dunnettreader + historiography-antiquity   7

Classical E-Text: DIODORUS SICULUS, LIBRARY OF HISTORY @ theoi.com
DIODORUS SICULUS was a Greek historian who flourished in Sicily in the C1st BC. He wrote a history of the world in 40 books which included large sections devoted to myth, legend and the unusual customs of foreign tribes.

Diodorus Siculus. Library of History (Books III - VIII). Translated by Oldfather, C. H. Loeb Classical Library Volumes 303 and 340. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1935.

Volumes II and III of Diodorus in the Loeb series contain the bulk of his mythological material. Both books are still in print and available new from Amazon.com (click on image right for details). In addition to the translations the book contains the source Greek text, maps, and Oldfather's footnotes and index.

NOTE: Diodorus attempts to convert the stories of myth into factual histories. To this end he concocts a variety of stories to rationalise and explain away the fantastical elements of myth. Many of these are as far-fetched as the original stories themselves. Nevertheless, in spite of these reworkings, his work does preserve many old stories not found elsewhere.
Mediterranean  Greek_lit  ancient_Greece  historiography-antiquity  translation  myth  etexts 
july 2016 by dunnettreader
Plutarch through the ages - conference videos (May 2013) | Warburg Institute, School of Advanced Study, University of London
This conference addressed the uses of Plutarch's historical and philosophical works by late antique, medieval and early modern scholars, writers and artists. Speakers: Ewen Bowie (Oxford), Roberto Guerrini (Siena), Constanze Güthenke (Princeton), Edith Hall (King's College London), Judith Mossmann (Nottingham), Frances Muecke (Sydney), John North (Institute of Classical Studies), Marianne Pade (Danish Institute Rome), Chris Pelling (Oxford), Alberto Rigolio (Oxford), Fred Schurink (Northumbria), Frances Titchener (Utah State), Rosie Wyles (King's College London), Sophia Xenophontos (Cyprus) and Alexei Zadorojnyi (Liverpool) **--** Thursday 23 May 2013 - Plutarch's revival in late Byzantium: the case of Theodore Metochites - From Francesco Barbaro to Angelo Poliziano: Plutarch's Roman Questions in the fifteenth century - John Whethamstede and Plutarch - Additional Lives: Hannibal, Scipio and Epaminondas - Plutarch, the Institutio Traiani, and the Social Dynamics of Philosophy in Renaissance England *^--** Friday 24 May 2013 - Plutarch in Scotland - Plutarco, Poussin e l’arte barocca - After Exemplarity: a Map of Plutarchan Scholarship - Plutarch à la Russe: Ancient Heroism and Russian Ideology in Tolstoy’s War and Peace - Plutarch’s Gracchi on the French, English and Irish stages, 1792-1852: From Revolution to Corn Laws and Famine - Welcomed with open arms: Plutarch and the modern Prometheus - Concluding Remarks
Plutarch  class_conflict  Europe-19thC  reception  historiography-19thC  Roman_Empire  video  ancient_Rome  biography  lecture  historiography  Roman_Republic  emulation  historiography-18thC  historiography-antiquity  historiography-17thC  political_history  historiography-Renaissance  Renaissance  translation  19thC  ancient_Greece  intellectual_history  usable_past  humanism  Greek_lit  history_as_examples  conference  Study_and_Uses  medieval_lit  medieval_philosophy  Byzantium 
march 2016 by dunnettreader
Ronald Mellor - Tacitus' Annals (2010) | Oxford University Press
Tacitus' Annals is the central historical source for first-century C.E. Rome. It is prized by historians since it provides the best narrative material for the reigns of Tiberius, Claudius, and Nero, as well as a probing analysis of the imperial system of government. But the Annals should be seen as far more than an historical source, a mere mine for the reconstruction of the facts of Roman history. While the Annals is a superb work of history, it has also become a central text in the western literary, political, and even philosophical traditions - from the Renaissance to the French and American revolutions, and beyond. This volume attempts to enhance the reader's understanding of how this book of history could have such a profound effect. Chapters will address the purpose, form, and method of Roman historical writing, the ethnic biases of Tacitus, and his use of sources. Since Tacitus has been regarded as one of the first analysts of the psychopathology of political life, the book will examine the emperors, the women of the court, and the ambitious entourage of freedmen and intellectuals who surround every Roman ruler. The final chapter will examine the impact of Tacitus' Annals since their rediscovery by Boccaccio in the 14th century.
books  kindle-available  historiography-antiquity  historians-and-politics  Tacitus  Latin_lit  ancient_Rome  Roman_Empire  political_culture  political_philosophy  Renaissance  historiography-Renaissance  historiography-17thC  historiography-18thC  oligarchy  Absolutism  raison-d'-état  government-forms 
june 2015 by dunnettreader
Matthew Bowser - The Golden Age of Rome: Augustus’ program to better the Roman Empire (2013 undergrad thesis) | History of the Ancient World - October 2014
Undergraduate Thesis, University of Pittsburgh, 2013 -- posted to History of the Ancient World website - Argument continues among historians to this day whether Augustus should be considered the benefactor that Vergil portrays, who restored virtue and order, or as the tyrant Tacitus describes. Using evidence from a variety of contemporary sources, I intend to show that Augustus did in fact work to bring about the Age of Gold that Vergil promises. Whether through warfare, legislation, political maneuvering, or propaganda, I believe that his actions from the start reflect a clear program to make the Roman Empire the most powerful and most secure state that it could be, and that he was not just working for personal ambition. I have narrowed down the concept of the Golden Age, as portrayed by the poets, to three primary qualities: peace and security, the flourishing of the old Republican virtues, and prosperity under a glorious, divine leader. I will address each of these aspects in turn, consulting evidence from the period to show how Augustus’ regime worked to satisfy them. This evidence will include contemporary literature, historical facts and records, art, architecture, religion, and symbolism. I will also address the major criticisms of each facet by eyewitnesses such as Ovid and Propertius, by Roman historians such as Tacitus and Suetonius, and by various modern scholars of Roman history. Studying the success of Augustus’ methods can reap numerous benefits, including a deeper understanding of later dictators and their programs. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  ancient_history  empires  Roman_Republic  Roman_Empire  Augustan_Rome  political_history  political_culture  civic_virtue  civil_religion  literary_history  Latin_lit  Virgil  Tacitus  historians-and-politics  state-building  Ovid  Suetonius  historiography  historiography-antiquity  downloaded  EF-add 
october 2014 by dunnettreader
Ronald Syme, review essay - Fasti Consolari dell' Impero Romano 30 BC-613 AD by Attilio Degrassi | JSTOR: The Journal of Roman Studies, Vol. 43 (1953), pp. 148-161
I Fasti Consolari dell' Impero Romano dal 30 Av anti Christo al 613 Dopo Christo by Attilio Degrassi
Review by: Ronald Syme

Didn't download the paper
Interesting discussion of what can be learned or inferred about the governance structures, politics of the Principate and Empire from the Fasti themselves and triangulating with other sources
article  jstor  ancient_Rome  Augustan_Rome  political_history  historiography-antiquity  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader
William W. Batstone: The Antithesis of Virtue: Sallust's "Synkrisis" and the Crisis of the Late Republic |JSTOR: Classical Antiquity, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Apr., 1988), pp. 1-29
How to interpret the contrasting praise of virtues of Caesar and Cato rhetorically (Sallust objective of effect on reader) and "philosophically" (Sallust's assessment of Republic's historical situation, weaknesses, fault lines as reflected in his treatment of the two contrasting ideologies, goals, virtues etc of Caesar and Cato) -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  ancient_history  ancient_Rome  historiography-antiquity  Roman_Republic  Latin_lit  rhetoric  downloaded  EF-add 
december 2013 by dunnettreader

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