dunnettreader + influence-literary   9

Brooke Holmes; W. H. Shearin, eds. - Dynamic Reading: Studies in the Reception of Epicureanism - Oxford University Press
(..) examines the reception history of Epicurean philosophy through a series of eleven case studies, (..). Rather than attempting to separate an original Epicureanism from its later readings and misreadings, this collection studies the philosophy together with its subsequent reception, focusing in particular on the ways in which it has provided terms and conceptual tools for defining how we read and respond to texts, artwork, and the world more generally. *--* Introduction, Brooke Holmes and W. H. Shearin -- 1. Haunting Nepos: Atticus and the Performance of Roman Epicurean Death, W. H. Shearin -- 2. Epicurus's Mistresses: Pleasure, Authority, and Gender in the Reception of the Kuriai Doxai in the Second Sophistic, Richard Fletcher -- 3. Reading for Pleasure: Disaster and Digression in the First Renaissance Commentary on Lucretius, Gerard Passannante -- 4. Discourse ex nihilo: Epicurus and Lucretius in 16thC England, Adam Rzepka -- 5. Engendering Modernity: Epicurean Women from Lucretius to Rousseau, Natania Meeker -- 6. Oscillate and Reflect: La Mettrie, Materialist Physiology, and the Revival of the Epicurean Canonic, James Steintrager -- 7. Sensual Idealism: The Spirit of Epicurus and the Politics of Finitude in Kant and Hölderlin, Anthony Adler -- 8. The Sublime, Today?, Glenn Most -- 9. From Heresy to Nature: Leo Strauss's History of Modern Epicureanism, Benjamin Aldes Wurgaft -- 10. Epicurean Presences in Foucault's The Hermeneutics of the Subject, Alain Gigandet -- 11. Deleuze, Lucretius, and the Simulacrum of Naturalism, Brooke Holmes
books  kindle-available  intellectual_history  Latin_lit  literary_history  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Epicurean  Lucretius  influence-literary  reception  Renaissance  reader_response  readership  reading  16thC  English_lit  materialism  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  La_Mettrie  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  Kant-aesthetics  Kant  Hölderlin  poetry  sublime  naturalism  Strauss  Foucault  Rousseau  Deleuze  lit_crit  new_historicism  subjectivity  finitude  death  literature-and-morality  literary_theory  postmodern  modernity  modernity-emergence  pleasure 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Maggie Kilgour - Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid (2012) | Oxford University Press
Milton and the Metamorphosis of Ovid contributes to our understanding of the Roman poet Ovid, the Renaissance writer Milton, and more broadly the transmission and transformation of classical traditions through history. It examines the ways in which Milton drew on Ovid's oeuvre, as well as the long tradition of reception that had begun with Ovid himself, and argues that Ovid's revision of the past, and especially his relation to Virgil, gave Renaissance writers a model for their own transformation of classical works. Throughout his career Milton thinks through and with Ovid, whose stories and figures inform his exploration of the limits and possibilities of creativity, change, and freedom. Examining this specific relation between two very individual and different authors, Kilgour also explores the forms and meaning of creative imitation. Intertexuality was not only central to the two writers' poetic practices but helped shape their visions of the world. While many critics seek to establish how Milton read Ovid, Kilgour debates the broader question of why does considering how Milton read Ovid matter? How do our readings of this relation change our understanding of both Milton and Ovid; and does it tell us about how traditions are changed and remade through time?
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  Renaissance  English_lit  influence-literary  imitation  Virgil 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Craig Kallendorf - The Other Virgil: 'Pessimistic' Readings of the Aeneid in Early Modern Culture | Oxford University Press
"The Other Virgil" tells the story of how a classic like the Aeneid can say different things to different people. As a school text it was generally taught to support the values and ideals of a succession of postclassical societies, but between 1500 and 1800 a number of unusually sensitive readers responded to cues in the text that call into question what the poem appears to be supporting. This book focuses on the literary works written by these readers, to show how they used the Aeneid as a model for poems that probed and challenged the dominant values of their society, just as Virgil had done centuries before. Some of these poems are not as well known today as they should be, but others, like Milton's Paradise Lost and Shakespeare's The Tempest, are; in the latter case, the poems can be understood in new ways once their relationship to the 'other Virgil' is made clear. -- no pbk, but shows ebook available
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Virgil  epic  politics-and-literature  16thC  17thC  18thC  English_lit  Shakespeare  Milton  influence-literary  imitation  poetry 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Elaine Fantham - Ovid's Metamorphoses (2004) | Oxford University Press
Oxford Approaches to Classical Literature (Series Editors: Kathleen Coleman and Richard Rutherford) introduces individual works of Greek and Latin literature to readers who are approaching them for the first time. Each volume sets the work in its literary and historical context, and aims to offer a balanced and engaging assessment of its content, artistry, and purpose. A brief survey of the influence of the work upon subsequent generations is included to demonstrate its enduring relevance and power. All quotations from the original are translated into English. Ovid's Metamorphoses have been seen as both the culmination of and a revolution in the classical epic tradition, transferring narrative interest from war to love and fantasy. This introduction considers how Ovid found and shaped his narrative from the creation of the world to his own sophisticated times, illustrating the cruelty of jealous gods, the pathos of human love, and the imaginative fantasy of flight, monsters, magic, and illusion. Elaine Fantham introduces the reader not only to this marvelous and complex narrative poem, but to the Greek and Roman traditions behind Ovid's tales of transformation and a selection of the images and texts that it inspired.
books  kindle-available  Latin_lit  literary_history  Ovid  ancient_Rome  epic  poetry  ancient_Greece  Greek_lit  ancient_religions  gods-antiquity  imitation  influence-literary 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Rita Felski - "Context Stinks!" | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 42, No. 4 (AUTUMN 2011), pp. 573-591
This essay draws on the work of Bruno Latour to question conventional methods of "historicizing" and "contextualizing" works of art. Context is typically equated with original historical context, and the act of historicizing a text becomes a matter of linking it to other texts and events in the same slice of time. Such historicist approaches, I argue, cannot account for the transtemporal movement of texts, their ability to resonate across different periods, and the ways in which they speak to us now. Moreover, traditional models of context and its correlates (society, power, ideology, etc.) tend to downplay or actively deny the agency of artworks. What if we were to think of these artworks as nonhuman actors who modify states of affairs by making a difference? Such an approach calls on us to recognize the specificity of works of art as well as their sociability and wordliness. Artworks are not heroic actors engaged in endless opposition, subversion, and resistance; rather they are coactors and codependents, enmeshed in multiple attachments and associations that enable them to survive. -- Project MUSE
article  jstor  paywall  Project_MUSE  historiography  literary_history  literary_theory  art_history  historicism  contextualism  influence-literary  influence-art  Latour  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
André Gendre - La Pléiade entre Bembo et l’Arioste | Italique, VI, 2003, p. 7-36
Italique [En ligne], VI | 2003, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.134 **--** L’imitation, en matière de poésie amoureuse par exemple, n’implique pas toujours la reconnaissance, fût-elle éphémère, d’une doctrine philosophique, d’une expérience commune, d’une affinité de sentiments ; elle est souvent comme un masque du sens qu’on emprunte pour le rendre ensuite. Elle correspond aussi à une séduction formelle momentanée. Ces pratiques aléatoires paraissent condamner la recherche d’une influence très particulière exercée sur nos poètes. Il est vrai que la Pléiade ne choisit souvent Bembo ou l’Arioste que pour leurs lieux communs pétrarquistes.Mais ces modèles sont trop grands poètes pour ne pas déterminer plus spécifiquement ceux qu’ils inspirent. -- Plan -- La sérénité néo-platonicienne de bembo. -- Le pittoresque de bembo -- L’arioste stimul. -- l’imaginaire sensuel des poètes de la pléiade. -- L’arioste et le portrait érotique. -- L’arioste inspire des imitations variées. -- Les Azolains éclairent-ils la composition des recueils français ? -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  Renaissance  Italy  France  Italian_lit  poetry  poetics  Ariosto  Bembo  French_lit  Pléiade  imitation  influence-literary  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Jean Balsamo - « Qual l’alto Ægeo... » : Montaigne et l’essai des poètes italiens | Italique, XI, 2008, p.109-129.
Italique [En ligne], XI | 2008, mis en ligne le 01 février 2012, DOI : 10.4000/italique.213. **--** La poésie est l’expression privilégiée de l’émotion pour Montaigne.1Il cite tout au long des Essais d’innombrables vers, par lesquels il exprime tout ce que sa prose ne peut dire. Ces citations contribuent à un effet d’hétérogénéité stylistique et linguistique, qui définit l’originalité même du livre, dans le cadre d’une « rhétorique des citations » et d’une esthétique de la surprise et de la varietas. Ces vers sont en latin pour la plupart d’entre eux, constituant une véritable anthologie, d’Ovide et de Virgile, cités dès le chapitre 2 du premier livre, à Horace, qui conclut le dernier chapitre du livre III. Montaigne cite également 70 vers de poètes italiens. Ces fragments en langue italienne sont plus importants que les vers français, si l’on excepte, dans les trois premières éditions, le recueil des 29 sonnets d’Etienne de La Boétie, qui constitue à lui seul la matière d’un chapitre dédié à la comtesse de Guiche. La langue italienne, sous le règne de Henri III, était un signe de distinction. De tels vers étaient l’expression ostentatoire d’une culture mondaine, que le livre partageait avec ses lecteurs, dames et gentilshommes dont Montaigne voulait être le pédagogue sans pédantisme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  French_lit  Italian_lit  Latin_lit  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  poetry  poetics  vernacular  epic  epigrammes  prose  style-philosophy  Montaigne  intertextual  influence-literary  elite_culture  Petrarch  Ariosto  Dante  Virgil  Tasso  Lucretius  Seneca  Pléiade  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Gabriele Bucchi - Au delà du tombeau: Pyrame et Thisbé dans deux réécritures de la Renaissance italienne | Italique, XIII, 2010, p. 53-80
Italique [En ligne], XIII | 2010, mis en ligne le 23 juin 2014, URL : http://italique.revues.org/282 ; DOI : 10.4000/italique.282 *--* La fable de Pyrame et Thisbé tirée des Métamorphoses d’Ovide (iv 55-166) fut pendant le Moyen Âge et la Renaissance une des plus connues parmi celles du poème latin. -- je voudrais prendre en considération deux réécritures, parues à une année de distance l’une de l’autre dans deux recueils poétiques de la Renaissance italienne: la Favola di Piramo e Tisbe des Amori di Bernardo Tasso (1534) et du poème du même titre paru une année plus tard dans les Rime toscane (1535) du mystérieux «Amomo», un poète italien exilé en France, que Nicole Bingen a récemment proposé d’identifier avec le Napolitain Antonio Caracciolo. -- je souhaiterais mettre en évidence la présence d’intertextes qui opèrent dans la réécriture de l’auteur classique. En effet, tout en restant dans un dialogue privilégié avec le texte latin, les deux auteurs se montrent néanmoins sensibles aux suggestions d’autres textes en langue vulgaire qui s’étaient à leur tour inspirés des Métamorphoses. C’est le cas, comme on le verra, de la paraphrase de Boccace dans le De claris mulieribus et surtout de deux épisodes de l’Orlando Furioso, dont le modèle se révèle (surtout pour Amomo) un vrai paradigme pour la scène de l’adieu des amants in articulo mortis. Finalement, je voudrais suggérer une lecture parallèle de l’épisode des funérailles de Clorinde dans la Gerusalemme liberata de Torquato Tasso (xii) avec un passage de la fable ovidienne réécrite par son père. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  Italian_lit  16thC  Renaissance  vernacular  Ovid  imitation  intertextual  Tasso  Boccaccio  Ariosto  fable  poetry  poetics  literary_history  influence-literary  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader

related tags

15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  ancient_Greece  ancient_philosophy  ancient_religions  ancient_Rome  Ariosto  article  art_history  Bembo  bibliography  Boccaccio  books  Byron  canon  Coleridge  contextualism  cultural_change  cultural_history  Dante  death  Deleuze  downloaded  Edinburgh_Review  EF-add  elite_culture  English_lit  Enlightenment  epic  Epicurean  epigrammes  fable  finitude  Foucault  France  French_Enlightenment  French_lit  gender  gender_history  German_Idealism  gods-antiquity  Greek_lit  Hazlitt_William  historicism  historiography  Hölderlin  imitation  influence-art  influence-literary  intellectual_history  intertextual  Italian_lit  Italy  Jeffrey_Francis  jstor  Kant  Kant-aesthetics  Keats  kindle-available  Latin_lit  Latour  La_Mettrie  literary_history  literary_journals  literary_theory  literature-and-morality  lit_crit  lit_survey  Lucretius  materialism  Milton  modernity  modernity-emergence  Montaigne  naturalism  new_historicism  Ovid  paywall  Petrarch  pleasure  Pléiade  poetics  poetry  politics-and-literature  postmodern  Project_MUSE  prose  readership  reader_response  reading  reception  Renaissance  revues.org  Romanticism  Roman_Empire  Roman_Republic  Rousseau  Seneca  Shakespeare  Shelley  Strauss  style-philosophy  subjectivity  sublime  Tasso  vernacular  Virgil  Wordsworth 

Copy this bookmark:



description:


tags: