dunnettreader + imagination   22

Petersen
How do modern individuals form a sense of the vast societies in which they live? Social cognition has evolved to make sense of small, intimate social groups; but in complex mass societies, comparable vivid social cues are scarcer. Extant research on political attitudes and behavior has emphasized media and interpersonal networks as key sources of cues. Extending a classical argument, we provide evidence for the importance of an alternative and internal source: imagination. With a focus on social welfare, we collected survey data from two very different democracies; the United States and Denmark, and conducted several studies using explicit, implicit, and behavioral measures. By analyzing the effects of individual differences in imagination, we demonstrate that political cognition relies on vivid, mental simulations that engage evolved social and emotional decision-making mechanisms. It is in the mind's eye that vividness and engagement are added to people's sense of mass politics. - didn't download
political_spectacle  moral_psychology  jstor  images-political  imagined_communities  political_science  article  imagination  symbols-political  political_culture  social_psychology  mass_culture  discourse-political_theory  comparative_politics  politics-and-aesthetics  political_sociology  bibliography  political_press 
july 2017 by dunnettreader
Spencer J. Pack, Eric Schliesser - Smith's Humean Criticism of Hume's Account of the Origin of Justice (2006) | Project MUSE
From: Journal of the History of Philosophy, Volume 44, Number 1, January 2006 pp. 47-63 | 10.1353/hph.2006.0004 *--* It is argued that Adam Smith criticizes David Hume's account of the origin of and continuing adherence to the rule of law for being not sufficiently Humean. ["Humean" is used for his tendency to use proto-evolutionary explanations of social phenomena in terms of psychological and material factors acting on individuals rather than rationalistic explanations] Hume explained that adherence to the rule of law originated in the self-interest to restrain self-interest. [Treatise 3.2.2,13-14, 316] [Smith says Hume's account is "too refined - TMS II, ii.3.5 ] According to Smith, Hume does not pay enough attention to the "unsocial" passion of resentment and the passion of admiration, which have their source in the imagination. Smith's offers a more naturalistic and evolutionary account [more Humean than Hume] of the psychological pre-conditions of the establishment and morality of justice. Yet, Smith's account also makes room for a thin conception of Lockean natural right to property, while rejecting the contractualist and rationalistic elements in Locke. It emerges that Smith severs the intimate connection that Hobbes and Hume made between justice and property. - paywall
article  paywall  intellectual_history  moral_philosophy  human_nature  18thC  Smith  Hume  justice  passions  imagination  resentment  property  property_rights  self-interest  Hobbes  self-protection  Locke-2_Treatises  natural_law  natural_rights 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Kathleen Lennon - Imagination and the Imaginary // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - July 2015
Kathleen Lennon’s new monograph joins a growing number of studies reclaiming the imagination from the dominance of a rationalist positivism.It marks the steps…
Instapaper  books  reviews  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Cartesian  Kant  Hume  imagination  self  phenomenology  Sartre  Merleau-Ponty  rationalist  perception  epistemology  creativity  positivism  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Michael Symes, The English Rococo Garden (2011) | Shire Publications
Delightful, eccentric, capricious, bizarre - the English Rococo garden, an intriguing branch of eighteenth-century horticulture, was all these and more. This book relates the components of the Rococo garden to movements in art and architecture that had developed in Britain and in Europe, and shows its particular appeal to amateur designers and owners. It was an expression of a period in time, following Baroque and neo-Palladian and anticipating Romanticism in its sense of freedom. Most of the enchanting scenes depicted in Thomas Robins’ watercolours have disappeared, but there are many garden buildings from the period that survive. The styles which overlap with Rococo - Gothic, chinoiserie, rustic - are also considered here, as is the use of flowers, rocks and shells. The principal designers are also profiled, including Sanderson Miller and Thomas Wright. **--** Introduction. *-* Rocks and shells *-* Garden sculpture. *-* Flowers and serpentines. *-* ’Twickenhamshire’ rococo. *-* Thomas Robins and Thomas Wright. *-* Gothic. *-* Chinoiserie. *-* Sanderson Miller. *-* Rococo ensembles. *-* The rococo garden: Painswick and Hampton Court House. *-* Further reading. *-* Gardens to visit. **--** Paperback; July 2011; 80 pages; ISBN: 9780747806257
books  18thC  British_history  cultural_history  elite_culture  architecture  gardens  Gothic_revival  Rococo  country_homes  country_house  Pope_Alexander  landscape  botany  Chinoiserie  Orientalism-Enlightenment  natural_history  imagination 
march 2015 by dunnettreader
Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright, eds. - Romanticism, History, and the Possibilities of Genre Re forming Literature 1789–1837 (2006 pbk) | Cambridge University Press
Tilottama Rajan, University of Western Ontario and Julia M. Wright, Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia **--** Romanticism has often been associated with lyric poetry, or otherwise confined within mainstream genres. As a result, we have neglected the sheer diversity and generic hybridity of a literature that ranged from the Gothic novel to the national tale, from monthly periodicals to fictionalized autobiography. In this new volume some of the leading scholars of the period explore the relationship between ideology and literary genre from a variety of theoretical perspectives. The introduction offers a fresh examination of how genre was rethought by Romantic criticism. **--** Introduction Tilottama Rajan and Julia M. Wright **--** Part I. Genre, History, and the Public Sphere: 1. Godwin and the genre reformers: on necessity and contingency in romantic narrative theory - Jon Klancher *-* 2. Radical print culture in periodical form - Kevin Gilmartin *-* 3. History, trauma, and the limits of the liberal imagination: William Godwin's historical fiction - Gary Handwerk *-* 4. Writing on the border: the national tale, female writing, and the public sphere - Ina Ferris. **--** Part II. Genre and Society: 5. Genres from life in Wordsworth's art: Lyrical Ballads 1798 - Don Bialostosky *-* 6. 'A voice in the representation': John Thelwall and the enfranchisement of literature - Judith Thompson *-* 7. 'I am ill-fitted': conflicts of genre in Elisa Fenwick's Secresy - Julia M. Wright *-* 8. Frankenstein as neo-Gothic: from the ghost of the couterfeit to the monster of abjection - Jerrold E. Hogle **--** Part III. Genre, Gender, and the Private Sphere: 9. Autonarration and genotext in Mary Hays' Memoirs of Emma Courtney - Tilottama Rajan *-* 10. 'The science of herself': scenes of female enlightenment - Mary Jacobus *-* 11. The failures of romanticism Jerome McGann -- downloaded pdfs of front matter and excerpt to Note
books  English_lit  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  philosophy_of_history  British_history  British_politics  genre  1790s  1800s  1810s  1820s  radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  reform-political  reform-social  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  literary_journals  literary_history  national_ID  nationalism  national_tale  narrative  narrative-contested  Hunt_Leigh  censorship  Hazlitt_William  Godwin_Wm  historical_fiction  historical_change  necessity  contingency  women-intellectuals  authors-women  social_order  public_sphere  private_life  lower_orders  Shelley_Mary  imagination  magazines  newspapers  gender  gender_history  Wordsworth  poetry  Napoleonic_Wars-impact  Romanticism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Gary Lachman on Iain McGilchrist, The Master and His Emissary - Oppositional Thinking | The Los Angeles Review of Books 2013
Gary Lachman on Iain McGilchrist, The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World -- But even if you don't accept McGilchrist's thesis, the book is a fascinating treasure trove of insights into language, music, society, love, and other fundamental human concerns. One of his most important suggestions is that the view of human life as ruthlessly driven by "selfish genes" and other "competitor" metaphors may be only a ploy of left brain propaganda, and through a right brain appreciation of the big picture, we may escape the remorseless push and shove of "necessity." I leave it to the reader to discover just how important this insight is. Perhaps if enough do, we may not have to settle for what's left when there's no right.
books  reviews  kindle-available  history_of_science  neuroscience  psychology  phenomenology  mind  mind-body  creativity  imagination  mechanism  holism  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  21stC  technology 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack Miles - Tilting Against Naïve Materialism: On Thomas Nagel's "Mind and Cosmos" | The Los Angeles Review of Books - Feb 2013
Nagel is a professed scientific realist. He does not put scientific knowledge in scare quotes. He believes that reason is reliable and that science does engage reality. But when an account of the origin of reason that links it entirely to reproductive success has this self-subversive corollary, he chooses to trust reason and question the account rather than trust the account and question reason.Here, for this reviewer, is the core challenge, the core disturbance, of this challenging and intentionally disruptive work. Mind and Cosmos, which has been taken as an oblique defense of creationism, is actually a defense of reason. Yet it is also a fabulous effort of the imagination. The place of imagination, of fantasy, even of dream-life in the history of human thought is a large one. Nagel admits that he is not a scientist, but it would call for imagination and not just analysis for a scientist in any given field to begin thinking past contemporary science as a whole toward the contours of what might someday succeed it. Unless one is a scientific Whig, one must strongly suspect that something someday will indeed succeed it. Nagel’s Mind and Cosmos does not build a road to that destination, but it is much to have gestured toward a gap in the hills through which a road might someday run. -- Swift would agree
books  reviews  kindle-available  philosophy_of_science  evolutionary_biology  evolution  Darwinism  Nagel  reason  epistemology  teleology  monism  panpsychic_monism  materialism  reductionism  truth  Swift  historiography-Whig  history_of_science  consciousness  mind  cosmology  imagination  creativity  human_nature  evo_psych  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Devin Henry - Berkeley's Passive Mind | Minerva Vol 4, 2000
The question this paper is intended to answer is, ‘Can the existence of ideas of sense be reconciled with the nature of God within the context of Berkeley’s philosophy?’ The way Berkeley characterises the immediate perception of ideas of sense (how we first come to be furnished with ideas) entails that the mind is passive: ideas of sense are those which are "actually imprinted on the senses" (PR 1). Thus, the question we need to address is, ‘In what sense is the mind passive?’ The main thesis of this paper holds that the existence of ideas of sense is incompatible with God’s nature within Berkeley’s philosophy, and it is based on the assumption that for Berkeley, perception is the passive reception of ideas of sense. However, because there are obvious textual discrepancies between the notebooks on the one hand, and the Principles and Dialogues on the other, we must allow for two possible interpretations of "passive": passive qua inactive and passive qua receptive. Pursuing the consequences of both these interpretations will take up the majority of this paper. However, I will begin by taking a brief look at an historical example of the ‘directional error’ before turning to Berkeley’s own theory of perception. -- Online journal, no pdf for download
intellectual_history  18thC  Berkeley  epistemology  mind  perception  ideas-theories  God-attributes  imagination  empiricism  realism  idealism  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Transcendental Aesthetics: The Language of Sense (Chapter 2) - Paul L. Sawyer - Ruskin's Poetic Argument: The Design of the Major Works (1985) | Victorian Web
Focus on Ruskin's first major work, defending Turner. Discusses Ruskin's mode of seeing landscape (Ruskinian sublime), starting with gestalt, then intense attention to detail and connections among them, with third stage the whole again but now informed by the energy in which the details create a whole that is a moment, extended by viewing, of divine nature. Distinguishes a Lockean empiricism that's limited to subject v object and extension by association with a more Aristotelian perception that grasps essences from surface particulars. The sort of hermeneutic circle from whole to parts to transformed whole breaks down a bunch of dualisms. Ruskin rejected the sublime as a useful aesthetic concept - confusion re whether experience of observer or character or feature of the object. Similarly imagination and artistic creativity weren't separately theorized by Ruskin.
books  etexts  19thC  Ruskin  aesthetics  art_history  art_criticism  English_lit  perception  painting  Turner  neoclassical  empiricism  imagination  sublime  Coleridge  Wordsworth 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Anthony J. La Vopa - The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer" from Luther to Kant | JSTOR - Huntington Library Quarterly (1997)
The Philosopher and the "Schwärmer": On the Career of a German Epithet from Luther to Kant -- Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 60, No. 1/2, Enthusiasm and Enlightenment in Europe, 1650-1850 (1997), pp. 85-115 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  religious_culture  religious_belief  enthusiasm  Pietist  Reformation  politics-and-religion  sectarianism  Luther  Kant  imagination  rationality  rational_religion  clergy  authority  self  self-knowledge  self-control  public_sphere  public_disorder  status  downloaded 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Rebecca M. Wilkin - Essaying the Mechanical Hypothesis: Descartes, La Forge, and Malebranche on the Formation of Birthmarks | JSTOR: Early Science and Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2008), pp. 533-567
This essay examines the determination by Cartesians to explain the maternal imagination's alleged role in the formation of birthmarks and the changing notion of monstrosity. Cartesians saw the formation of birthmarks as a challenge through which to demonstrate the heuristic capacity of mechanism. Descartes claimed to be able to explain the transmission of a perception from the mother's imagination to the fetus' skin without having recourse to the little pictures postulated by his contemporaries. La Forge offered a detailed account stating that the failure to explain the maternal imagination's impressions would cast doubt on mechanism. Whereas both characterized the birthmark as a deformation or monstrosity in miniature, Malebranche attributed a role to the maternal imagination in fashioning family likenesses. However, he also charged the mother's imagination with the transmission of original sin. -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  theology  science-and-religion  17thC  mechanism  reproduction  mothers  imagination  original_sin  monstrosity  Descartes  Malebranche  Cartesian  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jonathan Lamb - Imagination, Conjecture, and Disorder | Eighteenth-Century Studies -2011
Project MUSE - Jonathan Lamb. "Imagination, Conjecture, and Disorder." Eighteenth-Century Studies 45, no. 1 (2011): 53-69 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Imagination can put the world together or tear it apart, depending on how it works. Comparing the Cartesians and the empiricists of the eighteenth century, it is evident that the latter are more seriously invested in imagination than the former, partly because they rely on conjecture for the discovery of facts while the Cartesians use imagination to dispel the authority of sense impressions. Is it possible to suppose that when imagination becomes disordered, conjecture and factuality begin to be at odds? By using Northanger Abbey as a test case, the essay finds that there is a kind of fact-based empiricism (represented by Catherine Morland) that is hostile to conjecture but at the same time hospitable to romance. What are the implications of such a state of affairs for empirical truth and the probability of the novel?
article  Project_MUSE  lit_crit  epistemology  imagination  Cartesian  empiricism  18thC  19thC  Austen  novels  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Roger D. Lund - Wit, Judgment, and the Misprisions of Similitude (2004) | JHI on JSTOR
Wit, Judgment, and the Misprisions of Similitude
Roger D. Lund
Journal of the History of Ideas
Vol. 65, No. 1 (Jan., 2004), pp. 53-74
True wit is Nature to advantage dress' d
What oft was thought but ne'er so well ecpress' d
Downloaded pdf to Note - duplicate somewhere in Dropbox EF libraries
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  faculties  reason  understanding  imagination  wit  judgment-aesthetics  judgment-emotions  gentleman  poetry  genius  creativity  Innovation  epistemology  virtue_epistemology  Locke  Malebranche  deception  Pope  Dryden  English_lit  French_lit  Addison  downloaded 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Gregory Lynall: Swift and Science: The Satire, Politics and Theology of Natural Knowledge, 1690-1730 (2012) Kindle Store
It is often thought that Jonathan Swift was vehemently opposed to the new science that heralded the beginning of the modern age, but this book interrogates that assumption, bringing new perspectives to his most famous works, and making a case for the intellectual importance of some of his more neglected poems and prose satires. Lynall's study traces the theological, political, and socio-cultural resonances of scientific knowledge in the early eighteenth century, and considers what they can reveal about the growth of Swift's imagination. Taking us to a universe made from clothes, to a place where flowers can talk and men are only trees turned upside down, to an island that hovers high in the clouds, and to a library where a spider predicts how the world will end, the book shows how satire can be an active and unique participant in cultural debates about the methods and purposes of scientific enquiry.
books  kindle-available  18thC  history_of_science  intellectual_history  cultural_history  scientism  Scientific_Revolution  Royal_Society  epistemology  imagination  satire  Swift  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Hoyt Trowbridge: Joseph Warton on the Imagination (1937)
JSTOR: Modern Philology, Vol. 35, No. 1 (Aug., 1937), pp. 73-87 -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  English_lit  aesthetics  lit_crit  18thC  imagination  Pope  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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