dunnettreader + humours   5

Steven Shapin - How Foods Tasted in the Early Modern Period and How They Taste Now (2012) | School of Advanced Study, University of London
Speaker(s):
Professor Steven Shapin, ST Lee Visiting Professorial Fellow, 2011/12, Franklin L. Ford Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University
Event date:
Tuesday 22 May 2012
School of Advanced Study, University of London
sensation  Europe-Early_Modern  Addison  intellectual_history  Locke-Essay  video  consumer_revolution  lecture  perception  food  botany  medicine  physiology  cultural_history  taste  humours 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Steven Shapin on E.C. Spary, Eating the Enlightenment : Food and the Sciences in Paris, 1670-1760 | The Los Angeles Review of Books - March 2013
Delightful review noting that the traditional humoural medicine, including diet, was based on a close link between body and mind, but as humours were abandoned great confusion about just what the links were and how they worked. Also covers the commercial distribution of new (to Europeans) beverages (coffee, tea, chocolate etc) and invention of others (e.g. various spirits like eaux de vie) and flavors. Got wrapped up in morality debates re taste vs gluttony, luxury, consumer fashion, and naturalism, reflected in the Encyclopédie and Rousseau. Shapin extends his discussion beyond the book's time frame to 19thC.
books  reviews  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  French_Enlightenment  luxury  consumerism  fashion  naturalism  noble_savage  virtue  vice  medicine  food  taste  Encyclopédie  Voltaire  Rousseau  Bouffon  humours  history_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
T.S. Eliot. - "Ben Jonson" - The Sacred Wood; Essays on Poetry and Criticism 1921. | bartleby.com
Attacks reducing Jonson to superficial humours theory - nice analysis of how his characters fit each other driven by action in his invented world rather than Shakespeare’s characters acting on each other in a broader imaginative setting, implying with less discrete boundaries -- again Eliot returns to rhetoric as something to analyze not just cast as contentless term of denigration. Sees Marlowe and Jonson in similar light
books  etexts  17thC  20thC  English_lit  literary_history  lit_crit  poetry  theater  rhetoric  Jonson  Marlowe  Shakespeare  Molière  satire  tragedy  comedy  farce  humours 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Steven Shapin - Descartes the Doctor: Rationalism and Its Therapies | JSTOR: The British Journal for the History of Science, Vol. 33, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 131-154
During the Scientific Revolution one important gauge of the quality of reformed natural philosophical knowledge was its ability to produce a more effective medical practice. Indeed, it was sometimes thought that philosophers who pretended to possess new and more potent philosophical knowledge might display that possession in personal health and longevity. René Descartes repeatedly wrote that a better medical practice was a major aim of his philosophical enterprise. He said that he had made important strides towards achieving that aim and, on that basis, he offered practical medical advice to others and advertised the expectation that, taking his own advice, he would live a very long time. This paper describes what Cartesian medicine looked like in practice and what that practice owed to the power of modernist Reason. -- huge bibliography -- didn't download
article  jstor  intellectual_history  history_of_science  medicine  17thC  Descartes  Bacon  natural_philosophy  physiology  psychology  emotions  mind-body  diet  aging  humours  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Jacques Bos: The rise and decline of character: humoral psychology in ancient and early modern medical theory (2009) | History of the Human Sciences - Sage
doi: 10.1177/0952695109104422 History of the Human Sciences July 2009 vol. 22no. 3 29-50 -- Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these various domains together is character (êthos), which involves a view of human beings focused on clearly distinguishable psychological types that can be recognized on the basis of external signs. Psychological ideas based on humoral theory remained influential well into the early modern period. Yet, in 17th-century medicine and philosophy, humoral physiology and psychology started to lose ground to other theoretical perspectives on the mind and its relation to the body. This decline of humoralist medical psychology can be related to a broader reorientation of psychological thought in which the traditional concept of character lost its central position. Instead of the focus on types and stable character traits, a perspective emerged that was primarily concerned with individuality and transient passions.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  medicine  body  psychology  emotions  physiology  mind  mind-body  character  humours  moral_philosophy  rhetoric  Pope  paywall  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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