dunnettreader + history_of_england   25

Patrick Collinson - John Foxe as Historian | The Acts and Monuments Online
John Foxe as Historian
by Patrick Collinson
John Foxe disowned the title of 'martyrologist', the label most often attached to his name, almost to the extent that for English writers and readers of history it belongs to nobody else. Foxe wanted to be known as a 'story teller', which is to say, an historian. (How we distinguish between story tellers and historians, and even whether we should make such a distinction, are questions to which we shall have to return.) What was 'history' for those who inhabited the sixteenth century?
Evernote  16thC  Foxe-Book_of_Martyrs  Reformation  historiography-Renaissance  humanism  historiography  ancient_history  church_history  Eusebius  Elizabeth  Church_of_England  persecution  martyrs  objectivity  historians-and-religion  historians-and-state  intellectual_history  Protestants  Early_Christian  More_Sir_Thomas  Bacon  antiquaries  antiquity-source_of_narratives  history_of_England  Holinshed_Chronicles  nshed  rhetoric-writing  Cicero 
september 2017 by dunnettreader
Philip Connell - British Identities and the Politics of Ancient Poetry in Later 18thC England (2006) | The Historical Journal on JSTOR
The Historical Journal, Vol. 49, No. 1 (Mar., 2006), pp. 161-192 - This article examines the scholarly recovery and popular reception of 'ancient poetry' in later eighteenth-century England, with a view to elucidating the relationship between cultural primitivism and more overtly politicized discourses of national identity. The publication of the poems of Ossian, in the early 1760s, gave a new prominence to the earliest cultural productions of Celtic antiquity, and inspired the attempts of English literary historians, such as Thomas Percy and Thomas Warton, to provide an alternative 'Gothic' genealogy for the English literary imagination. However, both the English reception of Ossian, and the Gothicist scholarship of Percy and Warton, were complicated by the growing strength of English radical patriotism. As popular political discourse assumed an increasingly insular preoccupation with Saxon liberties and ancient constitutional rights, more conservative literary historians found their own attempts to ground English poetic tradition in some form of Gothic inheritance progressively compromised. The persistence of ancient constitutionalism as a divisive element of English political argument thus curtailed the ability of Gothicist literary scholarship to function as an effective vehicle for English cultural patriotism.
article  jstor  18thC  English_lit  literary_history  British_history  British_politics  politics-and-literature  political_culture  political_discourse  Gothic  ancient_constitution  liberty  radicals  conservatism  antiquity  antiquaries  history_of_England  popular_culture  high_culture  downloaded 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
David Wootton - Narrative, Irony, and Faith in Gibbon's Decline and Fall | JSTOR - History and Theory (Dec 1994)
History and Theory, Vol. 33, No. 4, Theme Issue 33: Proof and Persuasion in History (Dec., 1994), pp. 77-105 -- thinks Momigliano didn't see that Gibbon was Hume's follower and their "school" was defining on a number of elements for what "history" came to be understood as - Thinks Wormersley doesn't fully appreciate Gibbon's handling of religion and the various challenges to Christianity in both antiquity and Enlightenment -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  historiography  philosophy_of_history  epistemology-history  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  history_of_England  Gibbon  Momigliano  Enlightenment  religious_belief  religious_history  scepticism  miracles  Middleton_Conyers  irony  narrative  downloaded 
january 2016 by dunnettreader
Dafydd Moore - Patriotism, Politeness, and National Identity in the South West of England in the Late 18thC (2009) | JSTOR - ELH
ELH, Vol. 76, No. 3 (Fall, 2009), pp. 739-762 -- looks at Enlightenment sociability and culture and a focus on regional history as part of national identity to discuss one dimension of conservative reaction against French revolutionary radicalism -- part of bibliography covers "patriot" claims to historical sources of identity through 18thC, plus diversified approach to what constituted "conservatism" -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_history  political_culture  Enlightenment  18thC  1790s  French_Revolution  national_ID  regional_history  history_of_England  Antiquarianism  poetry  ancient_Britain  conservatism  anti-Jacobin  Patriots  patriotism  national_origins  national_tale  downloaded 
november 2015 by dunnettreader
Alzada Tipton - Caught between "Virtue" and "Memorie": Providential and Political Historiography in Samuel Daniel's the Civil Wars | JSTOR: Huntington Library Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 3/4 (1998), pp. 325-341
Daniel had Essex connections that got him in trouble for a play - his Civil Wars dealt with Lancaster and York from deposition of Richard Ii - another sensitive topic. Tension among ambitions as courtier, patronage limks with factions in upper elite, and artistic and historiographical standards that he intended to meet to obtain reputation as an author, though those standards were unclear and in the process of shifting in late Elizabethan and early Jacobean culture. -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  intellectual_history  cultural_history  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  history_of_England  14thC  15thC16thC  17thC  British_history  British_politics  Wars_of_the_Roses  patronage  faction  censorship  historians-and-politics  exempla  Providence  courtiers  court_culture  playwrights  Elizabethan  Essex_rebellion  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Neil Davidson - The Origins Of Scottish Nationhood (Pluto Critical History Series) (2000) 144 pages | pbk (9780745316086): : Books amazon.com
The traditional view of the Scottish nation holds that it first arose during the Wars of Independence from England in the 13thC & 14thC. Although Scotland was absorbed into Britain in 1707, Scottish identity is supposed to have remained alive through separate institutions of religion, education, and the legal system. Davidson argues otherwise. The Scottish nation did not exist before 1707. The Scottish national consciousness we know today was not preserved by institutions carried over from the pre-Union period, but arose after and as a result of the Union, for only then were the material obstacles to nationhood – most importantly the Highland/Lowland divide – overcome. This Scottish nation was constructed simultaneously with and as part of the British nation, and the 18thC Scottish bourgeoisie were at the forefront of constructing both. The majority of Scots entered the Industrial Revolution with a dual national consciousness, but only one nationalism, which was British. The Scottish nationalism which arose in Scotland during the 20thC is therefore not a revival of a pre-Union nationalism after 300 years, but an entirely new formation. -- Customer review - Davidson refutes Linda Colley's idealist thesis that Protestantism, Francophobia, monarchism and empire formed the British nation. The first three of these were ideas, present, yes, but not formative. Empire was external to Britain, and so it was never part of people's experience of becoming British or Scottish. Scotland was a full partner, not a junior partner in the British (not English) Empire, unlike Ireland. The experience of becoming the workshop of the world formed Britain as a nation, creating our culture and identity. Industry, making things, and organising in our Britain-wide trade unions (which Davidson barely mentions) made us British. -- not on kindle
books  amazon.com  find17thC  18thC  Scotland  British_history  1707_Union  national_ID  nationalism  bourgeoisie  Industrial_Revolution  British_Empire  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Anglo-Irish_constitution  colonialism  imperialism  history_of_England  Kirk  legal_system  Highlands-Scotland  Lowland-Scotland  Scottish_Enlightenment  Scottish_politics  Britannia 
september 2014 by dunnettreader
The Lamp of Experience - Online Library of Liberty
Trevor Colbourn, The Lamp of Experience: Whig History and the Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/674> -- In a landmark work, a leading scholar of the eighteenth century examines the ways in which an understanding of the nature of history, seen as as a continual struggle between liberty and virtue on one hand and arbitrary power and corruption on the other, influenced the thinking of the founding fathers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Founders  English_constitution  history_of_England  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed., 2000), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston - Online Library of Liberty
Laurence L. Bongie, David Hume: Prophet of the Counter-revolution (2nd ed.), Foreword by Donald W. Livingston (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2000). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/673> -- Though usually Edmund Burke is identified as the first to articulate the principles of a modern conservative political tradition, arguably he was preceded by a Scotsman who is better known for espousing a brilliant concept of skepticism. As Laurence Bongie notes, “David Hume was undoubtedly the eighteenth-century British writer whose works were most widely known and acclaimed on the Continent during the later Enlightenment period. Hume’s impact [in France] was of undeniable importance, greater even for a time than the related influence of Burke, although it represents a contribution to French counter-revolutionary thought which, unlike that of Burke, has been almost totally ignored by historians to this day.” The bulk of Bongie’s work consists of the writings of French readers of Hume who were confronted, first, by the ideology of human perfection and, finally, by the actual terrors of the French Revolution. Offered in French in the original edition of David Hume published by Oxford University Press in 1965, these vitally important writings have been translated by the author into English for the Liberty Fund second edition. In his foreword, Donald Livingston observes that “If conservatism is taken to be an intellectual critique of the first attempt at modern total revolution, then the first such event was not the French but the Puritan revolution, and the first systematic critique of this sort of act was given by Hume.” -- original on bookshelf - downloaded for Livingston foreword and translations
books  bookshelf  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Hume-ethics  history_of_England  intellectual_history  political_history  political_philosophy  moral_philosophy  moral_psychology  moral_sentiments  progress  perfectibility  human_nature  historians-and-politics  historiography-18thC  Enlightenment  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Enlightenment  English_Civil_War  Puritans  Levellers  Interregnum  Protectorate  Charles_I  Cromwell  Parliament  Parliamentarians  Ancien_régime  French_Revolution  Terror  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  conservatism  Whigs-Radicals  Radical_Enlightenment  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 2 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 2. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1824> -- Vol 1 covers 1603 to 1660, Vol 2 from the Restoration (starting with Vane's defense) through the flurry after the Glorious_Revolution, including Sherlock on the rule of William and Mary now settled, debates over loyalty oath and bill of rights. -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  Exclusion_Crisis  Popish_Plot  Rye_House_Plot  tolerance  prerogative  Glorious_Revolution  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  Queen_Mary  Shaftesbury_1st_Earl  Sidney  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  loyalty_oaths  Royalists  dissenters  parties  faction  Church_of_England  resistance_theory  religion-established  ecclesiology  nonjurors  defacto_rule  Norman_Conquest  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: 17thC English Political Tracts, vol. 1 of 2 - Online Library of Liberty
Joyce Lee Malcom, The Struggle for Sovereignty: Seventeenth-Century English Political Tracts, 2 vols, ed. Joyce Lee Malcolm (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 1999). Vol. 1. 07/12/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/810> -- Volume I consists of pamphlets written from the reign of James I to the Restoration (1620-1660). -- An entire literature of political discourse resulted from this extraordinary outpouring – and vigorous exchange – of views. The results are of a more than merely antiquarian interest. The political tracts of the English peoples in the 17thC established enduring principles of governance and of liberty that benefited not only themselves but the founders of the American republic. These writings, by the renowned (Coke, Sidney, Shaftesbury) and the unremembered (“Anonymous”) therefore constitute an enduring contribution to the historical record of the rise of ordered liberty. Each volume includes an introduction and chronology. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  British_history  British_politics  English_Civil_War  Interregnum  Protectorate  Restoration  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  history_of_England  politics-and-religion  political_participation  sovereignty  Parliament  ancient_constitution  government-forms  Absolutism  divine_right  Magna_Carta  politics-and-literature  political-theology  commonwealth  civic_humanism  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  bibliography  primary_sources  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Seed - The Spectre of Puritanism: Forgetting the 17thC in Hume's "History of England" | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Nov., 2005), pp. 444-462
The seventeenth century was not finished in eighteenth-century England. The ghosts of the 'Great Rebellion' continued to haunt Hanoverian England as political groupings struggled for some kind of control of representations of the past. One of the explicit purposes of Hume's "History of England" (1752-64) was to exorcize these ghosts of the past and to delegitimize the political memories of Whigs, Tories and Jacobites, churchmen and dissenters. This article focuses on the account of the puritans in the "History of England." In significant ways this contravenes Hume's own agenda. Out of his anti-puritan history there emerges the negative figure of the radical political intellectual which was subsequently appropriated by Burke and by wider forces of political reaction in England in the 1790s. Far from escaping the obsolete antagonisms of the past which continued to shape Hanoverian political hostilities, Hume in his "History of England" contributed to their reproduction and even intensification from the 1770s. -- begins by contrasting Bolingbroke's upfront treatment of the power of collective memory to enflame party conflict with Hume's attempt to reframe the memories themselves -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  1770s  1790s  British_history  British_politics  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Bolingbroke  Dissertation_on_Parties  Remarks_on_History_of_England  history_of_England  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  dissenters  Whigs-Radicals  Burke  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Leopold von Ranke - History of England Principally in the Seventeenth Century - 6 volume set :: Cambridge University Press
German historian Leopold von Ranke (1795–1886) is well known for pioneering the modern historical method which advocates empiricism, rather than a focus on the philosophy of history. Emphasizing the importance of presenting history exactly as it happened, Ranke asserted that different eras need to be understood in their own contexts rather than in relation to each other: history should not be regarded as one long, teleological narrative. These principles of writing history, established in earlier publications, are all evident here. Originally published as eight volumes between 1859 and 1869, Ranke's history, 'principally in the seventeenth century', was first published as a six-volume history in English by the Clarendon Press in 1875, the mammoth task of its translation distributed among eight Oxford dons.
books  17thC  British_history  history_of_England  19thC  Germany  Ranke  historiography-19thC  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Catherine Macaulay - History of England from the Accession of James I to the Brunswick Line : 8 volume set :: Cambridge University Press
A landmark in female historiography, this work first appeared in eight volumes between 1763 and 1783. Notable for her radical politics and her influence on American revolutionary ideology, Catharine Macaulay (1731–91) drew diligently on untapped seventeenth-century sources to craft her skilful yet inevitably biased narrative. Seen as a Whig response to David Hume's Tory perspective on English history, the early volumes made Macaulay a literary sensation in the 1760s. Later instalments were less rapturously received by those critics who took exception to her republican views. Both the product and a portrait of tumultuous ages, the work maintains throughout a strong focus on the fortunes of political liberty. Beginning with the founding of the dynasty in 1603, Macaulay paints a particularly vivid picture of Stuart tyranny under Charles I. Later volumes go on to cover the English Civil War, the Commonwealth, the Restoration and the Glorious Revolution.
books  17thC  British_history  18thC  history_of_England  Macaulay_Catherine  Whigs  republicanism  historiography-Whig  historiography-18thC  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative [eScholarship] (2007)
"National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative", Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2007), 293-317. -- Keywords: Nation, National Histories, Postnational, State, Transnationalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  political_culture  nation-state  national_ID  nationalism  territory  globalization  history_of_England  historiography-Whig  historians-and-politics  groups-identity  memory-group  memory_studies  narrative-contested  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Robert S. Jansen - Resurrection and Appropriation: Reputational Trajectories, Memory Work, and the Political Use of Historical Figures | JSTOR: American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 112, No. 4 (January 2007), pp. 953-1007
The Zapatistas and Sandinistas both invoked historical figures in their rhetoric, but they did so in very different ways. This variation is explained by a model of path‐dependent memory work that is sensitive to how previous memory struggles enable and constrain subsequent uses of historical figures. Specifically, previous struggles produce distinct reputational trajectories that condition the potential utility of different modes of memory work. The cases illustrate two reputational trajectories, which are situated within a broader field of mnemonic possibilities. This article offers a provisional baseline for comparing contested memory projects and supplies a framework for analyzing the opportunities and constraints by which reputational trajectories condition memory work. It builds on a recent processual emphasis in the collective memory literature and suggests that the contentious politics literature needs to historicize its conception of culture and take seriously the operation of constraints on symbolic work. -- over 200 references -- Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  political_culture  memory-group  memory_studies  narrative-contested  reputation  social_movements  social_process  Bolingbroke  history_of_England  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
James Noggle: Literary Taste as Counter-Enlightenment in Hume's "History of England" (2004)
JSTOR: Studies in English Literature, 1500-1900, Vol. 44, No. 3 (Summer, 2004), pp. 617-638.....
In David Hume's History of England, cultural achievement plays an ambiguous role in a larger narrative framework meant to demonstrate the nation's gradual progress toward refinement, liberty, and commercial success. Not only does culture, especially literary culture, seem oddly independent of political and economic advancement, it also exposes points where the dichotomies that organize what we understand as Enlightenment history itself-rationality versus irrationality, the modern versus the archaic, the general versus the particular, theory versus anomaly-break down. Hume's literary achievement in the History is to allow his understanding of England's progress to be conditioned by these collapses.

Downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  18thC  British_history  historiography  cultural_history  Enlightenment  Counter-Enlightenment  Hume  history_of_England  English_lit  downloaded  EF-add 
august 2013 by dunnettreader

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