dunnettreader + human_capital   19

Oliver Hart and the Poetry of Economic Theory -
At this year’s annual ASSA meeting, Stigler Center Director Luigi Zingales delivered a lecture honoring Oliver Hart, winner of the 2016 Nobel Prize for…
firms-theory  firms-structure  incentives-distortions  human_capital  organizations  microeconomics  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
A New Study of Labor Market Concentration - Roosevelt Institute
Labor economists have traditionally focused on worker-side characteristics, such as education, as the crucial causal variable for explaining outcomes like…
Labor_markets  antitrust  monopsony  unemployment  skills  human_capital  wages  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
Strong Employers and Weak Employees: Study Sheds New Light on How Labor Market Concentration Hurts Workers -
New study finds that wages are significantly lower in concentrated labor markets—and even lower in labor markets where unionization rates are low. Strikers and…
Labor_markets  wages  unions  human_capital  monopsony  antitrust  competition  industry_concentration  Evernote  from instapaper
march 2018 by dunnettreader
James Farr, review essay - Social Capital: A Conceptual History (2004) | Political Theory 32.1 on JSTOR
Farr, James. "Social Capital: A Conceptual History." Political Theory 32.1 (2004): 6-33. Web. -- Taking its departure from current debates over social capital, this article presents new textual findings in a backward-revealing conceptual history. In particular, it analyzes the texts and contexts of Lyda J. Hanifan who was rediscovered by Robert Putnam as having (allegedly first) used the term; it offers discoveries of earlier uses of the term and concept-most notably by John Dewey-thereby introducing critical pragmatism as another tradition of social capital; and it recovers features of the critique of political economy in the nineteenth century-from Bellamy to Marshall to Sidgwick to Marx-that assessed "capital from the social point of view," especially cooperative associations. While it ends with Marx's use of "social capital," Dewey is its central figure. The article concludes by returning to the present and offering work, sympathy, civic education, and a critical stance as emergent themes from this conceptual history that might enrich current debates. -- downloaded via Air
article  jstor  downloaded  social_theory  social_capital  human_capital  bibliography  sociability 
august 2016 by dunnettreader
Guido Alfani, Wouter Ryckbosch - Income inequality in pre-industrial Europe | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal 06 November 2015
Thomas Piketty and others have prompted renewed interest in understanding long-term patterns of inequality. This column presents evidence from pre-industrial Europe. Inequality rose even during the success stories of early modern Europe, but it can hardly have been the sole requisite for growth. In both economic history and today’s economic theory, the idea of a universal trade-off between growth and inequality needs to be replaced by stronger attention to social processes and institutional developments. -- brief but extensive lit review of how thinking of economic historians has been evolving -- downloaded pdf to Note
paper  economic_history  early_modern  Europe-Early_Modern  16thC  17thC  18thC  19thC  economic_growth  inequality  capital_formation  new_institutionalism  institutional_economics  political_economy  state-building  nation-state  human_capital  urbanization  Innovation  Industrial_Revolution  consumer_revolution  consumer_demand  wages  growth-equity_tradeoff  bibliography  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Two Philosophers’ Views on the Point of College | Daily Nous - September 2015
This week, two philosophers—Kwame Anthony Appiah (NYU) in the New York Times Magazine and Gary Gutting (Notre Dame) in The Chronicle of Higher Education—have discussed the point of a college education. - Both distinguish -long between the utilitarian (and subject mastery) function oriented toward what employers are likely to find useful and the intellectual or academic, oriented toward developing mental habits of learning with an open mind as a key part of whole-person development and life-long ability to be part of, at a minimum, middle brow culture. (The latter is more explicit in Gutting. The major difference is that Appiah takes a somewhat defensive faute de mieux approach, given the enormous economic pressures that are producing corporatized institutions that don't understand or appreciate the intellectual excellence tradition. Whereas Gutting (like Appiah) acknowledges the pressures for a "training " track that meets employer and employee expectations, he thinks the job should be shifted from what's effectively remedial classes in the first year or so of college with an effective J-12 education. Including shifting parties of college teachers )along with their budgets) to the K-12 system. He clearly thinks Appiah's defensive approach is going to fail. The demands if both students and employers are legitimate, and in the absence of another set of institutions to meet those legitimate expectations, the corporatism of universities will proceed at wn ever increasing pace.
education-finance  paywall  education-training  education-privatization  public_goods  intelligentsia  US_government  human_capital  university-contemporary  public_education  public_finance  Pocket  local_government  education-K-12  education-higher  US_politics  from pocket
september 2015 by dunnettreader
Markus Brückner, Daniel Lederman - Effects of income inequality on economic growth | VOX, CEPR’s Policy Portal - 07 July 2015
The relationship between aggregate output and income inequality is central in macroeconomics. This column argues that greater income inequality raises the economic growth of poor countries and decreases the growth of high- and middle-income countries. Human capital accumulation is an important channel through which income inequality affects growth.
economic_growth  economic_models  macroeconomics  inequality  inequality-wealth  trickle-down  LDCs  OECD_economies  human_capital 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Knowledge, Virtue and the Research University | chad wellmon - September 22, 2014
Published in The Hedgehog Review -- Recently, a broad literature has chronicled, diagnosed, and attempted to solve what many have referred to as a “crisis” in higher education. Some authors tie the purported crisis to an out- of-touch faculty or lackadaisical students, while others blame a conservative or liberal political culture or the public’s general distrust of univer- sities. Amidst all of these anxious arguments, however, we can discern four basic types. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  US_society  21stC  humanities  university  university-contemporary  disciplines  specialization  education-higher  humanities-finance  instrumentalist  knowledge  knowledge_economy  knowledge_workers  human_capital  downloaded 
july 2015 by dunnettreader
Martens, Rusconi and Leuze, eds. - New Arenas of Education Governance: The Impact of International Organizations and Markets on Educational Policy Making | Palgrave Macmillan - November 2007
Edited by Kerstin Martens, Alessandra Rusconi, Kathrin Leuze -- How and to what extent is education becoming a field of international and market governance? Traditionally, education policy making has been viewed as the responsibility of the nation state, falling within the realm of domestic politics. But recent years have witnessed the transformation of the state. Globalization has introduced new actors and led to the internationalization and marketization of education. This volume provides the most comprehensive and up-to-date account of these new arenas of education governance, examining the impact of international organizations and the role of the market in policymaking. It demonstrates how education policy is formulated at international levels and what the consequences for national policy making will be. -- excerpt = TOC, Introduction and index -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  public_policy  education  education-higher  education-training  education-privatization  education-finance  international_organizations  globalization  markets_in_everything  market_fundamentalism  privatization  public_goods  governance  global_governance  business-and-politics  business_influence  education-civic  values  accountability  Labor_markets  human_capital  competition  competition-interstate  development  distance_learning  IT  communication  nation-state  national_ID  knowledge_economy  OECD  World_Bank  WTO  trade-policy  trade-agreements  student_debt  democracy_deficit  political_participation  EU  EU_governance  standards-setting  testing  downloaded 
may 2015 by dunnettreader
theAIRnet.org - Home
The Academic-Industry Research Network – theAIRnet – is a private, 501(c)(3) not-for-profit research organization devoted to the proposition that a sound understanding of the dynamics of industrial development requires collaboration between academic scholars and industry experts. We engage in up-to-date, in-depth, and incisive research and commentary on issues related to industrial innovation and economic development. Our goal is to understand the ways in which, through innovation, businesses and governments can contribute to equitable and stable economic growth – or what we call “sustainable prosperity”.
website  economic_growth  industry  technology  Innovation  green_economy  development  business  business-and-politics  capitalism  global_economy  public-private_partnerships  public_policy  public_health  public_goods  urban_development  health_care  IP  Labor_markets  wages  unemployment  education-training  sustainability  financial_system  corporate_citizenship  corporate_governance  corporate_finance  CSR  firms-theory  management  plutocracy  MNCs  international_political_economy  human_capital  OECD_economies  emerging_markets  supply_chains  R&D  common_good  1-percent  inequality  working_class  work-life_balance  workforce  regulation  regulation-harmonization  incentives  stagnation 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
JW Mason - The Slack Wire: Mehrling on Black on Capital - June 2014
From Mehrking - downloaded pdf to Note -- Black’s emphasis is on the market value of wealth calculated as the expected present value of future income flows, rather than on the quantity of wealth calculated as the historical accumulation of savings minus depreciation. This allows Black to treat knowledge and technology as forms of capital, since their expected effects are included when we measure capital at market value. For Black, the standard aggregative neoclassical production function is inadequate because it obscures sectoral and temporal detail by attributing current output to current inputs of capital and labor, -- It’s familiar math, but the meaning it expresses remains very far from familiar to the trained economist. For one, the labor input has been replaced by human capital so there is no fixed factor. For another, both physical and human capital are measured at market values, and so are supposed to include technological change. This means that the A coefficient is not the usual technology shift factor (the familiar “Solow residual”) but only a multiplier, indeed a kind of inverse price earnings ratio, that converts the stock of effective composite capital into a flow of composite output. -- In retrospect, the most fundamental source of misunderstanding came (and comes still) from the difference between an economics and a finance vision of the nature of the economy. The classical economists habitually thought of the present as determined by the past. The financial point of view, by contrast, sees the present as determined by the future, or rather by our ideas about the future...and the quantity of capital can therefore change without prior saving.
economic_theory  economic_models  economic_growth  macroeconomics  Piketty  neoclassical_economics  financial_economics  capital  wealth  investment  savings  interest_rates  profit  productivity  human_capital  technology  labor  downloaded  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Branko Milanovic - globalinequality: Limits of neoclassical economics - June 2014
Great summary of the obvious that unfortunately needs to be said -- When people criticize Piketty for elevating a mere economic identity... to a Fundamental Law of Capitalism they show their inability to go back to economics as a social science [and] transcend neoclassical economics. The share of capital income in total income is not only a reflection of the fact that people with a factor of production B have so much, and people with the factor of production A have the rest.. We are basically saying: 20% of people ..claim 1/2 of national output and they do so without having to work. If it were a question of changing the distribution in favor of factor A (donuts) and against factor B (pecan pies), there would be no reason to be concerned. But here you change the distribution in favor of those who do not need to work, and against those that do. You thereby affect the entire social structure of society. This is where social science comes in, and neoclassical economics goes away. The entire 100 years of neoclassical economics [has made us] us forget this key distinction: between having or not having to work for a living. Hence neoclassicists like to treat capital (and labor) as basically the same thing: factors of production: a donut and a pecan pie...Thence also the attempt to treat labor as human capital. We are all capitalists now: a guy who works at Walmart for less than the minimum wage is a capitalist since he is using his human capital; a broker who makes a million in a day is also a capitalist, he just works with a different type of capital.The true social reality was thus entirely hidden. [Picketty returns us to] social science and you ask yourself questions like, would a society where 20% of non-workers earn 70% of total income be okay? What are the values that such a society would promote? (..more political, moral philosophy Qs)
Piketty  19thC  20thC  21stC  intellectual_history  intellectual_history-distorted  social_theory  social_sciences  political_economy  social_order  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  economic_history  economic_theory  macroeconomics  neoclassical_economics  classical_economics  Marx  inequality  distribution-income  capitalism  capital  labor  human_capital  markets_in_everything  class_conflict  economic_culture  political_culture  economic_sociology  bad_economics  memory-group 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Amparo Castelló-Climent, Rafael Doménech - Human capital and income inequality | vox , 23 April 2014
Most developing countries have made a great effort to eradicate illiteracy. As a result, the inequality in the distribution of education has been reduced by more than half from 1950 to 2010. However, inequality in the distribution of income has hardly changed. This column presents evidence from a new dataset on human capital inequality. The authors find that increasing returns to education, globalisation, and skill-biased technological change can explain why the fall in human capital inequality has not been sufficient to reduce income inequality.
paper  economic_history  economic_theory  human_capital  literacy  inequality  education  education-higher  globalization  technology  wages  labor  political_economy  global_economy  EF-add 
june 2014 by dunnettreader
Todd Cronan, lead remarks& forum - Do We Need Adorno? | nonsite.org
Participants - Todd Cronan, Emory University, Michael W. Clune, Case Western Reserve University, Nicholas Brown, UIC, Jennifer Ashton, UIC, Chris Cutrone, School of the Art Institute of Chicago and Marnin Young, Yeshiva University
intellectual_history  19thC  20thC  economic_history  political_economy  economic_theory  US_economy  Marx  Adorno  Frankfurt_School  classes  class_conflict  working_class  bourgeoisie  human_capital  neoliberalism  inequality  domination  Communist_Party  alienation  cultural_critique  Leftist  labor  leisure  wages  EF-add 
march 2014 by dunnettreader
John F. Tomer: Brain Physiology, Egoistic and Empathic Motivation, and Brain Plasticity: Toward a More Human Economics | World Economic Review: working papers 2012
Back to the Enlightenment and Adam Smith. -- comments section has interesting cites to other cognitive neuroscience models and connections to social theories that involve individual decision making. -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Brain plasticity refers to the ability of the brain to change structurally and functionally as a result of input from the environment. Some of this plasticity is no doubt genetically determined but some brain change is a product of individual effort and represents the individual’s investment in intangible capital (standard human capital, social capital, personal capital, and so on). In this revised view, the balance that individuals, groups, and societies strike between ego and empathy orientation is to a great extent determined by these intangible investments, not simply by brain physiology. In other words, it is the plastic aspect of the brain that determines how the capacity associated with brain physiology gets expressed.
paper  economic_models  economic_sociology  social_theory  cognition  neuroscience  self-interest  rationality-economics  empathy  social_capital  human_capital  education  work  rational_choice  feminist_economics  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Tim Leunig, Chris Minns and Patrick Wallis: Networks in the Premodern Economy: The Market for London Apprenticeships, 1600—1749 (2011)
JSTOR: The Journal of Economic History, Vol. 71, No. 2 (JUNE 2011), pp. 413-443 -- Cambridge paywall but jstor has references -- We examine the role of social and geographical networks in structuring entry into premodern London's skilled occupations. Newly digitized apprenticeship indenture records for 1600—1749 offer little evidence that personal ties strongly shaped apprentice recruitment. The typical London apprentices had no identifiable tie to their master through kin or place of origin. Migrant apprentices' fathers were generally outside the craft sector. The apprenticeship market was strikingly open: well-to-do families accessed a wide range of apprenticeships, and would-be apprentices could match ability and aptitude to opportunity. This fluidity aided human capital formation, with obvious implications for economic development.
article  jstor  paywall  economic_history  social_history  17thC  18thC  Britain  London  Labor_markets  mobility  human_capital  networks  bibliography  Great_Divergence 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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