dunnettreader + humanism   74

Patrick Collinson - John Foxe as Historian | The Acts and Monuments Online
John Foxe as Historian
by Patrick Collinson
John Foxe disowned the title of 'martyrologist', the label most often attached to his name, almost to the extent that for English writers and readers of history it belongs to nobody else. Foxe wanted to be known as a 'story teller', which is to say, an historian. (How we distinguish between story tellers and historians, and even whether we should make such a distinction, are questions to which we shall have to return.) What was 'history' for those who inhabited the sixteenth century?
Evernote  16thC  Foxe-Book_of_Martyrs  Reformation  historiography-Renaissance  humanism  historiography  ancient_history  church_history  Eusebius  Elizabeth  Church_of_England  persecution  martyrs  objectivity  historians-and-religion  historians-and-state  intellectual_history  Protestants  Early_Christian  More_Sir_Thomas  Bacon  antiquaries  antiquity-source_of_narratives  history_of_England  Holinshed_Chronicles  nshed  rhetoric-writing  Cicero 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Lawrence Cahoone - The Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida | The Great Courses
Modern Intellectual Tradition: From Descartes to Derrida
Professor of Philosophy at Holy Cross - PhD from SUNY
36 lectures, starting with 17thC scientific revolution
He devotes a lot to the period starting with fin de sciècle (analytic, pragmatism, Whitehead)
- has a whole lecture on Heidegger's rejection of "humanism" after 1 on existentialism and the Frankfurt School
- but entre dieux guerres and post WWII isn't a total downer - an entire lecture on Dewey
- though Derrida sounds like the endpoint, he's more the endpoint of the trend through Heidegger's version of phenomenology
- he then turns to Rorty's "end of philosophy" and says, not so fast
- he works through several themes from earlier that are re-emerging post-postmodern
- he goes back to Cassirer, Whitehead and the pragmatists - different orientations but working within what he terms pragmatic realism - with emergence and complexity part of the realist story
- my main question re that narrative arc is where is Deluze?
- but the whole show gets uniformly rave reviews - except that he works off a teleprompter which some thought was awkward - looks like audio download is the way to go
analytical_philosophy  18thC  Putnam  pragmatism  existentialism  Marxist  Wittgenstein  technology  Quine  mind  Frege  phenomenology  Frankfurt_School  Marx  Habermas  science-and-religion  Romanticism  philosophy_of_history  Spinoza  Husserl  buy  Sartre  epistemology  Hume  Rorty  emergence  neo-Kantian  biocultural_evolution  humanism  intellectual_history  dualism  James_William  Enlightenment_Project  historiography-Marxist  German_Idealism  Enlightenment  17thC  Hegel  Nietzsche  political_philosophy  Logical_Positivism  mind-body  video  Whitehead  individualism  French_Enlightenment  empiricism  modernity  Derrida  ordinary_language_philosophy  anti-foundationalism  20thC  Kierkegaard  philosophy_of_language  Heidegger  human_nature  truth  Descartes  Kant  complexity  philosophy_of_science  Berkeley  postmodern  philosophy_of_religion  21stC  19thC  Cassirer  metaphysics  Dewey  self  audio  anti-humanism  courses  Locke 
april 2016 by dunnettreader
Robert Black - Machiavelli and the Humanist Tradition (2013) | Warburg Institute - School of Advanced Study, University of London
Speaker(s):
Robert Black (Professor of Renaissance History, University of Leeds)
Event date:
Wednesday 19 June 2013
The Warburg Institute
Renaissance  video  Machiavelli  Florence  lecture  intellectual_history  humanism  15thC 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Plutarch through the ages - conference videos (May 2013) | Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
This conference addressed the uses of Plutarch's historical and philosophical works by late antique, medieval and early modern scholars, writers and artists. Speakers: Ewen Bowie (Oxford), Roberto Guerrini (Siena), Constanze Güthenke (Princeton), Edith Hall (King's College London), Judith Mossmann (Nottingham), Frances Muecke (Sydney), John North (Institute of Classical Studies), Marianne Pade (Danish Institute Rome), Chris Pelling (Oxford), Alberto Rigolio (Oxford), Fred Schurink (Northumbria), Frances Titchener (Utah State), Rosie Wyles (King's College London), Sophia Xenophontos (Cyprus) and Alexei Zadorojnyi (Liverpool) **--** Thursday 23 May 2013 - Plutarch's revival in late Byzantium: the case of Theodore Metochites - From Francesco Barbaro to Angelo Poliziano: Plutarch's Roman Questions in the fifteenth century - John Whethamstede and Plutarch - Additional Lives: Hannibal, Scipio and Epaminondas - Plutarch, the Institutio Traiani, and the Social Dynamics of Philosophy in Renaissance England *^--** Friday 24 May 2013 - Plutarch in Scotland - Plutarco, Poussin e l’arte barocca - After Exemplarity: a Map of Plutarchan Scholarship - Plutarch à la Russe: Ancient Heroism and Russian Ideology in Tolstoy’s War and Peace - Plutarch’s Gracchi on the French, English and Irish stages, 1792-1852: From Revolution to Corn Laws and Famine - Welcomed with open arms: Plutarch and the modern Prometheus - Concluding Remarks
Plutarch  class_conflict  Europe-19thC  reception  historiography-19thC  Roman_Empire  video  ancient_Rome  biography  lecture  historiography  Roman_Republic  emulation  historiography-18thC  historiography-antiquity  historiography-17thC  political_history  historiography-Renaissance  Renaissance  translation  19thC  ancient_Greece  intellectual_history  usable_past  humanism  Greek_lit  history_as_examples  conference  Study_and_Uses  medieval_lit  medieval_philosophy  Byzantium 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Michel Brix - Balzac et l'héritage de Rabelais - Cairn.info 2002 Revue d'Histoire Littéraire de la France
L’article définit la Renaissance comme le théâtre de l’affrontement entre deux courants intellectuels, initiés par le recul de l’Église romaine, laquelle ne règne plus, au XVIe siècle, de façon omnipotente sur les consciences. L’humanisme pétrarquisant, ou ficinien, s’engage sur la voie du Ciel, enfin dégagée, et propose à l’homme de se diviniser dès sa vie terrestre. À l’opposé des conceptions ficiniennes, l’œuvre de Rabelais exploite le recul de l’Église pour poser la question du bonheur terrestre et pour inviter les individus à se réconcilier avec l’existence quotidienne. Ces deux « humanismes » s’affrontent toujours au XIXe siècle : héritier de Rabelais, Balzac blâme les diverses manifestations du règne absolu de l’esprit, tandis que les romantiques hugoliens s’inscrivent dans la filiation des poètes et penseurs pétrarquisants du XVIe siècle. - downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
Renaissance  Romanticism  19thC  article  Neoplatonism  transcendence  Rabelais  French_lit  Ficino  16thC  Balzac  Petrarch  literary_history  humanism  downloaded 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Weibel P, Sloterdijk P, Finkielkraut A, Houellebecq M - La nouvelle conception de l'homme. La construction de l'être humain (2004) - Cairn.info
Weibel Peter, Sloterdijk Peter, Finkielkraut Alain, Houellebecq Michel, « La nouvelle conception de l'homme. La construction de l'être humain. », Le Philosophoire 2/2004 (n° 23) , p. 32-55
URL : www.cairn.info/revue-le-philosophoire-2004-2-page-32.htm.
DOI : 10.3917/phoir.023.0032.
Transcript from 2001 conference
Downloaded via iPhone to DBOX
21stC  evolution-social  biocultural_evolution  Modernism  humanism  downloaded  posthumanism  human_nature  change-social  conference  genetics  anti-humanism  neuroscience  social_theory  postmodern 
february 2016 by dunnettreader
Suzanne L. Marchand - The Rhetoric of Artifacts and the Decline of Classical Humanism: The Case of Josef Strzygowski | JSTOR - History and Theory ( Dec 1994 )
History and Theory, Vol. 33, No. 4, Theme Issue 33: Proof and Persuasion in History (Dec., 1994), pp. 106-130 -- historians have failed to appreciate an important element of historiographical reorientation at the fin de siecle. This second "revolution" in humanistic scholarship challenged the conviction of the educated elite that European culture was rooted exclusively in classical antiquity in part by introducing as evidence non-textual forms of evidence; the testimony of artifacts allowed writers to reach beyond romantic-nationalist histories toward the identification of cultural areas, defined by morphological similarities, and to disrupt the traditional categories of the civilized and the barbaric. -- Austrian art historian, Josef Strzygowski, insistence upon Europe's dependence on Oriental forms and upon the superior historical value of material, over textual, evidence provided critics of philologically-based humanism with 2 argumentative avenues. He also represents a para-academic type, whose rise to power and prestige contributed to the "decline of the German mandarins." -- show how this "decline" is bound up with the waning institutional and popular status of Renaissance humanism - and a corresponding rise of biologistic Germanophilia - in the 2ntellectual milieux he inhabited (Germany and Austria). -- this antihumanist crusade contributed not only to the articulation of racist historiography, but also ... transference of politico-moral legitimacy to a non-elitist, anthropological definition of culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-20thC  cultural_history  cultural_authority  philohellenism  Renaissance  humanism  anti-humanism  epistemology-history  orientalism  racialism  anthropology  archaeology  German_scholarship  German_scholars  entre_deux_guerres  art_history  nationalism  Romanticism  national_tale  Aryanism  bibliography  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Gerard Passannante - Homer Atomized: Francis Bacon and the Matter of Tradition (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 4 (Winter, 2009), pp. 1015-1047 -- extensive primary and secondary bibliography from Renaissance philology through Montaigne, Bacon, Vico and 18thC German challenges to Homeric "authorship" as well as ancient literary tradition, epistemology, cosmology and physics - Stoics, Epicureans -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  literary_history  historiography  cosmology  epistemology  philology  natural_philosophy  ancient_Greece  ancient_Rome  Hellenism  Homer  atomism  Stoicism  Epicurean  Cicero  Lucretius  authors  author_intention  text_analysis  time  void  chance  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  17thC  18thC  scepticism  Montaigne  Bacon  Vico  Nietzsche  tradition  cultural_transmission  knowledge  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
John Sellars, review essay - Renaissance Philosophy (2012) | Academia.edu
Review article on Christopher C. Celenza, ed., Angelo Poliziano’s Lamia: Text, Translation, and Introductory Studies, and S. Clucas, P. J. Forshaw, V. Rees, eds, Laus Platonici Philosophi: Marsilio Ficino and His Influence, for British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20/6 (2012), 1195-1204 -- Keywords: Renaissance Philosophy, Angelo Poliziano, and Marsilio Ficino -- complains that work on Early Modern tends to look at links to medieval and back to anciengs, ignoring Renaissance contributions for much of anything beyond translation (e.g. Ficino just regurgitating Neoplatonism) and these 2 volumes help to see both what was going on philosophically, that humanism wasn't just work on ancient texts, as well as links to Early Moderns. Didn't download
books  reviews  article  Academia.edu  intellectual_history  Renaissance  medieval_philosophy  ancient_philosophy  scholasticism  Aristotelian  Neoplatonism  humanism  Ficino  Poliziano  Cambridge_Platonists  More_Henry  identity  Locke-person 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Robert Goulding - Histories of Science in Early Modern Europe: Introduction to special issue (2006) | JSTOR - Journal of the History of Ideas
Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 67, No. 1 (Jan., 2006), pp. 33-40 **--** Articles in the issue *--* James Steven Byrne, Humanist History of Mathematics? Regiomontanus's Padua Oration in Context (pp. 41-61) *--* Robert Goulding, Method and Mathematics: Peter Ramus's Histories of the Sciences (pp. 63-85) *--* Nicholas Popper, "Abraham, Planter of Mathematics": Histories of Mathematics and Astrology in Early Modern Europe (pp. 87-106) *--* Lauren Kassell, "All Was This Land Full Fill'd of Faerie," or Magic and the past in Early Modern England (pp. 107-122) -- helpful on recent historiography on humanists, science and history writing -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  history_of_science  mathematics  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  humanism  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  astrology  magic  education-higher  natural_philosophy  reading  rhetoric-moral_basis  rhetoric-writing  downloaded 
october 2015 by dunnettreader
Steve Knepper - Pope Francis and Humane Ecology | The Hedgehog Review - July 2015
Pope Francis’s new encyclical calls for a holistic ethic, an “integral ecology” that insists on the dignity of both human and nonhuman nature and on the shared roots of ecological and social problems. This ethic holds that “everything is connected. Concern for the environment thus needs to be joined to a sincere love for our fellow human beings and an unwavering commitment to resolving the problems of society.” Many responses to Laudato Si’ have focused on Francis’s treatment of particular issues, such as air conditioning or carbon credits. Yet the call for an integral ecology is what makes the encyclical truly distinctive. (..) Patrick Deneen claimed that Laudato Si’ develops “a Thomistic and Aristotelian theme: ‘how human beings live in and with and through nature, in ways that do not fall into what Pope Francis calls, again and again, the twin temptations of, on the one hand, viewing human beings as separate from nature in our capacity to dominate nature, [and] on the other side, a kind of anti-humanism which regards human beings as equally foreign to nature, but now as a kind of virus that has to—in some ways—be eliminated.” Francis’s integral ecology thus challenges some tendencies on both the right and the left. It does so by staying resolutely focused on the poor.
Instapaper  Pope_Francis  Papacy  climate  environment  poverty  human_rights  humanism  human_condition  Thomism-21stC  Aristotelian  nature  nature-mastery  ecology  ecology-economic  anti-humanism  green_economy  green_finance  energy  energy-markets  water  climate-adaptation  LDCs  economic_growth  economic_culture  theology  creation_ex_nilho  conservation  dignity  empathy  from instapaper
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Alan Jacobs - Fantasy and the Buffered Self - The New Atlantis - Winter 2014
If fantasy rose to centrality as a form of nostalgia for a day when the porous self was at least surrounded by other sentient beings rather than a dark and silent cosmos, it may now have become something else altogether, a kind of ultimate disenchantment where even our own selves are vacated in favor of a world prefabricated for us by others. This raises again that key question from American Gods: Is resistance futile? Is it simply the case that “all we’re facing here is a f — ing paradigm shift”? Or might there be forces of resistance capable of waging a “mighty battle” on behalf of human freedom?(..) we might take comfort from what seems to me the authentic core of the fantastic as a genre, as we see it from the standpoint of late modernity: fantasy may best be taken as an acknowledgment that the great problem of the pagan world — how to navigate as safely as possible through an ever-shifting landscape of independent and unpredictable powers who are indifferent to human needs — is our problem once more. (..) American Gods is an especially important text for this moment, because it rightly identifies technologies as gods and simultaneously sides with the older gods as being intrinsically closer to the proper human lifeworld. Imaginatively, if not in substantive belief, we are pagans once more. (..) We may choose to believe that we can buffer ourselves, protect ourselves against unknown powers. But that’s a kind of wager: if the powers are real, our disbelief won’t deter them. And it may be that certain powers profit from being disregarded or treated as mere fancies. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  SFF  religious_belief  religious_culture  gods-antiquity  technology  self  teleology  cosmology  modernity  disenchantment  sublime  humanism  Taylor_Charles  philosophical_anthropology  cultural_change  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Nicolaas P. Barr Clingan, review essay on Edward Skidelsky and Tobias Bevc histories of the philosophy of Ernst Cassirer (March 2010) | H-Net Reviews - H-German
Nicolaas P. Barr Clingan. Review of Bevc, Tobias, Kulturgenese als Dialektik von Mythos und Vernunft: Ernst Cassirer und die Kritische Theorie and Skidelsky, Edward, Ernst Cassirer: The Last Philosopher of Culture. H-German, H-Net Reviews. March, 2010. Skidelsky offers a welcome, broad introduction of Cassirer's work, but one that is problematic in its approach to broader issues of philosophy and politics. His more polemic claims, often asserted rather than argued, are unlikely to persuade specialists in intellectual history and may misguide general readers about the complex political contours of continental philosophy. Bevc, in contrast, offers a more focused and systematic comparison of Cassirer's philosophy and Critical Theory. His argument is generally compelling. He also skillfully draws a number of significant parallels that would seem to have been precluded by Adorno's dismissive comment, although Bevc does occasionally overstep in the case of the Frankfurt School. But perhaps this faux pas is fitting for a scholar whose efforts at intellectual and political conciliation were so recklessly dismissed in his own time and remain, as Skidelsky observes, foreign to our contentious age.
books  reviews  kindle-available  intellectual_history  political_culture  20thC  Germany  entre_deux_guerres  Cassirer  Frankfurt_School  Heidegger  culture  symbol  symbols-religious  myth  reason  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  phenomenology  existentialism  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  human_nature  humanism  anti-humanism  culture_industries  irrationalism  rationalization-institutions  modernity  Marxist  continental_philosophy  neo-Kantian  Adorno 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
Ada Palmer - Reading Lucretius in the Renaissance | JSTOR: Journal of the History of Ideas, Vol. 73, No. 3 (July 2012), pp. 395-416
In the Renaissance, Epicureanism and other heterodox scientific theories were strongly associated with heresy and atheism, and frequently condemned. Yet, when Lucretius’s Epicurean poem De Rerum Natura reappeared in 1417, these associations did not prevent the poem’s broad circulation. A survey of marginalia in Lucretius manuscripts reveals a characteristic humanist reading agenda, focused on philology and moral philosophy, which facilitated the circulation of such heterodox texts among an audience still largely indifferent to their radical content. Notes in later sixteenth century print copies reveal a transformation in reading methods, and an audience more receptive to heterodox science. Article is on Project MUSE - the jstor archive is open through 2011, closed for 2012, and has no later volumes. The jstor page for articles from 2012 has the advantage of the full set of footnotes. I've copied the footnotes to Evernote. -- update, I've downloaded it to Note
article  jstor  bibliography  intellectual_history  Lucretius  Epicurean  heterodoxy  atheism  15thC  16thC  Renaissance  humanism  philology  moral_philosophy  reading  reader_response  readership  atomism  determinism  cosmology  Scientific_Revolution  cultural_change  cultural_transmission  circulation-ideas  Evernote  downloaded 
april 2015 by dunnettreader
Chad Wellmon - The Thin Reed of Humanism | The Infernal Machine - Hedgehog Review - Jan 2015
Leon Wieseltier is at his cantankerous best in his latest essay (..) reprising many of the themes of his public feud with Steven Pinker in the pages of the New Republic(..) are cultural barometers of our impoverished cultural imagination concerning the relationship of science, the humanities, and technology. (..) he’s gesturing toward real concerns about the reductive materialism or naturalism that tends to underlie the work of popular polemicists like Dawkins, Dennet, and Pinker. He is not denying that our world and our selves can, in part, be explained through material mechanisms. When critics invoke “humanism” against “scientism” or “technologism,” they presume to know the proper boundaries of science and technology; they presume that they can readily and forcefully articulate where scientific knowledge ends and humanistic knowledge begins. They assume the role of guardians of our intellectual and ethical world. That’s a heavy burden. But it’s also a presumption that ignores how much of our knowledge comes from these border crossings. -- discusses etymology of "humanism" - 1808 Germany used contra Enlightenment-era education to develop "natural" capacities, treated by the author as privileging man the "animal" unlike "humanism" that sybordinated body to reason, etc. -- also cites James Schmidt's detective work re origins of "scientism"
cultural_critique  intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  21stC  scientistism  humanism  reductionism  human_nature  humanities  dualism  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  cultural_history  cultural_change  cultural_authority  scientific_culture  naturalism  technology  from instapaper
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Richard Sennett - Humanism IASC: The Hedgehog Review - Volume 13, No. 2 (Summer 2011)
I have wanted, in sum, to explain in this essay why the label “humanist” is a badge of honor, rather than the name for an exhausted worldview. Humanism’s emphasis on life-narratives, on the enriching experience of difference, and on evaluating tools in terms of human rather than mechanical complexity are all living values—and more, I would say, these are critical measures for judging the state of modern society. Looking back to the origins of these values is not an exercise in nostalgia; it is rather to remind us that we are engaged in a project, still in process, a humanism yet to be realized, of making social experience more open, engaging, and layered. -- downloaded as pdf to Note
article  downloaded  humanism  Renaissance  19thC  technology  communication  Internet  programming  algorithms  robots 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Scott Montgomery - The Shape of the New: Four Big Ideas and How They Made the Modern World:Amazon:Books
Princeton U Press - release May 2015 - A testament to the enduring power of ideas, The Shape of the New offers unforgettable portraits of Adam Smith, Thomas Jefferson, Alexander Hamilton, Charles Darwin, and Karl Marx--heirs of the Enlightenment who embodied its highest ideals about progress--and shows how their thoughts, over time and in the hands of their followers and opponents, transformed the very nature of our beliefs, institutions, economies, and politics. Yet these ideas also hold contradictions. They have been used in the service of brutal systems such as slavery and colonialism, been appropriated and twisted by monsters like Stalin and Hitler, and provoked reactions against the Enlightenment's legacy by Islamic Salafists and the Christian Religious Right. The Shape of the New argues that it is impossible to understand the ideological and political conflicts of our own time without familiarizing ourselves with the history and internal tensions of these world-changing ideas. With passion and conviction, it exhorts us to recognize the central importance of these ideas as historical forces and pillars of the Western humanistic tradition. It makes the case that to read the works of the great thinkers is to gain invaluable insights into the ideas that have shaped how we think and what we believe.
19thc  books  kindle-available  modernity  political_philosophy  ideology  totalitarian  right-wing  fundamentalism  culture_wars  humanism  anti-humanism  postmodern  sociology_of_religion  science-and-religion  politics-and-religion  social_epistemology  20thc  Smith  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  counter-Enlightenment  18thc  21stc  political_economy  intellectual_history  Smoth  Jefferson  Hamilton  Marx  Darwin 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Paul Silas Peterson - Thomas Pfau and the emergence of the modern individual « The Immanent Frame - Oct 2014
Thomas Pfau’s presentation of modernity in Minding the Modern fails to incorporate both the sociopolitical dimensions of modernity’s emergence and its positive aspects. He sees modernity as the home of the “modern subject” of the Western world, or the “quintessentially modern, solitary individual” in his “palpable melancholy,” both “altogether adrift” and without “interpersonal relations.” (..) a challenge to those whom he sometimes calls the “modern apologists of secular, liberal, Enlightenment society.” -- Pfau draws upon a narrative which might be called the “middle age voluntarism to modern alienation theory.” This has many predecessors in the second half of the 20thC (..). The geopolitical situation in the 1980s and 1990s is one of the important features of the historical context of many of these narratives (..) a variety of intellectual assaults were waged in the Western world against what had become the dominant intellectual paradigm in the West. (..) Over the last 30 years (..) this critical diagnosis of modernity has become more precise; there has been a consolidation of the sources and arguments -- Alasdair MacIntyre, Michael J. Buckley, Charles Taylor, Colin E. Gunton, Stanley Hauerwas, John Milbank, Michael Allen Gillespie, and more recently David B. Hart, Adrian Pabst and Brad S. Gregory. Pfau’s Minding the Modern is a new contribution to this anti-modern diagnosis of contemporary Western culture and the modern individual. (..)some of the arguments can be found in the French Catholic reform theologians of the early 20thC. There were also many German-speaking intellectuals in the 1920s and 1930s who were developing sweeping narratives that cast a dark light on modernity and thus, both implicitly and explicitly, called into question the rationale and legitimacy of the liberal political order. Pfau claims that his book does not provide one of these narratives (..). It does seem to be similar, however, to the classic decline-and-fall narratives. Even the essays at the end of the book about “retrieving the human” are analogous. -- downloaded post as pdf to Note
books  kindle-available  reviews  modernity  modernity-emergence  reform-legal  intellectual_history  medieval_philosophy  theology  Renaissance  humanism  Erasmus  Thomism  Thomism-21stC  voluntarism  Ockham  Luther  liberalism  self  alienation  18thC  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Counter-Enlightenment  Counter-Reformation  19thC  Coleridge  transcendence  ontology  individualism  17thC  English_Civil_War  religious_wars  religious_culture  Hobbes  20thC  21stC  declinism  MacIntyre  Taylor_Charles  downloaded  EF-add 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
Collin Finn - Two Kinds of Social Epistemology « Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (8): 79-104. (2013)
Steve Fuller’s programme of Social Epistemology was initiated some 25 years ago with the launching of a journal and the publication of a monograph with those very words as their title. Since then, the programme has evolved in a constant critical dialogue with other players in the fields of epistemology and science studies. Fuller’s main confrontation has been with analytic epistemology which, in its classical form, adopts a contrary position on most key issues. However, analytic epistemologists have gradually moved in the direction of Fuller’s views and even adopted the term “social epistemology” for their emerging position. Still, substantial disagreement remains between the two identically named programmes with regard to the proper philosophical approach to knowledge as a social phenomenon; in this article, I try to pinpoint the locus of this disagreement. However, Fuller has also been engaged in minor skirmishes with his Science Studies fellows; I also examine these clashes. Finally, I express my wishes concerning the future direction of social epistemology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
epistemology  epistemology-social  analytical_philosophy  sociology_of_knowledge  sociology_of_science_&_technology  history_of_science  scientific_method  philosophy_of_science  philosophy_of_language  social_theory  downloaded  EF-add  cognition  cognition-social  institutions  power  power-knowledge  knowledge  knowledge_economy  power-asymmetric  Rawls  democracy  expertise  epistemology-naturalism  human_nature  posthumanism  post-truth  Latour  humanities  humanism  moral_philosophy  political_philosophy  political_culture  cultural_capital  social_capital  neoliberalism  instrumentalist 
november 2014 by dunnettreader
ERIC COCHRANE, The Transition from Renaissance to Baroque: The Case of Italian Historiography | JSTOR: History and Theory, Vol. 19, No. 1 (Feb., 1980), pp. 21-38
The meaning of the term "baroque" has been the subject of much debate. In the field of historiography, historians have not engaged in a dialogue on the subject and have accepted uncritically the value-judgments of eighteenth-century scholarship. One approach to be used in this author's new book, Historians and Historiography in the Italian Renaissance, compares the work of 782 Italian historians from earliest times through the seventeenth century. The humanist historiography of the Italian Renaissance exhibited the concepts of change, contingency, and epoch in history; relied on ancient forms; used methodological principles of causation; and taught moral and political lessons. Italian Baroque historiography, on the other hand, employed the forms of the new bulletins or avvisi, copied the prose style of its contemporaries, discounted its practical utility, and displayed a separation between history as literature and history as research. -- downloaded to Air
article  jstor  historiography  historicism  Renaissance  humanism  historiography-18thC  14thC  15thC  16thC  17thC  18thC  historiography-19thC  19thC  intellectual_history  Italy  Guicciardini  historical_change  contingency  Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Yitzhak Y. Melamed, review - Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature // Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews - September 11, 2014
Joseph Almog, Everything in Its Right Place: Spinoza and Life by the Light of Nature, Oxford University Press, 2014, 143pp.,-- Yitzhak Y. Melamed, Johns Hopkins University -- one can easily trace the influence of "continental" figures such as Étienne Balibar and Antonio Negri on Almog's reading. But Almog is an acolyte of no one (except Nature, and to a lesser extent, Spinoza). The book is marked by the freshness of an independently thinking mind, a mind which appears at some moments to be celebrating a quasi-religious "new-birth." This book is rich in genuine insights, though it does not engage in patient, close analysis of arguments and texts. Toward the end Almog unfolds his discontent with the "dissective philosopher" who "run[s] his deductions, and feel[s] the gratification of being the master of a domain of propositions" (107). For Almog, Part I of Spinoza's Ethics is a paradigm of such "dissective philosophy," and the philosophical key is letting go of such an analytic attitude and "letting instead the key come to you by way of understanding informally 'love of God (Nature)'" (107). I do not share these views, and I will shortly explain why. More importantly, I believe this "New Age" attitude really harms the work, which could have been even more impressive than it is.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  17thC  Spinoza  style-philosophy  continental_philosophy  nature  anthropocentrism  human_nature  humanism  mathematics  Platonism  political_philosophy  sociability  moral_philosophy 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Thomas Hunkeler - Les « déviations » de l’esprit. Lire Délie de Maurice Scève à la lumière du Dolce Stil Nuovo | Italique, V, 2002, p. 53-75.
Italique [En ligne], V | 2002, mis en ligne le 06 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.146 **--** Aimer l’esprit, madame, c’est aimer la sottise. C’est par ce vers provocant que Ronsard ouvre en 1578, dans la première édition de ses sonnets pour hélène, le procès d’un platonisme qui s’est affadi, du moins de son avis, en un phénomène de cour et en une phraséologie largement dépourvue de portée philosophique. Au moment où Ronsard passe ainsi à l’attaque, le platonisme connaît en effet en France une seconde vague après celle des années 1530-40... Mais si, depuis Ronsard, le platonisme et a fortiori la notion d’amour platonique semblent figurer parmi les ingrédients aussi insipides qu’hypocrites de la littérature sentimentale, ce jugement ne trahit pas seulement un changement de goût ou de mœurs. Il résulte aussi d’une réception partielle, timorée et édulcorée, de la pensée ficinienne, qui a banalisé une pensée bien plus riche et bien plus ambivalente que ne le laisse croire la caricature de Ronsard. Une notion semble résumer à elle seule les enjeux, mais aussi les ambivalences de la pensée ficinienne : l’esprit. En effet, c’est dans la mesure où la notion d’esprit ou de spiritus a été banalisée lors de son importation en France, où on en a évacué tous les aspects qui n’entraient pas dans la tendance à la moralisation et à la spiritualisation qui marquait la réception de Ficin en France, qu’une réaction de rejet comme celle de Ronsard peut se comprendre. C’est dans une telle perspective que j’aimerais analyser, après avoir fait le point sur la notion de spiritus chez Ficin, le rôle que joue la notion d’“esprit” dans la réception de la pensée de Ficin en France entre 1500 et 1550, avant d’aborder plus en détail le cas de Maurice Scève. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  intellectual_history  15thC  16thC  Italy  France  Renaissance  Ficino  Neoplatonism  humanism  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  sentimentalism  reception  court_culture  elite_culture  Pléiade  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Francisco Rico - Pétrarque au partage de midi | Italique, VII, 2004, 9-26
Italique [En ligne], VII | 2004, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.124. **--** dans voi ch’ascoltate comme en bien des endroits de l’œuvre de Pétrarque – qu’il s’agisse de prose ou de vers, de latin ou de langue vulgaire –, «errore» constitue à peu de choses près un terme technique emprunté à la tradition stoïcienne pour désigner la falsa opinio qui trouble la vision du commun des mortels, alimente les « speranze », le « dolore » et les autres affectus ou perturbationes animi, provoque la désagrégation de l’esprit en « pensieri » aussi « sparsi » que les rimes venant les refléter. De toute évidence, Pétrarque apparaît ici comme un « altr’ uom » : il n’est plus ce qu’il était autrefois, il arbore désormais l’air grave du sage stoïcien et n’hésite pas à dénoncer les poèmes du canzoniere comme autant de rerum vulgarium fragmenta dans leur fond et dans leur forme, comme de vulgaires morceaux dignes du « popol » ignorant. Il ne s’agit pas ici d’une simple fiction plus ou moins placée sous le signe des précédents bien connus offerts par la littérature latine et les troubadours : à plusieurs reprises, l’illustre Italien dont nous commémorons le septième centenaire a voulu se convertir en « altr’ uom » et y est parvenu. -- J’aimerais attirer un instant votre attention sur un des moments décisifs de cette trajectoire passionnée et émouvante : ce moment du partage de midi où, à la croisée des chemins, déjà à l’âge mûr, Pétrarque résout les incertitudes qui l’avaient hanté durant ses longues années de formation et s’engage d’un pas ferme sur la voie qui le conduira à son plein épanouissement, à la fois en tant qu’écrivain et en tant qu’homme. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  intellectual_history  religious_history  14thC  Italy  Renaissance  humanism  Italian_lit  Petrarch  poetry  poetics  Stoicism  epistemology  epistemology-moral  perception  moral_philosophy  theology  self-examination  self-fashioning  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Arnaud Tripet - Pétrarque, la parole silencieuse | Italique, VIII, 2005, p. 9-25.
Italique [En ligne], VIII | 2005, mis en ligne le 05 octobre 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.112. *--* Les historiens s’accordent en général pour attribuer à Pétrarque une place inaugurale dans la culture dite humaniste, une culture qui sacrifie avant tout aux divinités de la parole. On restitue alors celle des Anciens. On valorise le verbe en lui conférant un pouvoir inédit sur les âmes, la capacité de les convertir au bien, au vrai et au beau. Son œuvre tant latine qu’italienne fournirait presque à l’infini des citations où la puissance bienfaisante du discours est proclamée au sein d’une épiphanie antique de la sagesse. Bientôt, et sous son influence, vont se créer en Italie, puis en Europe des écoles parallèles à celles déjà en place. Dans leurs programmes humanistes, le traditionnel trivium ne suffira plus, avec la logique, la rhétorique et la grammaire, pour qualifier les disciplines du langage en vue de la maîtrise ès arts. Va s’ajouter l’étude de l’histoire et de la poésie, laquelle n’existait précédemment que comme une variante de la rhétorique. Le souci d’élégance expressive ira de pair avec une certaine laïcisation des contenus. Humanisme dont on dira en simplifiant outrancièrement qu’il se construit ad maiorem hominis gloriam, de l’homme « parlant » en tout cas, et tenté souvent par une copia un peu complaisante, voire incontinente. Une question se pose alors : le silence va-t-il tempérer cette abondance ? Va-t-il nuancer la tentation de croire que le mot a valeur ontologique, et que l’on est ce qu’on dit ? Va-t-il suggérer que l’on est tout autant ce qu’on tait ? Sans autre préambule, je voudrais produire deux exemples tirés de Pétrarque. Ils parlent d’eux-mêmes et le silence y prend rang avec pleine dignité dans son discours.
article  revues.org  14thC  15thC  literary_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Renaissance  Italy  Italian_lit  humanism  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  rhetoric-moral_basis  self-fashioning  liberal_arts  historiography-Renaissance  exempla  vernacular  eloquence  self-government  self-examination  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Lina Bolzoni - Les Asolani de Pietro Bembo, ou le double portrait de l’amour | Italique, IX, 2006, p. 9-27
Italique [En ligne], IX | 2006, mis en ligne le 29 mai 2009, DOI : 10.4000/italique.103. **--** Les Asolani réalisent en outre une synthèse complexe de traditions et de modèles différents, littéraires et philosophiques, anciens et modernes, latins et en langue vulgaire. Ainsi la tradition du dialogue latin, classique et humaniste, est réécrite en vulgaire et utilisée également comme cadre et comme commentaire à un choix de poésies ; si le cadre narratif renvoie à son tour au Décaméron, le choix de poésies s’inspire de plus en plus du Pétrarque du Canzoniere. Différentes traditions philosophiques – en particulier la réflexion moderne sur l’amour des néoplatoniciens florentins – sont utilisées pour donner une nouvelle dignité théorique à la tradition lyrique en vulgaire et en même temps pour réaliser une difficile réconciliation entre vie et littérature, entre autobiographie et création d’un modèle idéal. La célébrité des asolani n’est pas seulement italienne : une traduction française, par Jean Martin, est publiée à Paris en 1545 et elle sera réimprimée plusieurs fois au cours du XVIe siècle.En outre, il ne faut pas oublier que Bembo est le protagoniste du dernier livre du cortegiano grâce justement à l’autorité dont il jouissait pour avoir écrit les asolani ; la célébrité européenne du cortegiano contribue à amplifier aussi la renommée de notre texte. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  Italy  Venice  France  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  16thC  Bembo  Petrarch  Dante  Boccaccio  poetry  poetics  prose  style  style-philosophy  elite_culture  Renaissance  courtiers  sprezaturra  love  humanism  Neoplatonism  moral_philosophy  reception  vernacular  neo-Latin  dialogue  publishing  manners  gentleman  otium  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Volker Kapp - Les Exempla dans les Triumphi et la culture oratoire de Pétrarque | Italique, XII, 2009, p. 9-31.
Italique [En ligne], XII | 2009, mis en ligne le 01 novembre 2012 - DOI : 10.4000/italique.220 *--* Les réserves des lecteurs du XXIe siècle contrastent avec le succès fulminant des Triumphi au Quattrocento dans les domaines littéraire et artistique. Le nombre élevé de manuscrits, ... confirme la haute estime dont ils jouirent pendant la Renaissance...pour ne pas parler des tableaux consacrés au thème du triomphe et influencés, plus ou moins, par Pétrarque. Pour expliquer ce changement surprenant des paramè­tres de la réception, on peut invoquer les divergences qui nous séparent de la civilisation humaniste.-- Et n’est-il pas légitime de renvoyer à la rhétorique qui caractérise l’humanisme européen précisément depuis Pétrarque dont on connaît l’ambition de se détacher par-là de la littérature et de la philosophie médiévales ? ...Nous proposons d’analyser cette problématique en insistant sur la figure rhétorique de l’exemplum. Afin de saisir l’impact de ce procédé à l’intérieur de la culture oratoire de Pétrarque, il faudra identifier quelques figures dans cette poésie, situer celle-ci parmi les formes du discours et évaluer ce qu’on a qualifié de « passion archéologique » de notre auteur, passion, dont relèvent les exempla tant dans son œuvre historique que dans les Triumphi. -- montrer que les exempla servent à mettre en scène le théâtre de la mémoire dans lequel le 'je' lyrique explore les présupposées et les enjeux de son éloge lyrique de Laure. Toute réflexion sur la rhétorique de Pétrarque doit partir de l’affinité entre l’art oratoire et la philosophie morale qu’il ne cesse de postuler. Cette convic­tion qu’il tire de Cicéron marque le dialogue intitulé De eloquentia du De remediis utriusque fortune. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  revues.org  Italian_lit  14thC  15thC  Petrarch  poetics  neo-Latin  rhetoric  rhetoric-writing  humanism  Renaissance  Cicero  moral_philosophy  exempla  oratory  self-examination  reception  rhetoric-moral_basis  eloquence  Quintillian  literary_history  cultural_history  intellectual_history  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik - THE DEATH OF GOD AND THE FALL OF MAN | Pandaemonium July 2014
Transcript of talk for Institute of Ideas -- The moral vision of modernity may have been, in other words, nourished by the crumbling of the God-ordained order. It was – it had to be – however, also rooted in faith, but a faith of a different kind – faith that humans were capable of acting rationally and morally without guidance from beyond. It was through the 19thC that religious faith truly began to crumble. But it was also in the 19thC that faith in the human capacity to act without God began also to erode. The optimism that had once suffused the humanist impulse began to ebb away and there began to develop a much darker view of what it meant to be human. By the late 19thC European societies came to experience both a crisis of faith and a ‘crisis of reason’, the beginnings of a set of trends that were to become highly significant in the 20thC – the erosion of Enlightenment optimism, a disenchantment with ideas of progress, a disbelief in concepts of truth, the growth of a much darker view of human nature. -- The death of God, in other words, went hand in hand with what we might call, if we were to continue to use religious symbolism, the Fall of Man. And the Fall of Man transformed the meaning of the Death of God. God is a metaphor for the desire for an authority beyond ourselves to frame our existence and guide our lives, the death of God for the insistence on acting without guidance from beyond. There are two aspects to the death of God. The decline of religious belief and the growth of a new faith in the capacity of humans to act without guidance from beyond. The first has always been overstated. The second has always been undervalued. - frames talk around Anscombe and MacIntyre
intellectual_history  religious_history  cultural_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  morality-Christian  religious_belief  ancient_philosophy  ancient_Greece  pagans  gods-antiquity  monotheism  teleology  human_nature  morality-conventional  morality-objective  progress  Enlightenment  Fin-de-Siècle  humanism  anti-humanism  Counter-Enlightenment  political_philosophy  reason  Anscombe  MacIntyre  tradition  identity  autonomy  individualism  community  communitarian  social_order  change-social  historical_change  historicism  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Rex Gilliland - What Becomes of the Human after Humanism? Heidegger and Derrida | Dartmouth College
We will consider Heidegger’s concept of the human being in the “Letter on ‘Humanism’” and Derrida’s reading of it in “The Ends of Man.” The “Letter on ‘Humanism’” is the first publication in which Heidegger extensively discusses the central themes of his later thought and is also the text that framed Heidegger’s reception in postwar France. In it, Heidegger critically examines the metaphysical foundation of humanism and develops a conception of the human being that attempts to think human decision in terms of its fundamental orientation toward being. Against humanists such as Sartre, Heidegger argues that being, not the human being, is of primary importance. At the same time, he maintains that the human being cannot be reduced to an epiphenomenon of being because being needs the human being to preserve its truth. We will consider Derrida’s response and his own views about the human being. In “The Ends of Man,” a nuanced reading of this text and the debate about humanism it helped to inspire, Derrida highlights the inadequacies of the interpretations of Heidegger found on both sides of the debate. However, Derrida also argues that there is a certain justification for these readings: Due to the fact that he privileges the human being and defines its essence via the proximity and presence of being, Heidegger fails to escape metaphysics. Does Derrida provide an alternate conception that avoids these difficulties? We will explore these questions by examining Derrida’s notions of undecidability and the relationship to an impossible presence: Is the extreme minimalism of Derrida’s position needed to disrupt the metaphysics of presence, or does it lead to a conception of the human being that is unnecessarily meager?
paper  20thC  intellectual_history  Germany  France  continental_philosophy  Heidegger  Derrida  humanism  anti-humanism  post-WWII  human_nature  metaphysics  Being  determinism  free_will  responsibility  Sartre  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
RANDOLPH C. HEAD -- DOCUMENTS, ARCHIVES, AND PROOF AROUND 1700 (2013). | The Historical Journal, 56, pp 909-930 - Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract
RANDOLPH C. HEAD - University of California, Riverside -- Jean Mabillon's De re diplomatica, whose importance for diplomatics and the philosophy of history is well recognized, also contributed to the seventeenth-century European debate over the relationship among documents, archives, and historical or juridical proof. This article juxtaposes early works on diplomatics by Mabillon, Daniel Papebroche, and Barthélémy Germon against German ius archivi theorists including Rutger Ruland and Ahasver Fritsch to reveal two incommensurate approaches that emerged around 1700 for assessing the authority of written records. Diplomatics concentrated on comparing the material and textual features of individual documents to authentic specimens in order to separate the genuine from the spurious, whereas the ius archivi emphasized the publica fides (public faith) that documents derived from their placement in an authentic sovereign's archive. Diplomatics' emergence as a separate auxiliary science of history encouraged the erasure of archivality from the primary conditions of documentary assessment for historians, however, while the ius archivi's privileging of institutional over material criteria for authority foreshadowed European state practice and the evolution of archivistics into the twentieth century. This article investigates these competing discourses of evidence and their implications from the perspective of early modern archival practices.
article  paywall  find  intellectual_history  historiography  17thC  18thC  historians  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  France  Germany  humanism  evidence  archives  manuscripts  Mabillon  Académie_des_Inscriptions  scepticism  Europe-Early_Modern  philosophy_of_history  authority  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Patrick H. Hutton - Vico for Historians: An Introduction [dedicated issue to Vico for historians for our time] | JSTOR: Historical Reflections / Réflexions Historiques, Vol. 22, No. 3 (Fall 1996), pp. 479-493
Introduction gives a brief biography and discusses each of the papers in the issue, plus a short "further reading" -- Contents *--* Community, Prereflective Virtue, and the Cyclopean Power of the Fathers: Vico's Reflections on Unexpected Consequences (pp. 495-515) Edmund E. Jacobitti. *--* The Significance of Tacitus in Vico's Idea of History (pp. 517-535) Alexander U. Bertland. *--* Vico and the End of History (pp. 537-558) Patrick H. Hutton. *--* Vico, Rhetorical Topics and Historical Thought (pp. 559-585) Catherine L. Hobbs. *--* Situating Vico Between Modern and Postmodern (pp. 587-617) Sandra Rudnick Luft. *--* Interpretations and Misinterpretations of Vico (pp. 619-639) Cecilia Miller -- Introduction and all papers downloaded to Note and in separate folder in Dropbox
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  19thC  20thC  Vico  Enlightenment  historicism  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  ancient_history  poetry  rhetoric  philosophy_of_language  philosophy_of_history  stadial_theories  Tacitus  oral_culture  postmodern  reading  reader_response  readership  cycles  human_nature  humanism  hermeticism  hermeneutics  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
"Toward a Radical Integral Humanism: MacIntyre’s Continuing Marxism" by Jeffery L. Nicholas
Jeffery L. Nicholas, Providence College -- I argue that we must read Alasdair MacIntyre’s mature work through a Marxist lens. I begin by discussing his argument that we must choose which God to worship on principles of justice, which, it turns out, are ones given to us by God. I contend that this argument entails that we must see MacIntyre’s early Marxist commitments as given to him by God, and, therefore, that he has never abandoned them in his turn to Thomistic-Aristotelianism. I examine his reading of Marx, with its emphasis on the concept of alienation as a Christian concept, and explain how this reading differs from the dominant scientific-determinist reading of Marx. This examination then leads to a discussion of why MacIntyre abandoned both Marxism and Christianity in 1968. Finally, I turn to his more recent writing on Marx. I contend that if we view them through his argument about the principles of justice and which God to worship, we see MacIntyre’s mature philosophy as more Marxist than most people, perhaps even MacIntyre himself, would allow. -- Jeffery L. Nicholas. "Toward a Radical Integral Humanism: MacIntyre’s Continuing Marxism" Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia (2014): 223-241. -- downloaded pdf to Note
intellectual_history  20thC  21stC  post-WWII  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  modernity  cultural_critique  humanism  Marxist  MacIntyre  human_nature  Thomism  Aristotelian  virtue_ethics  justice  natural_law  divine_command  human_rights  self-interest-cultural_basis  self  alienation  moral_psychology  social_theory  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Jeremy Waldron - The Image of God: Rights, Reason, and Order (2010) :: SSRN
NYU School of Law, Public Law Research Paper No. 10-85 -- The idea that humans are created in the image of God is often cited as a foundation for human rights theory. In this paper, this use of imago dei is surveyed, and while the paper is basically favorable to this foundation, it draws attention to some difficulties (both theological and practical) that using imago dei as a foundation for human rights may involve. Also it explores the suggestion that the image of God idea may be more apt as a foundation for some rights rather than others. Its use in relation to political rights is specifically explored. The moral of the discussion is that foundations do make a difference. We should not expect that, if we simply nail this idea onto the underside of a body of human rights theory as a foundation, everything in the theory will remain as it is. -- Number of Pages in PDF File: 21 -- Keywords: death penalty, foundationalism, human rights, image of God, political liberalism, political rights, religion, rights, secularism
paper  SSRN  philosophy_of_law  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  imago_dei  foundationalism  human_rights  liberalism  rights-political  secularism  humanism  natural_rights  universalism  morality-Christian  morality-divine_command  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Postmodernism and the 'Death of the Subject' by James Heartfield (2002) | Marxists.org Philosophy excerpts
Source: Abstracted from The ‘Death of the Subject’ Explained, Sheffield Hallam UP, 2002 and reproduced with the permission of the author.
intellectual_history  20thC  poststructuralist  postmodern  humanism  anti-humanism  Derrida  feminism  Marxist  continental_philosophy  self  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik's 2009 Voltaire lecture on 'The Guilt of Science?: Race, Science and Darwinism'
By the end of the eighteenth century, then, scientists had constructed a taxonomy of nature into which humans could be fitted and out of which emerged the categories of race. This seems to lend credibility to the view that it is modernity itself, and in particular the Enlightenment, that give rise both to the idea of race and to the practice of racism. ‘Eighteenth century Europe was the cradle of racism’, the historian George Mosse, argues because ‘racism has its foundations’ in the Enlightenment ‘preoccupation with a rational universe, nature and aesthetics.’ To see why this is not the case, we need to look more closely at how Enlightenment thinkers viewed the concept of human differences. -- If any event could demonstrate the folly of giving into unreason, it is surely Nazism and the Holocaust. Yet now it is regarded as an expression of too much reason.There is no intrinsic link between the idea of race and a rational or scientific view of the world. On the contrary: what made ideas of race plausible were the growth of political sentiments hostile to both the rationalism and the humanism of the Enlightenment.
intellectual_history  cultural_history  17thC  18thC  19thC  20thC  racialism  species  biology  evolutionary_biology  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  humanism  anti-humanism  reason  Nazis  Holocaust  imperialism  slavery  civilizing_process  human_nature  diversity  historiography-18thC  social_theory  Social_Darwinism  Herder  Linnaeus  Locke  essentialism  essence  climate  stadial_theories  Romanticism  social_order  progress  atheism_panic  authority  class_conflict  bourgeoisie  liberalism  capitalism  equality  stratification  scientism  science_of_man  science-and-religion  positivism  social_sciences  France  Britain  British_Empire  Germany  Great_Powers  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
HUMANISM, ANTIHUMANISM AND THE RADICAL TRADITION | Pandaemonium
Edited extract from The Meaning of Race (Macmillan, 1996), pp 236-242 -- Associated with the anti-universalist stance of poststructuralist theories has been an unremitting hostility to a humanist approach. At the heart of humanism are two key ideas. First, humanists hold that human beings, while an inherent part of nature and subject to its laws, nevertheless have an exceptional status in nature because of the unique ability, arising out of human rationality and sociability, to overcome the constraints placed upon them by nature. Second, humanists believe in the unity of humankind, holding that all humans possess something in common, a something that is often described as a common ‘human nature’. -- Indeed, no emancipatory philosophy is possible without a humanist perspective, for any antihumanist outlook is forced to look outside of humanity for the agency of salvation. -- Antihumanist strands developed from the Enlightenment onwards... ranging from the conservatism of Burke, the Catholic reaction of de Maistre to the nihilism of Nietzsche and the Nazism of Heidegger. -- they despaired of the capacity of humankind for such rational progress. Such despair often emerged out of fear of, and contempt for, the masses, who were seen as irrational, atavistic and a threat to civilized society. Antihumanism rejected ideas of equality and human unity, celebrating instead difference and divergence, and exalting the particular and the authentic over the universal. -- a central component of elite theories and hence of racial theories. In the postwar era, however, antihumanism came to represent a very different tradition – the liberal, indeed radical, anticolonial and antiracist outlook.
intellectual_history  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  humanism  anti-humanism  post-colonial  poststructuralist  postmodern  post-foundational  post-WWII  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web | Literature index page
(1) Medieval Attitudes toward Literature (2) Literary Relations -- ** Dante and Boccaccio, ** The Proem of the Decameron: Boccaccio between Ovid and Dante, ** Authorship, ** The Decameron and the English Romantics -- (3) Narratology and Structural Exegesis -- ** Numerology in the Decameron, ** The Novella before Boccaccio, ** Performance and Interpretation, ** Performance and Interpretation 2, ** Nightingales and Filostrato's Apologia (V.4), ** The Rubrics of the Decameron, ** Madonna Filippa (VI.7): Feminist Mouthpiece or Misogynistic Tool? -- (4) Hypertext -- ** Hypertext, Hypermedia and the History of the Text, ** Boccaccio Online: Teaching the Decameron as Hypertext at Brown University -- (5) Theoretical Perspectives -- ** Poststructuralism and a Figural Narrative Model, ** Lotman and the Problem of Artistic Space, ** Weinrich and the Grammar of the Frame, ** The Narrative Frame, ** Framing the Decameron, ** Seduction by Silence in the Frame -- (6) La novella tra Testo e Ipertesto: il Decameron come modello
website  literary_history  lit_crit  Italian_lit  English_lit  14thC  Medieval  Renaissance  humanism  Latin_lit  Boccaccio  Ovid  Dante  Romanticism  narrative  literary_theory  digital_humanities 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Decameron Web
In his Western Canon Harold Bloom thus recently acknowledges the crucial position of Boccaccio's Decameron : "Ironic storytelling whose subject is storytelling is pretty much Boccaccio's invention, and the purpose of this breakthrough was to free stories from didacticism and moralism, so that the listener or reader, not the storyteller, became responsible for their use, for good or for ill." The Decameron has elicited throughout the centuries fundamental discussions on the nature of narrative art, on the tenets of medieval versus modern morality, on the social and educational value of any form of artistic and literary expression. A true encyclopedia of early modern life and a summa of late medieval culture, the Decameron is also a universal repertory of perennially human situations and dilemmas: it is the perfect subject for an experiment in a new form of scholarly and pedagogical communication aimed at renewing a living dialogue between a distant past and our present. The guiding question of our project is how contemporary informational technology can facilitate, enhance and innovate the complex cognitive and learning activities involved in reading a late medieval literary text like Boccaccio's Decameron. We fundamentally believe that the new electronic environment and its tools enable us to revive the humanistic spirit of communal and collaboratively "playful" learning of which the Decameron itself is the utmost expression.
website  Medieval  Renaissance  14thC  Italy  Italian_lit  narrative  digital_humanities  Boccaccio  cultural_history  humanism  literary_history  lit_crit 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Denis Dutton on Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism | Philosophy and Literature 23 (1999): 243-55. Denis Dutton
Richard A. Etlin’s In Defense of Humanism (Cambridge University Press, $39.95) is notable not only for its passion, but for the way it supplies a new take on familiar problems. -- Etlin, however, is an architectural historian, and it’s refreshing to come across a cultural warrior lobbing grenades from a different academic encampment. -- Etlin’s book is excessively ambitious in trying to attack poststructuralism from dozens of angles; this, however, is part of its charm. He is bravely willing to take on anyone — Hayden White, Foucault, Nietzsche, Derrida, Bourdieu, de Man, Norman Bryson, Freud — and has no hesitation in identifying heroes and heroines, from Rembrandt to Jane Austen to Jefferson to Victor Hugo to Frank Lloyd Wright. -- Etlin says that not since Hegel have intellectuals displayed the hubris they show today, “attributing to themselves the power to arbitrate all meaning.” Their celebration of complexity and ambiguity becomes a form of “boundless egotism.” Poststructuralists are as suckered by the notion that texts are hidden repositories of obscure meanings as previous generations of intellectuals were suckered by the forces of astrology or alchemy. But their feelings of power, freedom, and discovery are illusory. "....Claims about variety, endless or even limited, can never be merely asserted; they must be demonstrated with coherent solutions.” -- Etlin’s brief but incisive treatment of Walter Benjamin’s 1935 essay “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction” is quite typical of the provocations of his book, making me wonder why this essay is continuously reproduced, forced on students, and cited in articles. Benjamin’s so-called pathbreaking discourse is wrong on virtually all major counts, as Etlin shows.
books  reviews  intellectual_history  lit_crit  humanism  anti-humanism  19thC  20thC  poststructuralist  postmodern  social_theory  literary_theory  historiography-postWWII  epistemology-history  complexity  diversity  hermeneutics  deconstruction  narrative  aesthetics  mass_culture  Benjamin  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert Wokler - Todorov's Otherness | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 27, No. 1 (Winter, 1996), pp. 43-55
From dedicated issue organized around two essays by Todorov -- A Symposium on "Living Alone Together" Wokler is responding to the opening essay, which was organized around one work each by Rousseau, Adam Smith and Hegel. Todorov appreciates the Enlightenment engagement with the other, through travel literature and history, as a reflection of universalist values of humanism, contra the stereotypes and caricatures of the Enlightenment_Project. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  18thC  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  Rousseau  Smith  Hegel  moral_philosophy  culture  diversity  self-and-other  human_nature  humanism  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Hassan Melehy - Silencing the Animals: Montaigne, Descartes, and the Hyperbole of Reason | JSTOR: symplokē, Vol. 13, No. 1/2 (2005), pp. 263-282
Toulmin on Cartesian hyper rationality and Derrida on man animal, Montaigne and Descartes -- useful postmodern bibliography as well as articles in last few decades on whether Descartes was a friend or enemy of animals based on where he drew the boundary.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  modernity  rationality  scepticism  anti-foundationalism  Montaigne  Descartes  animals  humanism  reason  emotions  perception  sensibility  moral_psychology  moral_philosophy  bibliography  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Walter H. Sokel - On the Dionysian in Nietzsche | JSTOR: New Literary History, Vol. 36, No. 4 (Autumn, 2005), pp. 501-520
Dionysian unity - Heraclitus not Spinozist monist substance - as foundational theme even though not explicit after Birth of Tragedy. Sees Nietzsche as protofascist aesthetic and bridge between humanism and postmodernism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  aesthetics  metaphysics  humanism  postmodern  fascism  Nietzsche  Schopenhauer  Dionysian  tragedy  ancient_Greece  Heraclitus  Spinoza  pantheism  monism  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Eyal Chowers - The Physiology of the Citizen: The Present-Centered Body and Its Political Exile | JSTOR: Political Theory, Vol. 30, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 649-676
Shift from civic humanism's optimistic view of man's capacity to build for the future and control sociopolitical environment to pessimistic view of capacity of citizens under raison d'Etat -- 16thC and 17thC increasingly focused on multipart, shifting self and passions vs reason rather than the development of a stable character that Renaissance humanism concerned with. Ties shift to new views of anatomy (eg Harvey) and connections between physiology and psychology and impact on different notions of time relative to self, society and politics. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  cultural_history  natural_philosophy  15thC  16thC  17thC  British_history  France  Italy  Italian_Wars  Renaissance  humanism  civic_humanism  civic_virtue  republicanism  raison-d'-état  Absolutism  emotions  physiology  psychology  medicine  self  time  Machiavelli  Montaigne  Descartes  Gassendi  Hobbes  Locke  Harrington  Harvey  identity  character  mechanism  thinking_matter  mind  mind-body  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
The God Debates | A 21st Century Guide for Atheists and Believers
Shook presents a comprehensive, non-technical survey of the quest for knowledge of God. Using current ideas and concepts such as modernism, postmodernism, fideism, evidentialism, presuppositionalism, and mysticism, Shook ushers the importance of theological debates into a present-day context, steering clear of outdated caricatures of religion.

By mastering the clear and concise strategies Shook presents in each chapter, readers of all levels can participate in a thoughtful debate, grounded in knowledge of key arguments for and against the existence of God. Shook helps nonbelievers learn important theological standpoints while also acknowledging the shortcomings of some faith-based arguments. A final chapter considers the possibility of harmonizing reason and faith in light of several current worldviews, including fundamentalism and secularism.
books  God-existence  theology  atheism  science-and-religion  secularism  humanism  EF-add 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Kenan Malik's review essay on 'The Blank Slate' by Steven Pinker and 'Straw Dogs' by John Gray
A more generous reading of Pinker than he deserves re his strawmen but a pretty good discussion of the problems with his reductionism
books  bookshelf  human_nature  humanism  anti-humanism  innate_ideas  evo_psych 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
AIME - An Inquiry into Modes of Existence | Bruno Latour - Science Po
The inquiry in which you will be able to take part has the aim of providing a more precise definition for the experiences gathered under the vague expression “modernization”. And especially one that is more acceptable to those other civilisations that have also been subject to the same discovery: that there is no Earth where we can modernize “the way we used to”. So we have to think again what we mean by this term while both retaining the inheritance of the modernization project and composing it in a quite new way.

The inquiry is based on the delicate extraction of a series of “values”—a deliberately outdated term—which the Moderns say they hold dear. But without ever being sure what these values mean, and how they can all be endorsed at the same time while respecting their differences and being wary of their tendency to crush other ones.

To establish these differences, we have prepared a very simple little protocol that begins with the experience produced when there is a clash between two values. This clash is felt each time one value is judged using the instrumentation coming from another value. We will make a collection of such incidents by creating a database of what we will call “crossings” because they will allow two types of judgement to emerge.
website  books  anthropology  modernity  modernization  Modernism  values  ecology  climate  humanism  posthumanism  political_culture  economic_sociology  philosophy_of_science  EF-add 
november 2013 by dunnettreader
Carlin Romano: Dao Rising: Chinese Philosophy Lifts Off in America - The Chronicle Review Sept 2013
Chinese philosophy's so-called "legitimacy" problem. Classical Chinese philosophy, as in the work of Confucius and Mencius, often operates through storytelling, homily, and aphorism. Philosophers who insist that their discipline demands rigorous argument occasionally suggest that Chinese philosophy is better understood as "wisdom literature" or under some alternate rubric.

Philosophy is supposed to be the most universalizable mode of human thinking," says Tu, citing instances of close-mindedness he witnessed at Harvard, "but it became very, very parochial. Whereas religion, which began with a particular spiritual tradition, opened up. So the Christians love to talk with everybody, and the analytic philosophers, their religion is so parochial, they end up suffering from fundamentalism—a closed particularism."

Several speakers at the ISCP session on methodology in comparative philosophy between East and West criticized the default inclination of earlier scholars to ritually evaluate Chinese philosophy by Western standards. Any sense that Chinese philosophy ought to be judged by the standards of American analytic epistemology, with disdain toward more humanistic, practical concerns of philosophy—such as how one should live one's life—came in for withering criticism.
philosophy  China  analytical_philosophy  humanism  humanities  Confucius 
october 2013 by dunnettreader
Ian Hunter, review: The return of sacred history - Brad Gregory’s "The Unintended Reformation" « The Immanent Frame
Finally, let us return to the twin claims on which Gregory’s account is based: first, his claim that Protestant anti-sacramentalism facilitated a historical process by which “metaphysical univocity in combination with Occam’s razor opened a path that would lead through deism to Weberian disenchantment and modern atheism”; and, second, his claim that despite the “Western hyperpluralism” to which it gave rise, he can provide a true account of this history on the basis of a concept of a “transcendent creator God” whose compatibility with “all possible scientific findings” is grounded in a metaphysics that demonstrates God’s immanent presence in all scientific domains. How should we view these claims in light of the preceding evidences and observations? Well, the prima facie incompatibility between Gregory’s first claim and an array of significant historical evidence—taken in tandem with his relegation of anti-anachronist historiography altogether—suggests that his account should not be regarded as a contribution to trans-confessional historiography. Rather, it should be located, like Charles Taylor’s A Secular Age, in the genre of Catholic confessional metaphysical hermeneutics, where historical narratives are composed as unfoldings of predetermined metaphysical or theological doctrines.
books  reviews  religious_history  intellectual_history  cultural_history  Catholics  theology  metaphysics  Reformation  science-and-religion  Spinoza  monism  Deism  atheism  Hegelian  securitization  secularism  modernity  apostolic_succession  Thomism  historiography  historians-and-religion  church_history  history_of_science  Europe-Early_Modern  Germany  Biblical_criticism  philology  historicism  historiography-17thC  humanism  Duns_Scotus  God-attributes  transcendence  immanence  creation_ex_nilho  Early_Christian  Neoplatonism  Dioysius-Pseudo  forgeries  sacraments 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Anthony Grafton: A Sketch Map of a Lost Continent: The Republic of Letters | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Grafton, Anthony. “A Sketch Map of a Lost Continent: The Republic of Letters.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/34. -- In "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- The citizens of the early modern Republic of Letters created a virtual community not of those who shared beliefs, but of those who differed. They made up rules for civility: rules that could be used to judge the conduct of all those who offered their intellectual wares for sale in the new, largely free market. They developed new tolerances, for thinkers who disagreed with them on fundamental matters and for facts that challenged their most basic verities. What unified these efforts was a shared, if inchoate and incomplete, respect for truth, for civility, and for the integrity of the human being—a respect not founded, perhaps, on deep philosophical or theological arguments, and often violated in practice, but solid enough to make them bold when they confronted what they saw as superstitions...... Though its story has often been treated as coextensive with that of the eighteenth-century Enlightenment, such accounts foreshorten the traditions of scholarship, debate and sociability that connect the humanist sodalities of Renaissance Florence and Rome to the academies, public libraries, Masonic lodges and salons of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This complex and inspiring history remains to be written.
article  intellectual_history  cultural_history  16thC  17thC  18thC  Republic_of_Letters  Erasmus  Reformation  Huguenots  Jesuits  travel  intelligentsia  scholarship  Enlightenment  érudits  humanism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Dan Edelstein: Humanism, l’Esprit Philosophique, and the Encyclopédie | Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts
Citation: Edelstein, Dan. “Humanism, l’Esprit Philosophique, and the Encyclopédie.”Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 1, no. 1 (May 1, 2009): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/27. -- In "Rethinking the Republic of Letters" issue -- downloaded pdf to Note -- also downloaded attachments (1) Edelstein-Appendix1_citation_index.xls (2) Edelstein-Appendix2_discarded_names.xls (3) Edelstein- Appendix3_Etat_de_Nature_comparison_with_Locke.pdf -- Humanism, in this interpretation, no longer appears in opposition to the Enlightenment, but can be seen to lie at the heart of the philosophical project to diffuse knowledge and “change the common way of thinking.” The classification, extraction, and compilation of texts and ideas had indeed been elevated to an art form, if not a science, by early-modern scholars; their techniques could now serve the philosophical good of disseminating “general Enlightenment [lumières générales].” This important role, however, remained a fairly invisible one, given that a collège education had made humanist practices almost second nature for Enlightenment scholars. In fact, they often did not even seem aware of their debt to the past: 
article  intellectual_history  Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  16thC  17thC  18thC  humanism  érudits  scholarship  reading  philosophes  Encyclopédie  Diderot  Voltaire  Montesquieu  Republic_of_Letters  ancient_philosophy  antiquity  belles-lettres  French_lit  historiography  Locke  downloaded 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
AHR Forum - Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism - JSTOR: The American Historical Review, Vol. 101, No. 1, Feb., 1996
Articles -- Introduction: Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism (pp. 107-109)  Ronald Witt -**- The Crisis after Forty Years (pp. 110-118)  Ronald Witt -**- Baron's Machiavelli and Renaissance Republicanism (pp. 119-129)  John M. Najemy -**- The Historical Petrarch (pp. 130-141)  Craig Kallendorf -**- Hans Baron's Renaissance Humanism: A Comment (pp. 142-144)  Werner Gundersheimer
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  political_philosophy  humanism  Renaissance  14thC  15thC  16thC  Italy  Petrarch  Machiavelli  republicanism  city_states  political_culture  cultural_history  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Peter Stacey: The Sovereign Person in Senecan Political Theory | Republics of Letters (Stanford): 2011
Citation: Stacey, Peter. “The Sovereign Person in Senecan Political Theory.” Republics of Letters: A Journal for the Study of Knowledge, Politics, and the Arts 2, no. 2 (June 1, 2011): http://rofl.stanford.edu/node/98......Downloaded pdf to Note.......

After observing how the allegorical terms of the relationship between the prince andFortuna are established in resoundingly Senecan terms in Petrarch’s moral and political thought, I turn to investigate how the account subsequently becomes even more embroidered by Florentine humanists....... One aspect of Machiavelli’s assault on the prevailing contentions of the ideology of the Renaissance prince is a systematic and highly subversive reorganization of a set of concepts with which it had become conventional to map out the terms of that relationship. An integral part of this work is the brilliant reconfiguration of the Petrarchan—and ultimately Senecan—imagery with which the traditional relationship had been portrayed;
article  political_philosophy  intellectual_history  antiquity  Roman_Empire  Roman_law  Seneca  Stoicism  mirror_for_princes  Italy  Renaissance  Petrarch  humanism  Machiavelli  Bodin  sovereignty  15thC  16thC  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader
Feminism as Radical Humanism by Pauline Johnson. | Questia (1994)
Pauline Johnson calls for a reassessment of feminism's relationship to modern humanism. She argues that despite its very thorough and necessary critique of mainstream formulations of humanist ideals, feminism itself remains strongly committed to humanist values. Drawing on a broad range of political and intellectual traditions, Johnson demonstrates that, only by proudly affirming its own humanist commitments can feminist theory find a way to negotiate the impasse in which it currently finds itself. Useful dismantling of the whole "Enlightenment Project" nonsense What needs to be pruned from the masculine hierarchical version to get at the essential recognition that humanism IS feminism and vice versa And she sees Romanticism as a Janus faced era that with regards to self and community is potentially dangerous for feminism to appropriate
postmodern  humanism  feminism  Enlightenment  Enlightenment_Project  Romanticism  intellectual_history  EF-add 
july 2013 by dunnettreader

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