dunnettreader + iconography   4

Ada Palmer - Plato essay, #historypix, and the excessively exciting life of Pope Urban VIII - February 2016
Essay with pictures of a spectacular tapestry sequence in a corridor of the Vatican that's a perfect example of patronage, High Baroque, and Counter-Reformation iconography of legitimacy of authority of the Church hierarchy -- advancemeng of (classical) learning, military - new Fortress for Rome - mediator, peacekeeping within Christendom, straight pipeline to the heavens - both pagan and Christian -- a keeper!
Pocket  EF-add  17thC  art_history  Vatican  Rome  Papacy  baroque  iconography  Counter-Reformation  patronage-artistic  Papal_States  from pocket
february 2016 by dunnettreader
MARTHA VANDREI - A VICTORIAN INVENTION? THOMAS THORNYCROFT'S ‘BOADICEA GROUP’ AND THE IDEA OF HISTORICAL CULTURE IN BRITAIN | The Historical Journal - Volume 57 / Issue 02 / June 2014, pp 485-508 - Abstract - Cambridge Journals Online -
King's College London -- DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X14000119, Published online: 08 May 2014 -- This article examines the figure of Boudica (or Boadicea), with a specific focus on Thomas Thornycroft's Westminster Bridge statue, and on the work of the seventeenth-century antiquary, Edmund Bolton. By synthesizing historiography which investigates the idea of ‘historical culture’ in the modern and early modern periods, this article attempts to bridge chronological and generic divisions which exist in the study of the history of history. It argues that to fully understand the genealogy of popular historical ideas like Boudica, it is imperative that historians of such subjects take a longue-durée approach that situates individual artists and writers, and the historical-cultural works they produce, within their broader political, cultural, and social contexts while simultaneously viewing these works as part of a long, discursive process by which the past is successively reinterpreted. As a consequence, this article eschews an analysis of Boudica which labels her an ‘imperial icon’ for Victorian Britons, and argues that the relationship between contemporary context and the re-imagined past is not as straightforward as it might initially appear. -- paywall -- may be interesting for development of Britannia imagery relevant to Bolingbroke and Patriots
article  paywall  find  historiography  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  cultural_history  antiquaries  British_history  British_politics  national_ID  art_history  literary_history  political_culture  Victorian  usable_past  iconography  periodization  Britannia  patriotism  Patriots  British_Empire  imperialism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Stephen Alford, historiographical review - Politics and Political History in the Tudor Century | JSTOR: The Historical Journal, Vol. 42, No. 2 (Jun., 1999), pp. 535-548
Recent writing on the Tudor century emphasizes the importance to the history of politics of the study of political processes. Tudor historians are, for the most part, less willing than hitherto to describe bureaucracies or institutions of government, and more concerned to present politics as something dynamic rather than static. Although their work remains rooted in the archives, Tudor specialists are increasingly receptive to the significance of (for example) political language, iconography, and literature. This article examines a number of recent contributions, in the context of post-war Tudor historiography. It accepts that the insights of other disciplines can enhance the study of sixteenth-century politics, and welcomes the intellectual and cultural turn in recent writing, but maintains that Tudor culture is not always being reconstructed with the sensitivity it needs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  historiography  political_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  iconography  political_philosophy  political_culture  social_process  change-social  16thC  British_history  British_politics  Tudor  monarchy  monarchy-proprietary  Reformation  politics-and-religion  Parliament  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Allison Muri - The Grub Street Project :: Owls, Print Culture, and Knowledge in Eighteenth-Century Britain: the Iconography of Grub Street
Page of reproductions from 18thC maps and editions of the Dunciad -- Grub Street Project takes its name both from the street in London that became part of Milton Street in 1830 (figure 1) and from the derogatory term for a rising breed of hack writers scribbling away in a marketplace greedy for the latest news, politics, scandals, novels, and commentaries. Once home to the printers Bernard Alsop, Thomas Fawcett, and John Clowes, the historical Grub Street represents a particular moment in print culture and in the city's topography. Figuratively, Grubstreet has no particular topography or temporality: it is a fog of dulness inhabited by owls and dunces. In this sense, the term characterizes the tension between the idealized classical city and culture of the Augustans, with London imagined as a new Athens or Augustan Rome (figure 2) or print culture itself as an idealized purveyor of knowledge and wisdom bestowed upon Europe by Athena (figure 3), and the inversion of all such principles in a world of ill-educated literary hacks and unscrupulous money-grubbing printers (figure 4). Accordingly, it signifies for this project both a qualitatively defined cultural space both "high" and "low," and a measurable and computable topographical one.

The owl, both Athenian and Grub-streetian, represents an aspect of London as heterotopia (see also "Graphs, Maps, and Digital Topographies: Visualizing The Dunciad as Heterotopia," Lumen 30 (2011)). The Grub-street owl appeared repeatedly in Pope's Dunciad (figures 5-9), and represents both the dunces of Augustan London and, indirectly, the ideals that have supposedly been superseded by the "taste of the rabble."
18thC  British_history  cultural_history  publishing  Pope  Dunciad  iconography  digital_humanities  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader

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