and finally, their prudential approach to legislation helps clarify the specific types of "moderation" and "intelligence" required of contemporary nation builders. -- see bibliography -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Smith  Rousseau  nation-state  institution-building  political_culture  political_science  political_economy  modernity  natural_law  natural_rights  liberty  justice  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kristen Irwin, review - Nicholas Wolterstorff, The Mighty and the Almighty: An Essay in Political Theology // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Jan 2014
The Mighty and the Almighty takes on the task of theorizing a political theology for the Christian. [T]his book originated in his 1998 Stone Lectures at Princeton... [and] retains both the advantages and the disadvantages of its original lecture format: astonishingly clear and accessible, but a relatively light sketch ...Despite the specifically Christian orientation of his project, Wolterstorff asks for the attention of the nonreligious: "In a participatory democracy such as ours, it's important that we each be open with and open to our fellow citizens concerning the deep sources of how we think about political issues". -- Though political theology is not nearly so popular as in the days of Augustine or Calvin -- two of Wolterstorff's foils -- Wolterstorff argues that it's overdue for careful contemporary consideration.-- a substantive account of the relationship between political authority and divine authority. -- The most innovative part of the book is Wolterstorff's use of the above distinction to offer a rereading of Romans 13... Rather than counseling universal submission to civil authorities, Wolterstorff argues, Paul is counseling submission to civil authorities insofar as they are executing "the God-assigned task of government to curb injustice. . . . to protect the rights of the public". Government clearly has the positional authority to issue whatever directives it deems appropriate to its citizens, but insofar as its directives violate justice or the rights of the public, government forfeits its performance-authority. The corollary is that "the directives that the government issues to the public for the purpose of curbing injustice are binding". -- In other words, the political authority of the state as the institution responsible for "protecting members of the public from being wronged by their fellows" can be derived both from natural rights, and from divine authority.
books  reviews  kindle-available  political_philosophy  political-theology  liberalism  liberalism-public_reason  authority  obligation  natural_rights  Early_Christian  Paul  Augustine  Calvinist  resistance_theory  passive_obedience  justice  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Kelly Sorensen, review - Nicholas Wolterstorff, Terence Cuneo (ed.), Understanding Liberal Democracy: Essays in Political Philosophy // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews // Sept 2013
Public reason liberalism -- the form of liberalism defended by Rawls, Larmore, Audi, Gaus, Rorty, Nussbaum, and to some degree Habermas -- usually requires citizens to publicly discuss and vote based on only those reasons that pass some sort of test that sifts away religious and comprehensive non-religious reasons. In the public sphere, those with such views are required by the role of citizenship to shape up or shut up -- "shape up" in the sense of offering instead reasons that can or could be shared by all other citizens. Nicholas Wolterstorff argues that public reason liberalism is a dead end, and defends instead what he takes to be a more defensible form of liberalism ("equal political voice liberalism"). His book is fresh and compelling, and an important contribution to political philosophy. This is a collection of 15 mostly new essays: Ten concern public reason liberalism. The rest take up the nature of rights (extending the account he has been developing in Justice: Rights and Wrongs and Justice in Love), the nature and source of citizens' political obligations to the state, and other issues in political philosophy. Wolterstorff calls his alternative form of liberal democracy "equal political voice liberalism," and he thinks it better accounts for the "governing idea" found in the longer historical tradition of liberalism, before public reason liberalism seized the spotlight in recent decades.
books  reviews  political_philosophy  liberalism  public_sphere  politics-and-religion  citizens  liberalism-public_reason  Rawls  Habermas  Rorty  justice  obligation  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
Andrew Mason - Rawlsian Theory and the Circumstances of Politics | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 5 (October 2010), pp. 658-683
Builds on recent critique of "ideal" theory -- Can Rawlsian theory provide us with an adequate response to the practical question of how we should proceed in the face of widespread and intractable disagreement over matters of justice? Recent criticism of ideal theorizing might make us wonder whether this question highlights another way in which ideal theory can be too far removed from our non-ideal circumstances to provide any practical guidance. Further reflection on it does not show that ideal theory is redundant, but it does indicate that there is a need for a non-ideal theory that does not consist simply in an account of how to apply the principles which are yielded by ideal theory to non-ideal circumstances in the light of what is feasible and an assessment of the costs of implementation. Indeed any non-ideal theory that can adequately address this question will have to be partially autonomous, drawing on a notion of legitimacy that is rather different to the one which lies at the heart of Rawlsian ideal theory. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  social_theory  critical_theory  moral_philosophy  ideal_theory  legitimacy  liberalism  Rawls  justice  impartiality  conflict  pluralism  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Richard J. Arneson, review essay - The Priority of the Right Over the Good Rides Again - Brian Barry, A Treatise on Social Justice, Vol. 2, Justice as Impartiality | JSTOR: Ethics, Vol. 108, No. 1 (Oct., 1997), pp. 169-196
Very lengthy discussion of post Rawls attempts to ground liberalism in some sort of impartial proceduralism - Barry seems to rely on Scanlon who claims his contractualism has substantive content and isn't utilitarianism -- Arneson looks to be highly sceptical -- useful for sorting out those political_philosophy debates -- didn't download
books  reviews  article  jstor  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  liberalism  contractualism  utilitarianism  practical_reason  justice  impartiality  pluralism  intellectual_history  Rawls  20thC  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Amy Gutmann, review essay - Communitarian Critics of Liberalism | JSTOR: Philosophy & Public Affairs, Vol. 14, No. 3 (Summer, 1985), pp. 308-322
Reviewed work(s): Liberalism and the Limits of Justice. by Michael Sandel; Morality and the Liberal Ideal. by Michael Sandel; After Virtue. by Alasdair MacIntyre; Is Patriotism a Virtue. by Alasdair MacIntyre; Strong Democracy: Participatory Politics for a New Age. by Benjamin Barber; Atomism. by Charles Taylor; Powers, Possessions and Freedom: Essays in Honor of C. B. MacPherson. by Akis Kontos; "The Diversity of Goods," in Utilitarianism and Beyond. by Amartya Sen; Bernard Williams; Knowledge and Politics. by Roberto Mangabeira Unger; Spheres of Justice. by Michael Walzer -- heavily cited -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  reviews  jstor  articles  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  liberalism  liberalism-republicanism_debates  communitarian  political_participation  democracy  justice  individualism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Vivienne Brown - "Rights" in Aristotle's "Politics" and "Nicomachean Ethics"? | JSTOR: The Review of Metaphysics, Vol. 55, No. 2 (Dec., 2001), pp. 269-295
Follows up lengthy debates (especially Review of Metaphysics symposium in mid 1990s) - she argues that rights weren't part of Greek political or ethical theories re justice etc. -- useful for lit survey as well as how she sees Politics and Nicomachean Ethics working together or leaving some things not addressed --didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  Aristotle  natural_rights  human_rights  justice  civic_virtue  bibliography  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Nadia Urbinati - Unpolitical Democracy | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 38, No. 1 (February 2010), pp. 65-92
This paper analyzes critically the appeal the unpolitical is enjoying among contemporary political philosophers who are democracy's friends. Unlike a radical critique of democracy, what I propose to call "criticism from within," takes the form of dissatisfaction with the erosion of an independent mind and impartial judgment per effect of the partisan character of democratic politics. This paper proposes three main criticisms of the actual trend toward unpolitical views of democracy: the first points to the strategic use of deliberation as an antidote against democratic procedures themselves (like voting and majority rule); the second to the negative conception of democracy that the unpolitical aspiration makes visible; and the third to the dissolution of political judgment within a model of judgment that is tailored around justice. -- her 2012 article (still paywall) looks more interesting - extending the debate over participation to Renaissance and Early Modern including Harrington, Sidney etc -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  neo-republicanism  political_participation  deliberation-public  parties  partisanship  justice  majoritarian  Pettit  Habermas  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Livesey - The Dublin Society in 18thC Irish Political Thought | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 47, No. 3 (Sep., 2004), pp. 615-640
Through an analysis of the debate between Charles Davenant (1701 essay) in England, and Arthur Dobbs, Thomas Prior, and Samuel Madden in (1720s and 1730s) Ireland, it establishes that the founders saw the society as a response to Ireland's dependent status in the emerging British empire. The Dublin Society distinguished itself from other improving societies in the British Isles because it explicitly represented a new principle of sociality. The article describes the cultural origins of that principle arguing that a diverse set of groups converged on the ideal of association as a new form of order. The article concludes with a consideration of Madden's understanding, derived from his commitment to improving associations, that Irish national life was best understood as the pursuit of happiness rather than justice or virtue. -- huge bibliography -- Davenant essay important for Bolingbroke's views -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_philosophy  political_economy  political_culture  18thC  Ireland  improvement  Dublin_Society  sociability  clubs  urbanization  urban_elites  civic_virtue  justice  utilitarianism  happiness  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Sharon R. Krause - Hume and the (False) Luster of Justice | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 32, No. 5 (Oct., 2004), pp. 628-655
The close connection between norms and motives that is characteristic of Hume's moral theory threatens to break down when it comes to the political matter of justice. Here a gap arises between the moral approval of justice, which is based on its utility, and the desires that motivate just action, which utility cannot fully explain. Therefore the obligation to justice may seem to be motivationally unsupported. This difficulty is compounded by the fact that, for Hume, no obligation can arise unless a normally effective motivation exists for it. In addition to disabling just action, then, the motivational deficit threatens to undercut the normative status of justice as a virtue. A solution to this dilemma lies in what Hume calls the "immediately agreeable" condition of "integrity" or "character." The agreeableness of integrity indirectly confers upon justice a luster that makes it attractive and obligatory even when it does not actually serve the interests of individual or society, and when self-interest and sympathy fall short in sustaining compliance. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  18thC  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  moral_sentiments  justice  character  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Winfried Fluck - Fiction and Justice | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 34, No. 1 (Winter, 2003), pp. 19-42
Not an essay on the purported "ethical turn" in literary and cultural studies -- instead thesis that part of the ever growing appetite over the last several centuries for the novel reflects interest in social and individual justice.
article  jstor  cultural_history  literary_history  lit_crit  novels  sensibility  justice  Nussbaum  sympathy  18thC  19thC  20thC  postmodern  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader

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