dunnettreader + historiography-whig   28

Anna Plassart - The Scottish Enlightenment and the French Revolution (to be released April 2015) | Ideas in Context series | Cambridge University Press
Historians of ideas have traditionally discussed the significance of the French Revolution through the prism of several major interpretations, including the commentaries of Burke, Tocqueville and Marx. This book argues that the Scottish Enlightenment offered an alternative and equally powerful interpretative framework for the Revolution, which focused on the transformation of the polite, civilised moeurs that had defined the 'modernity' analysed by Hume and Smith in the 18thC. The Scots observed what they understood as a military- and democracy-led transformation of European modern morals and concluded that the real historical significance of the Revolution lay in the transformation of warfare, national feelings and relations between states, war and commerce that characterised the post-revolutionary international order. This book recovers the Scottish philosophers' powerful discussion of the nature of post-revolutionary modernity and shows that it is essential to our understanding of 19thC political thought. **--** Part I. The Burke–Paine Debate and Scotland's Science of Man: 1. The Burke–Paine debate and the Scottish Enlightenment *-* 2. The heritage of Hume and Smith: Scotland's science of man and politics **--** Part II. The 1790s: 3. Scotland's political debate *-* 4. James Mackintosh and Scottish philosophical history *-* 5. John Millar and the Scottish discussion on war, modern sociability and national sentiment *-* 6. Adam Ferguson on democracy and empire **--** Part III. 1802–15: 7. The French Revolution and the Edinburgh Review *-* 8. Commerce, war and empire
books  find  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_economy  18thC  19thC  British_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  Smith  Hume  Hume-politics  civil_society  civilizing_process  commerce  commerce-doux  science_of_man  social_sciences  IR_theory  French_Revolutionary_Wars  Napoleonic_Wars  nationalism  national_ID  historiography-18thC  historiography-Whig  military  Military_Revolution  mass_culture  levée_en_masse  conscription  sociability  social_order  empires  empire-and_business  imperialism  Great_Powers  balance_of_power  philosophy_of_history  progress  social_theory  change-social  change-economic  Burke  Paine  Mackintosh_James  Millar_John  Edinburgh_Review  British_Empire  British_foreign_policy  Scottish_politics  1790s  1800s  1810s  international_political_economy  international_system  international_law  democracy  morality-conventional  norms  global_economy  mercantilism 
february 2015 by dunnettreader
Carmel P. Murphy - History, revolution and the British popular novel: historical fiction in the romantic age (2013 PhD Thesis) | University College Cork.
Intro (pp.1-42) and Chapters 2 & 3 (pp.106-231) currently unavailable at request of author. -- Examining the complex intersection of the historical fiction genre with the political and historical dialogue generated by the French Revolution crisis, the thesis contends that contemporary fascination with the historical episode of the Revolution, and the fundamental importance of history to the disputes which raged about questions of tradition and change, and the meaning of the British national past, led to the emergence of increasingly complex forms of fictional historical narrative during the “war of ideas.” Considering the varying ways in which novelists (..) engaged with the historical contexts of the Revolution debate, (..) juxtaposes the manner in which English Jacobin novelists inserted the radical critique into the wider arena of history with (.use of.) the historical by anti-Jacobin novelists to combat the revolutionary threat and internal moves for socio-political restructuring. I argue that the use of imaginative historical narrative(..) represented a significant element within the literature of the Revolution crisis (.and..) a key context (.for.) the emergence of Scott’s national historical novel in 1814, and the broader field of historical fiction in the era of Waterloo. Tracing the continued engagement with revolutionary and political concerns evident in the early Waverley novels, Burney’s The Wanderer (1814), Godwin’s Mandeville (1816), and Mary Shelley’s Valperga (1823), my discussion concludes by arguing that Godwin’s and Shelley’s extension of the mode of historical fiction initially envisioned by Godwin in the revolutionary decade, and their shared endeavour to retrieve the possibility enshrined within the republican past, appeared as a significant counter to the model of history and fiction developed by Walter Scott in the post-revolutionary epoch. -- downloaded pdf to Note
thesis  1790s  1800s  1810s  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  French_Revolution  anti-Jacobin  conservatism  Radical_Enlightenment  Jacobins  historical_fiction  novels  English_lit  historians-and-politics  counter-revolution  Scott_Sir_Walter  Burney_Frances  Godwin_Wm  Shelley_Mary  Tories  usable_past  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  history_as_examples  historiography-Tory  historiography-Whig  tradition  change-social  reform-political  reform-social  social_order  critique  bibliography  downloaded  EF-add 
january 2015 by dunnettreader
Ian Hacking - Paradigms Regained - Thomas Kuhn's "Structure of Scientific Revolutions" 50 years later | The Los Angeles Review of Books
Excerpts from Hacking's introduction to the 50th anniversary reissue by the University of Chicago Press -- interesting comments re Kuhn's distaste for how some postmodernists and sociologists used his work, claimed him as an ally etc
books  bookshelf  intellectual_history  history_of_science  philosophy_of_science  sociology_of_knowledge  20thC  post-WWII  Kuhn  epistemology  anti-foundationalism  truth  Scientific_Revolution  scientific_method  scientific_culture  historiography-Whig  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Jack Miles - Tilting Against Naïve Materialism: On Thomas Nagel's "Mind and Cosmos" | The Los Angeles Review of Books - Feb 2013
Nagel is a professed scientific realist. He does not put scientific knowledge in scare quotes. He believes that reason is reliable and that science does engage reality. But when an account of the origin of reason that links it entirely to reproductive success has this self-subversive corollary, he chooses to trust reason and question the account rather than trust the account and question reason.Here, for this reviewer, is the core challenge, the core disturbance, of this challenging and intentionally disruptive work. Mind and Cosmos, which has been taken as an oblique defense of creationism, is actually a defense of reason. Yet it is also a fabulous effort of the imagination. The place of imagination, of fantasy, even of dream-life in the history of human thought is a large one. Nagel admits that he is not a scientist, but it would call for imagination and not just analysis for a scientist in any given field to begin thinking past contemporary science as a whole toward the contours of what might someday succeed it. Unless one is a scientific Whig, one must strongly suspect that something someday will indeed succeed it. Nagel’s Mind and Cosmos does not build a road to that destination, but it is much to have gestured toward a gap in the hills through which a road might someday run. -- Swift would agree
books  reviews  kindle-available  philosophy_of_science  evolutionary_biology  evolution  Darwinism  Nagel  reason  epistemology  teleology  monism  panpsychic_monism  materialism  reductionism  truth  Swift  historiography-Whig  history_of_science  consciousness  mind  cosmology  imagination  creativity  human_nature  evo_psych  EF-add 
august 2014 by dunnettreader
Lord Acton, Lectures on the French Revolution (LF ed. 2000, ed. Steven J. Tonsor ) - Online Library of Liberty
Delivered at Cambridge University between 1895 and 1899, Lectures on the French Revolution is a distinguished account of the entire epochal chapter in French experience by one of the most remarkable English historians of the nineteenth century. In contrast to Burke a century before, Acton leaves condemnation of the French Revolution to others. He provides a disciplined, thorough, and elegant history of the actual events of the bloody episode – in sum, as thorough a record as could be constructed in his time of the actual actions of the government of France during the Revolution. There are twenty-two essays, commencing with “The Heralds of the Revolution,” in which Acton presents a taxonomy of the intellectual ferment that preceded – and prepared – the Revolution. An important appendix explores “The Literature of the Revolution.” Here Acton offers assessments of the accounts of the Revolution written during the late eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries by, among others, Burke, Guizot, and Taine. -- downloaded pdf of typeset to Note
books  etexts  Liberty_Fund  18thC  19thC  intellectual_history  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  France  French_Enlightenment  French_Revolution  philosophes  Ancien_régime  Terror  monarchy  Absolutism  political_participation  historians-and-politics  historians-and-religion  anticlerical  Papacy  Catholics  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Lamp of Experience - Online Library of Liberty
Trevor Colbourn, The Lamp of Experience: Whig History and the Intellectual Origins of the American Revolution (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund 1998). 07/13/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/674> -- In a landmark work, a leading scholar of the eighteenth century examines the ways in which an understanding of the nature of history, seen as as a continual struggle between liberty and virtue on one hand and arbitrary power and corruption on the other, influenced the thinking of the founding fathers. -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  intellectual_history  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  Adams_John  Jefferson  Bolingbroke  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Founders  English_constitution  history_of_England  British_Empire-constitutional_structure  Parliamentary_supremacy  limited_monarchy  republicanism  republics-Ancient_v_Modern  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government [1803], eds. Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith - Online Library of Liberty
John Millar, An Historical View of the English Government, From the Settlement of the Saxons in Britain to the Revolution in 1688, in four volumes, edited by Mark Salber Philips and Dale R. Smith, introduction by Mark Salber Philips (Indianapolis: Liberty Fund, 2006). 07/11/2014. <http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/1886> -- An Historical View of the English Government consists of three parts, concerned with the most substantive revolutions in English government and manners: from the Saxon settlement to the Norman Conquest, from the Norman Conquest to the accession of James I, and from James I to the Glorious Revolution. Through these three phases Millar traces the development of the “great outlines of the English constitution”—the history of institutions of English liberty from Saxon antiquity to the revolution settlement of 1689. Millar demonstrates serious concern for the maintenance of liberties achieved through revolution and maintains that the manners of a commercial nation, while particularly suited to personal and political liberty, are not such as to secure liberty forever.
books  etexts  18thC  intellectual_history  Scottish_Enlightenment  British_history  British_politics  historiography-Whig  historiography-18thC  historians-and-politics  ancient_constitution  English_constitution  Anglo-Saxons  Norman_Conquest  Magna_Carta  Tudor  Elizabeth  James_I  Charles_I  Charles_II  James_II  William_III  English_Civil_War  Restoration  Glorious_Revolution  Revolution_Principles  commerce  liberty  Parliament  Parliamentary_supremacy  monarchy  civil_liberties  civilizing_process  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works and Life of Walter Bagehot, vol. 5 (Historical & Financial Essays; The English Constitution) - Online Library of Liberty
A UNIVERSAL MONEY. (1869.) Deals with international exchange, seignorage etc-- *-- HENRY CRABB ROBINSON.1 (1869.) *--* BAD LAWYERS OR GOOD? (1870.) *--* THE EARL OF CLARENDON. (1870.) *--* MR. GROTE. (1870?) *--* ON THE EMOTION OF CONVICTION. (1871.) *--* MR. LOWE AS CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER. (1871.) **--**--**--**-- THE ENGLISH CONSTITUTION. (2nd edition)
books  etexts  17thC  18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  historiography-17thC  historiography-19thC  historicism  English_Civil_War  English_constitution  political_philosophy  constitutionalism  ancient_history  ancient_Greece  public_finance  sovereign_debt  Clarendon_1st_Earl  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  UK_Government  Bagehot  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
The Works and Life of Walter Bagehot, vol. 2 (Historical & Financial Essays) - Online Library of Liberty
WILLIAM COWPER.1 (1855.) *--* THE FIRST EDINBURGH REVIEWERS.1 (1855.) *--* THOMAS BABINGTON MACAULAY.1 (1856.) *--* EDWARD GIBBON.1 (1856.) *--* THE CHARACTER OF SIR ROBERT PEEL.1 (1856.) *--* PERCY BYSSHE SHELLEY.1 (1856.) *--* THE CRÉDIT MOBILIER AND BANKING COMPANIES IN FRANCE.1 (1857.) *--* LORD BROUGHAM.1 (1857.) *--* THE MONETARY CRISIS OF 1857. The essay on the early Edinburgh Review is a delight -- Those years were the commencement of what is called the Eldonine period. The cold and haughty Pitt had gone down to the grave in circumstances singularly contrasting with his prosperous youth, and he had carried along with him the inner essence of half-liberal principle, which had clung to a tenacious mind from youthful associations, and was all that remained to the Tories of abstraction or theory. As for Lord Eldon, it is the most difficult thing in the world to believe that there ever was such a man. It only shows how intense historical evidence is, that no one really doubts it. He believed in everything which it is impossible to believe in—in the danger of Parliamentary Reform, the danger of Catholic Emancipation, the danger of altering the Court of Chancery, the danger of altering the Courts of Law, the danger of abolishing capital punishment for trivial thefts, the danger of making landowners pay their debts, the danger of making anything more, the danger of making anything less. It seems as if he maturely thought: “Now I know the present state of things to be consistent with the existence of John Lord Eldon; but if we begin altering that state, I am sure I do not know that it will be consistent”.
books  etexts  Bagehot  17thC18thC  19thC  British_history  British_politics  historiography-18thC  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  historians-and-politics  Macaulay  Gibbon  Edinburgh_Review  Reform_Act_1832  Catholic_emancipation  conservatism  Tories  reform-political  Parliament  judiciary  financial_system  political_economy  financial_crisis  banking  France  French_Empire  Peel_Robert  Brougham  English_lit  Romanticism  Shelley  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
John Paget - The new "Examen": or, An inquiry into... Lord Macaulay's History ... (1861) - Google Books
John Paget -- The new "Examen": or, An inquiry into the evidence relating to certain passages in Lord Macaulay's History concerning I. The Duke of Marlborough; II. The massacre of Glencoe; III. The Highlands of Scotland; IV. Viscount Dundee; V. William Penn -- W. Blackwood and sons, 1861 -- essays 1st published in Blackwood's Magazine -- downloaded pdf to Note
books  etexts  Google_Books  17thC  18thC  British_history  British_politics  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  Macaulay  Marlborough  Marlborough_Duchess  William_III  Highlands-Scotland  James_II  Penn_William  Shrewsbury  Godolphin  tolerance  religion-established  Church_of_England  Glorious_Revolution  Glorious_Revolution-Scotland  Nine_Years_War  British_Army  British_Navy  Jacobites  downloaded  EF-add 
july 2014 by dunnettreader
Nicholas Hudson - "Britons Never Will be Slaves": National Myth, Conservatism, and the Beginnings of British Antislavery | Eighteenth-Century Studies 34.4 (2001) 559-576 - Project MUSE
According to a virtual consensus in modern scholarship on the abolition of slavery, this event marked a historic victory for nonconformist, radical, or otherwise antiestablishment elements in British culture. A recent historian has connected the rise of antislavery with "Wilkite" tendencies in the British middle class, and others have located abolitionism in a "reform complex" devoted to the radical overhaul of the British political system. It has been widely assumed that British slavery was generally excused by the established Anglican church and that the abolitionist movement was dominated by "Quakers, evangelicals and Rational Dissenters." -- This scholarship exemplifies a "Whig" historiography that routinely looks for the sources of social change in the attack of peripheral or nontraditional groups on the center. -- the most resonant voices against slavery during the 18thC belonged to men and women with strong backgrounds in the Anglican Church and conservative views on social and political issues in Britain. These include Samuel Johnson, William Warburton, Edmund Burke, ... -- we find that these humanitarian objections emerged from within the groups and ideologies that conceived of Britain as fundamentally Anglican, royal, and hierarchical. -- it is, in fact, inaccurate to identify mainstream British values with the merchants and colonists who controlled the slave-trade. As I will contend, antislavery took shape amidst an essentially ideological conflict about the very nature of "Britain" between proponents of unbridled free-market capitalism and the essentially conservative and traditionalist outlook of those who wished to contain capitalism within the constraints of morality, religion, and their patriotic image of Britons as a freedom-loving people. -- copy 1st 2 pages in Simple Note
article  Project_MUSE  paywall  find  18thC  British_history  British_politics  Atlantic  West_Indies  American_colonies  slavery  dissenters  Radical_Enlightenment  Whigs-oligarchy  Whigs-Radicals  Whigs-opposition  Tories  national_ID  British_Empire  abolition  plantations  planters  Anglican  Royalists  Wilkes  Johnson  Warburton  Burke  conservatism  historiography-Whig  nationalism  merchants  finance_capital  moral_economy  political_economy  capitalism  patriotism  Patriots  Patriot_King  Bolingbroke  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
John Seed - The Spectre of Puritanism: Forgetting the 17thC in Hume's "History of England" | JSTOR: Social History, Vol. 30, No. 4 (Nov., 2005), pp. 444-462
The seventeenth century was not finished in eighteenth-century England. The ghosts of the 'Great Rebellion' continued to haunt Hanoverian England as political groupings struggled for some kind of control of representations of the past. One of the explicit purposes of Hume's "History of England" (1752-64) was to exorcize these ghosts of the past and to delegitimize the political memories of Whigs, Tories and Jacobites, churchmen and dissenters. This article focuses on the account of the puritans in the "History of England." In significant ways this contravenes Hume's own agenda. Out of his anti-puritan history there emerges the negative figure of the radical political intellectual which was subsequently appropriated by Burke and by wider forces of political reaction in England in the 1790s. Far from escaping the obsolete antagonisms of the past which continued to shape Hanoverian political hostilities, Hume in his "History of England" contributed to their reproduction and even intensification from the 1770s. -- begins by contrasting Bolingbroke's upfront treatment of the power of collective memory to enflame party conflict with Hume's attempt to reframe the memories themselves -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  jstor  17thC  18thC  1770s  1790s  British_history  British_politics  historiography-18thC  Hume-historian  Hume-politics  Bolingbroke  Dissertation_on_Parties  Remarks_on_History_of_England  history_of_England  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  counter-revolution  Counter-Enlightenment  dissenters  Whigs-Radicals  Burke  French_Revolution  downloaded  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Critical Miscellanies - The Works of Lord Morley (Vol 6) - John Morley - Google Books
A mix of biograohical and critical treatment of a range of 19thC authors. Plus an interesting description of the Edinburgh Review after Jeffrey handed editorial duties over to Napier. Added to Google_Books library
books  etexts  Google_Books  19thC  intellectual_history  English_lit  historiography-19thC  historiography-Whig  Emerson  Carlyle  Macaulay  Byron  Eliot_George  Martineau  Wordsworth  Coleridge  Transcendentals  Locke  Mill  empiricism  religious_belief  religious_culture  Edinburgh_Review  journalism  magazines  Brougham  Bolingbroke  Bagehot  Morley  lit_crit  EF-add 
may 2014 by dunnettreader
Catherine Macaulay - History of England from the Accession of James I to the Brunswick Line : 8 volume set :: Cambridge University Press
A landmark in female historiography, this work first appeared in eight volumes between 1763 and 1783. Notable for her radical politics and her influence on American revolutionary ideology, Catharine Macaulay (1731–91) drew diligently on untapped seventeenth-century sources to craft her skilful yet inevitably biased narrative. Seen as a Whig response to David Hume's Tory perspective on English history, the early volumes made Macaulay a literary sensation in the 1760s. Later instalments were less rapturously received by those critics who took exception to her republican views. Both the product and a portrait of tumultuous ages, the work maintains throughout a strong focus on the fortunes of political liberty. Beginning with the founding of the dynasty in 1603, Macaulay paints a particularly vivid picture of Stuart tyranny under Charles I. Later volumes go on to cover the English Civil War, the Commonwealth, the Restoration and the Glorious Revolution.
books  17thC  British_history  18thC  history_of_England  Macaulay_Catherine  Whigs  republicanism  historiography-Whig  historiography-18thC  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Mark Bevir - National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative [eScholarship] (2007)
"National Histories: Prospects for Critique and Narrative", Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2007), 293-317. -- Keywords: Nation, National Histories, Postnational, State, Transnationalism -- downloaded pdf to Note
article  eScholarship  intellectual_history  historiography  sociology_of_knowledge  political_culture  nation-state  national_ID  nationalism  territory  globalization  history_of_England  historiography-Whig  historians-and-politics  groups-identity  memory-group  memory_studies  narrative-contested  downloaded  EF-add 
february 2014 by dunnettreader
Macaulay's “noble enduring quality in our literature” — his passion for history by G.K. Chesterton | Victorian Web
His reason was entirely one-sided and fanatical. It was his imagination that was well-balanced and broad. He was monotonously certain that only Whigs were right; but it was necessary that Tories should at least be great, that his heroes might have foemen worthy of their steel. If there was one thing in the world he hated it was a High Church Royalist parson; yet when Jeremy Collier the Jacobite priest raises a real banner, all Macaulay's blood warms with the mere prospect of a fight.
19thC  cultural_history  English_lit  historiography-Whig  Macaulay  Chesterton 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Macaulay begins the Victorian Age by G.K. Chesterton | Victorian Web
This Whig world was exclusive; but it was not narrow. It was very difficult for an outsider to get into it; but if he did get into it he was in a much freer atmosphere than any other in England. Of those aristocrats, the Old Guard of the eighteenth century, many denied God, many defended Bonaparte, and nearly all sneered at the Royal Family. Nor did wealth or birth make any barriers for those once within this singular Whig world. The platform was high, but it was level. Moreover the upstart nowadays pushes himself by wealth: but the Whigs could choose their upstarts. --- For the fundamental fact of early Victorian history was this: the decision of the middle classes to employ their new wealth in backing up a sort of aristocratical compromise, and not (like the middle class in the French Revolution) insisting on a clean sweep and a clear democratic programme. It went along with the decision of the aristocracy to recruit itself more freely from the middle class. It was then also that Victorian "prudery" began: the great lords yielded on this as on Free Trade. These two decisions have made the doubtful England of to-day; and Macaulay is typical of them; he is the bourgeois in Belgravia. The alliance is marked by his great speeches for Lord Grey's Reform Bill: it is marked even more significantly in his speech against the Chartists. Cobbett was dead.
19thC  cultural_history  British_politics  Whigs-grandees  Macaulay  Victorian  middle_class  Reform_Act_1832  Chartists  franchise  historiography-Whig  Chesterton 
january 2014 by dunnettreader
Review by: J. G. A. Pocock - Hume's Philosophical Politics by Duncan Forbes (1978)
JSTOR: The American Political Science Review, Vol. 72, No. 2 (Jun., 1978), pp. 638-639 -- downloaded pdf to Note -- Finds Forbes writing and analysis both hopelessly confused -- some great stuff re where Hume sits vis à vis various flavors of Whigs, Tories and political historians at different times from 1740s onwards. Here's where Pocock's idée fixe on corrupting commerce is useful in explaining how the Essays fit with History of England -- not just against "vulgar Whiggism" (by time Hume wrote History based on Modern constitution theory of the Court Whigs, both oligarchic and radical Whigs had returned to Ancient Constitution) but pro the civilizing virtues of economic development. His target is the austere civic virtue of the republicans. Here's where Pocock misses -- Britain post Fletcher had few austere republicans - only found among idolators of Sparta on the Continent. That there was a luxury debate across the 18thC in both Continental Europe and Britain is clear, but it's not a debate re republicanism -- it's about the new "civil society", about foundation of morals if not biblicalrevelation or fear of hell, it's about human nature, and it's involved in comparative anthropology (geographic and historical) In short, it's about the science of man. Pocock's terrific observations re time, and the shift from anxiety re inevitable decline to possibility of progress fits in the science of man luxury and corruption debates that go far wider and deeper than classical republicanism. Though on Continent it takes on more of a republican angle after Montesquieu.
books  reviews  Pocock  Hume  18thC  historiography-18thC  political_philosophy  historians-and-politics  historiography-Whig  Whigs-oligarchy  Tories  clientelism  British_politics  British_history  commerce-doux  fiscal-military_state  sovereign_debt  parties  UK_government-colonies  War_of_Austrian_Succession  Seven_Years_War  Pitt_the_Elder  British_Empire  political_economy  downloaded  EF-add  bookshelf 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Joyce Appleby - Special Issue Intro - Republicanism and Ideology (1985)
JSTOR: American Quarterly, Vol. 37, No. 4 (Autumn, 1985), pp. 461-473 -- Intro to Republicanism in the History and Historiography of the United States -- downloaded pdf to Note -- downloaded not simply due to republicanism debates but her discussion of impact on historians of US in recent change in understanding how ideas matter, spread etc -- a social history based on objective attributes of individual decision makers in objective circumstances with objective interests shifting toward cultural history that recognizes how people think about their circumstances, position, interests, options for action, choices is a social process -- Kramnick's "ideology" approach to Bolingbroke's Circle part of this shift in political history to revised understanding of "ideology" -- Appleby also interested in linguistic turn
article  jstor  US_history  historiography  American_colonies  American_Revolution  Early_Republic  social_sciences-post-WWII  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  political_culture  political_history  social_history  cultural_history  ideology  language-politics  historiography-Whig  historiography-Progressive  historians-and-politics  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader
Emile Perreau-Saussine: Quentin Skinner in Context (2007)
JSTOR: The Review of Politics, Vol. 69, No. 1 (Winter, 2007), pp. 106-122 -- downloaded pdf to Note As Quentin Skinner argues, political thinkers are best read in historical context. But in what context do Skinner's own interpretations of the history of political thought belong? This essay places his denunciation of grand narratives in the context of the decline of Whig interpretations of history and presents his Republicanism as a substitute source of legitimacy in the wake of the collapse of the British Empire and of the loss of social influence of Christianity. This essay also argues that Skinner's inquiries cannot be understood solely in the light of their historical context. His historical work is linked with his republican philosophy. The relation between his concept of liberty and his contextualism shows the dependence of his contextualist methodology on specific philosophical commitments.
article  jstor  intellectual_history  political_philosophy  Cambridge_School  historiography  historiography-Whig  republicanism  downloaded  EF-add 
september 2013 by dunnettreader

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